Title:
Flaming flower rose, flaming flower cone, chiminea and chimney chum and chimney chum wrap firestarters
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
These firestarters comprise parts of the dead yucca Whipplei plant and the folicles from the Magnolia Grandiflora tree, wicking, wax and fabric. The inner core along with the hard outer shell of the yucca Whipplei stalk, the dead basal leaf rosette of the yucca Whipplei and the Magnolia folicle used with a yucca Whipplei stalk are all very conducive to use in a formula to develop a firestarter.

The use of these all natural plant materials allow for the making of different firestarter forms and enhance the unique nature of these firestarters. My method of construction include ing the use of candle wax, fabric, wicking and the properties of the yucca Whipplei and Mag nolia tree folicles produce a flame when ignited that will last from 15 minutes to 30 minutes. The firestarters of this invention finds utility as an igniter for natural wood logs in fireplaces, chimineas and wood stoves without the usual appearance of a common firestarter. The bum time of these firestarters is sufficient to ignite natural wood logs without the use of kindling or newspapers.




Inventors:
Mertz, Brenda Kay (Temecula, CA, US)
Application Number:
09/985207
Publication Date:
05/08/2003
Filing Date:
11/02/2001
Assignee:
MERTZ BRENDA KAY
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
44/534, 44/535, 44/533
International Classes:
C10L11/06; (IPC1-7): C06C5/00; C10L1/00; C10L11/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
TOOMER, CEPHIA D
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Brenda K. Mertz (Temecula, CA, US)
Claims:
1. What I claim as my invention is the discovery of the use of the all natural properties of the dead yucca Whipplei and the folicles from the Magnolia Grandiflora, and the method of developing these properties into a firestarter that is environmentally friendly and has the unique appearance of a flower or decorative log. These forms produce a 15 to 30 minute intense flame with no oils or chemicals.

2. A firestarter according to claim 1 wherein the dead basal rosette leaves of the yucca Whipplei are fastened together and stems wrapped in fabric creating the appearance of a flower. Wicking is added and the unit is covered with several coatings of either paraffin, bees or candle wax at different temperatures

3. A firestarter according to claim 1 wherein the upper stem of the dead flower stalk of the yucca Whipplei is wrapped in fabric and a folicle from the Magnolia Grandiflora is inserted on top creating the appearance of a flower. Wicking is added and the unit is covered with several coatings of either paraffin, bees or candle wax at different temperatures.

4. A firestarter according to claim 1 wherein the approx. middle portion of the dead flower stalk of the yucca Whipplei is cut into various lengths. Then {fraction (1/16)}th inch wide cuts around the diameter are made into the stalk which acts as a conduint. It is then soaked in melted paraffin, bees or candle wax. Let cool, then cover with several more coatings of wax at different temperatures. Wicking is added.

5. A firestarter according to claim 1 wherein the approx. middle portion of the dead flower stalk of the yucca Whipplei is cut into various lengths. It is then soaked in melted paraffin, bees or candle wax. The entire unit is again covered two more times with wax at various temperatures. It is then wrapped with tapestry fabric. Add wicking and again cover most of the unit with wax. It has the appearance of a elegant log.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

[0001] The firestarter of this invention finds utility as an igniter for logs in fireplaces, woodstoves and chimineas. This invention is environmentally friendly in that it uses dead organic material from the yucca Whipplei and the folicles from the Magnolia Grandiflora tree, wax, fabric and wicking. This firestarter will burn with intense flame for 15 to 30 minutes, depending on the unit used, without the use of any chemicals, oils, newspaper or kindling. The all natural texture of the dead yucca Whipplei and the folicle from the Magnolia tree along with the method of construction add to the longevity of the high intense flame and also has the pleasing look of a flower or decorative log.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0002] FIG. 1 is a individual dead basal leaf rosette from the yucca Whipplei.

[0003] FIG. 2 is a view after putting several leaf rosettes together to make a rose looking flower.

[0004] FIG. 3 is a view of completed firestarter with appearance of a flower. (Flaming Flower Rose)

[0005] FIG. 4 is one folicle from Magnolia Grandiflora tree.

[0006] FIG. 5 is a view of the upper most part of the flower stalk of the yucca Whipplei.

