Title:
Decorative recessed cabinets
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Recessed shelves and cabinets designed for insertion into an installation aperture cut in a gypsum board panel between two studs of a hollow wall of frame construction are manufactured of paintable polymeric plastic material that has been injection molded. Each shelf or cabinet includes a box portion which includes a generally laminar rear panel and a plurality of mutually-intersecting side panels which are continuous with the rear panel and generally perpendicular to the rear panel. Each shelf or cabinet also includes a perimetric rim or bezel that is continuous with and generally perpendicular to the side panels. The rim serves both as a trim piece to cover the cut edges of the installation aperture cut into the gypsum board, and as a perimetric limit stop which sets the depth that the box portion is inserted into the hollow space of the frame wall.



Inventors:
Johnson, Kris S. (Provo, UT, US)
Application Number:
10/340021
Publication Date:
07/10/2003
Filing Date:
01/09/2003
Assignee:
JOHNSON KRIS S.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
312/9.48
International Classes:
A47B81/00; E04F19/08; (IPC1-7): A47B81/06
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
BROWN, PETER R
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Angus C. Fox, III (Provo, UT, US)
Claims:

What is claimed is:



1. A decorative box for mounting principally in the hollow space formed between cover panels attached to opposite sides of a wall frame constructed of scantling, said decorative box comprising: a body having a back panel, a pair of opposed side panels, a top panel and a bottom panel, said side panels connected to and generally perpendicular to said back panel, said top and bottom panels each connected to both side panels and said back panel; a perimetric rim continuous with said side top and bottom panels, said rim functioning as a trim piece to cover the edges of a installation aperture cut within one of said cover panels for installation of said body; and attachment means for anchoring said body within the installation aperture.

2. The decorative box of claim 1, wherein said attachment means comprises a plurality of reversably compressible spring clips attached to the side panels of said body, which anchor said body to an interior surface of the cover panel in which the installation aperture is cut, said spring clips being compressed by the edges of the installation aperture as the decorative box is inserted therethrough, and expanding once they have passed an inner surface of the cover panel.

3. The decorative box of claim 1, wherein said attachment means comprises a plurality of 90-degree-rotatable screw-type fasteners, each of which includes a retaining screw which passes through the perimetric rim, which can be tightened to anchor the bocy within the installation aperture.

4. The decorative box of claim 1, wherein said attachment means comprises at least one recess in the exterior surface of both side panels or the top and bottom panels, said at least one recess being fillable with foaming adhesive prior to the installation of the decorative box in the installation aperture.

5. The decorative box of claim 1, wherein said body incorporates at least one vertical column having a plurality of slots defined by parallel fins molded in the body.

6. The decorative box of claim 1, wherein said slots are sized to accept jewel cases of compact discs and CD-ROMs.

7. The decorative box of claim 1, wherein said body incorporates a plurality of slots sized to accept containers of motion picture recordings produced for home use.

8. The decorative box of claim 1, wherein the bottom panel extends outwardly beyond the perimetric rim to form a shelf that is both inside and outside the hollow space.

9. The decorative box of claim 1, wherein a top portion of said perimetric rim is curved, an interior surface of the top panel is concave, and an exterior surface of the top panel is convex.

10. The decorative box of claim 1, which further comprises a book retaining strip which bridges opposite vertical portions of said perimetric rim.

11. A decorative box for mounting, at least partly, in the hollow space formed between gypsum panels attached to opposite sides of a scantling wall frame, the box being mounted within a installation aperture cut within one of the gypsum panels, said decorative box comprising: a perimetric rim which fits flush against an exterior surface of the gypsum panel and covers the edges of the installation aperture; a generally hollow body which fits, at least partly, inside the hollow space between the gypsum panels, and which is continuous with the perimetric rim, spanning a distance between opposite portions of thereof; and attachment means for anchoring said body within the installation aperture.

12. The decorative box of claim 11, wherein said attachment means comprises a plurality of reversably compressible spring clips attached to said body, which anchor said body to an interior surface of the gypsum panel in which the installation aperture is cut, said spring clips being compressed by the edges of the installation aperture as the decorative box is inserted therethrough, and expanding once they have passed an inner surface of the cover panel, the perimetric rim anchoring the box from the exterior side of the gypsum panel.

13. The decorative box of claim 11, wherein said attachment means comprises a plurality of 90-degree-rotatable screw-type fasteners, each of which includes a retaining screw which passes through the perimetric rim, which can be tightened to anchor the bocy within the installation aperture.

14. The decorative box of claim 11, wherein said attachment means comprises at least one recess in the exterior surface of the body which is juxtaposed the edges of the installation opening when the box is installed therein with the perimetric rim flush with an exterior surface of the gypsum panel, said at least one recess being fillable with foaming adhesive prior to the installation of the decorative box in the installation aperture.

