Title:
Slipper and method for forming slipper
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An open heel slipper configuration is presented. The open heel slipper configuration includes a platform foot bed having a flexible sidewall, and a vamp secured to the flexible sidewall at a location adjacent a region of the platform foot bed that is secured to an outsole, during construction. The construction is such to provide a free extension of a portion of the sidewall of the platform foot bed, underneath a vamp, in the final product. A preferred method of assembly is also provided.



Inventors:
Walter Jr., Thomas Bray (Reynoldsburg, OH, US)
Stewart, Theresa (Columbus, OH, US)
Application Number:
09/798767
Publication Date:
06/20/2002
Filing Date:
03/02/2001
Assignee:
BRAY WALTER THOMAS
STEWART THERESA
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
36/12
International Classes:
A43B3/10; (IPC1-7): A43B13/28
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20070275238Waterproof Vapor-Permeable Multilayer ArticleNovember, 2007Moretti et al.
20030208926Shoe sole structuresNovember, 2003Frampton III
20040025373Footwear having a window for visual sizingFebruary, 2004Schuver et al.
20090223088Athletic Shoe Cleat With Dynamic Traction and Method of Making and Using SameSeptember, 2009Krikorian et al.
20080110052Novelty footwear item with concealed wax combMay, 2008Ritter et al.
20040154188Footwear with dual-density midsole and deceleration zonesAugust, 2004Laska
20020043007Kicking aid for a shoe and method thereforApril, 2002Hannah
200300977674-E.V.A systemMay, 2003Perkinson
20080110050Flexible and Adjustable FastenerMay, 2008Prickell
20090307932SHOE WITH TRACTION OUTSOLEDecember, 2009Kirby et al.
20090272013Article of Footwear with Lighting SystemNovember, 2009Beers et al.



Primary Examiner:
BAYS, MARIE D
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MERCHANT & GOULD P.C. (MINNEAPOLIS, MN, US)
Claims:

We claim:



1. An open heeled slipper comprising: (a) an outsole; (b) a platform foot bed secured to the outsole; (i) the platform foot bed having a flexible sidewall portion and a top foot pad portion; the flexible sidewall portion extending in direction between the top foot pad portion and the outsole; and, (c) a vamp; (i) the vamp being secured in the slipper with a free extension of the flexible sidewall portion projecting upwardly, from a line of attachment of the vamp to a remainder of the slipper, a distance of at least 60% of the greatest height of extension of the sidewall portion from the outsole covered by the vamp.

2. A slipper according to claim 1 wherein: (a) the vamp is secured in the slipper with a free extension of the flexible sidewall portion projecting upwardly, from a line of attachment of the vamp to a remainder of the slipper, a distance of at least 80% of the greatest height of extension of the sidewall portion from the outsole covered by the vamp.

3. A slipper according to claim 1 wherein: (a) the top foot pad portion is secured to the flexible sidewall portion by stitching.

4. A slipper according to claim 1 including: (a) an insole filler positioned between the top footpad portion, of the platform foot bed, and the outsole.

5. A slipper according to claim 4 wherein: (a) the insole filler comprises: (i) a compressible midsole; and, (ii) a heel portion; the heel portion being positioned between the compressible midsole and the outsole.

6. A slipper according to claim 5 wherein: (a) the compressible midsole comprises a single piece of polymeric foam.

7. A slipper according to claim 6 wherein: (a) the compressible midsole comprises a single piece of polyurethane foam having a density within the range of about 70 to 75 grams per cubic centimeter.

8. A slipper according to claim 5 wherein: (a) the heel portion includes a beveled front edge defining a bevel surface; (i) the heel portion being oriented with the bevel surface directed toward the midsole and away from the outsole.

9. A slipper according to claim 1 wherein: (a) the top foot pad portion and the flexible sidewall portion of the platform foot bed each comprise flexible fabric material.

10. A slipper according to claim 1 wherein: (a) the vamp comprises flexible fabric material.

11. A slipper according to claim 10 wherein: (a) the vamp comprises two layers of flexible fabric material secured to one another along a perimeter stitch line.

12. A slipper according to claim 10 wherein: (a) the vamp is secured to the platform foot bed by stitching.

13. A slipper according to claim 12 wherein: (a) the vamp is secured to the platform foot bed along a stitch line which is positioned no farther than about 1 centimeter from the outsole, when the slipper is fully assembled.