[0007] FIG. 6 is a view of the completed firestarter that looks like a flower by attaching FIGS. 4 & 5 together. (Flaming Flower Cone)

[0008] FIG. 7 is a view of the middle portion of the flower stalk of the yuca Whipplei with cuts around the diameter of the unit.

[0009] FIG. 8 is a view of completed firestarter with wicking and wax. (Chiminea and Chimney Chum)

[0010] FIG. 9 is a view of a portion of the stalk from the yuca Whipplei wrapped in fabric for completed firestarter. (Chimney Chum Wrap)

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0011] The Flaming Flower Rose firestarter is made up of the dead basal leaf rosette (FIG. 1), which is a stiff sword shape leaf arising at ground level of the Chaparral Yucca, also known as Y. Whipplei. The rose is constructed by using a PVC tube with an opening at the top of 1 inch in diameter and 3½ inch long reduced to 1½ inch diameter opening at bottom. I attach this to another PVC tube, with masking tape, that is 1½ inches in diameter and 23 inches long.

[0012] I insert one leaf at a time into the top opening of the PVC tube, using approx. 13 leaves, each measuring approx. 26 inches long to form the rose. I then secure all 13 leaves at the neck of the rose with a zip tie. I remove all rose leaves from the tube. I then secure together from the neck down the rest of the rose leaves with floral tape approx. every 4 inches (FIG. 2). I trim the bottom of each rose unit evenly into different lengths, but no longer than 23 inches overall. I then snip zip tie at locking point.

[0013] I melt white candle wax to 195 degrees F. and dip entire rose, not stem, into liquid wax. Cool 5 minutes and re dip again at 195 degrees F. I let melted wax cool to 168 degrees F. then pour over entire stem of rose. I again let melted wax cool to 155 degrees F. and again pour over entire stem. At this time I make the wicking for the rose firestarter. This is made from rope that is ⅛ inch in diameter and made up of 35% cotton and 65% polyester. I dip 24 inch lengths into green candle wax melted to 190 degrees F. I cut 2-2 inch sections for the stem and 1-5 inch section for the rose. For the stem of the rose firestarter I cut 100% cotton green Duck Cloth fabric into 1½ inch wide×42 inches long sections. I completely wrap the diameter of the rose stem, starting from the neck of the rose to the bottom of the stem with this fabric. I insert and hot glue the 5 inch piece of wicking at the neck of the rose as I wrap the stem with the fabric. I push the wick to the center of the rose leaving 4 inches exposed for igniting. I continue wrapping with the fabric and insert and hot glue the 2 inch piece of wicking approx. half way down the stem and another 2 inch piece again 1½ inch from the bottom of the stem, leaving 1 inch exposed for igniting. The wicks are placed so that they line up vertically for easy igniting. I then pour liquid white candle wax melted to 195 degrees F. over the entire stem.

[0014] At this time the unit will have the appearance similar to a rose flower (FIG. 3). The formula using the strong leaf fibers of the yucca Whipplei along with the density of the fabric and specific waxing and wicking makes a composition when ignited burn with sufficiently intense flame and for a long enough time, approx. 15 minutes, to quickly ignite natural wood fire logs. This firestarter may be used in any environment where it is desired to start a fire.

[0015] The Flaming Flower Cone firestarter is made up of the dead stalk of the yucca Whipplei and the folicle from the Magnolia Grandiflora tree. For the cone flower I use the folicles from the magnolia tree, about 5 inches in length with a 2 inch stem, after they have split and the dark red seeds (fruit) have fallen off (FIG. 4). For the stem of the cone flower I use the upper most part of the dead flower stalk of the yucca Whipplei at the end of its life cycle (FIG. 5). I cut 19 inches off from the top. I turn the cut stalk so the point is facing down. I hot glue and push the stem of the cone folicle into top area that was cut, allowing cone to become fixed.

[0016] I then dip only the cone in melted candle wax using the same method I used for the rose. I then pour wax over the stem of the cone using the same method as for the rose stem, allowing some wax seepage into the inner core of the stalk. Wicking composition for the cone flower is the same as I used for the rose flower, except I cut 2-2 inch pieces and 1-3 inch piece. I then wrap the stem of the cone using the same fabric and dimensions and method as for the rose stem, with the exception of the 5 inch wick for the rose. Instead of the 5 inch wick, I use the 3 inch wick inserted into a drilled hole at the top of the cone secured with hot glue allowing 1½ inches exposed for igniting. I then pour melted candle wax over entire cone stem, using same method for rose stem.

