Title:
Domed container
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A container with an interior space for the storage of objects, especially digital data carriers, includes a bottom piece and a top piece. In order to use the container as a flying disc, it is shaped in a way that enables it to fly, wherein the container basically has the shape of a round disc with an edge area and an edge section sharply bent and/or bulged away from an imaginary datum plane of the disc. The ratio of the height of the container and the diameter of the container ranges from 0.05 to 0.5, and the ratio of the maximum thickness of the container and the diameter of the container ranges from 0.02 to 0.3 at the most. The interior space of the container is defined by the bottom piece and the top piece and by the body of the container. The bottom piece and the top piece can be connected with each other in order to close the container firmly and protect the stored objects.



Inventors:
Andreas, Dirk (Eisenach, DE)
Application Number:
10/187354
Publication Date:
11/14/2002
Filing Date:
06/28/2002
Assignee:
ANDREAS DIRK
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
G9B/33.015, G9B/33.014
International Classes:
G11B33/04; (IPC1-7): B65D85/57
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
FOSTER, JIMMY G
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Friedrich Kueffner (New York, NY, US)
Claims:

I claim:



1. Container with an interior space (4) for the storage of objects (5), especially digital data carriers, wherein the container comprises a bottom piece (11, 11′, 11″) and a top piece (12,12′,12″) and the objects can be taken out of the container, wherein, in order to use the container as a flying disc, it is shaped in a way that enables it to fly, wherein-the container basically has the shape of a round disc with an edge area (2) and an edge section (14, 14″) sharply bent and/ or bulged away from the imaginary datum plane (E) of the disc, wherein the ratio of the height of the container (1,1′,1″) and the diameter of the container (1,1′,1″) ranges from 0.05 to 0.5 and wherein the ratio of the maximum thickness (d) of the container (1,1′,l″) and the diameter of the container (1,1′,1″) ranges from 0.02 to 0.3 at the most, and wherein the interior space (4) of the container is limited by the bottom piece (11, 11′, 11″) and the top piece (12,12′,12″) and the interior space is limited mainly by the body of the container (II ), and wherein the bottom piece (11,11′, 11″) and the top piece (12,12′,12″) can be connected with each other in order to close the container (1,1′,1″) firmly and protect the stored objects.

2. Container as recited in claim 1, wherein the edge area (2) and the edge section (14, 14′) of the container (1,1′,1″) are bulged and / or sharply bent and at an angle with relationship to the imaginary datum plane (E) of the disc that ranges from ca. 45 degrees to 270 degrees, preferably from 70 degrees to 180 degrees, and most preferably approximately 90 degrees.

3. Container as recited in claim 1, wherein a middle section (3) of the container (1,1′,1″) is bulged away from the imaginary datum plane (E) of the disc, wherein the bulges of the top piece (12,12′,12″) increase in size from the center along the radius outwards, and wherein the-bulges are designed in a way that gives it flying properties.

4. Container as recited in claim 3, wherein the middle part (3) of the container (1,1″) is only slightly bulged, whereby its flying properties can be changed.

5. Container as recited in claim 1, wherein the container is designed as a CD container.

6. Container as recited in claim 1, which can be subdivided in the body section of the container (II) and an edge area (2) and an edge section (14) that are connected to each other.

7. Container as recited in claim 1, wherein the thickness (d) of the container (1,1′,1″) decreases from the middle section of the container (1,1′,1″) towards the edge area (2) and the edge section (14) of the container.

8. Container as recited in claim 1, where the edge area of the bottom piece (11,11′,11″) is stronger with regard to the material used, in comparison with the top piece.

9. Container as recited in claim 1, wherein the container has passageways (43) distributed around the perimeter, wherein the passageways are in the edge area (2) and edge section (14).

10. Container as recited in claim 1, wherein the bulges of the bottom piece (11,11′,11″) increase in size from the center along the radius outwards and where the bulge of the bottom piece creates free room (41) that makes it easier to take out objects.

11. Container as recited in claim 1, wherein the top piece consists of at least one of the following transparent, partly transparent or completely clear material.

12. Container as recited in claim 1, wherein the top piece (12,12′,12″) and the bottom piece (11,11′,11″) fit together with regard to their bulges.

13. Container as recited in claim 1, wherein the bottom piece (11,11′,11″) and the top piece (12,12′,12″) have locating locking systems (16,16′) in order to connect the bottom piece (11,11′,11″) and the top piece (12,12′,12″).

