Title:
Putter heads having enhanced rotational moment of inertia and manufacturing method
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A method for making a blade putter having a high inertia of rotation. The product of the method has a base, a ball-striking part, a toe weight and a heel weight. The base is made of a first material of relatively low mass, such as aluminum, and the other parts are made of a second material having a relatively high mass, such as copper or brass. A dovetailed groove is formed in the toe end of the base to slidingly receive a dovetailed protuberance formed in the toe weight and a dovetailed groove is formed in the heel end of the base to slidingly receive a dovetailed protuberance formed in the heel weight. A recess formed in a leading wall of the base receives the ball-striking part. Fasteners hold the parts together as they are machined so that respective perimeters of the weights are flush with the base. The fasteners are then removed and the base is anodized separately from the other parts. The putter is then reassembled and the fasteners are again installed with their respective heads protruding slightly above the leading wall of the base. The leading wall of the base and the ball-striking part are then removed by milling, exposing an unanodized surface of the base and shearing off the heads of the fasteners so that the heads are flush with the unanodized surface. The combination of copper or brass with anodized and unanodized aluminum provides a putter of enhanced aesthetic appeal. A mallet putter is made in a similar way.



Inventors:
James, Robert T. (Clearwater, FL, US)
Grace, Robert M. (Clearwater, FL, US)
Application Number:
09/681143
Publication Date:
07/25/2002
Filing Date:
01/25/2001
Assignee:
JAMES ROBERT T.
GRACE ROBERT M.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/334, 473/340, 473/341
International Classes:
A63B53/04; (IPC1-7): A63B53/04
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
DUONG, THANH P
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Smith & Hopen (private clients) (Oldsmar, FL, US)
Claims:
19. ] A method of making a putter head, comprising the steps of: milling a base of predetermined width, said base having a leading wall, a trailing wall, a heel end, and a toe end; milling a stop plate so that it is formed integrally with said base, said stop plate projecting from said trailing wall in normal relation thereto; anodizing said base; forming a recess in said leading wall and securing a striking plate in said recess so that said striking plate is flush with said leading wall; securing a heel weight to said trailing wall of said base such that a heel end of said heel weight is flush with said heel end of said base and so that a toe end of said heel weight abuts said stop plate; securing a toe weight to said trailing wall of said base such that a toe end of said toe weight is flush with said toe end of said base and so that a heel end of said toe weight abuts said stop plate; selecting a first material for said base and selecting a common second material for said striking plate, said heel weight, and said toe weight such that said first material has less mass than said second material; and milling said leading wall of said base to expose an unanodized surface to enhance the aesthetic appeal of said putter head.

29. ] The method of claim 1, further comprising the steps of: securing said striking plate, said heel weight, and said toe weight to said base with screw fasteners that are made of said second material; positioning a head of each of said screw fasteners in slightly raised relation to said leading wall of said base; whereby said step of milling said leading wall includes the step of shearing each of the heads of said screw fasteners so that said heads are flush with said leading wall.

39. ] A method of making a putter head, comprising the steps of: forming a base of predetermined width, said base having a leading wall, a trailing wall, and a perimeter wall that circumscribes said base; said perimeter wall having a top, a bottom, a heel end and a toe end; forming a stop plate that projects from said trailing wall in normal relation thereto; forming a first groove of predetermined configuration in a heel end of said base, said first groove being formed in said trailing wall, said first groove having a first end in open communication with said heel end of said base and said first groove having a depth less than said predetermined width of said base; forming a second groove of predetermined configuration in a toe end of said base, said second groove being formed in said trailing wall, said second groove having a first end in open communication with said toe end of said base; forming a recess of predetermined configuration in said leading wall, substantially centrally thereof, said recess having a depth less than said width of said base; forming a first throughbore in said toe end of said base, a second and a third throughbore in said recess, and a fourth throughbore in said heel end of said base; forming a heel weight having a protuberance of predetermined configuration that mates with said predetermined configuration of said first groove and sliding said heel weight protuberance into said first groove until said heel weight abuts a heel end of said stop plate; forming a toe weight having a protuberance of predetermined configuation that mates with said predetermined configuation of said second groove and sliding said toe weight protuberance into said second groove until said toe weight abuts a toe end of said stop plate; forming a striking plate having a predetermined configuration that fits within said recess and forming a pair of throughbores in said striking plate that align with said second and third throughbores formed in said recess; and fastening said heel weight, said toe weight, and said striking plate to said base.

