Title:
Missile spiralling mechanism -2
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A missile 1 with a spiral inducing assembly 2 which is capable of inducing the missile to travel in a continuous spiralling motion without the missile rolling. Two fins 3 and 4 are attached to a tube 5 that is able to rotate around the encircled part of the missile fuselage. The fins 3, 4 are able to rotate in a pivoting manner on the rotatable tube 5 with respect to the rotatable tube 5, thereby changing their pitch relative to the longitudinal axis of the rotatable tube 5. Fin 3 is larger than fin 4. The difference in sizes between the fins makes the larger fin 3 exert a greater force on the rotatable tube 4 than the smaller fin 4 when the fins are pitched in unison. The aerodynamic imbalance between the fins thus causes the rotatable tube 5 to rotate. When pitched at an angle to the longitudinal axis in unison, both fins 3, 4 would exert a lateral force on the rotatable tube 5. Thus, as well as forcing the rotatable tube 5 to rotate, the fins 3, 4 would also push the rotatable tube sideways. But as the rotatable tube is pushed sideways, it rotates, and hence the lateral direction of push constantly revolves, causing a spiralling motion of the missile when in flight.



Inventors:
Kusic, Tom (Melbourne, AU)
Application Number:
10/173633
Publication Date:
12/26/2002
Filing Date:
06/19/2002
Assignee:
KUSIC TOM
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B64C5/04; B64C5/10; B64C9/00; B64C9/02; B64C13/16; B64C13/18; (IPC1-7): B64C5/00; B64C13/00; B64C17/00; B64D31/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
DINH, TIEN QUANG
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
TOM KUSIKC (GPO MELBOURNE, AU)
Claims:

The claims defining this invention are as follows:



1. A missile comprising a missile fuselage and a spiral inducing assembly, which said spiral inducing assembly is capable of forcing the missile to travel in a spiralling motion during flight of the missile, and which said spiral inducing assembly consists of a tube, and which said tube encircles part of the missile fuselage of the missile and is able to rotate relative to the encircled part of the missile fuselage, with a plurality of fins connected to the said tube, which said fins are connected to the tube such that the fins protrude laterally outward from the tube and such that the said fins can be rotated in a pivoting manner relative to the tube, and such that the said fins can be rotated in the said pivoting manner in the same direction, and which said spiral inducing assembly comprises a fin rotating mechanism by which fin rotating mechanism the said fins can be rotated in the said pivoting manner, and by which said fin rotating mechanism the said fins can be rotated in the said pivoting manner and simultaneously in the same direction as each other such that during flight of the missile one of the said fins connected to the tube can continuously exert a greater magnitude of force on the said tube than can another of the said fins that is connected to the said tube.

2. A missile comprising a missile fuselage and a spiral inducing assembly, which said spiral inducing assembly is capable of forcing the missile to travel in a spiralling motion during flight of the said missile, and which said spiral inducing assembly consists of a tube, and which said tube encircles part of the missile fuselage of the missile and is able to rotate relative to the encircled part of the missile fuselage, with a plurality of fins connected to the said tube, which said fins are connected to the tube such that the fins protrude laterally outward from the tube and such that the said fins can be rotated in a pivoting manner relative to the tube, and which said spiral inducing assembly comprises a fin rotating mechanism by which fin rotating mechanism the said fins can be rotated in the said pivoting manner such that during flight of the said missile one of the said fins connected to the tube can continuously exert a greater magnitude of force on the said tube than can another of the said fins that is connected to the said tube.

3. A missile comprising a missile fuselage and a spiral inducing assembly, which said spiral inducing assembly is capable of forcing the missile to travel in a spiralling motion during flight of the missile, and which said spiral inducing assembly consists of a tube, and which said tube encircles part of the missile fuselage of the missile and is able to rotate relative to the encircled part of the missile fuselage, with a plurality of fins connected to the said tube, which said fins are connected to the tube such that the fins protrude laterally outward from the tube and such that the said fins can be rotated in a pivoting manner relative to the tube, and such that the said fins can be rotated in the said pivoting manner in the same direction, and which said spiral inducing assembly comprises a fin rotating mechanism by which said fin rotating mechanism the said fins can be rotated in the said pivoting manner and in the same direction as each other and by which said fin rotating mechanism the said fins thus can be rotated in the said same direction relative to the tube such that one of the said fins connected to the tube can be rotated to a greater degree relative to the tube than can another of the said fins that is connected to the said tube.