15. The decorative box of claim 11, wherein said body incorporates at least one vertical column having a plurality of slots defined by parallel fins molded in the body.

16. The decorative box of claim 11, wherein said slots are sized to accept jewel cases of compact discs and CD-ROMs.

17. The decorative box of claim 11, wherein said body incorporates a plurality of slots sized to accept containers of motion picture recordings produced for home use.

18. The decorative box of claim 11, wherein a bottom portion of the body extends outwardly beyond the perimetric rim to form a shelf that is both inside and outside the hollow space.

19. The decorative box of claim 11, wherein a top portion of said perimetric rim is curved, an upper interior surface the body is concave, and an upper exterior surface of the body is convex.

20. The decorative box of claim 11, which further comprises a book retaining strip which bridges opposite vertical portions of said perimetric rim.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0001] This invention relates to shelves and cabinets and, more particularly, to shelves and cabinets that are installable within a hollow wall.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] In 1833, only a year after the city of Chicago began to rise from the treeless glacial plain adjacent lake Michigan, a carpenter from Connecticut named Augustine Deodat Taylor contracted to build a large number of houses in that Illinois city. Taylor responded by building what had become known as balloon frame houses. The walls, ceilings and roofs of a balloon frame structure are constructed from interconnected scantling frames which are subsequently covered. Though Taylor is frequently credited with the invention of the balloon frame structure, it seems that the construction technique emerged over several decades as a popular hybrid of many diverse building methods. In the historic Mississippi River town of Ste. Genevieve, Mo., the French were constructing houses, which still stand, using building methods which were precursors of the balloon frame method. Typically, the French constructed houses with palisade walls-vertical wooden posts placed side by side on 16-inch centers, with a continuous plate nailed across the top. Apparently, the walls were built flat on the ground, then tilted up within trenches dug along the perimeter of the building. Eventually, this palisade construction was modified so that the posts were nailed onto timber sills resting on stone or brick foundations. When standard-size lumber is substituted for the posts, the process is very close to the balloon construction method.

[0003] Light-weight, wood-frame houses have become the standard in this country. Because they are quite resistant to destruction in earthquake-prone regions, they are being adopted in faraway places, such as Japan, where killer earthquakes are common.

[0004] One of the distinguishing characteristics of wood-frame buildings is that the walls are generally hollow. The hollow walls facilitate the invisible routing of electrical, telecommunications and security system wiring, as well as gas and water pipes. Structural lumber used for nearly all interior walls and for some exterior walls is typically 2×4 scantling having a generally rectangular cross section that measures about 3.8 cm by 8.9 cm (1.5 inches by 3.5 inches). The walls are typically covered with gypsum board sheets that are nailed or screwed to the framing material. For residential applications, the gypsum board sheets have a standard thickness of about 1.25 cm (½ inch). For commercial applications, the thickness of the gypsum board is about 1.59 cm (⅝ inch). Thus, the depth of a standard hollow interior wall, as constructed within the United States, is either 10.15 cm or 10.5 cm.

[0005] Although the dead air space between gypsum board sheets serves to acoustically insulate adjoining rooms, it is largely wasted space. Though wall space is generally counted as living space by the real estate and building industry, in a 1500 sq. ft. single level four-bedroom, two-bath home, wall space can easily take up eight percent of the available living area. For more than half a century, recessed medicine cabinets have been routinely installed in tract home subdivisions. These cabinets are typically designed so that they fit between two framing studs. The cabinets are typically anchored to both studs with wood screws passing through the interior cabinet wall. Because such cabinets must be anchored to a pair of adjacent studs installed on 40.65 cm (16-inch) centers, they must invariably have an exterior width dimension of 36.83 cm (14½ inches).

[0006] What is needed is a new line of easily-installable decorative shelves which are not limited to an exterior width dimension of 14½ inches.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0007] The present invention provides a variety of recessed shelves and cabinets designed for insertion into a hole cut in a gypsum board cover panel between two studs of a hollow wall of frame construction, as well as a method for the installation of such shelves and cabinets. Each shelf or cabinet is manufactured of paintable polymeric plastic material that has been injection molded. Each shelf or cabinet includes a box portion which includes a generally laminar rear panel and a plurality of mutually-intersecting side panels which are continuous with the rear panel and generally perpendicular to the rear panel. Each shelf or cabinet also includes a perimetric rim or bezel that is continuous with and generally perpendicular to the side panels. The rim serves both as a trim piece to cover the cut edges of an installation aperture cut into the gypsum board, and as a perimetric limit stop which sets the depth that the box portion is inserted into the hollow space of the frame wall. The side and/or top panels may be equipped with at least one reversably compressible clip, which is compressed by the edges of the installation aperture as the shelf or cabinet is inserted through the aperture and expands once it has passed the inner surface of the gypsum board panel, thereby securing anchoring the shelf or cabinet within the gypsum board cover panel. Alternatively, one or more side panels may be equipped with 90-degree-rotatable screw-type fastener, which can be tightened to anchor the shelf or cabinet within hole. A further alternative is to equip at least an opposing pair of side panels with one or more recesses into which several drops of an expanding foam adhesive, such as foaming polyurethane adhesive, may be placed immediately prior to insertion of the shelf or cabinet into the installation aperture in the gypsum board panel. The adhesive will foam and adhere the side panels of the shelf or cabinet to the edges of the gypsum board cover panel.

