Title:
Disk pump assembly
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A disk pump assembly having a transparent housing and a transparent disk assembly within. The disks of the disk assembly have apertured bosses and indents corresponding to one another for registering the disks into single assembly. The rear disk has a rearward extension with an imbedded a metal insert having a central threaded bore. The rear housing component of the housing has a flanged rear which attaches to a corresponding square-flanged front end of an external motor having an extending shaft with a threaded end and an internally reverse-threaded central bore. The housing components are connected together with v-clamps; the suction port and discharge port each are flanged and also connected to external components with a v-clamp. A securing fastener further fastens the rear disk to the shaft through the internally reverse-threaded central bore at the end of the shaft.



Inventors:
Moorehead, Jack (San Diego, CA, US)
Lodico, Joseph T. (San Diego, CA, US)
Application Number:
10/006910
Publication Date:
05/08/2003
Filing Date:
11/08/2001
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
29/888.024, 29/889, 415/90, 415/200
International Classes:
F01D1/36; F04D5/00; (IPC1-7): F01D1/36
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
VERDIER, CHRISTOPHER M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Thomas J. Tighe, Esq. (San Diego, CA, US)
Claims:

The invention claimed is:



1. A disk pump comprising: (a) a rear housing having a rearward protruding first axial extension and a flanged rear end; (b) a transparent front housing having rearward extending perimeter walls, said perimeter walls having a radial flange around its rearward end which connects to said rear housing defining an inner chamber therein; (c) a flanged suction port on said front housing; (d) a flanged discharge port on said front housing; (e) a rear disk having a rearward protruding second axial extension and an insert permanently imbedded within said second extension, said insert having a threaded aperture therein and adapted to thread onto a cooperating shaft of an external motor; (f) a front disk and one or more internal disks in between said front disk and said rear disk; (g) registration means for registering and connecting together said front disk, said one or more internal disks, and said rear disk thereby forming a disk assembly for placement into said inner chamber; and (h) connection means for connecting said front housing to said rear housing, for connecting said suction port to an external inlet source, and for connecting said discharge port to an external outlet source.

2. The disk pump according to claim 1 wherein said front housing is made of a polymer.

3. The disk pump according to claim 1 wherein said front housing is transparent.

4. The disk pump according to claim 1 wherein said rear housing is made of a polymer.

5. The disk pump according to claim 1 wherein said rear housing is transparent.

6. The disk pump according to claim 1 wherein said one or more internal disks are made of a polymer.

7. The disk pump according to claim 1 wherein said one or more internal disks are transparent.

8. The disk pump according to claim 1 wherein said front disk is made of a polymer.

9. The disk pump according to claim 1 wherein said front disk is transparent.

10. The disk pump according to claim 1 wherein said rear disk is made of a polymer.

11. The disk pump according to claim 1 wherein said rear disk is transparent.

12. The disk pump according to claim 1 wherein said registration means comprises a plurality of cooperating apertured bosses and apertured indents on said front disk, said rear disk, and said one or more internal disks removably secured together in a spaced fashion by a fastener assembly.

13. The disk pump according to claim 12 wherein said apertured bosses are on one side of each of said one or more internal disks and said apertured indents are on another side of each of said one or more internal disks.

14. The disk pump according to claim 12 wherein said apertured bosses are on one side of said rear disk and said apertured indents are on one side of said front disk.

15. The disk pump according to claim 14 wherein said fastener assembly comprises a nut imbedded within each of said apertured bosses of said rear disk and a cooperating bolt inserted through the apertured indents of the front disk and through the apertured bosses and apertured indents of the one or more internal disks.

16. The disk pump according to claim 12 wherein said apertured indents are on one side of said rear disk and said apertured bosses are on one side of said front disk.

17. The disk pump according to claim 16 wherein said fastener assembly comprises a nut imbedded within each of said apertured indents of said rear disk and a cooperating bolt inserted through the apertured bosses of the front disk and through the apertured bosses and apertured indents of the one or more internal disks.