14. Container as recited in claim 13, wherein the locking systems (16,16′) have at least one locating protrusion.

15. Container as recited in claim 1, wherein the top piece (12,12′,12″) has at least one latch (44) that reaches over the bottom piece (11,11′,11″), wherein the latch has at least one locking system (16,16′).

16. Container as recited in claim 15, wherein the bottom piece (11,11′,11″) has a depression in the area where the latch (44) reaches over.

17. Container as recited in claim 1, wherein the top piece (12,12′,12″) and the bottom piece (11,11′,11″) are connected with each other by a hinge joint (31).

18. Container as recited in claim 1, wherein an edge section of the top piece (12,12′,12″) fits flatly on the bottom piece (11,11′,11″) when the two pieces are connected.

19. Container as recited in claim 1, wherein there is a smooth transition from the top piece (12,12′,12″) to the bottom piece (11,11′,11″) when the two pieces are connected, wherein its flying properties can be influenced by this.

20. Container as recited in claim 1, wherein a holding mechanism (24) is foreseen in the interior (4) of the container (1,1′,1″) to hold an object (5) to be stored.

21. Container as recited in claim 20, wherein the holding mechanism consists of at least one of the following gadgets: protrusions that prevent a sideward movement of a stored object (5), for example, centering system (22), centering protrusion (24), tensioning mechanism (25).

22. Container as recited in claim 21, wherein the holding mechanism includes a tensioning mechanism that is foreseen basically in the middle of the top piece (12,12′,12″), which stresses the stored object elastically towards the bottom piece (11,11′,11″).

23. Container as recited in claim 1, comprising an electronic data recording unit which includes a data entry unit for the recording of at least one piece of information, wherein the container has at least one of the following recording device: voice-recording device, text-recording device, picture-recording device.

24. Container as recited in claim 1, comprising an electronic information reproduction device that includes an output unit for the reproduction of the recorded information, wherein the container has at least one of the following reproduction devices : voice-reproduction device, text-reproduction device, picture-reproduction device.

25. Container as recited in claim 1, wherein at least one of the following materials is used: plastic, unbreakable plastic, carbon materials, light metal, rubber.

26. Flying disc, identifiable by the fact that passageways (43) are distributed along the perimeter of the flying disc, wherein the passageways are distributed in the edge area (2) and edge section (14, 14″), whereby the flying properties are influenced positively by this, in addition to that a straight flight is made possible.

27. Container as recited in claim 1, wherein the bottom piece (11,11′,11″) is bulged towards an interior space (4) of the container. 28. Container as recited in claim 1, wherein the top piece (12,12′,12″) is bulged away from the interior space (4) of the container.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application is a Continuation Application of International Application PCT/EP00/13340.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] 1. Field of the Invention

[0003] The invention relates to a case with an interior for the storage of objects, especially of digital data carriers.

[0004] 2. Description of the Related Art

[0005] Containers for the storage of objects of whatever kind serve to protect them from exterior influences such as, for example, soiling or physical influences. In particular, sensitive objects, such as digital data carriers like compact discs (CD's), are stored in more-or-less protective cases like the commercial rectangular, flat CD-cases.

[0006] On the one hand, these containers must be useful for the storage of objects to be stored. On the other hand, they have to comply with the growing ecological need to minimize the waste resulting from wrapping. With regard to this, it is possible to think of a container that minimizes the amount of wrapping for the container and, on the other hand, to extend the use and realm of applicability of the container irrespective of the objects to be stored. For a vast number of objects to be stored, as for example digital data carriers, their respective containers serve so far exclusively for their protection and storage. Furthermore, containers with a multiple-cornered design like the CD-containers just mentioned are very susceptible to damage by tearing or breaking. Often a small weight will suffice to develop small tears, which will eventually lead to the uselessness of the container.

[0007] Another problem of known containers is the cumbersome labelling. There are containers for which labelling fields or compartments to put in a labelled sign are provided. With the customary plastic CD-cases, direct labelling of containers is difficult. However, these customary CD-cases regularly come with a compartment in the interior to put in a printed page or a cover or booklet that can be seen through a transparent part of the container. For known containers, labelling is more or less cumbersome. It requires, in particular, a pen or pencil or a sticker. If the container has a compartment, a page in a fitting form is required. Also the removal or the change of an existing label is not always easy, if indeed it is even impossible.