4. A missile comprising a missile fuselage and a spiral inducing assembly, which said spiral inducing assembly is capable of forcing the missile to travel in a spiralling motion during flight of the said missile and which said spiral inducing assembly consists of a tube, and which said tube encircles part of the missile fuselage of the missile and is able to rotate relative to the encircled part of the missile fuselage, with a plurality of fins connected to the said tube, which said fins are connected to the tube such that the fins protrude laterally outward from the tube and such that the said fins can be rotated in a pivoting manner relative to the tube, and such that the said fins can be rotated in the said pivoting manner in the same direction, and which said spiral inducing assembly comprises a fin rotating mechanism by which said fin rotating mechanism the said fins can be rotated in the said pivoting manner and in the same direction as each other, and with the said fins being such that one of said fins connected to the tube is of larger size than is another of the said fins.

5. The missile of claim 1 wherein the said fin that is able to exert a greater magnitude of force on the tube can be pivotly rotated to a greater degree than the said other fin by means of the fin rotating mechanism, such that when the said fin that can be rotated to greater degree is rotated to a greater degree than the said other fin the fin that is rotated to a greater degree exerts a greater magnitude of force on the tube during flight of the missile than the said other fin.

6. The missile of claim 1 wherein the said fin that is able to exert a greater magnitude of force on the tube is of larger size than the said other fin such that by being of larger size the fin that is of larger size can exert a greater magnitude of force on the tube than the said other fin during flight of the missile.

7. The missile of claim 2 wherein the said fin that is able to exert a greater magnitude of force on the tube can be pivotly rotated to a greater degree than the other said fin by means of the fin rotating mechanism, such that when the said fin that can be rotated to greater degree is rotated to a greater degree than the said other fin the fin that is rotated to a greater degree exerts a greater magnitude of force on the tube during flight of the missile than the said other fin.

8. The missile of claim 2 wherein the said fin that is able to exert a greater magnitude of force on the tube is of larger size than the said other fin such that by being of larger size the fin that is of larger size can exert a greater magnitude of force on the tube than the said other fin during flight of the missile.

9. A missile comprising a missile fuselage and a spiral inducing assembly, which said spiral inducing assembly is capable of forcing the missile to travel in a spiralling motion during flight of the said missile, and which said spiral inducing assembly consists of a tube, and which said tube encircles part of the missile fuselage of the missile and is able to rotate relative to the encircled part of the missile fuselage, with a plurality of fins connected to the said tube, which said fins are connected to the tube such that the fins protrude laterally outward from the tube and such that the said fins can be rotated in a pivoting manner relative to the tube, and such that the said fins can be rotated in the said pivoting manner in the same direction and in unison relative to the tube and which said spiral inducing assembly comprises a fin rotating mechanism by which said fin rotating mechanism the said fins can be rotated in the said pivoting manner in the same direction as each other and in unison relative to the tube and with the said fins being such that during flight of the said missile one of the said fins connected to the tube can continuously exert a greater magnitude of force on the said tube than can another of the said fins that is connected to the said tube.

10. The missile of claim 9 wherein the said fin that is able to exert a greater magnitude of force on the tube is of larger size than the said other fin such that by being of larger size the fin that is of larger size can exert a greater magnitude of force on the tube than the said other fin during flight of the missile.

11. The missile of claim 1 wherein the spiral inducing assembly can force the said missile to travel in a continuous spiralling motion while the said fins are continuously maintained in a rigid position with respect to the said tube.