[0017] At this time the unit will have the appearance similar to a cone flower (FIG. 6). The formula using the hard outer shell and the dense soft inner composition of the stalk of the yucca Whipplei along with wood like folicle from the Magnolia tree along with the density of the fabric and specific waxing and wicking makes a composition when ignited burn with sufficiently intense flame and for a long period of time, approx. 15 minutes, to quickly ignite natural wood logs. This firesrtarter may be used in any environment where it is desired to start a fire.

[0018] Chiminea and Chimney Chum firestarters are made up of the middle and lower portion of the flower stalk of the yucca Whipplei when at the end of its life cycle. The lower portion being approx. 22 inches up from the base of the whipplei and the middle portion being 35 inches down from the top of the Whipplei. This will give me unites of 2 inches in diameter and 2¼ inches in diameter. For the Chimney Chum I cut from the flower stalk of the Whipplei a 6½ inch length by 2 inch diameter unit. For the Chiminea Chum I cut a 10 inch length by 2¼ inch diameter unit. I then make a {fraction (1/16)}th inch wide cut around the diameter of the unit. I make 11 cuts spaced evenly for the 6½ inch unit (FIG. 7) and 13 cuts spaced evenly for the 10 inch unit. I then soak the unites in melted candle wax at 195 degrees F. for 10 seconds, allowing seepage into the inner core of the unit. Let cool 5 minutes. I again dip entire unites in melted candle wax at 175 degrees F. Let cool 5 minutes. I then pour melted candle wax at 155 degrees F. over entire unit. Let cool 5 minutes. I pour melted candle wax at 150 degrees F. over unit once again. Four waxings in all.

[0019] Using the same wicking as described previously, I cut 3-1½ inch pieces for the 6½ inch unit and 5-1½ inch pieces for the 10 inch unit. I drill ⅛th inch diameter and ¾inch deep holes in the 6½ inch unit. One on each end and one in the middle length of the unit (FIG. 8). I do the same for the 10 inch unit except I drill three holes in the middle length spaced evenly apart. I fill the holes with hot glue and insert the wicking leaving ¾ inch exposed for igniting. This method and composition of the hard outer shell and soft dense inner core of the yucca Whipplei and the application of wax at different temperatures and allowing seepage into the crevices of the diameter cuts which acts as a conduit allowing circulation movement of air around the unit that adds intensity to the flame causes the Chiminea and Chimney chum firestarters to burn from 20 to 30 minutes, thus sufficient time to ignite any natural wood log.

[0020] The Chimney Chum Wrap firestarters are also made up of the middle portion of the yucca Whipplei. Again I use a 6½ inch by 2 inch diameter piece. I soak the entire unit in melted candle wax at 195 degrees F. for 10 seconds. Let cool 5 minutes. I then dip entire unit in melted candle wax at 175 degrees F. Let cool 5 minutes. I then pour melted candle wax over entire unit at 155 degrees F. and again at 150 degrees F., allowing 5 minute cooling time in between. I then wrap the entire diameter of the unit with a 100% cotton tapestry fabric overlapping ¼ inch and hot glue together and allowing 1½ inch fabric to extend beyond the ends of the unit for igniting. I then close the ends by pulling the fabric together snuggly against the ends of the unit with a zip tie and snip off excess at the locking point. I then rewax entire unit by dipping it into melted candle wax at 195 degrees F. Using the same wicking as previously described, I cut one 2 inch piece. I drill one ⅛th inch diameter hole ¾th inch deep into the center length of the unit and fill with hot glue and insert wicking leaving 1¼th exposed for igniting (FIG. 9).

[0021] This method and composition of the hard outer shell and soft dense inner core of the yucca Whipplei and the application of wax at different temperatures plus the density of the tapestry fabric and method of igniting causes the Chimney Chum Wrap firestarter to produce a intense flame that will bum for 20 to 25 minutes, enough time to ignite natural wood logs. This firestarter may be used in any environment where it is desired to start a fire.