14. A slipper according to claim 1 including: (a) a flexible fabric binding secured to the sidewall of the platform foot bed at a location adjacent the outsole.

15. A slipper according to claim 14 wherein: (a) the flexible fabric binding is secured to the sidewall of the platform foot bed by stitching.

16. A slipper according to claim 15 wherein: (a) the binding is secured to the outsole, by stitching.

17. A slipper according to claim 1 wherein: (a) the outsole is selected from: molded polymeric material and leather.

18. The slipper according to claim 1 wherein: (a) the top foot bed portion is substantially flat.

19. The slipper according to claim 1 wherein: (a) the top foot bed portion does not include any upwardly extending portions.

20. A method of constructing an open heeled slipper; the method including a step of: (a) securing a flexible vamp to a flexible sidewall portion of a platform foot bed along a line of attachment at least 80% of the height of the sidewall portion from a line of attachment of the sidewall portion to a top foot pad portion of the platform foot bed.

Description:

[0001] This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/255,475 filed Dec. 14, 2000, which is hereby incorporated by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0002] The present invention relates to footwear. More particularly, the invention relates to a slipper having a preferred construction, and methods for achieving that construction.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003] A wide variety of slipper designs are known. The particular slipper designs of the current disclosure relate to open-heeled configurations. Variations of these, for example the clog-style designs of U.S. Pat. No. 5,491,860, incorporated herein by reference, are known.

[0004] The present invention relates to improvements in the construction of open-heeled slippers, and methods of achieving such a construction.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0005] According to the present disclosure there is provided an open heel slipper. The open heel slipper is provided in both a closed toe and an open toe configuration. In general, the open heel slipper includes an outsole; a platform foot bed secured to the outsole; and, a vamp secured to the platform foot bed. Preferably the platform foot bed comprises a top foot bed portion and a flexible sidewall or mudguard portion. The vamp is preferably secured to the flexible sidewall portion of the platform foot bed at a region remote from a line of attachment of the flexible sidewall portion to the top foot bed portion. This creates an arrangement in which there is a free height or free extension of the platform foot bed sidewall upwardly underneath the vamp, above the point of attachment of the vamp in the slipper.

[0006] Most preferably the greatest free extension or free height is at least 60% of the sidewall height of the footpad, above the outsole, most preferably it is at least 70% of the height, and a typical and most preferred construction is at least 80% of that height. Indeed in instances depicted, the point of attachment or line of attachment to the vamp in the platform foot bed is as close to a bottom edge of the platform foot bed as is feasible.

[0007] A preferred method of construction provided, which involves securing the vamp to the platform foot bed, in the preferred region is characterized.

[0008] Preferred materials, specific components and specific steps of assembly are provided.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0009] FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of an open heeled, closed toed, right footed slipper in accord with the present invention;

[0010] FIG. 2 is a schematic perspective view of a step of assembling the slipper depicted in FIG. 1;

[0011] FIG. 3 is a schematic plan view of a mudguard heel component useable to form a slipper in accord with FIG. 1 and via the assembly of FIG. 2;

[0012] FIG. 4 is a top plan view of a mudguard toe component useable to form a slipper in accord with FIG. 1 and via the assembly of FIG. 2;

[0013] FIG. 5 is a top plan view of a vamp component useable in the formation of a slipper in accord with FIG. 1, via the assembly of FIG. 2;

[0014] FIG. 6 is a top plan view of a sock component, usable to form the slipper of FIG. 1 in accord with the assembly of FIG. 2;

[0015] FIG. 7 is a top plan view of a mid-sole useable in the formation of a slipper according to FIG. 1, via the assembly of FIG. 2;

[0016] FIG. 8 is a top plan view of a heel filler component useable in assembling the slipper of FIG. 1 in accord with the assembly of FIG. 2;

[0017] FIG. 9 is a top plan view of an outsole useable to form the slipper of FIG. 1, in accord with the assembly of FIG. 2;

[0018] FIG. 10 is a side elevational view of an open heeled, open toed, left footed slipper in accord with the second embodiment of the present invention; and,

[0019] FIG. 11 is a top plan view of a vamp piece useable in forming the slipper of FIG. 10.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

[0020] Attention is first directed to FIG. 1. In FIG. 1 a slipper 1 in accord with the present invention is depicted. The particular slipper 1 depicted, is an “open heeled” slipper. By “open heeled” in this context, it is meant that the heel portion of the slipper, i.e. the portion which receives the heel of a wearer during use, does not have a sidewall which projects upwardly and surrounds the heel of the wearer. The particular open heeled slipper depicted, in FIG. 1, is a “closed toe” slipper; “closed toe” in this context meaning that the toes of the wearer are completely covered by the slipper. An alternate embodiment, depicted in FIG. 10, is an “open toe” version, the term “open toe” in this context meaning at least a portion of the toes of the wearer are left uncovered, when the slipper is worn.

