Title:
Princess cut invisible stone setting
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A new and improved stone setting is disclosed that supports the stone with an invisible setting comprising a notch on a facet of the stone with a portion of an upwardly extending support bracket extending into the notch and forming an interference fit therewith. The notch is generally V-shaped with an upper surface and a lower surface. The stone setting does not require support from a sidewall or a prong.



Inventors:
Ubhayakar, Vivek V. (Mumbai, IN)
Application Number:
10/289104
Publication Date:
03/27/2003
Filing Date:
11/06/2002
Assignee:
UBHAYAKAR VIVEK V.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A44C17/04; (IPC1-7): A44C17/02
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20080110204Adornment Assembly Linked by Clasp MembersMay, 2008Suen
20050016210Wristwatch or bracelet with arm-grasping housingJanuary, 2005Weiss et al.
20100024480IRIS SHUTTER CASE FOR DISPLAYING A DECORATIVE OBJECTFebruary, 2010Emer
20050044890Gemstone mount assemblies, jewelry pieces and methods for forming the sameMarch, 2005Lodholz
20060288735Rims 'n' RocksDecember, 2006Prasad
20020121107Variable pressure ear clipSeptember, 2002Memar
20090013723JEWELERY ADAPTERJanuary, 2009Coulter et al.
20100071413PURSE HOOK AND BRACELETMarch, 2010Shamlian
20090056376MODULAR SETTING DIAMOND JEWELRYMarch, 2009Lin
20090007597Body attached band with removal visual image pocketsJanuary, 2009Hanevold
20050274144Multiplet jewelry product and method of manufactureDecember, 2005Goughnour et al.



Primary Examiner:
MITCHELL, KATHERINE W
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
THE MATTHEWS FIRM (Houston, TX, US)
Claims:

What is claimed is:



1. A new and improved notched, invisible precious and semi-precious stone setting that does not require the use of a four sided setting socket in a plane parallel with a table comprising: a stone having a table, at least one outwardly downwardly extending facet, a girdle, and at least two inwardly downwardly extending facets such that a width of the girdle is greater than a width of the table; a notch extending at least partially along two opposed inwardly downwardly extending facets, the notch having an upper surface and a lower surface, the upper surface generally extending in a parallel plane with the table; and, at least two upwardly extending support brackets having an upper surface and a lower surface with no perpendicular cross-support bracket along a plane of the upper surface of the at least two support brackets, a perpendicular cross-support bracket connected to the at least two parallel upwardly extending support brackets about the lower surface of the at least two support brackets wherein a portion of the upper surface of each support bracket being at least partially deformed into the notch to secure the stone whereby an invisible setting is formed.

2. The setting of claim 1 wherein the table is quadrangular with four inwardly downwardly extending facets meeting at an apex.

3. The setting of claim 1 wherein the notch is a V-shape.

4. The setting of claim 3 wherein the lower surface of the notch extends at an angle of about 10 to 25 degrees from the upper surface of the notch.

5. The setting of claim 1 further comprising additional upwardly extending support brackets having an upper surface and a lower surface whereby a plurality of stones may be set.

6. The setting of claim 1 further comprising at least one prong.

7. The setting of claim 1 further comprising at least one sidewall.

8. The setting of claim 1 wherein at least one of the upward extending support brackets further comprises a projection that is inserted into the notch.

9. The setting of claim 1 wherein at least one of the upper surfaces of the support bracket forms an interference fit with the stone.

10. A new and improved stone setting that does not require a setting socket comprising: a stone having a V-notch extending at least partially into the stone and a girdle, the notch having an upper surface and a lower surface, the lower surface extending at an angle of about 10 to 25 degrees from the upper surface with a portion of an upwardly extending support bracket deformed thereto to secure the stone with an opposing upwardly extending support bracket, the support brackets supported from beneath the stone by a cross-support.

11. The stone setting of claim 10 wherein the upper surface of the notch is generally planar with the girdle.

12. The stone setting of claim 10 further comprising a side surface connected to a portion of at least one of the support brackets.

13. The stone setting of claim 10 further comprising a side surface connected to a portion of the cross-support.

14. The stone setting of claim 12 further comprising a design in the side surface.

15. The stone setting of claim 10 wherein the portion of the upwardly extending support bracket forms an interference fit with the notch.

16. A new and improved pendant earring invisible stone setting comprising: at least two stones, having a girdle, a table, and a facet, with a V-notch on opposing surfaces having an upper and a lower surface; the upper surface of the notches on opposing surfaces generally parallel with the table of the stones; at least two opposing support brackets having projection portions that are deformed within the notch; and, a cross-support member below the stones.