18. The disk pump according to claim 1 wherein said connection means comprises a v-clamp.

19. The disk pump according to claim 1 wherein said connection means comprises a fastener selected from the group consisting of bolts, screws, and rivets.

20. The disk pump according to claim 1 further comprising guide means for maintaining a smooth rotation of said disk assembly when said disk pump is being operated.

21. The disk pump according to claim 20 wherein said guide means comprises a forward extending axial lip on said front disk and a rearward extending axial lip on said front housing, said forward extending axial lip adjacent to said rearward extending axial lip and extending past said rearward extending axial lip.

22. A method of suction pumping liquids from one source to another source comprising the steps of: (a) selecting a motor having a square-flanged receiving end, a protruding shaft having a threaded end and a threaded central bore; (b) connecting a rear housing having a radial perimeter and a rearward protruding first axial extension with a flanged rear end thereat, adapted to mate with said square-flanged receiving end of said motor, by aligning said square-flanged receiving end of said motor to said flanged rear end of said rear housing and by connecting said square-flanged receiving end to said flanged rear end; (c) placing a sealing member over said shaft; (d) assembling a disk assembly comprising: (1) a rear disk having a rearward protruding second axial extension and an insert permanently imbedded within said second extension, said insert having a threaded aperture therein and adapted to thread onto the threaded end of said shaft of said motor; (2) a front disk and one or more internal disks in between said front disk and said rear disk; and (3) registration means for registering and connecting together said front disk, said one or more internal disks, and said rear disk thereby forming said disk assembly; (e) connecting and tightening said threaded insert onto the threaded end of said shaft; (f) attaching a transparent front housing over said disk assembly, said front housing having rearward extending perimeter walls, said perimeter walls having a radial flange around its rearward end which connects to said rear housing defining an inner chamber therein; (g) connecting said front housing to said rear housing by placing and tightening a housing v-clamp over said radial flange of said perimeter walls and said radial perimeter; (h) connecting first either said flanged suction port on said front housing to an external inlet source by placing and tightening an inlet v-clamp over said flanged suction port and said external inlet source followed by connecting said flanged discharge port on said front housing to an external discharge source by placing and tightening a discharge v-clamp over said flanged discharge port to an external discharge source or by reversing, or by first connecting said flanged discharge port as defined above followed by connecting said flanged suction port as defined above; and (i) operating said disk pump.

23. The method of claim 22 further comprising the step of observing the operation of said disk pump through its transparent housing to detect any problems associated with said operation, said problems selected from the group consisting of worn component parts, loose component parts, damaged component parts, mis-aligned component parts, and obstructions to any component parts.

24. The method of claim 23 further comprising the step of ceasing said operation upon detection of said problem and removing said housing v-clamp, pulling said motor, with rear housing and disk assembly connected thereto, away from said front housing, and correcting said problem detected.

25. The method of claim 22 further comprises the step of selecting said registration means to comprise a plurality of cooperating apertured bosses and apertured indents on said front disk, said rear disk, and said one or more internal disks removably secured together in a spaced fashion by a fastener assembly.

26. The method of claim 25 further comprising the step of ensuring said apertured bosses are on one side of each of said one or more internal disks and said apertured indents are on another side of each of said one or more internal disks.

27. The method of claim 25 further comprising the step of ensuring said apertured bosses are on one side of said rear disk and said apertured indents are on one side of said front disk.

28. The method of claim 27 further comprising the step of ensuring said fastener assembly comprises a nut imbedded within each of said apertured bosses of said rear disk and a cooperating bolt inserted through the apertured indents of the front disk and through the apertured bosses and apertured indents of the one or more internal disks.

29. The method of claim 25 further comprising the step of ensuring said apertured indents are on one side of said rear disk and said apertured bosses are on one side of said front disk.

