Title:
Method and system for providing conduit and boxes in a closed wall system
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The present invention provides an engineered closed wall system that includes one or more preinstalled conduits installed during fabrication of the closed wall system and an associated box that is positioned to intersect the preinstalled conduit at a standard connection port of the box and in a predetermined location. The location of the conduit and/or box can vary according to job-specific requirements. Advantageously, the conduit can be installed equidistant from the first and second outward layers. Specific boxes, and any ring extensions mounted to the boxes, can be sized to flexibly mount from either outward layer and still be substantially flush with the face of the outward layer and still intersect the conduit at a standard connection port provided on the box.



Inventors:
Plsek, William J. (Friendswood, TX, US)
Bergtold, Gregory S. (Midland, MI, US)
Application Number:
09/963989
Publication Date:
03/27/2003
Filing Date:
09/26/2001
Assignee:
The Dow Chemical Company
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04C2/52; (IPC1-7): E04C2/52
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
AMIRI, NAHID
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
LOCKE LORD LLP (HOUSTON, TX, US)
Claims:
1. An engineered closed wall system, comprising: a) a first outward layer; b) an inside insulation core having a first and a second face, the first face being coupled to the first outward layer; c) a second outward layer coupled to the second face of the inside insulation core; d) at least one preinstalled conduit installed in the insulation core during fabrication of the closed wall system; and e) at least one box installed in the insulation core and aligned with the conduit, the preinstalled conduit intersecting the box at a standard connection port of the box.

2. The system of claim 1, wherein the conduit and box locations installed in the engineered closed wall system vary according to job specific requirements.

3. The system of claim 1, wherein the conduit is disposed equidistant from the first outward layer and the second outward layer in the insulation core.

4. The system of claim 3, further comprising an extension coupled to the box to allow the box to intersect the conduit at the standard connection port of the box.

5. The system of claim 1, wherein the conduit is installed vertically through the insulation core and extends beyond the insulation core.

6. The system of claim 1, wherein the conduit is installed laterally through the core.

7. The system of claim 1, wherein at least one of the outward layers comprises oriented strand board (OSB).

8. The system of claim 1, wherein: a) the two outward layers have a thickness of about {fraction (7/16)} inches; b) the insulation core has a thickness of about 3-½ inches; c) the box is about 1-½ inches in depth; and d) an extension ring having a depth of about 1-½ inches coupled to the box.

9. The system of claim 8, wherein the conduit is centrally disposed in the insulation core and the combination of the extension ring and box allow the box to be inserted into the core with the extension ring substantially flush with the outer face of the outward layer and to allow the box to be aligned with the conduit at the standard connection port of the box.

10. The system of claim 9, wherein the extension ring is mounted to the outward layer through which the ring extends.

11. An engineered closed wall system, comprising: a) a first outward layer; b) an inside insulation core having a first and a second face, the first face being coupled to the first outward layer; c) a second outward layer coupled to the second face of the inside insulation core; d) at least one preinstalled electrical conduit installed in the insulation core during fabrication of the closed wall system, the electrical conduit being centrally disposed in the insulation core by being substantially equidistant from both outward layers; e) at least one electrical box installed in the insulation core and positioned to intersect the preinstalled electrical conduit at a standard connection port of the box; and f) an extension ring coupled to the electrical box and adapted to align the standard connection port of the box with the centrally disposed electrical conduit.

12. The system of claim 1, wherein the conduit and box locations installed in the engineered closed wall system vary according to job specific requirements.

13. The system of claim 1, wherein system comprises two or more modular closed walls, one of the modular closed walls having a first conduit and a first box installed in predetermined positions that are different from positions of a second conduit and a second box installed in a second modular closed wall.

14. The system of claim 1, wherein the conduit is installed vertically through the insulation core and extends beyond the insulation core.

15. The system of claim 1, wherein the conduit is installed laterally through the core.

16. The system of claim 1, wherein at least one of the outward layers comprises oriented strand board (OSB).

17. The system of claim 1, wherein: a) the two outward layers have a thickness of about {fraction (7/16)} inches; b) the insulation core has a thickness of about 3-½ inches; c) the box is about 1-½ inches in depth; and d) the extension ring has a depth of about 1-½ inches.