12. A missile comprising a missile fuselage and a spiral inducing assembly, which said spiral inducing assembly is capable of forcing the missile to travel in a spiralling motion during flight of the said missile, and which said spiral inducing assembly consists of a tube, which said tube encircles part of the missile fuselage of the missle and which said tube is able to rotate relative to the encircled part of the missile fuselage, with a plurality of fins connected to the said tube, which said fins are connected to the tube such that the fins protrude laterally outward from the tube and such that the said fins can be rotated in a pivoting manner relative to the tube, and such that the said fins can be rotated in the said pivoting manner in the same direction, with a stem connected to one fin and another stem connected to another fin, and with an additional tube encircling part of the missile fuselage of the missile, which missile fuselage comprises a fore end and an aft end, and which said additional tube is able to move between the fore end and the aft end of the missile fuselage, with at least one hydraulic actuator connected to the missile fuselage, which hydraulic actuator is connected to the missile fuselage such that the hydraulic actuator is able to push the additional tube and force the additional tube to move between the fore end and the aft end of the missile fuselage, such that as the additional tube is moved the additional tube can be pressed against the said stems, such that as the additional tube presses against the stems, the respective fins are rotated in a pivoting manner with respect to the tube that is able to rotate relative to the missile fuselage, with the stems of such relative lengths with respect to one another and with the stems connected to the respective fins such that the said fins can be rotated in the said pivoting manner and in the same direction as each other such that one of the said fins can be pivotly rotated to a greater degree relative to the tube that is able to rotate relative to the missile fuselage than can another of the said fins be rotated relative to tube that is able to rotate relative to the missile fuselage.

13. The missile of claim 12 wherein the said stems are positioned such that they extend longitudinally with respect to the missile fuselage of the missile.

14. The missile of claim 12 wherein the additional tube is in the form of a ring.

15. The missile of claim 12 wherein an additional hydraulic actuator is connected to the missile fuselage, which additional hydraulic actuator is connected to the missile fuselage such that as hydraulic pressure is applied to the additional hydraulic actuator, the additional hydraulic actuator is able to be pressed against the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage such that friction can be induced between the additional hydraulic actuator and the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage.

16. The missile of claim 12 wherein a lever is connected to the missile fuselage, which lever is connected to the missile fuselage such that the lever is able to be pressed against the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage such that friction can be induced between the lever and the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage.

17. The missile of claim 1 wherein an additional hydraulic actuator is connected to the missile fuselage, which additional hydraulic actuator is connected to the missile fuselage such that as hydraulic pressure is applied to the additional hydraulic actuator, the additional hydraulic actuator is able to be pressed against the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage such that friction can be induced between the additional hydraulic actuator and the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage.

18. The missile of claim 1 wherein a lever is connected to the missile fuselage, which lever is connected to the missile fuselage such that the lever is able to be pressed against the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage such that friction can be induced between the lever and the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage.

19. The missile of claim 2 wherein an additional hydraulic actuator is connected to the missile fuselage, which additional hydraulic actuator is connected to the missile fuselage such that as hydraulic pressure is applied to the additional hydraulic actuator, the additional hydraulic actuator is able to be pressed against the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage such that friction can be induced between the additional hydraulic actuator and the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage.

20. The missile of claim 2 wherein a lever is connected to the missile fuselage, which lever is connected to the missile fuselage such that the lever is able to be pressed against the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage such that friction can be induced between the lever and the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage.

21. The missile of claim 3 wherein an additional hydraulic actuator is connected to the missile fuselage, which additional hydraulic actuator is connected to the missile fuselage such that as hydraulic pressure is applied to the additional hydraulic actuator, the additional hydraulic actuator is able to be pressed against the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage such that friction can be induced between the additional hydraulic actuator and the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage.

22. The missile of claim 3 wherein a lever is connected to the missile fuselage, which lever is connected to the missile fuselage such that the lever is able to be pressed against the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage such that friction can be induced between the lever and the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage.

23. The missile of claim 4 wherein an additional hydraulic actuator is connected to the missile fuselage, which additional hydraulic actuator is connected to the missile fuselage such that as hydraulic pressure is applied to the additional hydraulic actuator, the additional hydraulic actuator is able to be pressed against the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage such that friction can be induced between the additional hydraulic actuator and the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage.