17. The earring of claim 16 wherein the table of the stones is generally parallel with a surface of the projection portions.

18. The earring of claim 16 further comprising an earring stud adapted for releasable engagement with an earring backing.

19. The earring of claim 16 wherein the stones are releasably secured within the earring whereby a user may selectively change the stones on the earring.

20. The earring of claim 16 wherein the projection portions forms an interference fit with the notch.

21. A new and improved stone setting comprising: a stone having a side and a table; at least two notches that extend at least partially along the table; and, at least two parallel upwardly extending support brackets having an upper surface and a lower surface wherein a portion of the upper surface of each support bracket being at least partially inserted into the notch to form an interference fit whereby the stone is secured in the setting.

Description:

RELATED APPLICATION

[0001] This application is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/721,109, filed Nov. 22, 2000.

TECHNICAL FIELD

[0002] The present invention relates generally to an improved invisible stone setting. More particularly, the present invention relates to an invisible setting of semi-precious and precious stones.

BACKGROUND ART

[0003] The setting of precious stones is well known in the art. However, a common difficulty in mounting stones is achieving an invisible setting. An invisible setting is where the brackets supporting the stones are not easily seen and do not interfere with the luster or appearance of the stone. However, there are numerous invisible stone settings in the art field that have met with a variety of successes, but none have achieved a truly invisible setting of a princess cut diamond with a flat table.

[0004] Accordingly, one of the most common types of stones for which the art field has sought an invisible setting is a diamond. In fact, the art field is filled with various methods and techniques to create an invisible setting in a diamond. A common method of setting a diamond in an invisible setting has comprised drilling a notch in the diamond along a surface or facet or along multiple surfaces or facets, placing the diamond in a socket composed of upwardly extending ribs and bending or forming the ribs into the notch. Various other methods further secure the diamond with the use of prongs or sidewalls that are bent into or over the table of the diamond. These prior art methods have suffered from a common problem in that the setting is not entirely invisible and, often, portions of the setting extend over the table of the diamond. These visible portions reduce the value of the diamond and destroy the inherent beauty of a setting. Accordingly, the art field has sought for an invisible setting for a stone that requires the use of as few support brackets or settings to minimize the amount of visible support bracket on or through the table of the diamond.

[0005] One prior art process for cutting a notch in a stone is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,738,240 to Aich. The process disclosed generally uses a sawing machine to cut a dihedron shaped notch in a diamond whereby the dihedron is in a V-shape. The V-shape is cut such that the lower surface of the notch is parallel with the table of the diamond. This cutting does not provide a notch for a secure setting of a stone because the V-shape of the notch encourages and allows a setting more easily slide from the notch. Additionally, the notch disclosed is at an angle of at least 30 degrees whereby a large amount of metal is required to fill the notch. Therefore, the art field is in search of a setting that does not require large portions of the diamond to be removed as well as a setting that firmly secures the diamond.

[0006] Another prior art attempt at arriving at an invisible setting is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,813,246 to Richards. This patent discloses a precious stone setting by forming notches at angles in all the corners of the stone and inserting a matrix into the notches to secure the stones. This disclosure requires a notch along all portions of the diamond and a metal cast to firmly secure the diamonds. Accordingly, this setting does not reduce the amount of setting visible from the table and lowers the value of the diamond because a portion of the table is obscured. Therefore, the art field is in search of a setting whereby the amount of support required for the setting does not obscure the table and lower the value of the diamond.

[0007] A further prior art setting is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,123,265 to Ramot. This patent discloses a setting with a plurality of ribs that define one or more sockets of polygonal configuration for support of a corresponding configured diamond. The diamond has V-shaped notches formed on two opposed sides with the lower surface of the V-shaped notch parallel to the table of the diamond. This setting requires the diamond to be mounted in a socket with at least two opposing sides bent into the notches of the diamond. As such, this setting does not reduce the visible amount of setting ribs required to mount the stone because four ribs are still required. Therefore, the art field is in search of a setting that does not require a socket for the diamond.