18. The system of claim 17, wherein the extension ring is mounted to the outward layer through which the ring extends.

19. A method of preparing an engineered closed wall system, comprising: a) providing at least two outward layers of material and an insulation core; b) coupling the two outward layers with the insulation core; c) forming an elongated opening in the insulation core; d) installing a conduit in the elongated opening; e) forming a second opening in the insulation core and an opening in at least one outward layer, the second opening in the insulation core being substantially aligned with the opening in the outward layer; f) installing a box into the second opening; and g) aligning a standard connection port of the box with the conduit.

20. The method of claim 19, further comprising coupling the box with an extension ring that is disposed outwardly from the box toward the opening formed in at least one of the outward layers.

21. The method of claim 20, wherein the extension ring does not extend substantially beyond the outer face of the outward layer having the opening.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0001] The invention relates to the building industry. More particularly, the invention relates to a method and system of providing various members within a closed wall system.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] In conventional construction, walls are fabricated by erecting on a foundation a structural frame that is usually formed from timber. The frame is subsequently clad internally with a suitable material, which is usually finished to conceal the joints with a wall covering. An exterior wall is usually made from concrete block, brick veneer, or a suitable cladding material that is fastened to the timber frame. Common exterior cladding materials include wood, fiber-reinforced cement, and aluminum.

[0003] In recent years, the cost of building using conventional materials has escalated rapidly. Further, new methods have been sought to make the buildings more thermally efficient and faster to construct. One technology is the use of composite panels, also known as “closed wall systems” or simply “closed walls.” Such closed walls typically include one or more structural materials and one or more, typically two, surface materials, also known as “skins” that enclose the members therebetween. Some closed walls include insulating board sandwiched or otherwise disposed between the skins with or without structural or other members. Typically, the closed walls are made in relatively large sections, such as four feet by eight feet or larger. The closed walls can be brought to the building site, set in place, and fastened to rapidly erect walls or other portions of the building. Further, the materials used in the closed walls can be made from non-conventional materials and promote ecological conservation.

[0004] Despite such advantages, acceptance of the closed wall technology has been slow. One reason that closed wall systems have gained only limited acceptance in the marketplace is due to the amount of hand work required to install conduits and boxes into the closed wall system. A subcategory of the closed wall system is known as a structural insulated panel (SIP). Typically, the SIP includes two outward layers of material and one or more layers of insulation material. Insulation material is typically a rigid foam core such as polyurethane, polystyrene, EPS, XPS, and polyisocyanurate. The conduit and box are installed in the insulation material.

[0005] Current methods of installing conduit and boxes typically involve receiving a plurality of closed walls at the job site, removing one or both outward layers of a closed wall to access the insulation material, installing the conduit and box, and remounting the outward layer to the closed wall system before installing the closed wall in position.

[0006] Alternatively, some job site attempts have been made to drill an elongated hole through the insulating material while the outward layers are still assembled with the insulating material. Frequently, the holes are hand drilled off-center, at angles, or otherwise at inappropriate places and do not properly align with a box's intended location. Thus, the box may need to be installed at a different location to connect to the conduit.

[0007] Such attempts increase the tasks for trades and increase the amount of coordination among trades. Thus, the lack of an adequate design in the fabrication process of the closed wall system, in particular, the SIP system, has limited the usefulness of the closed wall systems.

[0008] Others have recognized a need to provide openings for electrical wiring, but have stopped short of providing the solution of the present invention. For example, Japanese Patent Application No. JP3-187444 (“JP '444) describes a structural panel having a polystyrene insulated material sandwiched between two wafer boards. The disclosure provides a plurality of electric wiring holes installed in a criss-cross horizontal and vertical direction that can be aligned with horizontally or vertically adjacent panels. The disclosure does not address conduits installed in the fabrication process, boxes installed that intersect the conduits, nor the ability to customize and vary the installation of the conduit and/or box for job-specific locations. Thus, a closed wall system constructed in the manner of the disclosure of the JP '444 would still require the job site modifications and complexities described above.

[0009] Therefore, there remains a need for an improved system of providing installed conduits and associated boxes into closed wall systems and particularly SIP systems.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0010] The present invention provides an engineered closed wall system that includes one or more conduits installed during fabrication of the closed wall system and an associated box that is positioned to intersect the preinstalled conduit at a standard connection port of the box and in a predetermined location. The location of the conduit and/or box can vary according to job-specific requirements.

[0011] In general, the engineered closed wall system includes a first outward layer, an inside insulation core having a first and second face, the first face being coupled to the first outward layer, a second outward layer coupled to the second face of the inside insulation core, at least one preinstalled conduit installed in the insulation core during fabrication of the closed wall system, and at least one box installed in the insulation core and positioned to intersect the preinstalled conduit at the extended connection port of the box. Advantageously, the location of the conduit and/or box can vary according to job-specific requirements. The conduit and/or box can be engineered into the closed wall system during the fabrication.