[0008] Due to the difficulties involved in constructing a two-piece injection mold that would form the box portion, the rim and the compressible clips as a single unit, the clips are formed separately from the rim and box portion, either by injection molding or by stamping and bending resilient sheet metal, such as spring steel. The clips attach to the side panels of the box portion and are adjustable for the thickness of the gypsum board panel.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0009] FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of a first main embodiment decorative recessed cabinet;

[0010] FIG. 2 is a right-side elevational view of the first main embodiment decorative recessed cabinet of FIG. 1;

[0011] FIG. 3 is a top or bottom plan view of the first main embodiment decorative recessed cabinet of FIG. 1;

[0012] FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the first main embodiment decorative recessed cabinet of FIG. 1, taken through line 4-4;

[0013] FIG. 5 is a front elevational view of a second main embodiment decorative recessed cabinet, adapted for the storing of telephone directories;

[0014] FIG. 6 is a right-side elevational view of the second main embodiment decorative recessed cabinet of FIG. 4, adapted for wall attachment using spring clips;

[0015] FIG. 7 is a top or bottom plan view of the second main embodiment decorative recessed cabinet of FIG. 4, adapted for wall attachment using spring clips;

[0016] FIG. 8 is a right-side elevational view of the second main embodiment decorative recessed cabinet of FIG. 4, modified for adhesive wall attachment;

[0017] FIG. 9 is a top or bottom plan view of the second embodiment decorative recessed cabinet of FIG. 4, modified for adhesive wall attachment;

[0018] FIG. 10 is a front elevational view of a third embodiment decorative recessed cabinet, adapted for the storing of video cassete tapes;

[0019] FIG. 11 is a cross-sectional view of the third embodiment decorative recessed cabinet of FIG. 10, taken through line 11-11;

[0020] FIG. 12 is a top or bottom plan view of the third embodiment decorative recessed cabinet of FIG. 10;

[0021] FIG. 13 is a front elevational view of a fourth embodiment decorative recessed cabinet, adapted for displaying statues or other similarly proportioned artistic creations;

[0022] FIG. 14 is a right-side elevational view of the fourth embodiment decorative recessed cabinet of FIG. 13;

[0023] FIG. 15 is a cross-sectional view of the fourth embodiment decorative recessed cabinet of FIG. 13, taken through line 15-15; and

[0024] FIG. 16 is a top or bottom plan view of the fourth embodiment decorative recessed cabinet of FIG. 13;

[0025] FIG. 17 is a front elevational view of a third embodiment decorative recessed cabinet, adapted for the storing of video cassete tapes, modified for attachment to a wall with 90-degree-rotatable screw-type fasteners;

[0026] FIG. 18 is a cross-sectional view of the modified third embodiment decorative recessed cabinet of FIG. 17, taken through line 18-18;

[0027] FIG. 19 is a right-side elevational view of the modified third embodiment decorative recessed cabinet of FIG. 17; and

[0028] FIG. 20 is a top or bottom plan view of the modified third embodiment decorative recessed cabinet of FIG. 17.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0029] A variety of recessed shelves and cabinets are contemplated within the scope of the invention as hereinafter claimed. Those various embodiments of the invention will now be described in detail with reference to the attached drawing figures.

[0030] Referring now to FIG. 1, 2 and 3, a first main embodiment of decorative recessed cabinet 100 is adapted for the storing CDs and CD-ROMs enclosed within jewel cases in two parallel vertical columns 101L and 101R. Each jewel case fits into a slot defined by fins 102 on two sets of opposed vertical sidewalls, the first set including walls 103A and 103B; the second set including walls 104A and 104B. The cabinet inludes a front bezel or perimetric rim 105 coupled to a box portion 106, which includes a generally laminar rear panel 107 and mutually-intersecting left and right side panels, 108L and 108R, respectively, and top and bottom panels, 108T and 108B, respectively, which are continuous with the rear panel 107 and generally perpendicular thereto. It will be noted that a pair of spring clips 109 are attached to each of the side panels 108L and 108R. These clips compress as the box portion 106 of cabinet 100 is inserted into an installing aperture 110 cut in a gypsum board 111 sheathed frame wall, and spring to their original shape once the cabinet 100 is seated in the opening, which is sized to just fit the shape of the box portion 106.