30. The method of claim 29 further comprising the step of ensuring said fastener assembly comprises a nut imbedded within each of said apertured indents of said rear disk and a cooperating bolt inserted through the apertured bosses of the front disk and through the apertured bosses and apertured indents of the one or more internal disks.

31. The method of claim 22 further comprising the step of further securing said disk assembly to said shaft by placing a fastener with a washer thereon into said threaded central bore and tightening said fastener thereat.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] None.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY-SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

[0002] Not applicable.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003] This present invention relates to an improvement in disk pumps, and more particularly to disk pumps used for and in water treatment facilities. Conventional disk pumps all have a housing, suction [or inlet] ports, discharge ports, impeller blades of some configuration, and a drive means [or motor]. Of particular interest are the Gurth device [U.S. Pat. No. 4,335,994], the Possell device [U.S. Pat. No. 4,347,032], the Effenberger device [U.S. Pat. No. 4,402,647], another Gurth device [U.S. Pat. No. 4,514,139], and the Dial device [Publication Number U.S. Ser. No. 2001/0019693 A1]. These devices are all well-suited for the intended purposes but fall short in flexibility of use, ease of manufacture, and simplicity of maintenance; particularly if the disk pumps are used in conjunction with water treatment systems involving a dissolved air separation system [DAS] where raw influent water is pumped into a mixing or blending unit along with whitewater microbubbles wherein the influent and whitewater mix or blend together and pass into a hydro-cyclone separator. Disk pumps I have found to be an important component to the DAS process.

[0004] Ordinary impeller-type pumps apply stress to the water combination [influent and whitewater] it is pushing. This can shear the microbubbles or cause them to merge into larger bubbles thereby reducing their efficacy. Using a disk pump in the DAS process pulls the water combination into the separator, rather than pushes it in, and thereby prevents this shearing and merger effect. To further reduce the shearing and merger effect, the disks inside the disk pump should have smooth flat surfaces. Tapering, slotting, ribbing, angling, and the like, on the disk surfaces will reduce the efficiency of the disk pump in the DAS process.

[0005] With such smooth surfaces, as the water combination passes through the disk pump, less of the influent water comes into direct contact with the spinning disk surfaces. The molecular layer of fluid in direct contact with the disk surfaces creates a viscous drag effect that pulls the rest of the water combination through the pump housing and between the disk surfaces. Only a small fraction of the influent portion of the water combination actually touches any surface of the spinning disks and the fluid is not under any compression until it enters the disk pump housing after the microbubbles have already formed therein. As a result, minimum shearing is realized. Using disk pumps in the DAS process increases the efficiency levels of performance.

[0006] Regardless, the disks and other component parts of the disk pump can, through operation, become damaged, worn, misaligned, and clogged with debris or build-up of slime, calcium, or other particulants of the influent water. When any of the above problems occur, the efficiency of performance diminishes. Oftentimes, a problem of such nature is not detected until it has become worse, even to the point of causing damage to other component parts. Cleaning or repairing a disk pump assembly usually requires disassembly of the pump housing and impeller units. The cleaning, repairing process is compounded generally by threaded connectors holding the unit together which eventually “weld” together over time. They may become difficult to unthread and are often damaged in the process or the threads stripped when a wrench is applied to the jammed threaded connections. Any damage to the threaded parts will result in costly replacement of the damaged parts.

[0007] Additionally there are a number of different contaminants suspended in the influent process water stream that can eventually cause a blockage between the smooth disks inside the disk pump housing, including slime or calcium scale coating the disk's surface. Organic slime can cause silt and other organic or inorganic particles to adhere to the disk surface, building up until the space between the disks is completely blocked. Sand and silt grit can damage the smooth surface of the disk pack, thereby reducing the efficiency of the viscous drag effect, which pulls the raw process water stream saturated with whitewater microbubbles through the disk pump housing. In most opaque metal or plastic disk pack pump housings, none of this is discernible until too late and the disk pump unit and one or more of its component parts are damaged.