[0012] Advantageously, the conduit can be installed equidistant from the first and second outward layers. Specific boxes, and any ring extensions mounted to the boxes, can be sized to flexibly mount from either outward layer and be substantially flush with the face of the outward layer and still intersect the conduit at a standard connection port provided on the box.

[0013] The invention further provides a method of preparing an engineered closed wall system, comprising providing at least two outward layers of material and an insulation core, coupling the two outward layers with the insulation core, forming an elongated opening in the insulation core, installing a conduit in the elongated opening, forming a second opening in the insulation core and an opening in at least one outward layer, the second opening from the insulation core being substantially aligned with the opening in the outward layer, installing a box in the second opening, and aligning a standard connection port of the box with the conduit.

[0014] Other and further embodiments may be described in the accompanying description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0015] A more particular description of the invention, briefly summarized above, may be realized by reference to the embodiments thereof that are illustrated in the appended drawings and described herein. However, it is to be noted that the appended drawings illustrate only some embodiments of the invention. Therefore, the drawings are not to be considered limiting of the invention's scope, for the invention may admit to other equally effective embodiments.

[0016] FIG. 1 is a perspective schematic view of a building having a closed wall.

[0017] FIG. 2 is a perspective schematic view of a closed wall with a conduit and box installed therein.

[0018] FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional schematic view of a closed wall system having a conduit and box installed therein.

[0019] FIG. 4 is partial cross-sectional schematic view of another embodiment of the box and/or extension ring installed in a closed wall system.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0020] FIG. 1 is a perspective schematic view of a building having a closed wall. A building 10 is representative of any building upon which a closed wall may be installed. Building 10 can include residential, commercial, industrial, and other types of structures. The building can include any shape that can be constructed such as rectangular, square, multi-story, single-story, geodesic, or any other surface shape in which a building may be made. Generally, a building will include a foundation 12, walls 14, and roof 16.

[0021] The foundation 12 can be any typical foundation, such as but not limited to, a slab, wood, beam, steel, raised platform, and other types of underlying supports. Further, the foundation can be the upper level of a lower story in a multi-story building. Generally, one or more walls 14 form a supporting surface between the foundation and a roof. The term “wall,” “walls,” and like terms are used broadly herein and can include exterior or interior walls that may be vertical, horizontal, or at angles to the foundation, as is appropriate to the particular building design.

[0022] The roof 16 is shown to be an angled roof as would generally exist in many buildings. However, it is to be understood that the roof can have any shape as is appropriate, including a flat roof. Further, the building 10 can have one or more doors 18 and one or more windows 20. An exterior 22 of the building 10 generally includes an exterior medium such as brick, stone, metal, wood, fiberglass, composites, and other materials to protect from weather, theft, and other aspects known to those with ordinary skill in the art.

[0023] A closed wall, shown in more detail in FIG. 2, can be installed inwardly of the building exterior 22. The closed wall generally is a composite wall containing a first outward layer 24 and a second outward layer 26 with one or more inside members enclosed or otherwise disposed therebetween. One or more of the outward layers 24, 26 can include a variety of structural or nonstructural material. For example, the outward layers can include materials made from sheetrock, plywood, particle board, oriented strand board (OSB), laminates, fiberboard, insulation boards and other insulating materials, films, plastics, metals, and other building materials. The second outward layer can be made of similar materials.

[0024] The term “inside member” is intended to include any member(s) or feature(s) that can be disposed or formed at least partially between the first and second outward layers 24, 26. For example, some inside members can be studs, insulation, headers, elements of the plumbing or electrical systems, such as pipes, vents, conduits, wires, and rigid and flexible insulation, or other elements as can exist between the two outward members in a building. Further, the inside members can include openings, such as holes of various sizes and shapes, access ports, and other void areas. In at least one embodiment, a standard closed wall thickness can be formed from about {fraction (7/16)} inch thick outward layers and each about 3-½ inches thick inside members, although the thicknesses can vary depending on the building and materials used. Insulative, plumbing, electrical, and other elements can be installed therein.