24. The missile of claim 4 wherein a lever is connected to the missile fuselage, which lever is connected to the missile fuselage such that the lever is able to be pressed against the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage such that friction can be induced between the lever and the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage.

25. The missile of claim 9 wherein an additional hydraulic actuator is connected to the missile fuselage, which additional hydraulic actuator is connected to the missile fuselage such that as hydraulic pressure is applied to the additional hydraulic actuator, the additional hydraulic actuator is able to be pressed against the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage such that friction can be induced between the additional hydraulic actuator and the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage.

26. The missile of claim 9 wherein a lever is connected to the missile fuselage, which lever is connected to the missile fuselage such that the lever is able to be pressed against the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage such that friction can be induced between the lever and the tube that is able to rotate around the missile fuselage.

Description:
[0001] The aim of this invention is to provide a missile that has higher chance of surviving attacks from anti-missile weapons when flying towards an enemy than missiles currently in use. The missile according to this invention is fitted with a mechanism that enables the missile to travel in a continuous spiralling motion while flying towards an enemy, without the need to make continues control adjustments. The mechanism is such that once activated, the spiralling motion is automatic. The spiralling motion is achieved during flight without rolling the missile.

[0002] In this invention the spiralling motion of the missile is achieved using moveable fins on a rotatable tube, with the tube encircling a part of missile (preferrably the forward part of the missile fuselage) and able to rotate around the encircled part of the missile. The fins are attached to the rotatable tube so that they can be rotated in a pivoting manner relative to the rotatable tube.

[0003] For the missile to enter a spiralling motion, the fins would need to revolve around part of the missile so that the missile is pushed in changing directions. In the invention this achieved by using the rotatable tube, that allows the fins to revolve around part of the missile—using the rotatable tube as means of travelling around a part of the missile. The invention provides a number of means by which rotation of the rotatable tube can be achieved. One way is to use fins that are of unequal size with respect to one another. Having fins that are of unequal size would cause an aerodynamic imbalance when the fins are moved from the horizontal position. With one fin pushing harder than the other, rotation of rotatable tube would result. The rotation of the rotatable tube would be automatic and continuous while the imbalance between the fins was maintained. Placing the fins back in a horizontal position would remove the imbalance, allowing the rotatable tube to come to rest. Friction between the missile and the rotatable tube or a braking mechanism such as a hydraulicly activated brake pad being push against the rotatable tube could help to stop the rotatable tube from rotating.

[0004] Another way of causing the rotatable tube to rotate according to the invention is to increase the pitch of one fin more than that of the other. Increasing the pitch of one fin relative to the other would cause an aerodynamic imbalance on the rotatable tube, thereby forcing it to rotate. Allowing the fins to return to a horizontal position would remove the aerodynamic imbalance, allowing the rotatable tube to come to rest.

[0005] FIG. 1 shows a missile 1 according to this invention, fitted with one form of a spiral inducing assembly 2.

[0006] Referring to FIG. 1, a rotatable tube 3 forming part of the spiral inducing assembly 2 can be seen encircling part of the missile fuselage 4 of the missile 1. The missile fuselage has a fore end and an aft end. Referring to this tube 3 as the primary tube 3, the primary tube 3 is able to rotate around the part of the missile fuselage encircled by the primary tube. The primary tube is shown as being narrower in the front than at the rear. Also shown is another tube 5 that is fitted to the missile 1 such that it encircles part of the missile fuselage 4 of the missile. Referring to this tube 5 as the activation tube 5, the activation tube 5 is fitted so that it can be moved in a forward direction relative to the part of the missile fuselage 4 encircled by the activation tube and then back to its original position on the missile fuselage. FIG. 1 also shows the edge of one horizontal fin 6 that is connected to the outside of the primary tube 3. The fin 6 is connected to the outside of primary tube 3 such that it can rotate in a pivoting manner as shown in FIG. 2.