49. ] The method of claim 3, further comprising the steps of: forming said base from a first material having a first mass; forming said heel weight, said toe weight, and said striking plate from a common second material having a second mass; and selecting said first and second materials so that said first mass is less than said second mass.

59. ] The method of claim 4, further comprising the steps of: anodizing said base prior to said step of fastening said heel weight, said toe weight, and said striking plate thereto; employing screw fasteners in said step of fastening said heel weight, said toe weight, and said striking plate to said base; at completion of said fastening step, positioning respective heads of said screw fasteners in slightly raised relation to said leading wall and said striking plate; and milling said leading wall of said base to expose an unanodized wall of said base, said step of milling also serving to make said respective heads of said screw fasteners flush with said exposed surface.

69. ] The method of claim 4, further comprising the step of selecting aluminum as said first material.

79. ] The method of claim 5, further comprising the step of selecting said second material from a group of metals having a greater mass than aluminum.

89. ] The method of claim 6, further comprising the step of anodizing said aluminum after said recess and grooves have been formed therein.

99. ] The method of claim 3, wherein said predetermined shape of said first groove is a dovetail shape and wherein said predetermined configuration of said heel weight protuberance is a dovetail shape complementary thereto.

109. ] The method of claim 3, wherein said predetermined shape of said second groove is a dovetail shape and wherein said predetermined configuration of said toe weight protuberance is a dovetail shape complementary thereto.

119. ] The method of claim 3, further comprising a first internally threaded blind bore formed in said toe weight, said first internally threaded blind bore extending through said heel weight protuberance, a first throughbore formed in said base adjacent said toe end of said base, and said first internally threaded blind bore being in alignment with said first throughbore when said toe weight is connected to said base.

129. ] The method of claim 11, further comprising a second internally threaded blind bore formed in said toe weight, a throughbore formed in a toe end of said recess, and said second internally threaded blind bore being in alignment with said second throughbore when said toe weight and said striking plate are connected to said base.

139. ] The method of claim 12, further comprising a third internally threaded blind bore, formed in said heel weight, a throughbore formed in a heel end of said recess, said third internally threaded blind bore being in alignment with said third throughbore when said toe weight and said striking plate are connected to said base.

149. ] The method of claim 13, further comprising a fourth internally threaded blind bore formed in said heel weight, said fourth internally threaded blind bore extending through said heel weight protuberance, a fourth throughbore formed in said base adjacent said toe end of said base, and said fourth internally threaded blind bore being in alignment with said fourth throughbore when said toe weight is connected to said base.

159. ] The product of claim 1.

169. ] The product of claim 3.

179. ] A method of making a putter head, comprising the steps of: forming a base of predetermined width, said base having a leading wall, a trailing wall, and a perimeter wall that circumscribes said base; said perimeter wall having a top, a bottom, a heel end and a toe end; forming a block that has a leading wall adapted to abuttingly engage said trailing wall of said base; forming a first groove of predetermined configuration in a heel end of said block, said first groove being disposed normal to a plane of said base; forming a second groove of predetermined configuration in a toe end of said block, said second groove being disposed normal to said plane of said base; forming a recess of predetermined configuration in said leading wall, substantially centrally thereof, said recess having a depth less than said width of said base; forming a first throughbore in said toe end of said base, a second and a third throughbore in said recess, and a fourth throughbore in said heel end of said base; forming a heel weight having a protuberance of predetermined configuration that mates with said predetermined configuration of said first groove and sliding said heel weight protuberance into said first groove until said heel weight abuts said trailing wall; forming a toe weight having a protuberance of predetermined configuration that mates with said predetermined configuration of said second groove and sliding said toe weight protuberance into said second groove until said toe weight abuts said trailing wall; forming a striking plate having a predetermined configuration that fits within said recess and forming a pair of throughbores in said striking plate that align with said second and third throughbores formed in said recess; and fastening said heel weight, said toe weight, said block and said striking plate to said base.