[0025] In at least one embodiment, one or more of the outward layers can be laminated or otherwise coupled to the inside member, such as a foam core, during the fabrication process. The term “coupling” is used broadly herein and is intended to include any method of securing, binding, bonding, fastening, attaching, joining, inserting therein, forming thereon or therein, or otherwise associating one or more of the layers and members together. Alternatively, the outward members can be provided and the foam core or other inside member can be formed or disposed between the outward layers.

[0026] One exemplary embodiment of various inside members that can generally be included in a closed wall is shown in the exemplary embodiment of FIG. 1. Full-length studs 28, generally known as kings studs, are used to support the wall along its length. Shorter studs 30, known as jack studs, can be used to support headers 32 that can span distances laterally between king studs 28. Insulation 29 can be placed between one or more of the studs and throughout the building structure. Shorter supports 34 may be used to support other headers 36 below building structures, such as the window 20. A structure supporting the roof 16, generally termed herein upper structure 38 can include joists, rafters, braces, and other supports. Further, the upper structure 38 can include girders, beams, and other supports for multi-story building structures.

[0027] Other inside members disposed between the outward layers 24, 26 can include elements of the plumbing system 40. For example, such elements can include pipes, vents, drains, and other plumbing elements. Similarly, the inside members disposed in the space between the outward layers 24, 26 can include elements of an electrical system 42. Such elements can include conduits, wires, boxes, switches, and other typical electrical elements. Some of the inside members, such as electrical, plumbing, air conditioning and other system elements, can be visible from an interior 44 or from the exterior 22 of the building 10.

[0028] FIG. 2 is a perspective schematic view of a closed wall with a conduit and box installed therein. A closed wall 50 includes a first outward layer 24 and a second outward layer 26. An inside member 51 can include elements such as studs 52, 58, and 60 and other structural elements, insulation core 54, conduit 56, features, such as openings, and other members as would be generally be found in a building structure.

[0029] The insulation core 54 can include any insulation material generally used in closed wall systems, including relatively rigid foam cores, polyurethane, polystyrene, EPS, XPS, and polyisocyanurate, more flexible materials, such as fiberglass batting, or other materials known to those with ordinary skill in the art.

[0030] The term “conduit” 56 is used broadly herein and can include any shaped tubing used for any variety of general building purposes. For example, such conduits commonly include metal, such as copper, aluminum, and steel, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and other structural materials. Such conduit can be used for plumbing, electrical, air conditioning, and other systems using the construction of building 10. A conduit that is particularly useful in the electrical trade is known as “electrical metallic tubing” (“EMT”) in which electrical wiring is placed. The conduit 56 can be placed at predetermined locations in the insulation core 54, for example, by drilling, machining, routing, or otherwise forming a pathway through the core 54 for the conduit during fabrication of the closed wall, for example, at a manufacturing facility.

[0031] In at least one embodiment, the conduit 56 can extend sufficiently beyond the closed wall system, and particularly the insulation core 54. A connector, such as connector 64, can be attached to the conduit 56 at the extension. The connector 64 can allow another conduit 66 to be attached thereto to continue the conduit path. Although the conduit 56 is shown extending above the closed wall 50, it is to be understood that the conduit can extend in any direction, such as through the top, sides, or bottom of the closed wall, or at a variety of angles to the closed wall, as is appropriate to the particular installation.

[0032] A box 68 can be installed in the closed wall 50 at a predetermined position. Generally, the box or some member coupled to the box, such as an extension ring, will extend through one of the outward layers 24, 26 and into the insulation core 54. The box 68 can be coupled to the conduit 56.

[0033] The term “box” is used broadly and includes not only boxes in which electrical devices, such as switches and outlets, can be installed but also includes junction boxes, conduit bodies, load sensors, fixture boxes, breaker boxes, fuse boxes, plumbing drain pans, access ports, and any other boxes used in building trades associated with constructing the building 10, shown in FIG. 1. The box 68 can be made of any metallic, plastic, foam, or other structural material. Further, the box can be octagonal, round, square, or any geometric shape. Generally, the box 68 includes an open face 72 for access to an inside volume of the box. The open face 72 may be closed by a cover (not shown) after access to the box 68 is complete.

[0034] In some embodiments, the box can be attached to a structural member, such as stud 52 or the insulation core 54, if the box is located adjacent the member. Openings 76 formed in the box 68 provide access for attaching the box to a structural member with a fastener, such as a nail or screw or other known fastener. Advantageously, the box 68 can be mounted substantially “flush,” that is, substantially even, or below the outer face 73 or 77 of the corresponding outward layer 26 or 24. The flush mounting or below surface mounting allows the closed walls to be shipped without excess shipping materials or dunnage interposed between adjacent closed walls that increases packing and shipping costs to avoid damage to adjacent walls.