[0021] Herein, the slipper 1 will be described in part by reference to the components from which it is formed. The primary components of the slipper 1 are: outsole 4, platform foot bed or fabric cover 5, vamp 6 and binding 7. Not viewable in FIG. 1, is an insole filler 10, shown in FIG. 2, positioned underneath fabric covering 5, between the fabric covering 5 and the outsole 4.

[0022] The particular slipper 1 of FIG. 1 utilizes a platform foot bed or fabric covering 5 having a top footpad or sock piece 15, and a downwardly extending sidewall or mudguard 17. In general, the sidewall 17 is secured to the top footpad or sock piece 15 to create a sidewall and top covering for the internally received insole filler 10.

[0023] For the particular slipper 1 depicted in FIG. 1, the vamp 6, which covers a front portion of a wearer's foot in use, is secured to a remainder of the slipper 1 at a region adjacent a bottom edge portion 18 of the sidewall or mud guard 17, i.e. to an edge portion of the sidewall or mudguard 17 opposite an edge 19 of the sidewall or mud guard 17 to which the sock piece 15 is secured. This will be further understood from further detail below, in connection with a method of assembly characterized in FIG. 2.

[0024] FIGS. 3-9 depict components useable to form the assembled slipper 1 of FIG. 1, in accord with the principles of assembly depicted in connection with FIG. 2. In general, the components may be used to assemble slipper 1, described hereinafter in connection with these figures.

[0025] FIGS. 3 and 4 depict components useable to form the sidewall or mudguard component 17 of the slipper 1. In FIG. 3, a heel component 20 of the eventual sidewall or mudguard 17 is shown; and, in FIG. 4 a toe component 21 of the eventual sidewall or mudguard 17 is shown. In general, the mudguard or sidewall 17 is assembled by securing components 20 and 21 together into a continuous loop, with opposite edges and two seams. It is noted that heel component 20 includes an edge 24 with a heel bulge 25 therein. The heel bulge 25 will typically be oriented in the assembled slipper 1 adjacent the top sock 15, i.e. opposite from the outsole 4 or on top of the insole filler 10.

[0026] It is foreseen that in typical preferred constructions, the material(s) of heel component 20 and toe component 21 will be of a type that can be secured along a sewn seam using conventional stitching techniques. Typically, when such a sewn seam is used, for aesthetic purposes the stitching will be done with the pieces 20, 21 overlying one another with a fabric inside pointed out, (and an aesthetically preferred fabric side pointed in) with the assembled sidewall 17 then inverted to leave the seams inside, for aesthetic purposes. Such seams will be referred to herein as inseams or finished inseams.

[0027] A further step of assembly involves securing the top foot pad or sock piece 15 to the assembled sidewall or mudguard 17. A useable foot pad is shown in FIG. 6 at 15. Attachment to the mudguard 17 would generally occur along peripheral edge 27. In general, the securment should be along a seam created along an edge generated in the eventual sidewall or mudguard 17 by edges 28 and 29 of the two components 20, 21, FIGS. 3 and 4. In typical embodiments, inseam stitching will be preferred.

[0028] The assembly resulting from securing the mudguard 17 to the top footpad or sock piece 15, is generally referred to herein as the platform foot bed 5, typically provided in the specific form of a fabric cover. Platform foot bed 5 defines a hollow interior, to be filled with the insole filler 10, as described below in connection with FIG. 2. The sidewall 17 is preferably flexible, so it can flex and bend under the weight of a wearer.