189. ] The method of claim 17, further comprising the steps of: forming said base from a first material having a first mass; forming said heel weight, said toe weight, and said striking plate from a common second material having a second mass; and selecting said first and second materials so that said first mass is less than said second mass.

199. ] The method of claim 18, further comprising the step of anodizing said base.

209. ] The method of claim 19, further comprising the steps of: forming a first throughbore in said toe end of said base, a second and a third throughbore in said recess, and a fourth throughbore in said heel end of said base; fastening said heel weight, said toe weight, said striking plate, and said block to said base with screw fasteners made of the same material as said common second material; positioning respective heads of said screw fasteners in slightly raised relation to said leading wall at the completion of said fastening step; and milling off a predetermined layer of said leading wall of said base to expose an unanodized surface, so that said screw fasteners are flush with said unanodized surface.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] 1. Field of the Invention

[0002] This invention relates, generally, to blade putters and mallet putters used in the game of golf. More particularly, it relates to a method of making a blade putter and a mallet putter having a weighted heel and toe and a method for manufacturing such putter heads.

[0003] 2. Description of the Prior Art

[0004] he face or striking surface of every putter has a “sweet spot” that when impacted against a golf ball during a putting stroke produces an optimal putt. The sweet spot is generally at the center of the putter head. If a golfer strikes the ball away from the sweet spot, i.e. , toward the heel or the toe of the striking surface, a less-than-optimal putt results because at the moment of impact, the striking surface rotates relative to a longitudinal axis defined by the club handle. Specifically, for a right-handed golfer striking a ball toward the toe area of the putter face, the toe rotates in a clockwise direction, thereby causing the putt to veer to the right of a target hole. Similarly, for a right-handed golfer striking a ball toward the heel area of the putter face, the heel rotates in a counterclockwise direction, thereby causing the putt to veer to the left of the target hole.

[0005] One way to reduce the amount of rotation at the moment of impact is to increase the mass of the toe and heel areas of the putter head relative to the central region of the putter. There are several known methods for making a putter head with such characteristics. As a first example, a blind bore is milled into the putter head in each of said areas and a plug having a high mass is inserted into each blind bore and secured therein by a suitable adhesive. This increases the rotational moment of inertia and thus reduces the amount of rotation as desired.

[0006] As a second example, such as disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,669,825 to Shira, the toe and heel of a club head are made of a dense material such as tungsten and the middle part is made of a lighter material such as titanium. Shira teaches that the disparate parts may be joined to one another by welding, brazing, diffusion, or adhesive bonding.

[0007] Both of these known methods have drawbacks. A blind bore milled into a putter head has a limited size and thus the plug that fills it is also limited in size. It is also difficult to position the weights at the extreme outer ends of the putter head. Moreover, a suitable means must be employed to prevent the plug from separating from the blind bore. Some of these limitations are overcome in the Shira design, but forming materials by sintering is an energy-intensive process and joining together the parts of different masses by welding, brazing, and the like, is labor intensive.

[0008] Blade putters and mallet putters are also quite expensive. However, many blade and mallet putters lack aesthetic appeal. This disappoints many golfers because for their money they would prefer to have an attractive, aesthetically-pleasing putter.

[0009] What is needed, then, is an improved blade putter and mallet putter construction where the rotational moment of inertia is increased, where no sintered metals are used, and where the parts are easily assembled and joined together. There is also a need for a more aesthetically-pleasing blade or mallet putter.

[0010] However, in view of the prior art in at the time the present invention was made, it was not obvious to those of ordinary skill in the pertinent art how the identified needs could be fulfilled.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0011] The longstanding but heretofore unfulfilled need for an improved method for making a putter head is now met by a new, useful, and nonobvious method that includes the steps of milling a base of predetermined width so that the base has a leading wall, a trailing wall, a heel end, and a toe end. A stop plate is milled such that it is formed integrally with the base, projecting from the trailing wall of the base in normal relation thereto. The base is anodized at a suitable point in the procedure. A recess is formed in the leading wall of the base and a striking plate is secured in the recess so that the striking plate is flush with the leading wall. A heel weight is secured to the trailing wall of the base such that a heel end of the heel weight is flush with the heel end of the base and so that a toe end of the heel weight abuts the stop plate, A toe weight is secured to the trailing wall of the base such that a toe end of the toe weight is flush with the toe end of the base and so that a heel end of the toe weight abuts the stop plate. A first material for the base is selected as is a second material for the striking plate, the heel weight, and the toe weight such that the first material has less mass than the second material. When the striking plate and weights have been fastened to the base, the leading wall of the base is milled to expose an unanodized surface to enhance the aesthetic appeal of the putter head.