[0035] Generally, an opening for the box can be formed in the core 54 and the outward layer through which the box extends. The opening for the box can be formed either in core 54 prior to installation of the outward layer with the core, or can be done after installation of the outward layer with the core.

[0036] The present invention provides that the conduit and box are preinstalled, that is, installed during fabrication of the closed wall. Generally, the installation occurs at predetermined positions. Thus, the closed wall can be fabricated as a system having the conduit and box preinstalled. An engineer, designer, or other person associated with the fabrication process determines prior to fabrication the desired location of the conduit and/or box. The conduit and/or box is installed at the predetermined positions during the fabrication process.

[0037] In at least one embodiment, the location of the box 68 and associated conduit(s) can vary depending on the specific requirements of the job. For example, if the closed wall 50 is used in residential construction, such as in a kitchen, the box 68 may be positioned at a particular height above countertops. As a further example, the horizontal spacing between adjacent boxes can vary in the closed walls of the present invention to accommodate different rooms in the building.

[0038] The flexibility in job-specific predetermined locations appears to address part of the reason that acceptance of closed wall systems has been limited. The present invention allows the boxes to be installed at job-specific locations, for example, at a manufacturing facility where a closed panel is engineered and fabricated. Thus, a manufacturing facility can review a set of architectural plans, engineer the specific locations of the boxes to accommodate the building design, and construct the closed walls with the conduit and boxes preinstalled for the particular placement of that closed wall on that job site.

[0039] As a variation of job-specific requirements for locations, the boxes and/or conduit can be located at standard positions in multiple categories of closed walls. For example, a building 10 could have one category of standard closed walls without a box, another category of closed walls with boxes installed at certain predetermined positions, and other categories with boxes installed at yet other positions. Each of the closed walls could be installed in a selected position relative to the building design at the job site.

[0040] The present invention allows such flexibility in coordinating and designing the locations of the boxes. For example, an engineer/designer could select one category of closed walls having a box in one position for some areas of the house and another category of closed walls having a box in another position for other parts of the building 10, shown in FIG. 1. Still other panels could have no electrical box and could be interspaced between those panels having electrical boxes. Thus, the present invention allows such modular concepts, where the closed walls can be selected depending on the specific requirements of the job site.

[0041] FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional schematic view of a closed wall system having a conduit and box installed therein. A closed wall 50 can include the previously described first and second outward layers 24, 26 and an inside member such as the insulation core 54. A conduit 56 can be installed in the core 54 at some predetermined position. The conduit 56 may extend beyond the core 54 to allow attachment of a connector 64. Another conduit 66 may be attached to the connector 64 to continue the conduit path. One or more boxes 68, 86 can be installed in the wall and directly or indirectly coupled to the conduit 56.

[0042] Advantageously, the conduit 56 can be installed in the closed wall 50, so that the conduit intersects the boxes, such as box 68, at a standard connection port 70a. Standard connection ports are generally meant to include those connection openings that are preformed prior to installation of the box. Generally, such connection ports are formed by the box manufacturer. The conduit can extend slightly into the box at conduit end 82. The box 68 and conduit 56 can be coupled together, for example, by a retainer 84 attached to the conduit.

[0043] Advantageously, the conduit can be installed in a centrally disposed location through the closed wall 50, so that the conduit is equidistant from the outward layers 24, 26. This location provides an advantageous setup in the fabrication of the closed wall 50, in which boxes, such as box 68 and box 86, can be installed from either side of the closed wall and still be aligned with the conduit 56.

[0044] Still further, the equidistant spacing can allow alignment from box to box. For example, box 68 can be aligned with box 86, where both can be aligned with the conduit 56 at a standard connection port. In FIG. 3, the conduit 56 is aligned with a standard opening 70a in box 68. Box 86 is aligned with box 68 through a standard connection port 70b in box 68 and port 70c in box 86.

[0045] The boxes 68, 86 can be coupled to each other, for example, by a short conduit 88, sometimes called a “chase nipple.” The chase nipple can be secured to each box by a retainer 90 in box 68 and a retainer 92 in box 86, if appropriate.

[0046] In some embodiments, the box 68 and/or 86 may be insufficiently deep to extend outward the outward layers 24, 26. In such embodiments, it may be advantageous to use one or more extension rings, such as extension ring 94 for box 68 and extension ring 96 for box 86. The extension ring can be coupled to the respective box by screws, fasteners, and other devices (not shown).