[0008] In operation, when the smooth disks of a disk pump are rotated within its chamber, fluid [or gas as the case may be] is pulled into the pump through the suction port and out the discharge port. Such is the purpose of this pump; i.e., to move fluid or gas from one source to another. Most smooth rotating disks are made of thick metal. Whether used to pump fragile articles, slurry, or waste water, over time, the disks within the pump can become clogged, damaged, misaligned, or corroded. As stated above, such problems are not immediately nor readily detected; not until the efficiency and effectiveness of the unit have diminished significantly that the problems are detected, appreciated, and corrected. Corrective action requires shutting down the pump, dismantling it, locating the root of the problem, correcting the problem, and reassembling the pump. In the prior art devices referenced above, the corrective actions required are daunting tasks. In many cases, based on the particular configuration of the pump and the disks therein, removing the housing or removing the pump from the motor can be hampered by ‘frozen’ or locked fasteners coupling the housing unit to the pump or connecting the pump to the motor. Inlet and discharge lines also must be disconnected, the disk assembly removed from the housing, and the disks disassembled from the disk assembly. The same problems will be faced.

[0009] Ease of removal of the housing, ease of removal of the pump from the motor, ease of removal of the inlet and discharge lines, ease of removal of the disk assembly renders the operation and maintenance of a disk pump more efficient, more economical, and more effective. The ability to see the efficacy of the disk pump, or lack thereof, in real-time operation provides an unprecedented advantage in this regard. First, a problem can be detected at its incipient stages rather than at its critical stages thereby engaging in pre-emptive or pro-active maintenance rather than reactive maintenance. Depending on the problem involved, a user may only be required to remove the external feed lines and the front housing; or to leave the external feed lines in tact; or any combinations thereof. If necessary, ease of removing the disk assembly and easy of replacing any one or more disks, simplify maintenance.

[0010] The present invention, with its transparent housing, flange-shaped rear housing, flange-shaped front housing, and flange-shaped suction and discharge ports combined with an o-ring and a v-clamp connection member provide for dis-assembly and re-assembly simplification. The transparency of the housing and the disk assembly within further simplify maintenance by alerting a user to an upcoming need before a real problem or disaster strikes for want of this information. Assembling or re-assembling the disk assembly is further facilitated by the registration projections and cooperating recesses on the disk surfaces.

[0011] Accordingly, several objects and advantages of the present invention are to:

[0012] a. simplify manufacture of disk pumps;

[0013] b. simplify operation and maintenance of disk pumps;

[0014] c. provide the user with the ability to see the pumping operation in ‘real time’; and

[0015] d. reduce the costs associated with the manufacture, maintenance, and repair of disk pumps.

[0016] The foregoing has outlined some of the more pertinent objects of the present invention. These objects should be construed to be merely illustrative of some of the more prominent features and applications of the intended invention. Many other beneficial results can be attained by applying the disclosed invention in a different manner or by modifying the invention within the scope of the disclosure. Accordingly, other objects and a fuller understanding of the invention may be had by referring to the summary of the invention and the detailed description of the preferred embodiment in addition to the scope of the invention defined by the claims taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0017] The above-noted problems, among others, are overcome by the present invention. Briefly stated, the present invention contemplates a disk pump assembly having a transparent housing made of a polymer and a disk assembly therein, also transparent and made of a polymer. The disks comprising the disk assembly have apertured bosses and indents corresponding to one another d for registering the disks into single assembly. The rear disk has a rearward extension into which is imbedded a metal insert having a central threaded bore. The rear housing component of the housing has a flanged rear which attaches to a corresponding flanged front end of an external motor having an extending shaft with a threaded end and an internally reverse-threaded central bore. These flanged components may be circular or the more conventional square-shape. Most external motors have a square-flanged front end. In such cases, the rear housing could have a corresponding square-flanged rear end or a suitable adapter may be used over the square-flanged front end of the motor. Since with the present invention, it is not necessary to remove the rear housing to service the internal components of the disk pump, the rear housing may be bolted onto the motor rather than clamped thereon with v-clamps as are the other external connectors of the disk pump [i.e., housing components connected to each other with v-clamps, suction port connected to external inlet source with a v-clamp, and discharge port connected to external outlet source with a v-clamp]. The threaded insert of the disk assembly is threaded onto the threaded end of the shaft. A securing fastener further fastens the rear disk to the shaft through the internally reverse-threaded central bore at the end of the shaft. The transparent housing permits viewing the operation of the disk pump. Any problems will be detected at their incipient stages thereby preventing critical damage to the units component parts and reducing down time of operation.