[0012] The method further includes the steps of securing the striking plate, the heel weight, and the toe weight to the base with screw fasteners that are made of the second material, and positioning a head of each of the screw fasteners in slightly raised relation to the leading wall of the base so that the step of milling the leading wall includes the step of shearing each of the heads of the screw fasteners so that the heads are flush with the leading wall.

[0013] In a preferred embodiment, the method steps include the steps of forming a base of predetermined width, said base having a leading wall, a trailing wall, and a perimeter wall that circumscribes the base. The perimeter wall has a top, a bottom, a heel end and a toe end. The method further includes the steps of forming a stop plate that projects from the trailing wall in normal relation thereto, forming a first groove of predetermined configuration in a heel end of the base, said first groove being formed in the trailing wall, said first groove having a first end in open communication with the heel end of the base and said first groove having a depth less than the predetermined width of the base. Further steps include forming a second groove of predetermined configuration in a toe end of the base, said second groove being formed in the trailing wall, said second groove having a first end in open communication with the toe end of the base, forming a recess of predetermined configuration in the leading wall, substantially centrally thereof, said recess having a depth less than the width of the base, forming a first throughbore in the toe end of the base, a second and a third throughbore in the recess, and a fourth throughbore in the heel end of the base, forming a heel weight having a protuberance of predetermined configuration that mates with the predetermined configuration of the first groove and sliding the heel weight protuberance into the first groove until the heel weight abuts a heel end of the stop plate, forming a toe weight having a protuberance of predetermined configuration that mates with the predetermined configuration of the second groove and sliding the toe weight protuberance into the second groove until the toe weight abuts a toe end of the stop plate, forming a striking plate having a predetermined configuration that fits within the recess and forming a pair of throughbores in the striking plate that align with the second and third throughbores formed in the recess, and fastening the heel weight, the toe weight, and the striking plate to the base.

[0014] The novel method for making a mallet putter includes the steps of forming a base of predetermined width, said base having a leading wall, a trailing wall, and a perimeter wall that circumscribes said base, said perimeter wall having a top, a bottom, a heel end and a toe end. Further steps include forming a block that has a leading wall adapted to abuttingly engage the trailing wall of the base, forming a first groove of predetermined configuration in a heel end of the block, said first groove being disposed normal to a plane of the base, forming a second groove of predetermined configuration in a toe end of the block, said second groove being disposed normal to the plane of the base, forming a recess of predetermined configuration in the leading wall, substantially centrally thereof, said recess having a depth less than the width of the base, forming a first throughbore in the toe end of the base, a second and a third throughbore in the recess, and a fourth throughbore in said heel end of the base, forming a heel weight having a protuberance of predetermined configuration that mates with the predetermined configuration of the first groove and sliding the heel weight protuberance into the first groove until the heel weight abuts the trailing wall of the base, forming a toe weight having a protuberance of predetermined configuration that mates with the predetermined configuration of the second groove and sliding the toe weight protuberance into the second groove until the toe weight abuts the trailing wall of the base, forming a striking plate having a predetermined configuration that fits within the recess and forming a pair of throughbores in the striking plate that align with the second and third throughbores formed in the recess, and fastening the heel weight, the toe weight, and the striking plate to the base.

[0015] A primary object of the invention is to provide a blade putter and a mallet putter construction method that provides a putter head having an enhanced rotational moment of inertia vis a vis conventional putter heads.

[0016] Another important object is to accomplish the foregoing object with a putter head having a high degree of aesthetic appeal.

[0017] Still another important object is to provide a putter head made of aluminum and copper, aluminum and brass, or similar materials.

[0018] Another important object is to provide a manufacturing method where all forming steps are performed by a milling machine.