[0007] FIG. 1A shows an enlarged illustration of the left side of the spiral inducing assembly 2. The fin 6 in FIG. 1A is connected to the outside of the primary tube 3 by a connecting joint 7 which is in the form of a connecting rod 7. Extended from the connecting rod 7 in FIG. 1A is a protruding section 8 which is used to rotate the connecting rod 7. Rotation of the connecting rod 7 causes the fin 6 to rotate in a pivoting manner around the connecting rod 7 (in the manner shown in FIG. 2). Linked to the protruding section 8 in FIG. 1A is a stem 9. Referring to this stem 9 as an activation stem 9, the activation stem 9 is used as a means for pushing the protruding section 8 such that when the protruding section 8 is pushed, the protruding section 8 forces the connecting rod 7 to rotate around the longitudinal axis of the connecting rod 7. The activation stem 9 is linked to the protruding section 8 by a rivet 10. The activation stem 9 is shown as being fitted on the outside of the primary tube 3 and is supported on the primary tube 3 by a retaining bracket 11. The retaining bracket 11 is rigidly joined to the primary tube but is channelled to allow the activation stem 9 to move longitudinally between the retaining bracket 11 and the primary tube 3. The activation stem 9 is allowed to protrude rearward from the primary tube so that it can be reached by the activation tube 5 when the activation tube 5 is moved forward on the missile fuselage 4. The activation tube 5 is forced to move forward by an activation mechanism 12 consisting of hydraulic actuators 13 and 14. FIG. 3 shows the hydraulic actuators 15 and 16 located on the right side of the spiral inducing assembly 2 which also form part of the activation mechanism 12 by which the acivation tube 5 is forced to move. When the hydraulic actuators 13 14 15 and 16 are forced to extend as hydraulic pressure is applied to them, they force the activation tube 5 to move forward as shown in FIG. 2. FIG. 2 shows that as the activation tube 5 is forced to move forward on the missile fuselage 4 when the hydraulic actuators 13 and 14 extend, it eventually makes contact with the activation stem 9. As the activation tube 5 is forced to move further forward, it pushes the activation stem 9 forward on primary tube. As the activation stem 9 is pushed forward, the activation stem pushes against the protruding section 8 and moves the protruding section 8, thereby rotating the fin 6 around the connecting rod 7 in a pivoting manner.

[0008] In FIG. 2 a rivet 10 is shown connecting the activation stem 9 to the protruding section 9, which allows movement between the activation stem 9 and the protruding section 8. The retaining bracket 11 keeps the activation stem from moving laterally around the primary tube. The retaining bracket 11 however does allow longitudinal sliding movement of the activation stem 9 so that it can be pushed and moved by the activation tube 5.

[0009] FIG. 3 shows the the right side of the spiral inducing assembly 2 of FIG. 1. Shown is another fin 17, another connecting joint 18 in the form of a connecting rod 18 that connects the fin 17 to the outside of the primary tube 3. Another protruding section 19 is used to rotate the connecting rod 18, and the activation stem 20 is used to push the protruding section 19, with the activation stem 20 linked to the protruding section 19 by a rivet 21. Also visible in FIG. 3 is the activation tube 5. The connecting rod 18 allows the fin 17 to rotate in a pivoting manner. Another retaining bracket 22 is shown supporting the respective activation stem 20.

[0010] Thus, it can be seen from FIGS. 1, 1A, 2 and 3 that the activation tube 5, the activation stems 9 and 20, retaining brackets 11 and 22, protruding sections 8 and 19, rivets 10 and 21 used to connect the activation stems 9 and 20 to respective protruding sections 8 and 19, the connecting joints 7 and 18 in the form of connecting rods 7 and 18, and the activation mechanism 12 used to move the activation tube 5 consisting of the hydraulic actuators 13, 14, 15 and 16, collectively form a fin rotating mechanism.

[0011] FIG. 4 shows the missile 1 of FIG. 1 from underneath. It shows that one fin 6 is larger than the other fin 17. When these fins 6 and 17 are rotated in a pivoting manner and in the same direction to the same extent, an aerodynamic imbalance between the fins 6 and 17 arises furing flight of the missile because of size diference between the fins 6 and 17. The larger fin 6 will exert a greater magnitude of force on the primary tube 3 during flight of the missile 1 than the smaller fin 17. As a result, the aerodynamic imbalance between the fins 6 and 17 would cause the primary tube 3 to rotate. But both fins 16 and 17 would also be pushing the missile laterally, in a similar manner to canards. Thus, because the primary tube 3 is forced to rotate, the lateral force exerted on the missile by the fins 6 and 17 keeps changing, thus forcing the missile to keep changing its direction and hence entering a spiralling motion.