[0018] The foregoing has outlined the more pertinent and important features of the present invention in order that the detailed description of the invention that follows may be better understood so the present contributions to the art may be more fully appreciated. Additional features of the present invention will be described hereinafter which form the subject of the claims. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the conception and the disclosed specific embodiment may be readily utilized as a basis for modifying or designing other structures and methods for carrying out the same purposes of the present invention. It also should be realized by those skilled in the art that such equivalent constructions and methods do not depart from the spirit and scope of the inventions as set forth in the appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0019] For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention, reference should be made to the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

[0020] FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective view of the disk pump assembly.

[0021] FIG. 2 is a side elevation cross-section view of the disk pump assembly.

[0022] FIG. 3 is a detailed view of the disk sections.

[0023] FIG. 4 is a detailed cross-section side elevation view of the disk pump assembly.

[0024] FIG. 5, taken on line 5-5 of FIG. 3, is an elevation view of a disk.

[0025] FIG. 6, taken on line 6-6 of FIG. 3, is an elevation view of a disk.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0026] Referring now to the drawings in detail and in particular to FIG. 1, reference character 10 generally designates a disk pump assembly constructed in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention. Further reference should be made to FIGS. 2-4. The disk pump assembly 10 has a rear housing unit 21, a front housing unit 11, and a disk assembly unit 31, 32, 34 within the inner chamber as defined therein when the front housing unit 11 and the rear housing unit 21 are connected. The disk pump assembly 10 is attached to an external motor 53 by way of the rear housing 21. The suction port 13 attaches to an external inlet line and the discharge port 43 attaches to an external discharge line [or to another device such as, but not limited, to a hydro-cyclone particle separator unit]. Connecting the disk pump assembly 10 to the motor 53 may be by conventional means of bolting or screwing the components together or, if a suitable adapter is used, may be by clamping the components together using a conventional v-clamp; such as, but not limited to, a CLAMPCO brand v-clamp with quick connect fastener bolt. Use of such v-clamp component, however, is the preferred means of connect the housing units 11, 21 together, and for attaching the suction port 13 and the discharge port 43 to their respective external sources.

[0027] The motor 53 to which attached preferably should have a square-flanged end 59 and a shaft 58 with a threaded outside end and an internally threaded aperture or central bore. The rear housing 21 has a rearward protruding axial extension 23 and, preferably, a square-flanged rear end 29 matable to the square-flanged end 59 of the motor 53. The flanged rear end 29 mates with the flange 59 of the motor 53 and it secured thereat by suitable fasteners, such as, but not limited to bolts. This is the first step of the attachment process. Generally a suitable sealing member, such as, but not limited to, an o-ring is placed in between the two flanged surfaces [as well as in between the other flanged surfaces later described when being connected together] before the two flanged surfaces are joined together by and with the v-clamp.

[0028] Once so attached, the rear housing 21 is secured to the motor 53. The shaft 58 of the motor 53 extends forward into the inside cavity 26 of the rear housing 21. The disk assembly 31, 32, 34 [after it has first been assembled] next is secured to the shaft 58 followed by placing the front housing 11 over the disk assembly 31, 32, 34 and securing the front housing 11 to the rear housing 21 by the v-clamp 17A. The attachment process is facilitated by the structural components of the front housing 11 which include the rearward extending side wall 12 around the outer perimeter of the front housing 11. A radial flange 9 extends outward of and around the side wall 12 at its rear most end. Flange 9 mates with the perimeter of the rear housing 21. A suitable sealing member [such as, but not limited to, an o-ring] is placed at the point of contact between the rear housing 21 and the front housing 11. The v-clamp 17A sealingly secures the two housing members 11, 21 together. The perimeter of the rear housing 21 may, but need not, have a forward protruding lip 19 therearound which is adapted to mate with flange 9 of the front housing 11.