[0008] U.S. Pat. No. 6,003,335 to Gurevich et al. discloses a Multi-stone setting for four gemstones. The setting has a first crossbar and a second crossbar extending in a perpendicular direction that define a seat with V-shaped corner prongs extending upwards and securing a gemstone. The gemstone is further secured by the first crossbar being slid into the notch of the diamond. While this invention has reduced the amount of visible mounting bracket, it has increased the amount of prong extending over the table. Thereby reducing the beauty and value of the gemstone. Additionally, this patent requires a seat of four sides to secure the diamond, thereby increasing the amount of visible metal about the diamond. This added metal seat decreases the appearance of the diamond. Furthermore, the side prongs of the first crossbar of the diamond disclosed in the patent extends above the notch of the diamond, thereby revealing excess metal in the setting. Therefore, the art field desires a stone setting that reduces the amount of support bracket extending towards the table and above the notch while displaying a maximum view of an unobstructed table.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0009] The present invention generally relates to the setting of a stone, more particularly, to a setting for a precious stone such as a diamond. A princess cut diamond is notched on two opposing sides with a V-shaped notch such that an upper surface of the V-shaped notch is parallel with the table of the stone and an upwardly extending support bracket is bent into the notch. Perpendicular supports for the upwardly extending support brackets are below the diamonds and completely invisible when viewing the table. Thereby achieving an invisible setting.

[0010] This summary is not intended to be a limitation with respect to the features of the invention as claimed, and this and other objects can be more readily observed and understood in the detailed description of the preferred embodiment and the claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

[0011] For a further understanding of the nature and objects of the present invention, reference should be made to the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which like elements are given the same or analogous reference numbers and wherein:

[0012] FIG. 1 is an illustration of a setting of an embodiment of the present invention.

[0013] FIG. 2 is an illustration of an embodiment of a notched stone of an embodiment of the present invention.

[0014] FIG. 3a is an illustration of an embodiment of a diamond wheel for notching and cutting stones of the present invention.

[0015] FIG. 3b is an illustration of a cross-sectional view of an embodiment of the diamond wheel of FIG. 3a from an orientation from the side.

[0016] FIG. 3c is an illustration of a notch of the present invention.

[0017] FIG. 3d is an illustration of a prior art notch.

[0018] FIG. 3e is an illustration of a prior art notch.

[0019] FIG. 4a is an illustration of an embodiment of the present invention with a setting of four stones.

[0020] FIG. 4b is an illustration of an embodiment of the present invention with a setting of six stones.

[0021] FIG. 5 is an illustration of an embodiment of the present invention set in an earring stud.

[0022] FIG. 6 is an illustration of an alternate embodiment of the present invention set in an ring stud.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION AND PREFERRED MODE FOR CARRYING OUT THE INVENTION

[0023] Referring now to FIG. 1, an illustration of a setting of an embodiment of the present invention, a two (2) stone setting 1 is displayed. However, the present invention is not thereto limited and may be used for multi-stone settings of any number and a solitary stone. Generally, stone(s) 2 are secured in a setting 1 comprising at least two upwardly extending support brackets 3 that generally do not extend above a girdle 7 of stone 2.

[0024] A preferred embodiment of the present invention utilizes a diamond for the stone. A most preferred embodiment utilizes a princess cut diamond as the stone. However, various other embodiments incorporate all other semi-precious and precious stones. Generally, the present invention is designed for the setting of any stone in which the user desires an invisible setting.

[0025] A prong 4 may be placed on an upper portion of support bracket 3 for visual effect. However, prong 4 does not support or secure stone 2 in this embodiment of a setting of the present invention and in no embodiment is the prong necessary to support the stone. The support imparted for setting 1 of stone 2 for this embodiment is provided from the interaction of projection 5, or, as otherwise referred to, upper portion of a support bracket, inserted into notch 6 with cross-support bracket 8 securing support bracket(s) 3.

[0026] In a most preferred embodiment, outer support bracket(s) 3 generally extend inwardly downwardly toward stone(s) 2 and an interior support bracket(s) 3 of a multi-stone setting generally extends downwardly to a perpendicular contact with cross-support bracket 8. In this preferred embodiment, the inwardly downwardly extending support bracket(s) 3 provide an increased fit for setting 1 thereby reducing the tendency of stone(s) 2 to loosen from setting 1.

[0027] In a preferred embodiment, projection 5 extends from an upper surface of support bracket 3. In a most preferred embodiment, projection(s) 5 generally establish a plane below girdle 7 on stone(s) 2. However, various other embodiments of the present invention may utilize a projection along any locations of support bracket 3 and in varying planes. Still, further embodiments do not use an extending projection 5, but rather a deformable member for at least a portion of support bracket 3 that may be bent, placed or inserted into notch 6. The deformable member at least partially configuring to the shape of notch 6.

[0028] In another embodiment, projection 5 is inserted into notch 6 to form an interference fit.