[0019] These and other important objects, advantages, and features of the invention will become clear as this description proceeds.

[0020] The invention accordingly comprises the features of construction, combination of elements, and arrangement of parts that will be exemplified in the description set forth hereinafter and the scope of the invention will be indicated in the claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

[0021] For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention, reference should be made to the following detailed description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

[0022] FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a novel blade putter in its assembled configuration;

[0023] FIG. 2 is a first side elevational view of the novel base;

[0024] FIG. 3 is a second side elevational view of said base;

[0025] FIG. 4 is a top plan view of said base;

[0026] FIG. 5A is a side elevational view of the novel striking plate;

[0027] FIG. 5B is a top plan view of said striking plate;

[0028] FIG. 6A is a first side elevational view of a novel weight member;

[0029] FIG. 6B is an end view of said novel weight member;

[0030] FIG. 7 is an exploded perspective view of the novel putter head;

[0031] FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a mallet putter in its assembled configuration; and

[0032] FIG. 9 is an exploded perspective view of the novel mallet putter.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0033] Referring to FIG. 1, it will there be seen that the reference numeral 10 denotes an illustrative embodiment of the novel putter head as a whole.

[0034] As best understood in connection with FIGS. 2-4, putter head 10 includes a base 12 formed of a machineable material such as aluminum.

[0035] Base 12 has a leading wall 14, (FIG. 2), a trailing wall 6, (FIG. 3), and a perimeter wall 18 (FIG. 4) that circumscribes base 12.

[0036] A recess 20 having a generally trapezoidal shape is formed in leading wall 14. As indicated in FIG. 4, the depth of recess 20 is approximately half the width of base 12. An oval throughbore 22 extends from the bottom of recess 20 into open communication with trailing wall 16. Any other shape is also within the scope of this invention; the oval is preferred for its aesthetic appeal.

[0037] Striking plate 24, depicted in FIGS. 5A and 5B, which essentially defines the sweet spot of the finished putter head, has a main body 26 having a width equal to the depth of trapezoidal recess 20 and an integrally-formed oval-shaped protuberance 28 that projects from its trailing side and which fits snugly within throughbore 22 when putter head 10 is assembled, as perhaps best understood in connection with FIG. 7. Throughbores 30 and 32 are formed in main body 26 near its lower opposing corners. Striking plate 24 is preferably formed of copper or brass, but it could be formed of many other suitable materials. A metal such as BeNi, for example, could be employed to provide a different hardness and a different feel.

[0038] Four throughbores 34, 36, 38, and 40 (FIGS. 2-4) extend transversely through base 12.

[0039] A stop plate 42 extends transversely from trailing wall 16 at the central region of base 12 and is flush with a bottom wall or sole 44 of said base 12.

[0040] A first groove 46, having a dovetail shape, is formed in trailing wall 16 and has a depth of about one-third of the width of base 12. First groove 46 extends from a heel end 48 of base 12 and is in open communication with said heel end. Said groove 46 is also formed in registration with throughbore 40.

[0041] A second groove 50, also having a dovetail shape, is also formed in trailing wall 16 and has a depth of about one-third of the width of base 12. Second groove 50 extends from a toe end 52 of base 12 and is in open communication with said toe end. Said groove 50 is also formed in registration with throughbore 34.

[0042] A heel weight 54 and a toe weight 56 (FIG. 1) are next formed from a rectangular (parallelepiped) block of copper or brass. Both copper and brass, like aluminum, are millable and have an aesthetically-pleasing appearance. Just as importantly, their mass exceeds that of aluminum.

[0043] As best understood in connection with FIGS. 6A, 6B, and 7, dovetail-shaped protuberance 58 is formed in heel weight 54. The heel end of the protuberance is flush with the heel end of heel weight 54, when all milling operations have been finished, and the longitudinal extent of protuberance 58 is slightly less than that of dovetail-shaped groove 46. A pair of internally-threaded blind bores 60, 62 is formed in heel weight 54, the latter of which extends through protuberance 58 and into the main body of heel weight 54 and the former of which is formed in said main body but not in said protuberance. Protuberance 58 is slid into heel groove 46 until heel weight 54 abuts stop plate 42. When so positioned, internally-threaded blind bores 60, 62 are in registration with throughbores 40, 38 formed in base 12, respectively.