[0008] The invention is derived from a container with an interior for the storage of objects, especially digital carriers, whereby the container, consisting of a bottom and a top piece, has essentially the form of a round disc. A part of the container is bulged away from the imaginary datum plane of the disc and/ or sharply bent. A container like this is known from the U.S. Pat. No. 5,542,532.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0009] It is a task of the invention to design a container with an interior for the storage of objects, especially digital data carriers, which has extra functions in that it has a property independent of its function as wrapping material.

[0010] This task is solved by a middle part of the container extending in a slightly arched fashion, creating space between it and the flat surface of the disc, with the bottom piece arched towards the interior of the container, while the top piece is arched away from the interior of the container, and with the bulge of the bottom piece and the top piece increasing in size from the center along the radius outwards, which makes the container capable of flying.

[0011] One can imagine the invented container as a flat middle piece extending outward to a connecting edge, with the interior being bounded mainly by the flat middle piece.

[0012] This disc-like shape of the container with the arched and/ or sharply bent edge corresponds roughly with the shape of a frisbee, which is a type of rotating disc, which makes the invented container capable of flying through the application of the frisbee throwing technique. Like this the invented container gains a functional property as a toy, gift or sporting device, separate from its packaging and preservation properties with regard to what is to be stored within. A special advantage of the invention is that in spite of the functional extentions on the one hand, the structure of the container remains simple. The idea of the invention also extends to a rotating disc or flying disc that is shaped accordingly with the invented container. Such a rotating disc is provided with an accessible interior, in which things can be stored. Like this the rotating disc also functions as a means of transport and is functionally extended in this sense.

[0013] The disc shape of the container can-vary in-particular-with regard to its external perimeter in accordance with the things to be stored in it. Herewith, some form parameters need to be mentioned that can be changed according to the flying qualities required. One of those form parameters, for example, is determined by the angle that the edge of the container forms with the imaginary flat surface of the disc. This angle in particular ranges from about 45 to 270 degrees, preferably from 70 to 180 degrees. Regarding the manufacturing techniques as well as the flying qualities, an angle of less than 90 degrees is very favorable. The ratio of the height and the diameter of the container as another parameter should be 0.5 at the most; preferably it should range from 0.05 to 0.4. In addition to that, the ratio of the maximum thickness of the container (measured for instance from the upper side of the top piece to the lower side of the bottom piece) and the diameter of the container should be 0.3 at maximum, preferably ranging from 0.02 to 0.3.

[0014] Finally, the thickness of the container should be selected in a way that it decreases from the middle piece of the container towards the edge. The middle piece should preferably be flat or only slightly bulged. Therefore, the thickness of the middle piece of the container can remain constant or decrease only slightly, at least.

[0015] In practice especially suitable containers have a height of less than 5 cm, preferably less than 3 cm. The preferred diameter ranges from 14 to 25 cm.

[0016] The container consists of a bottom piece and a top piece, which limit the interior of the container. They are to be connected with each other in a way that, in order to close the container, the top piece should be either completely separable from the bottom piece or preferably attached to it by a hinge. With regard to cost-saving manufacturing of the container, the top piece and the bottom piece can contain only one level, with the hinge as a weaker transitional area (e.g. a film hinge) being the connection between top and bottom piece. Preferably, the hinge is indented from the external outline towards the middle piece of the container.