[0029] In typical operation, another step of assembly will involve connecting a vamp construction or vamp 6 to the platform foot bed 5. Typically, the vamp 6 will comprise two layers of fabric sewn to one another, each positioned (when assembled in the slipper 1) with its aesthetic fabric side out, if each piece has only one aesthetic side. Referring to FIG. 5, a vamp piece 35 is depicted. A typical vamp 6, FIG. 1, will be formed from two vamp pieces each having the same general perimeter shape, secured to one another along the outer edge 36. Typically an aesthetic face to aesthetic face orientation will be used during a first portion of the stitching across the mouth 37, and then the partially assembled vamp unit will be inverted to generate the aesthetic sides out for the fabrics, and a more attractive internal seam. After inversion of the partially assembled vamp, the bottom perimeter edge 38 of the vamp will be stitched together. The stitching on the bottom perimeter edge 38 of the vamp does not require an inseamed or finished stitching method because this edge will be hidden in the final assembly construction.

[0030] The vamp 6 is preferably secured to the platform foot bed 5 in a region adjacent the edges of the sidewall or mudguard 17 opposite from the top footpad or sock piece 15. This would be along an edge of the platform foot bed 5 resulting from edges 41 and 42 of component 20, 21, typically and mostly in the toe section 21 along edge 42. This creates a slipper assembly 1 in which a front portion of the mudguard or sidewall 17 extends underneath, and inside of, the vamp 6. Typically, prior to the vamp 6 being sewn to the platform foot bed 5, the vamp 6 is shirred in a toe portion thereof, to create a smooth, attractive appearance. Shirring is a well known technique involving stitching lines that generate a bunching of the fabric in the toe area to provide an attractive appearance. Shirring techniques are well known and are briefly described, for example, in U.S. Pat. No. 5,491,860 at column 4, lines 7-21, and such a technique can be utilized to generate an attractive shirred toe portion for slippers according to the present invention.

[0031] Herein when reference is made to securing the vamp 6 adjacent the edge of the sidewall or mud guard 17 opposite from the top footpad 15, it is meant that preferably the securing occurs either immediately at the lower edge of the foot pad 15, or within a distance of about two centimeters of the edge, such that preferably a sidewall 17 free extension upwardly beneath the vamp 6 of at least one centimeter is left. Also preferably the line of attachment of the vamp 6 to a remainder of the slipper 1 is spaced at least one centimeter, and preferably at least 1.5 centimeters from seam 19, where the mudguard 17 joins the top foot pad 15.

[0032] Alternately stated, and referring to FIGS. 1 and 10, the mudguard 17 which results from using mudguard toe piece 21, will generally have an extension of height H, measured from top seam or edge 19 to bottom seam or edge 18. Height H varies slightly along the profile of the slipper. Height H corresponds approximately to the length of the edge 43 on the toe mudguard portion 21 of FIG. 4. However, H will be smaller than the length of edge 43 because edge 29 will be stitched to the sock 26 and edge 42 will be stitched to the binding strip and to the outsole. Referring to FIG. 4, the edge 29 of toe piece 21 becomes adjoined to the sock 26. Preferably the line of attachment of the vamp 6 to the mudguard 17, resulting from strip 21, is spaced along height H from edge 29 at least 60% of height H, preferably at least 70% of height H, and most preferably at least 80% of height H. Indeed it is anticipated that typically and preferably the line of attachment the vamp 6 to the mudguard 17 will be as adjacent the lower edge (in the assumed example of this paragraph edge 42, FIG. 4) of the resulting mudguard 17 as is feasible for the means of attachment, for example stitching. The net result will be a slipper, FIG. 1, in which the mudguard 17 freely extends upwardly inside and underneath the vamp, without being secured to the vamp, a distance of at least 60% of the mudflap height, from the outside, preferably at least 70% of the mudflap height from the outsole, and most preferably at least 80% of the mudflap height from the outsole, in the overall slipper 1. This presents a preferred slipper line, with respect to appearance, and also results in a comfortable convenient slipper.

[0033] Herein the term “free” extension or variations thereof in this context is meant to refer to an upward extension above a line of connection to the vamp 6 and not tethered or inhibited by the vamp 6, but also is underneath the vamp 6.

[0034] In FIG. 1, cutaway section 30 reveals the free extension 32 of the mudguard 17. The height of the free extension is measured from the bottom seam 18 to the top edge 19. The height of the free extension beneath the vamp will vary slightly along the side wall. The greatest height of extension is the point where H is greatest, which is typically at the point beneath the vamp that is closest to the heel region. Cut away section 31 in FIG. 10 reveals the free extension 32 in the open toe slipper 100.