[0044] Similarly, a dovetail-shaped protuberance 64 (FIG. 7) is formed in toe weight 56. The toe end of protuberance 64 is flush with the toe end of toe weight 56 when all milling operations have been completed and the longitudinal extent of protuberance 64 is slightly less than that of dovetail-shaped toe groove 50. A pair of internally-threaded blind bores 66, 68 is formed in toe weight 56, the first of which extends through protuberance 64 and into the main body of toe weight 56 and the second of which is formed in said main body but not in said protuberance. As depicted in FIG. 7, protuberance 64 is slid into groove 50 until toe weight 56 abuts stop plate 42. Blind bores 66, 68 enter into alignment with throughbores 36, 34, respectively.

[0045] Fastener screws 70, 72, 74, and 76 (FIG. 7) are then inserted through throughbores 34, 36, 38, and 40, respectively, of base 12. In so doing, the distal free end of screw 76 extends into and screw-threadedly engages internally-threaded blind bore 62 formed in heel weight 54, the distal free end of screw 74 extends through throughbore 30 of striking plate main body 26 and screw-threadedly engages blind bore 60 formed in heel weight 54, the distal free end of screw 72 extends through throughbore 32 of striking plate main body 26 and screw-threadedly engages blind bore 66 formed in toe weight 56, and the distal free end of screw 70 extends into and screw-threadedly engages internally-threaded blind bore 68 formed in toe weight 56.

[0046] As those skilled in machining will recognize, there is no exact sequence of milling that must be followed when forming base 12, striking plate 24, and weights 54 and 56. Base 12 is preferably milled from a bar stock of high grade aluminum such as 6061, 2024, 7075, or other suitable high grade aluminum. Similarly, striking plate 24 and weights 54, 56 are preferably milled from parallelepiped blocks of copper or brass. A CNC (computer numerically controlled) milling machine is preferably employed in all milling operations.

[0047] This invention is not limited to the use of aluminum, copper, and brass; these materials are merely preferred.

[0048] The preferred sequence of making a prototype of the novel putter head is as follows.

[0049] In the first operation, base 12 is milled by forming trapezoidal recess 20, oval throughbore 22, and dovetail grooves 46 and 50 therein.

[0050] In the second operation, heel and toe weights 54 and 56 are milled to form dovetailed protuberances 58 and 64 therein, respectively. The weights are then slid into their respective operative positions by sliding protuberance 58 into groove 46 and protuberance 64 into groove 50. Fastener screws 70, 76 are inserted to hold the weights into place, and the assembly is profile milled to create the appearance of the base 12 as depicted and to make the weights flush with body 12.

[0051] In the third operation, striking plate 24 is milled and the throughbores formed therein are drilled.

[0052] In the fourth operation, the screws are then removed so that the weights may be detached from base 12. Base 12 is then anodized to a rich, protective finish, acquiring an aesthetically-appealing black color. However, the use of other colors, such as the colors of collegiate or professional sports teams, is also within the scope of this invention.

[0053] In the fifth operation, striking plate 24 and weights 54, 56 are reattached to base 12 with screws 70, 72, 74, and 76.

[0054] Significantly, throughbores 34 and 40, formed in the toe and heel ends, respectively, of base 12, are countersunk so that the heads of fasteners 70 and 76 are slightly raised with respect to leading wall 14 of base 12 when said fasteners are fully engaged. Similarly, throughbores 30 and 32, formed in trapezoidal striking plate 26, are also countersunk so that the heads of fasteners 74 and 72 are raised with respect to said striking plate when said fasteners are fully engaged. Each fastener is made of the same material as striking plate 26 and weights 54, 56. Thus, in the preferred embodiment, each fastener is made of copper or brass, depending upon the composition of said striking plate and weights.