[0029] The interference fit of this embodiment is created by contact of the projection and an edge of a notch. Other embodiments create an interference fit by contact of the projection and all edges of a notch. Various embodiments utilize a projection 5 that is the same size as notch 6 to form the interference fit. Still, other embodiments use a projection 5 that is larger than notch 6. In this latter embodiment, when the projection is larger than the notch, the interference fit is created as the projection is deformed into notch 6. In some of these embodiments, projection 5 may be constructed of a malleable material to aid in formation of an interference fit. Common metals for use as the projections are gold, silver, copper, brass, steel, iron and any combinations and/or purity thereof. The creation of an interference fit enables a setting to more securely hold a stone against all forces that act to dislodge or shake loose a stone.

[0030] In a preferred embodiment, cross-support bracket 8 is not in the plane projection(s) 5. In a another preferred embodiment, cross-support bracket 8 is below stone(s) 2 such that cross-support 8 is not visible when viewing stone(s) 2 from above setting 1. However, various other embodiments of the present invention have cross-support bracket 8 in any plane along support bracket(s) 3.

[0031] Notch 6 is typically cut from stone 2 with a diamond cuffing blade (Shown in FIG. 3a+b) to a particular depth within stone 2. Preferred embodiments utilize a diamond cutting blade that cuts a shallow depth notch within stone 2. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, two opposed sides of stone 2 have a notch 6. However various other embodiments of the present invention may utilize stones with a varying number and arrangement of notches.

[0032] In a preferred embodiment, a V-shaped notch 3 is cut in stone 2. Notch 6 only extends within stone(s) 2 to a shallow depth. Notch 6 is preferred cut to a shallow depth to reduce and/or eliminate the visibility of notch 6 when viewing stone(s) 2 from above table 17. In this preferred embodiment of setting 1 the amount of visible support provided for stone(s) 2 is greatly reduced, thereby not decreasing the value, beauty and/or luster of stone(s) 2. In fact, the positioning of cross-support bracket 8 below stone(s) 2 further aides in reduction of an amount of visible support producing like results as aforementioned.

[0033] Now referring to FIG. 2, an illustration of an embodiment of a notched stone of an embodiment of the present invention, a preferred preparation of stone 2 is illustrated. Stone 2 is generally composed of a table 17, several facets 18 and 19, a girdle 7, a notch 6 and an apex 15. A preferred stone for use in embodiments of the present invention is a princess cut stone. A princess cut stone is generally defined by a quadrangular table 17 with an outwardly downwardly extending facet 18 to a girdle 7 and an inwardly downwardly extending facet 19 to an apex 15. Table 17 is generally planar in a quadrangular orientation. However, various other polygonal structures are still within the scope of this disclosure and may be readily used while adhering to the general embodiments disclosed. Facet 18 may extend downwardly from table 17 at any angle and length. However, preferred embodiments utilize an angle of between 15 degrees and 60 degrees and a length sufficient to allow a notch 6 to be cut that is deep enough to secure stone(s) 2 while not extending beyond a hatched line 16. Hatched line 16 is for illustrative purposes only and extends along an edge of table 17, perpendicular to table 17. In a most preferred embodiment, hatched line 16 extends along an outer edge of table 17. Girdle 7 is defined by the intersection of facet 18 and facet 19. In a most preferred embodiment, girdle 7 is the largest portion, in width, of stone(s) 2. Facet 18 may be one facet, one angle, or may be several different facets, angles, extending outwardly and downwardly. Likewise, facet 19 may be composed of one facet or several facets extending inwardly downwardly to an apex 15. In a preferred embodiment, apex 15 is a point, but apex 15 may also be a flat surface.

[0034] In another preferred embodiment, notch 6 is a V-shaped notch. The V-shaped notch has an upper surface 20 and a lower surface 21. The upper surface 20 is generally in a parallel plane with table 17. In a most preferred embodiment, upper surface 20 is generally in a parallel plane with both table 17 and girdle 7. However, various other embodiments of the present invention may utilize a notch of differing structure and still be within the scope of the claims and embodiments herein disclosed.

[0035] Now referring to FIGS. 3a and 3b, an illustration of an embodiment of a diamond wheel for notching and cutting stones of the present invention, a common diamond cutting wheel 30 is disclosed. Notch 6 is typically cut into a surface of a stone 2 by diamond cutting wheel 30. The diamond cutting wheel 30 is tapered along an outer edge to a size and shape of a desired notch 6. In a preferred embodiment, cutting edge 32 is between 5 and 30 degrees. In another preferred embodiment, cutting edge 32 is between 10 and 25 degrees. The smaller the angle used on diamond wheel 30, the less of stone 2 that is removed. This may be extremely important when dealing with precious stones, such as diamonds.