[0035] In a typical slipper construction, a binding strip 7 is sewn along a bottom edge 18 of the platform foot bed/vamp combination 50, FIG. 2 to create a platform foot bed/vamp/binding subassembly 52, useable to generate slipper 1. A folded strip of fabric can be used for the binding strip 7.

[0036] Referring now to FIG. 2, assembly of the slipper 1 is shown utilizing three components: platform foot bed/vamp/binding strip subassembly 52; outsole 53; and, insole filler subassembly 10.

[0037] Still referring to FIG. 2, in general, the outsole 4 is preferably a flat outsole piece, i.e. flat on both top and bottom. During assembly, subassembly 52 is generally secured to the outsole 4 in heel region 56, for example by stitching. As a result, through temporary toe opening 57, the insole filler 10 can be inserted. For the particular arrangement depicted in FIG. 2, preferred insole filler 10 comprising an assembly of an upper midsole piece 60, FIG. 7, and a lower heel support 61, FIG. 8, is shown. Preferably, heel support 61 is provided with a beveled front edge 64, FIGS. 2 and 8, with the bevel surface 65 directed upwardly toward midsole 60, so that the midsole 60, when made from preferred flexible materials can flex downwardly along surface 65. An angle of the bevel surface from the horizontal of 10° to 70° will be preferred, more preferably 20° to 45°.

[0038] Still referring to FIG. 2, after filler 10 is positioned underneath subassembly 52, surrounded by sidewall or mudguard 17 and above outsole 14, the final resulting slipper assembly can be closed along toe region 70, for example by stitching. Preferably the subassembly 52 is stitched to the outsole 4 and the stitching is visible on the outsole bottom, along the perimeter of the outsole. A small ridge may be provided along perimeter edge of the outsole adjacent to the stitching for reducing the load and wear on the stitching, as is known in the art. Preferably the ridge on the outsole bottom is about 1-5 mm thick, or more preferably about 2 mm thick.

[0039] Referring to the figures depicting the component parts, i.e. FIGS. 3-9 and 11, it is noted that along the perimeter of each of the pieces there are provided spaced projections and spaced notches. In general, these projections and notches can be used to facilitate alignment of parts, during assembly. The use of such projections and notches is well known in the manufacture of fabric slipper components and is described for example in U.S. Pat. No. 5,491,860. It is noted that FIGS. 3-9 and 11 can be considered to be the pattern for the fabric pieces, as opposed to being the actual pieces.

[0040] The slipper of the present invention is also described in a U.S. Design patent application filed on Mar. 2, 2001 by the same applicants as the present invention, having Attorney Docket No. 8530.552USI1 and in U.S. Design Patent application Ser. No. 29/134,127, filed Dec. 29, 2000, which are hereby incorporated herein in their entirety.

Preferred Materials

[0041] In preferred constructions according to the present invention, the vamp pieces 35, the top footpad or sock piece 15, the mud guard or sidewall 17 and the binding strip 7 are each flexible, typically a flexible fabric material. By “flexible” in this context, it is meant that they can flex and conform as a clothing or covering fabric, to a wearer's foot. Herein, in this context the term “fabric” is meant to include within its scope multilayer fabrics, laminates and composites. In general, the term is meant to include materials that can be either woven or non-woven, or components of both types of materials. Both natural and synthetic fiber, and composite fiber, materials are included.

[0042] Preferably some of the components of the slipper include a flexible fabric laminated to a thin layer of flexible non-woven synthetic material. The nonwoven material provides stability to the fabric component so that the fabric does not stretch out or loose its shape during assembly or use. Preferably the sock, binding strip, mud guards or sidewall and outer vamp material include a non-woven component.

[0043] Herein when reference is made to the term “adhesive” and “glue” or variants thereof, there is no intent to distinguish the materials or the method of securement from one another. That is, the term “adhesive” is meant to include within its breadth the term “glue” and the term “glue” is meant to include within its breadth the term “adhesive”. No method or approach of the binding which results, is meant to be inferred, i.e. chemical adhesion or mechanical interaction or both; further, no effort is meant to indicate the nature of the chemicals in the materials that form the adhesive or glue. In general, adhesive or glue materials known to be appropriate for slipper materials being secured are useable and commercially available.