[0017] In order to guarantee a firm connection between the top and the bottom piece, especially while flying, the edge of the top piece can be provided with a seating that fits tightly and preferably flatly to a corresponding counter surface of the bottom piece, at least in certain places. A smooth external outline of the container, in particular at the transition from the outline of the top piece to the bottom piece, provides for a good airflow around the container while flying. Essentially,. the bottom piece and the top piece of the container have the shape of a round, particularly circular, disc that is more or less flat. Moreover, the top and the bottom piece are more or less bulged, with the bottom piece being bulged concavely towards the interior and the top piece being bulged convexly, towards the outside of the container. The bulges of the top piece and the bottom piece are matched to each other, i.e. they bulge in the same direction. The size of the bulge in the top piece with regard to the imaginary datum plane of the disc of the container can increase from the approximate center of the container in radial direction. The same is true for the bottom piece, but the size of the bulge, compared to the one of the top piece along the radius towards the edge, increases less strongly. The ratio of the different-sized bulges of the bottom and the top piece can be selected in a way so that when the container is closed the top piece meets the bottom piece approximately on its edge. In the place where the top and the bottom piece meet, which is particularly at the above-mentioned seating or the area of the hinge connection between the two pieces, the two pieces have approximately the same size of bulge. In order to guarantee a firm connection between the bottom piece and the top piece, preferably a locating mechanism is foreseen. Such a locating mechanism can be formed in particular by a locating protrusion, preferably a spherical one, and a locating aperture that interacts with the protrusion while being pressed shut. This locating protrusion can either be on the top or the bottom piece with the locating aperture being on the corresponding bottom or the top piece. Generally, the aperture can be formed as a sack-shaped hole or a passageway opening. Instead of a locating device, a screw-like connection can be used to connect the bottom with the top, e.g. with an external thread at the bottom and a corresponding internal thread at the top. Due to the fact that generally the bottom piece contains the object or objects to be stored and is stronger with regard to the material used than the top part (at least at the edge), the option of putting the locating protrusion on the top piece and the locating aperture on the bottom piece is to be preferred.

[0018] Also in order to fasten the bottom and the top piece safely, the latter can have a latch that reaches over the bottom piece. In order to avoid protrusions of the outline in the area of the latch, an indentation can be formed in the area of the bottom piece where the latch overlaps to make it thinner there. This indentation of the bottom piece then holds the latch when the container is closed. The latch preferably includes one of the above-mentioned fastening mechanisms to guarantee a safe closure.

[0019] The interior of the container can include a holding mechanism for the object to be stored so it would retain a fixed position especially while flying. This holding mechanism can hold the thing to be stored inside the container in a way that the center of gravity of the object to be stored is approximately on the rotation axis of the container. Like this, one can avoid forces inside the container that are created by imbalance and could lead to damage of the object to be stored and of the container itself, and that, in addition to that, would lead to a deterioration of the flying qualities. In the case that things have to be stored whose center of gravity coincides with their geographical middle, the holding mechanism has to be in the middle of the container.

[0020] The holding mechanism can include some sort of receptacle in the bottom piece, particularly a configuration of protrusions adapted to the shape of the object to be stored. Such a receptacle prevents the object to be stored from moving sideways inside the container. Moreover, it can be made easier to insert an object, especially a CD, if this receptacle deceases in size as it becomes deeper so that a CD can slide into its final holding position more or less by itself. If the container is supposed to hold more than one compact disc, a central protrusion as a centering system is to be preferred. The CDs can easily be stacked up in a pile. Therefore, the holding mechanism preferably has a tensioning mechanism at its top piece that stresses the object to be stored, e.g. the CD or the stack of CDs, elastically towards the bottom piece. Therefore it is also advantageous, too in that the CDs are held in a way that they cannot rotate, so the above-mentioned CD areas cannot be damaged through a rotation of the CDs over enclosed foreign substances.

[0021] Furthermore, the tensioning mechanism helps to push the top piece open away from the bottom piece when the press-shut mechanism between the bottom and the top piece is unfastened. Then the top piece, being apart from the bottom piece, can easily be grabbed with your fingers in order to open the top piece completely and create unhampered access to the object stored. If the bottom piece is bulged concavely as. described above, the lateral CD edge lies more or less open and can be grabbed with your fingers particularly easily to take the CD out.

[0022] For example, the tensioning mechanism can be formed by one elastic body (e.g. one made of elastic plastic or foamed plastic) or an arrangement of several ones and, in the case of a CD container, stresses the CD preferably in the area of the protrusion extending in the direction of the CD's axis. The usage of plate springs can be considered for this, too.

[0023] Preferably, the container is a CD container for the storage of at least one CD. If formed accordingly, especially the interior offers enough room to hold the information recording and playing equipment including power supply. For instance, a voice-recording device, including peripheral devices and battery, can be accommodated.

[0024] For the mobile use of a container in particular, the power supply can also include an arrangement of solar cells that can be attached to the flat side of the container under a transparent lid, for instance.

[0025] The information recording/playing equipment can be suitable for the recording of voice and/or text and/or picture information. Accordingly, it can include input/output devices such as a telephone, a microphone, a keyboard, a speaker, and/or a flat display device like an LCD display, for example. Herewith one can also think of multiply recordable transparency arrangements or boards that can record by responding to the tip of a pen or the magnetic effects of special magnetic pens.