[0029] The suction port 13 has a flange 39 around its perimeter and the discharge port 43 also has a flange 49 around its perimeter. The suction port 13 is sealingly connected to an external inlet line by v-clamp 17B and the discharge port 13 is sealingly connected to an external discharge line [or other device] by v-clamp 17C. Suitable sealing members [such as, but not limited to, an o-ring] are placed in between the two flanged connecting components.

[0030] The disk assembly 31, 32, 34 within the inner chamber of the connected housing units 11, 21 has a rear disk 32, a front disk 31, and any number of disks 34 [internal disks] in between the rear disk 32 and the front disk 31. The rear disk 32 has an axial rearward projecting extension 33. An insert 38 is imbedded within the rearward extension 33. Insert 38 has a threaded central bore therethrough. After the disk assembly 31, 32, 34 is assembled, a washer or spring-loaded seal assembly 48 is placed over the shaft 58 and the disk assembly 31, 32, 34 is then threaded onto the shaft 58. A typical seal assembly 48 suited for this purpose is a mechanical seal, part number MS1-600V, manufactured by U.S. Seal Manufacturing Company. Shaft 58 also has a threaded central bore at its end. The threading of this threaded central bore of the shaft 58 should be reverse-threaded from the rotation of spin of the shaft 58. The disk assembly 31, 32, 34 is further held fast to the shaft 58 by fastener 68; preferably a reverse-threaded bolt. A washer 69 may, but need not, be inserted over the shank of the fastener 68 before threading fastener 68 into the central bore of the shaft 58. The front disk 31 and the internal disks 34 may be removed from the disk assembly 31, 32, 34 without need to un-thread or remove the rear disk 32 from the motor shaft 58. These features combine to greatly facilitate assembly and dis-assembly of the disk pump assembly 10 for maintenance, repair, and replacement of one of more components as necessary.

[0031] The disk assembly 31, 32, 34 comprises the front disk 31, the rear disk 32, the internal disks 34 in between the front and rear disk 31, 32, and the retaining assembly 14, 15 holding the disks 31, 32, 34 together as a unit. Attention is now invited to FIGS. 3, 5, and 6. The internal disks 34 each have an axial aperture 36C with a plurality of projections or bosses 35 around the axial aperture 36C on one side of the internal disk 34 and corresponding recesses or indents 37 on the opposite side of the internal disk 34. The bosses 35 and indents 37 are distal to the axial aperture 36C. Each side of the internal disks 34 are, except for the bosses 35, circular, smooth, flat, of equal diameter, and relatively parallel to one another. The bosses 35 and indents 37 of each internal disk 34 corresponds and cooperates with the bosses 35 and indents 37 of each other internal disk. With this as a registration component of the internal disks 34, any number of internal disks 34 may be accurately aligned together.

[0032] The front disk 31 and the rear disk 32 may, but need not, have only a set of bosses 35 or a set of indents 37 [or in some cases both] which correspond and cooperate with the bosses 35 and indents 37 of the internal disks 34. As illustrated in FIG. 3, the rear side of the front disk 31 has the bosses 35 and the front side of the rear disk 32 has the indents 37. In this configuration, the internal disks 34 are aligned with the front disk 31 and the rear disk 32 with the bosses 35 of the internal disks 34 facing rearward. It must be understood, however, that the front disk 31 may have the indents 37 and the rear disk 32 may have the bosses 35 in which case the internal disks 34 would be aligned with the front disk 31 and the rear disk 32 with the bosses 35 of the internal disks 34 facing forward. The front disk 31 and the rear disk 32 also have an axial aperture, 36A and 36C, respectively around which are located their respective bosses 35 and indents 37.