[0055] The sixth and final step of the manufacturing process is to remove by machine milling a thin layer of the anodized aluminum that forms leading wall 14 of base 12. When this milling is finished, all four of the fastener screw heads will be flush with the newly exposed surface of said leading wall. The newly exposed leading surface of striking plate 26 has a color that is the same as the removed layer because said striking plate is formed of solid copper or brass or other suitable material as aforesaid. However, the color of the newly exposed surface of base 12 is the color of the unanodized aluminum from which said base is made because the coloring of the aluminum by the anodization process affects only the exterior surface of base 12. The heads of fastener screws 70 and 76 are flush with said exposed aluminum surface and are clearly visible thereagainst because said fasteners are made of the same material as striking plate 24 as mentioned earlier. However, the heads of fastener screws 72 and 74, which are also flush with the newly exposed surface of said striking plate, are not discernable to the unaided eye because said heads blend in perfectly with the striking plate. The result is a putter club head having an unusually striking degree of aesthetic appeal, including a combination of copper or brass surfaces for the striking plate, the heel and toe weights, and the screws, anodized aluminum surfaces for the perimeter wall 18 of the base, the trailing wall 16 thereof, and stop plate 42, and an unanodized aluminum color for the leading wall 14 of said putter head.

[0056] When putter head 10 is mass-produced, there is no need to follow the steps described above. Instead, all parts are milled to their final specification as independent parts, there being no need to assemble the parts for a perimeter milling, to disassemble the parts to anodize the base, and to reassemble the parts after anodization. The parts are milled to specification, the base is anodized, and the parts are assembled. Step six of the prototype process is then performed to produce the final product.

[0057] The second embodiment of the invention, depicted in FIGS. 8 and 9, is a mallet putter 80 constructed in accordance with the same principles as disclosed in connection with blade putter 10. It includes an aluminum base 82 having a leading wall 84 and a trailing wall 86. A trapezoidal recess 88 is formed in said leading wall to receive a trapezoidal striking plate 90. Throughbore 92 is formed in the toe end 93 of base 82, throughbores 94 and 96 are formed in the recessed region of said body, and throughbore 98 is formed in the heel end of said body. Trailing wall 100 is formed integrally with base 82 and extends in a trailing direction from a top edge thereof.

[0058] Unlike the first embodiment, there are no dovetailed grooves formed in trailing wall 86 of base 82.

[0059] Aluminum (or other suitable material) block 102 is also not provided in the first embodiment. It is essentially block 102 that makes the putter a mallet putter.

[0060] Aluminum block 102 includes a set of opposed terraces, collectively denoted 104, that are primarily ornamental. A first dovetailed groove 106 is formed in a heel end of aluminum block 102 and extends the entire extent thereof. A second dovetailed groove 108 is formed in a toe end of said aluminum block and also extends the entire extent thereof.

[0061] A heel weight 110 includes a dovetailed protuberance 112 that slidingly mates with first dovetailed groove 106 and a toe weight 114 includes a dovetailed protuberance 116 that slidingly mates with second dovetailed groove 108. Internally threaded blind bores 118, 120, 122, and 124 are formed, respectively, in the leading end of heel weight 110, in the leading wall of aluminum block 102 near its heel end and near its toe end, and in the leading end of toe weight 114. As in the first embodiment, base 82 is anodized at an appropriate step of the manufacturing process, four fasteners 126, 128, 130, and 132 are employed to hold the assembled parts together, and leading wall 84 of the anodized base 82, together with the protruding heads of the four fasteners, are milled off at the conclusion of the process to produce the highly attractive finished part.

[0062] In addition to its pleasing appearance, the novel putter head is further desirable because it is 100% machined, has a multi-metal construction, and has a rich anodized finish. Advantageously, in the preferred embodiment the parts are held together with four common screws although the various parts could be secured to one another by adhesives or other means. The use of an aluminum base, a copper or brass striking plate (or other suitable metals of different hardnesses to provide different feels) and copper or brass weights increases the moment of rotational inertia as desired while further enhancing the aesthetic appeal of the putter. The final step of removing a thin layer of anodized aluminum from the leading wall of the putter head, including the flush cutting of protruding heads of the screw fasteners, is also highly innovative.

[0063] It will thus be seen that the objects set forth above, and those made apparent from the foregoing description, are efficiently attained. Since certain changes may be made in the above construction without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matters contained in the foregoing description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

[0064] It is also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention herein described, and all statements of the scope of the invention which, as a matter of language, might be said to fall therebetween.

[0065] Now that the invention has been described,