[0036] Referring further to FIG. 3b, an illustration of a cross-sectional view of an embodiment of the diamond wheel of FIG. 3a from an orientation from the side, the angle of cutting edge 32 is more clearly illustrated. In a preferred embodiment, cutting edge 32 is a V-shape. However, the shape of the cutting edge 32 may be any shape sufficient to create a recess capable accepting a projection for engagement. During cutting operations, diamond wheel 30 will spin about spindle 31 at a speed sufficient to cut stone 2. Stone 2 may be tilted and or rotated about holder 33 to enable diamond wheel 30 to make the desired cut into stone 2 or stone 2 may be tilted in an orientation to diamond wheel 30.

[0037] Now referring to FIG. 3c, an illustration of a notch of the present invention, a preferred notch is disclosed for securing stone 2 within an invisible setting. A notch 6 is cut from stone 2 such that the notch has an upper surface 40 and a lower surface 41. Preferred embodiments have an upper surface 40 that is generally parallel to girdle 7 and generally conforms to the shape and size of projection 5 on support bracket 3 or which generally conform to the shape and size of projection 5 when it is deformed into notch 6. To secure the diamond in the setting, stone 2 is positioned such that projection 5 is pushed or deformed within notch 6. In a preferred embodiment, a like notch is cut on an opposing side of stone 2 and another projection is positioned or deformed within the opposing notch. In this manner stone 2 is secured while revealing less of projection 5 when being viewed from above table 17. Now referring to FIG. 3d, an illustration of a prior art notch, a notch 38 is disclosed that does not adequately secure stone 2. Notch 38 has an upper surface 42 and a lower surface 43. Because upper surface 42 is not generally parallel with girdle 7, stone 2 is not securely mounted. In this prior art embodiment, lower surface 43 is generally parallel to girdle 7. In such an arrangement, stone 2 more easily moves and slips from the setting because notch 38 does not contain a portion of projection 36 able to prevent stone 2 from movement. As well, this stone setting uses a support bracket 3 with a projection 36 that is above stone 2 and will be visible when viewing the diamond. Thus resulting in a loss of value to stone 2. Accordingly, this stone setting is not preferred.

[0038] Now referring to FIG. 3e, an illustration of an alternate prior art notch, a notch 39 is disclosed that does not adequately secure stone 2. Notch 39 has an upper surface 44 and a lower surface 45. Because upper surface 44 is not generally parallel with girdle 7, stone 2 is not securely mounted. In this prior art embodiment, neither upper surface 44 not lower surface 45 is generally parallel with girdle 7. As such, stone 2 is not securely mounted within the setting and may more easily slip from the setting. Upwards force upon stone 2 enables stone 2 to slip from projection 37. Accordingly, this stone setting is not preferred.

[0039] Now referring to FIGS. 4a and 4b, illustrations of various embodiments of multi-stone settings of the present invention are disclosed. As FIGS. 4a and 4b illustrate, the scope of the present invention encompasses stone 2 settings that are multi-stone. Seams 51 are invisible such that the size of stone 2 appears to be much larger than a single stone 2. False Corner prong(s) 52 may be used for aesthetic purposes, but are not needed and do not secure stone(s) 2 within the settings. Generally, if a user desires false prongs 52, prongs 52 may extend upwards from a portion of support bracket 3 and extend above and/or over a portion of facet 18 and table 17. In a preferred embodiment, false prongs 52 are corner pieces and fit above or over a corner portion of stone(s) 2.

[0040] Now referring to FIG. 5, an illustration of an embodiment of the present invention set in an earring stud, a preferred setting of stone(s) 2 is disclosed. Stone(s) 2 are secured within the setting as taught herein such that the setting is invisible from above stone(s) 2. A base member 55 may be attached below the setting for aesthetic purposes, but is not necessary for securing stone(s) 2. A stud 56 may be mounted on base member 55 to engage the ear of a user. In a preferred embodiment, stud 56 is an elongated portion of metal that may be engaged for securing the earring on the ear of a user.

[0041] Now referring to FIG. 6, an illustration of an embodiment of the present invention set in a ring stud, the adaptability of the setting of the present invention is disclosed. Stone(s) 2 are set in a setting as taught herein and mounted on a ring stud 57. Side covers 58 may be used for aesthetic purposes. For further aesthetic purposes, designs such as hearts or others may be cut or formed in portions of side covers 58.

[0042] While a single embodiment has been shown and described, various other embodiments and modifications will become apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art and are intended to be covered by this disclosure.