[0033] All of the boss/indents 35, 37 have an aperture through which a suitable fastener 15 inserts to securingly hold the disk assembly 31, 32, 34 together. Any fastener 15 suited for the intended purpose will suffice such as, but not limited to, a bolt 15-nut 14 combination, a bolt 15 and threaded-indent 37 combination, and the like. In practice, the disk assembly 31, 32, 34 is assembled by placing either the front disk 31 [front side down] or the rear disk 32 [rear side 33 down] on a surface, preferably a relatively flat surface. For clarity, the disk used for this purpose will be referred to as the primary disk rendering the other disk the final disk. One or more internal disks 34 are the aligned with and placed onto the primary disk. By way of this example only and not by limitation, the rear disk 32, with insert 38, will be the primary disk. It is placed on a flat surface with rear side 33 down. After a suitable number of internal disks 34, with bosses 35 facing toward and into the indents 37 of the primary disk, are aligned with the primary disk, the front disk 31, as the final disk with bosses 35 also facing the primary disk, is aligned with and onto the indents 37 of the last-placed internal disk 34.

[0034] A bolt 15, of suitable length and beginning at the front disk 31, is inserted through each boss/indent 35, 37 alignment down through and to the primary disk 32. The bolt 15 is of such length to pass through the primary disk 32 exposing the threaded end of the bolt 15 thereat for accepting a nut 14 to thereby secure the disk assembly 31, 32, 34 as a viable unit made up of its plurality of component parts. The nut 14 may also be imbedded into the primary disk such thereby eliminating the need to manually hold the nut 14 in place when removing the bolt 15 or re-inserting it. In this example, the nut 14 may be compression-fitted into the primary disk or may, in the manufacture process of the primary disk, be molded therein as illustrated in FIG. 4. The indent 37 on the primary disk instead may have an internally threaded indent 37 or boss 35 which is adapted to accept the threaded end of the inserting bolt 15 thereby eliminating the need for a nut 14. the imbedded nut 14 and the internally threaded indent 37 or boss 35 of the primary disk are the preferred embodiments as they facilitate the repair, replacement, and maintenance of the disk pump 10 and its component parts.

[0035] After the disk assembly 31, 32, 34 is so assembled, it is ready to be attached to the shaft 58. First the seal assembly 48 or other suitable sealing member is inserted over the shaft 58. Then the disk assembly 31, 32, 34, is threaded onto the shaft 58 by way of the insert 38 at the rear disk 32. This is followed by inserting a suitable fastener 68 with or without a washer 69 through the axial apertures 16A, 16C, 16B of the disk assembly 31, 32, 34 and into the threaded central bore of the shaft 58. Though the threaded insert 38 tightened onto the external threading of the shaft 58 is sufficient to hold the disk assembly 31, 32, 34 on the shaft 58, the fastener 68 and washer 69 provide, with reverse threading, for greater retention thereon.

[0036] As described above, the front housing 11 is then placed over the disk assembly 31, 32, 34 and connected to the rear housing 21 followed by connecting the suction port 13 and the discharge 43 to their respective external objects [not shown]. Depending on the nature and configuration of these external objects, a suitable adapter to mate the flanges of the suction port 13 and the discharge port 43 should be used. For example, a conventional pipe flange connector matable to the suction port 13 and the discharge port 43 may have a conventional pipe fitting, threaded or glued thereto, which pipe fitting is attached or attached to the external object.

[0037] All the disks [front 31, rear 32, and internal 34] and the front 11 and rear 21 housing units are preferably made of a polymer; of particularly suited functionality of purpose include conventionally available transparent ABS, transparent PVC, or other transparent plastic materials.