[0026] Also, the display device can be made of electronic paper. This term describes an arrangement of transparencies described for example in the journal “Netzwerk und Computer”, edition 1/2000, issued by Neue Mediengesellschaft in Munich/Germany. It is a 0.2 mm thick coating with capsules swimming in it that, by inducing a voltage in it, can be used for recording and erasing. The recording of voice information is particularly interesting for the use of the container by children.

[0027] Basically, such input/output devices can be attached to any place in or on the container. With regard to the reproduction of information that is as simple as possible there can be a key on the outside of the container to activate the reproduction process so that the container does not have to be opened for this. Preferably, an input device for the recording of information is to be put in the interior of the container, i.e. accessible only after opening the container. This dependably prevents unintended recording of information, for example.

[0028] Also, an input or output unit (reproduction unit) can automatically be activated by opening or closing the container.

[0029] A container that is intended for advertisement can also be designed to record a piece of information only once so that it cannot be changed anymore, unlike for example a CD container for the storage of a CD in the private sector. Here, it can be especially advantageous to be able to change the information as often as desired. Alternatively or additionally, for the recording of information a data entry unit can be provided, e.g. a receptacle socket that is linkable to an external source of information, especially a computer. This particularly simplifies the recording of more extensive information and, in addition to that, offers the advantage-that-already existing information (e.g. in a database) can be transferred to the container without having to input it again. For example, this entry unit can be an electrical connection such as an interface as is common especially in computers, in particular PCs, or an optical entry unit, as is common with opto-electronic interface installations.

[0030] The various features of novelty which characterize the invention are pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed to and forming a part of the disclosure. For a better understanding of the invention, its operating advantages, specific objects attained by its use, reference should be had to the drawing and descriptive matter in which there are illustrated and described preferred embodiments of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

[0031] In the drawings:

[0032] FIG. 1 Cross-sectional view taken at the diameter of a first example/prototype of the invented container;

[0033] FIG. 2 Cross-sectional view taken at the diameter of the invented container in a second example;

[0034] FIG. 3 Side view of the invented container in a third version;

[0035] FIG. 4 Sectional view of the container as seen in FIG. 3 along the cutting line IV- IV;

[0036] FIG. 5 Top view of the locking systems in FIG. 4 in the direction of the arrow V

[0037] FIG. 6 Top view of the invented container;

[0038] FIG. 7 View of a top piece of an invented container from below;

[0039] FIG. 8 A CD-centering system.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0040] FIG. 1 shows the diameter of a container (1), the form of which resembles a frisbee (a rotating disc.) This basic form is realized, in the first place, by a greater extention of the container (1) in radial direction ® than in axial direction (a). Additionally, the outline of the container is formed in a way that especially the edge area (2) of the container (1) is bulged with reference to the virtual datum plane E (shown by a broken line in FIG. 1).

[0041] The circular edge area (2) continuously runs into a middle section (3) of the container (1) which, contrary to edge area (2), is less bulged and almost flat in the middle point (M). The middle section (3) has an interior, in which the objects (5) to be stored (here CDs) are placed. The size of the interior (4) is also determined by the thickness d of container (1), which is largest in the area of the middle point (M) of the container (1) and decreases continually in radial direction (r). The ratio (d) of the thickness of the container (1) to its diameter must be small enough, so that ability of the container (1) to fly is maintained. That means that for voluminous objects (5) to be stored, the container must be large enough in its radial direction (r).

[0042] In the following, the structure of the invented container (1) is described for objects (5) that are basically flat and therefore especially suitable for the invented container (1). These objects (5) is represented in this example by one or more compact discs (CDs). The CD container (1) that is formed like-a disc as shown in FIG. 1 includes a bottom piece (11) and a top piece (12). Both parts (11+12) have approximately the form of a circular disc and are bulged from their middle point. In radial direction (r), the bulge of the top piece (12) increases more than the bulge of the bottom piece (11) towards the point where the top piece (12) and the bottom piece (11) touch each other. At this point of contact (13), the edge of the top piece (12) is at an angle of approximately 90° in relationship to the imaginary datum plane (E) of the disc.

[0043] The edge section (14) of the bottom piece (11), which is fits together with the bulge of the top piece (12), extends from the edge as shown in the example. In this example, the edge section (14) forms a great portion of the edge area (2) of the container (1). In relationship to the imaginary datum plane (E) of the disc, the edge section (14) of the bottom piece (11) is at an angle of approximately 180°.