[0012] FIG. 5 shows the front cut out of the spiral inducing assembly 2 of FIG. 1. Shown here is the primary tube 3, the fins 6 and 17, (with fin 6 being larger than fin 17), the missile fuselage 4 of the missile, the activation stems 9 and 20, linked by rivets 10 and 21 to the protruding sections 8 and 19 respectively, the connecting rods 7 and 18 penetrating the primary tube 3, and with the protruding sections 8 and 19 screwed in the connecting rods 7 and 18 respectively. FIG. 5 shows the primary tube 3 as being creased in sections 23, 24 and 25. The creased sections 23, 24 and 25 are used as a means to support the primary tube 3 on the on the encircled part of the missile fuselage 4, while allowing for gaps 26 and 27 to exist between the primary tube 3 and the encircled part of the missile fuselage 4. The gaps 26 and 27 allow the connecting rods 7 and 18 to protrude inwardly through the primary tube 3 without making contact with the encircled part of the missile fuselage 4. Securing bolt nuts 28 and 29 are shown securing the connecting rods 7 and 18 to the primary tube 3, with thrust bearings 30 and 31 allowing for easy rotation of the connecting rods 7 and 18 around their respective longitudinal axes'.

[0013] FIG. 6 shows the rear of the primary tube 3 of FIG. 1 as a cut out. Shown in FIG. 6 are the rear ends of the activation stems 9 and 20, and the retaining brackets 11 and 22 that support the activation stems 9 and 20, and prevent uncontrolled lateral movement of the activation stems 9 and 20. The primary tube 3 is shown as having sections creased 32, 33 and 34.

[0014] The primary tube can be formed in various geometric shapes, including cylindrical or cone shaped.

[0015] FIG. 7 shows a side cutting of the part of the missile fuselage 35 encircled by the primary tube 3 of FIG. 1. The encircled part of the missile fuselage 35 can be seen to be narrower than the rest of the missile fuselage 4. Thrust bearings 36 and 37 are positioned on the narrowed section of the missile fuselage 35. The thrust bearings are used to support the primary tube and to prevent the primary tube moving longitudinally relative to the missile fuselage 4.

[0016] FIG. 8 shows another way that the primary tube 3 of FIG. 6 can be supported, with wheels 38, 39 and 40 attached to the creased sections 32, 33 and 34 of the primary tube 3. The wheels 38, 39 and 40 help to support the primary tube 3 on the encircled part of the missile fuselage 35.

[0017] FIG. 9 shows another way of supporting the primary tube 3. Shown is a tube of smaller diameter 41 than the primary tube 3. This smaller tube 41 is a supporting tube 41 in that it can be used to support the primary tube 3. It has a smaller diameter than the primary tube 3 to provide a gap 42 between the primary tube 3 and the supporting tube 41. The gap 42 is used to allow freedom of movement to the protruding sections 8 and 19, and the activation stems 9 and 20 shown positioned inside the primary tube 3. The protruding sections 8 and 19 and the connecting rods 7 and 18 have been formed as moulded units, allowing easier assembly. Bolts 43, 44, 45 and 46 are used to join the primary tube 3 to the supporting tube 41. The supporting tube 41 is able to rotate around the encircled part of the missile fuselage 35.

[0018] FIG. 9A shows a side view of an missile 1 using the fin rotating mechanism of FIG. 9. The activation stem 9 of FIG. 9 can be seen to be protruding rearward from inside the primary tube 3.

[0019] FIG. 10 shows a cut out of the front of the primary tube 3 of FIG. 1, but with the protruding sections 8 and 19 protruding from the fins 6 and 17 respectively.

[0020] FIGS. 11 and 12 show another manner in which the aerodynamic imbalance between the fins can be created during forward flight.