[0047] FIG. 4 is partial cross-sectional schematic view of another embodiment of the box and/or extension ring installed in a closed wall system. The box and/or extension ring can include one or more tabs 74. The tabs 74 can allow attachment of the box and/or extension ring to an outward layer, such as outward layers 24, 26. One or more fasteners 75 can be disposed through the tabs and into the outward layer and/or core 54 to secure the element(s). In general, the extension by the tabs above the face 73 of the outward layer is greater than a flush mounted box without the tabs. However, for the purposes of this disclosure, the amount of extension is minimal and is to be substantially flush with the surface of the outward layer.

[0048] It has been discovered by the inventors, once the concepts of the invention were realized, that the invention can use in at least one embodiment standard boxes and/or extensions, as readily available components from various manufacturers. Such components improve cost efficiency and accessibility for fabrication purposes. Because the conduit is centrally disposed, the same components can be used regardless of which side the box is placed.

EXAMPLE 1

[0049] As merely an example and without limitation, the following example offers specific dimensions of a closed wall system and standard components for use with those dimensions. In one embodiment, the closed wall system includes two outward layers made from {fraction (7/16)} inch thick oriented strand board (OSB) and an insulation core disposed therebetween. As is known to those with ordinary skill in the art, OSB is a laminate of fibers and other materials that are mixed with a binder and formed into panels. In this example, the insulation core was a foam core of about 3-½ inches thick and made from either polyurethane or polyisocyanurate foam. The OSB was laminated onto the foam core on both sides to form the outward layers. Alternatively, the OSB can be formed or otherwise supplied and the foam can be formed between the OSB outward layers.

[0050] At least one opening was drilled with an elongated drill, commonly called a “chase drill,” during fabrication of the closed wall and electrical conduit inserted therethrough. A jig or other setup device could be used to help assist accuracy of the placement of the opening(s) formed in the closed wall, as would be known to those with ordinary skill in the art. A location for an electrical box was chosen and an opening formed through the outward layer and into the insulation core. Alternatively, the opening for the electrical box could have been formed in the core separately from a corresponding opening formed in an unattached outward layer. The openings are designed to align upon coupling of the outward layer with the core.

[0051] The conduit was installed so that it would be centrally spaced, that is, equidistant from the outer surface. The opening for the box was made about 3 inches deep from the outward face of the outward layer. An electrical box of about 4 inches square and 1-½ inches deep was inserted into the opening. An electrical box from Raco, Inc. of South Bend, Ind., USA, Model 190 or a similarly-styled box was used. An extension ring, Raco Model 201, of approximately the same cross-sectional area and also 1-½ inches deep was coupled to the box. The combination of the box and the extension ring allowed the assembly to extend approximately flush with the outer face of the outward layer through which the box and/or extension extended.

[0052] Advantageously, this selection of component dimensions for this wall allowed a standard connection port formed in the box by the manufacturer to be aligned with the centrally disposed conduit. Also, this selection of component dimensions allowed the same type of box and extension ring to be installed from the other outward layer and still align with the centrally disposed conduit, the box installed from the first outward layer, or both. Naturally, other components could be used as well as other dimensions of various elements, such as outward layers, inside members, and other components of the closed wall system.

[0053] While the foregoing is directed to various embodiments of the present invention, other and further embodiments can be devised without departing from the basic scope thereof. For example, the various methods and embodiments of the invention can be included in combination with each other to produce variations of the disclosed methods and embodiments. Discussion of singular elements can include plural elements and vice-versa. Also, any directions shown or described such as “top,” “bottom,” “left,” “right,” “upper,” “lower,” and other directions and orientations are described herein for clarity in reference to the figures and are not to be limiting of the actual device or system or use of the device or system. The device or system can be used in a number of directions and orientations. Further, the order of steps can occur in a variety of sequences unless otherwise specifically limited. The various steps described herein can be combined with other steps, interlineated with the stated steps, and/or split into multiple steps. Additionally, the headings herein are for the convenience of the reader and are not intended to limit the scope of the invention.

[0054] Further, any references mentioned in the application for this patent as well as all references listed in the information disclosure originally filed with the application are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety to the extent such may be deemed essential to support the enabling of the invention(s). However, to the extent statements might be considered inconsistent with the patenting of the invention(s), such statements are expressly not meant to be considered as made by the Applicants.