[0044] At the end of the edge section (14), a ring protrusion (15) that is directed inward is foreseen, which makes it possible to grip the container (1) without it slipping out of one's hand especially when one throws it.

[0045] The top piece (12) is connected to the bottom piece (11) by a locating device (16). This locating device is formed by a spherical protrusion (17) at the edge of the top piece that is directed inward and interacts with a locating aperture that is not shown in FIG. 1. In the preferred example of a CD container (1) shown in FIG. 1, two, three or four locking systems of this kind are distributed evenly around the perimeter.

[0046] In the interior of the CD container (1) a holding mechanism is foreseen, which in the given example includes a receptacle (21) and also a centering system (22). The receptacle (21) is formed by several (e.g. four) basically cone-shaped bulges (23), which are located on a circular line around the middle point (M) of the container (1). The diameter of the circular line is a little larger than the one of the CDs to be stored. The centering system (22) is formed system by a centering cylinder (24) the axis of which coincides with the one of the container (1). The diameter of the cylinder (24) is a little smaller than the diameter of the receptacle common with CDs. FIG. 8 shows another example of the centering system (22): a clamping device (27) with clamping tongues (28) that are directed inward.

[0047] In order to hold the CD in axial direction (a), a tensioning mechanism (25) is basically envisaged to be in the middle of the top piece (12). In the example of the container (1) shown in FIG. 1, the tensioning mechanism (25) is formed as an elastic airbag (26) with a coat which is surrounded by a jacket (29) that is preferably made of rubber. When the container (1) is closed, the jacket (29) touches the top surface of the CD flatly and presses it against the inner surface (30) of the bottom piece (11) near the centering system. When opening the locating mechanism (16), the compressed airbag (26) slackens, so that the top piece (12) springs open and away from the bottom piece (11) and can be gripped and separated from the bottom piece (11) more easily. This tensioning device (25) guarantees that the CD to be stored is held firmly in the interior space (4) of the container (1) and does not move relatively to it and even while the container (1) is flying.

[0048] FIG. 2 shows another example of an invented CD container (1 ) where, in comparison with the example shown in FIG. 1, identical components have identical reference characters and, therefore, do not need more explanations. Similar components are identified by identical reference numbers with one apostrophe.

[0049] The CD container (1′) also includes a bottom piece (11′) and a top piece (12′) with both pieces (11′+12′) containing only one level. Both pieces (11′+12′) are connected with each other by a long-stretched, linear film hinge joint (31) that, with regard to the external outline, is indented towards the interior of the container (1′). Like this, the top piece (12′) can be opened away from the bottom piece (11′). There are locking systems in the form of a locating mechanism (16′) that is shaped according to the one in FIG. 1, basically diametrically opposite the film hinge joint.

[0050] There is a cylinder in the middle of the internal surface of the bottom piece (11′) that holds 2 compact discs to be stored and thus prevents a relative movement of the latter in radial direction (r). The example of a tensioning mechanism (25′) shown in FIG. 2 preventing a relative movement in axial direction (a) of the container is shaped like an elastic pressing device (32) that presses the CDs towards the bottom piece. This elastic pressing device (32) is in the middle of the top piece (12′)—the axes of symmetry of the cylinder (24), the bottom piece (11′), the top piece (12′) and the pressing device (32) coincide.

[0051] On the outside of the top piece (12′) along the gravitational axis, a suspension mechanism is foreseen which has a cross section shaped like a T and, in this example, approximately mushroom-shaped in its entirety. The two lateral jaws (34+35) of the holding mechanism (33)stretch in a slightly tilted way from the upper end of a stem (36) of the holding mechanism (33) towards the external surface of the top piece (12′).

[0052] FIG. 2 shows a broken outline of a supporting mechanism (33a), which is ring-shaped or consists of distributed protrusions standing up from the suspension mechanism (33) where a CD can be placed safely without the danger of damaging the CD areas described.

[0053] The elastic pressing device (32) is connected to the top piece (12′) containing only one level by a concentric pin, (39). Also, it is basically disc-shaped and includes a protruded edge (37) that is directed towards the bottom piece (11′). This protruded edge (37) gets in contact with the objects to be stored (5)—the CDs—when the container is closed and presses them against the bottom piece (11′).