[0038] A unique feature of the present invention also lies in the transparency of the front housing 11. In this regard, the rear housing 21 and the disks [front 31, rear 32, and internal 34] also may be transparent. The insert 38 imbedded within the axial extension 33 of the rear disk 31, however, should be made of a suitable metal, such as, but not limited to, number 303 or number 316 stainless steel, with the rear disk 31 molded around the insert 38.

[0039] Making the housing units 11, 21 and the disks [front 31, rear 32, and internal 34] of a polymer which is transparent permits the user to observe the internal operation of the disk pump assembly 10 under real-time operational conditions. This ability can prevent problems before the problem, unseen, can escalate and cause a major breakdown of equipment and operations. A user would be able to see if the disk assembly 31, 32, 34 is coming undone from the shaft 58; would be able to see if the bolt fasteners 15 are coming undone; would be able to see if the imbedded nut 14 is coming undone; would be able to see if the washer 48 is worn; and would be able to discern any obstructions within the interstitial spacing between the disks 31, 32, 34.

[0040] On the front side of the front disk 31 is an axial lip or ridge 73. On the rearward side of the front housing 11 is a rearward extending axial lip or ridge 75. The respective axial lips 73, 75, though not in direct contact with one another, are adjacent to one another and in close proximity thereto as to function as a guide mechanism for the disk assembly 31, 32, 34 as it rotates within the inner chamber and liquid flows through thereby facilitating smooth operation of the disk pump 10.

[0041] In view of the component parts comprising the present invention, one can readily see how simplified is the assembly and dis-assembly of the disk pump and how efficient and effect this unit is in operation and maintenance. In simplified terms as gleaned from the above detailed description, assembling a disk pump comprised of these component parts entails using a motor having a square-flanged housing 59 and first attaching the rear housing 21 of the present invention onto the motor's flanged housing 59 using, for example, bolts. After the disk assembly 31, 32, 34 is assembled as above described, a suitable sealing assembly 48 is placed over the shaft 58 and against the rear housing 21. Next, the disk assembly 31, 32, 34, with rear disk 32 first with its threaded insert 38, is threaded onto the threaded end of the shaft 58 of the motor 53. A washer 69 and a reverse-threaded bolt 68, which cooperate with the threading of the central bore at the end of the shaft 58, more firmly secures the disk assembly 31, 32, 34 to the shaft 58. The front housing 11 is then placed over the disk assembly 31, 32, 34 and attached to the rear housing 21 by using a v-clamp. This is then followed by first attaching, with a v-clamp, the suction port 13 to an external inlet component after which the discharge port 43 is attached, with a v-clamp, to an external discharge component; or the order may be reversed.

[0042] As described above, the ability to view the operation of the disk pump, particularly in water treatment operations, cannot be overstated—it is paramount to the efficiency of the present invention. Problems are detected at their most basic incipient stages. Corrective action is simplified. A user of the present invention may elect to attached the suction port 13 and the discharge port 43 with bolts or other fasteners rather than the v-clamp fastening. Of course, dis-assembly is more onerous. In such cases, one need only remove the v-clamp 17A securing the front housing 11 to the rear housing 21 and pull the motor 53 rearward until the disk assembly 31, 32, 34 is clear of the front housing 11 side walls 12. This exposes the entire working structural component parts of the disk pump 10 and permits one to correct any problem encountered. Re-assembly is just as easy and quick by mere pushing the motor 53, with its attached component parts, back into mating communication between the front housing 11 and the rear housing 21, re-inserting the original sealing member 48 or a new one therebetween [if warranted or desired], and replacing the v-clamp 17A thereover.

[0043] The present disclosure includes that contained in the present claims as well as that of the foregoing description. Although this invention has been described in its preferred forms with a certain degree of particularity, it is understood that the present disclosure of the preferred forms has been made only by way of example and numerous changes in the details of construction and combination and arrangement of parts and method steps may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. Accordingly, the scope of the invention should be determined not by the embodiment[s] illustrated, but by the appended claims and their legal equivalents.