[0031] Referring now to FIG. 4, this cross-sectional view shows the shape of the fins 102 on wall 102A.

[0032] Referring now to FIGS. 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, a second main embodiment decorative recessed cabinet 500 is adapted for the storing of telephone directories and other similar items. Like the first main embodiment cabinet 100, the second main embodiment cabinet 500 includes a front bezel 505 and a box portion 506. The box portion 506 has a rear panel 507 and left and right-side panels and top and bottom panels 508L, 508R, 508T and 508B, respectively. The front bezel 505 of this embodiment includes a book retaining strip 501 having a plurality of decorative apertures 502 therein. FIGS. 6 and 7 show spring clips 109 like those used for the first embodiment cabinet 100. However, FIGS. 8 and 9 show recesses or indentations 801, into which several drops of a foaming adhesive, such a polyurethane adhesive may be placed immediately prior to the insertion of the second embodiment cabinet 500 into an opening in a gypsum board covered framed wall. The adhesive will foam and set up, thereby securing the cabinet 500 within the opening.

[0033] Referring now to FIG. 10, a third main embodiment decorative recessed cabinet 1000 is adapted for the storing of individually boxed video cassette tapes in two parallel horizontal columns 1001T and 1001B. Each boxed video cassette tape fits into a slot defined by fins 1002 on two sets of opposed horizontal sidewalls, the first set including walls 1003A and 1003B; the second set including walls 1004A and 1004B. Like the first main embodiment cabinet 100 and the second main embodiment cabinet 500, the third main embodiment cabinet 1000 includes a front bezel 1005 and a box portion 1006. The box portion 1006 has a rear panel 1007 and left and right-side panels and top and bottom panels 1008L, 1008R, 1008T and 1008B, respectively. FIG. 12 shows a spring clip 109 like those used for the first embodiment cabinet 100. The cross-sectional view of FIG. 11 shows four of the box retaining fins 1002.

[0034] Referring now to FIG. 13, a fourth main embodiment decorative recessed cabinet 1300 is adapted for displaying statues or other similarly proportioned artistic creations. Like the first main embodiment cabinet 100, the second main embodiment cabinet 500, and the third main embodiment cabinet 1000, the fourth main embodiment cabinet 1300 includes a front bezel 1305 and a box portion 1306. The box portion 1306 has a rear panel 1307 and left and right-side panels and top and bottom panels 1308L, 1308R, 1308T and 1308B, respectively. It will be noted that the top panel 1308T is curved, being concave on its interior surface 1501 and convex on its exterior surface 1502. FIG. 14 shows a spring clip 109 like those used for the first embodiment cabinet 100 for retention of the cabinet in a wall opening. It will also be noted that the front bezel 1305 includes a shelf 1310, which is an extension of the bottom panel 1308B.

[0035] Referring now to FIGS. 17, 18, 19 and 20, a fifth embodiment decorative recessed cabinet 1700, which is a modification of the third embodiment decorative recessed cabinet 1000, is shown. The primary difference between the two embodiments is the in-the-wall securing mechanism. Whereas the third embodiment used either spring clips or a foaming adhesive, the fifth embodiment employs a plurality of 90-degree-rotatable screw-type fasteners 1701. Each fastener has a screw 1702 and a flip-up retainer nut 1703. The screws 1702 are inserted through apertures in the bezel 1705. Such fasteners are used extensively on rough-in boxes for remodel electrical work.

[0036] It should be clear to those having ordinary skill in the art of fabrication, that the five heretofore disclosed embodiments of the decorative recessed cabinets can be fabricated from a variety of materials such as metal, wood, and thermoplastics, the preferred materials are thermoplastics, because of the ease with which mutliple units may be formed once a mold is created. Preferably, the thermoplastic is a paintable material. Materials that readily qualify are polystyrene, ABS, PVC, Bakelite. The spring clips 109 may be made of spring steel or simply a resilient plastic material and may be adhesively bonded or mechanically attached to the sides of the cabinets.

[0037] Although only several single embodiments of the invention have been heretofore described, it will be obvious to those having ordinary skill in the art that changes and modifications may be made thereto without departing from the scope and the spirit of the invention as hereinafter claimed. For example, the use of a body for the decorative box that extends both into the wall cavity and outside the wall cavity, with the perimetric rim between the inner and outer portions of the body, is also contemplated by this application, and this scope of the invention is intended to be covered by the existing claims.