[0021] In FIG. 11 the protruding section 8, on the left side of the spiral inducing assembly 2 is shorter than the protuding section 19 in FIG. 12 on the right side of the spiral inducing assembly 2. The shorter protruding section 8 would generate a greater degree of movement of fin 6 in FIG. 11 than the movement of fin 17 that the protruding section 19 would cause in FIG. 12 for an equal movement in the respective activation stems 9 and 20. An aerodynamic imbalance between the fins could thus be created.

[0022] FIGS. 13 and 14 show the left and right sides of the spiral inducing assembly 2 of another arrangement for creating an aerodynamic imbalance between the fins 6 and 17. FIG. 14 shows the activation stem 20 on the right side as being shorter than the activation stem 9 on the left side in FIG. 13. Hence when the activation tube 5 is moved forward, it first starts pushing the activation stem 9 in FIG. 13, forcing fin 6 to rotate, and then when the activation tube 5 later starts pushing the activation stem 20 of FIG. 14, the activation tube 5 will continue pushing the longer activation stem 9 of FIG. 13, forcing the fin 6 in FIG. 13 into a higher degree of rotation, or pitch, than fin 17 of FIG. 14, at all times until both fins are allowed to become horizontal again by the activation tube 5 being allowed to retreat.

[0023] FIG. 15 shows a spiral inducing assembly 2 with a wheel 47 fitted to the connecting stem 9. The wheel 47 would reduce frictional forces between the activation stem 9 and the activation tube 5 as the activation stem travels around the activation tube 5 when the primary tube is rotating.

[0024] FIG. 16 shows the spiral inducing assembly of FIG. 4 with the fins 6 and 17 of FIG. 4, and with the primary tube 3 in a state of rotation. It can be seen comparing FIG. 4 with FIG. 16 how the lateral forces on the missile would be constantly changing, enabling the spiral inducing assembly 2, to force the missile 1 to travel in a continuous spiralling motion.

[0025] Looking at the fins 6 and 17 shown in FIG. 16 it can be seen that the rear section of each fin behind the respective connecting rods 7 and 18 is greater than the section of each fin in front the respective connecting rods 7 and 18. This is deliberate. This is used to allow the fins to adopt a horizontal position when hydraulic pressure is not applied to the hydraulic actuators 13, 14 (and 15 and 16 of FIG. 3). Aerodynamic forces are in effect used to allow the fins to remain a resting horizontal position thereby allowing non-spiralling flight. Friction between activation the activation tube 5 and activation stems 9 and 20 caused by the rotation of the activation stems 9 and 20 around the activation tube (since the activation stems rotate with the primary tube) can be used as a means of slowing the rotation of the primary tube when smooth flight is desired. The braking mechanisms shown in FIGS. 17 and 18 could also be used as a means of slowing the primary tube when smooth flight needs to be resumed.

[0026] FIG. 17 shows a side cutting of the primary tube 3 and the part of the missile fuselage 35 encircled by the primary tube 3. Shown here is a hydraulic actuator 48 attached to the encircled part of the missile fuselage 35, in an extended form. Extended it creates friction on the primary tube 3 and acts as a brake to help slow the primary tube 3 when the spiral inducing assembly is de-activated. Using a braking system lightly would allow the primary tube 3 to rotate, but would intensify the lateral forces on the missile 1. To allow use of a braking mechanism, the primary tube 3 would be kept smooth and round in the area that fricion is induced. Any creased sections 23, 24, 32, 34 would be restricted to areas where the hydraulic actuator 48 would not make contact.

[0027] FIG. 17A shows the hydraulic actuator rod 48 in a compressed state, as when the primary tube 3 is allowed to freely rotate.

[0028] FIG. 18 shows another braking mechanism where a lever is used to slow the primary tube. The lever 49 is shown protruding from a hole 50 in the missile fuselage, and is operated by an actuator in the form of an electric motor 51.

[0029] FIG. 19 shows a spiral inducing assembly 2 where the primary tube 3 extends over the activation tube 5, but the fin is located on the outside of the primary tube.