[0044] Preferably the midsole portion of the insole filler, piece 60, FIG. 7, is a compressible foam, for comfort. Typical preferred materials will comprise a single piece of polyurethane foam having a density of about 2.2-2.7 lbs per cubic inch, (60-75 grams/cm3) typically about 2.5 lbs per square inch (or about 70 grams/in3). Alternatively, polyurethane foam may be used having a density of 2.2-2.7 lbs per square inch for a uniform thickness of ⅜ inch, most typically about 2.5 lbs. per square inch. Typical preferred midsole pieces will be between about ¾ inch (1.9 cm) and 1 inch (2.5 cm) thick, most typically about ¼-¾ inch (0.6 to 1.9 cm), usually midsole pieces about ⅜ inch (1 cm) thick or about ⅛ inch (0.3 cm) thick will be used.

[0045] The heel filler 61, FIG. 8, will typically and preferably be a firm material, i.e. one which does not readily compress under the weight of a person. Materials such as styrofoam, wood, rock or solid (molded) polymeric materials, or composites are examples of useable materials. A typical preferred material is a molded polymeric material, for example, an EVA (ethylene vinyl acetate) piece. The heel filler 61 may have a thickness at its thickest point of about ¼ inch (0.6 cm) to about 1 ¼ inch (3 cm), preferably about {fraction (3/8)} inch (0.9 cm).

[0046] The preferred outsole will typically be either a molded polymeric material or synthetic rubber, i.e. a thermoplastic rubber (TPR), or leather. Typical preferred materials will be ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) or polyethylene. A typical outsole thickness will be about 1 inch thick or thinner. Typically, when the remaining components are secured to the outsole by stitching, the outsole thickness will be no greater than about ¾ inch (1.9 cm), typically about {fraction (3/16)} inch-⅜ inch (0.5 cm-0.9 cm). As described below, in some embodiments, components will be secured to the outsole by adhesive (or glue) rather than stitching. When this is the case, the outsole can be somewhat thicker, since it is not necessary for the needle of the stitching process to pierce the outsole. In instances in which leather is chosen for the outsole, relatively thin outsoles can be used. The outsole bottom may include one of many different tread patterns that are known in the art, such as horizontal grooves in the heel and toe regions.

Alternate Embodiments

[0047] Attention is directed to FIGS. 10 and 11, which relate to an alternate embodiment. Referring to FIG. 10, the slipper 100 depicted is similar construction to slipper 1, FIG. 1, except slipper 100 is an open-toed configuration, so the vamp 110 of slipper 100 does not cover to the toe. Referring to FIG. 11, the vamp 110 of the alternate slipper embodiment 100 of FIG. 10 is shown. The vamp 110 has an open toe configuration so that the toes of the slipper wearer will be exposed during use. The top edge 112 and bottom edge 114 of the vamp 110 as oriented in FIG. 11 will be stitched with inseam stitching, shown in cut-away section 120. The side edges of vamp 110 do not need to have a finished edge as these edges will be hidden in the final construction. Assembly of slipper 100 would otherwise be analogous to the assembly of FIG. 1, described above in connection with FIG. 2. In addition, except for the specific configuration of the vamp, the components may be as described above in connection with the preferred embodiment, FIG. 1. That is, slipper 100 is merely an open-toed version of the slipper depicted in FIG. 1. Other vamp or upper configurations are also possible, such as one or more sandal-type straps.

[0048] In general, for the preferred construction approach described above, reference was made to stitching the various parts together. Alternate approaches to securing the parts or components together can be used in some instances, for example adhesives or glues can be used.

[0049] When constructing a slipper of the present invention using glue or adhesives, the vamp would be stitched to the vamp liner and set aside, as is done in the stitched method of assembly of the present invention. The fabric covering would be glued over the mid sole. Next, the vamp would be glued to the bottom of the mid sole. Finally, the vamp mid sole assembly would be glued to the outsole. When gluing assembly methods are used, appropriate materials should be selected to insure proper bonding with the selected adhesives, as is known in the art.

[0050] The present invention has been described herein in a preferred embodiment and alternatives. However, it will be appreciated that modifications and equivalence of the disclosed concepts may become apparent to those skilled in the art. It is intended that such modifications and equivalence be included within the scope of the present invention, as defined by the appended claims.