[0054] After closing the container (1′), the CDs are held firmly in the interior (4′) of the container (1′) due to the gripping force created by the elastic pressing device (32). The protruded edge (37) touches the CD near the receptacle aperture of a CD into which the cylinder (24) in the middle of the bottom piece (11′) is inserted in order to hold the CD horizontally.

[0055] The example in FIG. 2 shows the broken outline of two CDs stacked on top of each other with the lower CD resting on the internal surface (30) of the bottom piece (11′) near the cylinder (24). The bulging of the bottom piece (11′) creates free room (41) in radial direction which makes it possible to grab the CDs stored and take them out of the opened container (1′) easily. Another difference in comparison to the example described before is that the bottom piece (11′) has a ring protrusion sticking out downward in axial direction which interacts advantageously with a corresponding ring aperture on the upper side of the top piece (12′) in order to stack containers (1′).

[0056] FIG. 3 shows another example of the invented container where components that are identical with the ones in previous examples have identical reference characters and similar components have identical reference numbers with two apostrophes.

[0057] The container (1″) has an edge section that is not as sharply bent away from the imaginary datum plane E of the disc, unlike the examples in FIGS. 1 and 2. In FIG. 3, the borderline (42) between the top piece (12″) and the bottom piece (11″) is noticeable. The bottom piece (11″) includes air passages (43) that while flying influence lift and air currents passing under the container positively and cause the container to fly straight. Moreover, one can reach with one's fingers into the passageways so one can hold and open the container more comfortably. Preferably, the air passages are longish, for example approximately elliptical. Furthermore, an even distribution of the passageways around the perimeter is to be preferred. As shown basically in the middle of FIG. 3, a latch (44) is foreseen that together with the top piece (12″) contains only one level and stretches over the whole edge (14″) of the bottom piece (11″), as can be seen in FIG. 4. The latch can have a passageway (which is not seen in FIG. 4) that continues a passageway (43) below it towards the external edge so that there is no gap in the row of passageways (43). So the external outline of the container would not have any cracks especially in the area of the latch (44) that reaches over; the bottom piece (11″) includes a depression (which is not shown) that holds the latch (44). This provides for a smooth transition from the bottom piece (11″) to the latch (44). As can be seen in FIG. 4, the latch (44) has a locating protrusion (45) on its interior surface that grips a locating aperture (46) in the bottom piece (11′). Together with the latch, the locating protrusion preferably contains only one level (44).

[0058] The locating mechanism with the container (1″) being closed is shown in FIG. (5), which represents a view along the direction of the arrow V in FIG. (4). Here the locating protrusion (45) is spherical, the locating aperture goes through the bottom piece (11″) and its shape shown as a broken line is basically square. This shape can also be round, for example. The aperture (46) can be limited by locating lips, for example.

[0059] FIG. 6 shows the top piece (12″) of the example of the container (1′) shown in FIG. 2. Preferably, the top piece is made of transparent but, for the most part dull material, and a circular stripe (51) out of clear material. One can see through the stripe (51) if an object is in the container (1′) and what it is. However, it is imaginable to make the top piece clear in its entirety.

[0060] FIG. 7 shows the bottom side of the top piece (12′). Four pockets (52) are foreseen to hold the four corners of a rectangular information brochure (53). With regard to the object to be stored, the four pockets can be in different places of the top piece (12′) in accordance with the external shape of the information brochure (53). There can also be a clamping device, for example at each pocket, which additionally holds the information brochure (53) in place., In this example, the elastic pressing device (32) presses downward on the CD through the brochure. As an alternative, there could be a special brochure with one or several holes for the pressing device shown to go through or for several distributed pressing devices. Also, the shape of a special brochure can be adjusted to the container, hence be round in particular.

[0061] If a common rectangular brochure is to be held, it can be foreseen to fold it and clamp or push it in.

[0062] Differently from the example shown, the brochure could also be held under the bottom piece, for instance in a plastic pocket.

[0063] Finally, it is to be said that the invented container (1), (1′), and (1″) can consist of all materials suitable for a rotating disc. Here, especially carbon materials, light metal, rubber, and unbreakable plastics, particularly PE, PP, and ABS are to be mentioned. The material preferably used for the invented container is polypropylen.

[0064] While specific embodiments of the invention have been shown and described in detail to illustrate the inventive principles, it will be understood that the invention may be embodied otherwise without departing from such principles.