Title:
Game call producing antler sounds
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A manually operated game call is provided which includes a number of contacts having a non-round cross section, and at least one band bundling the contacts to one another when manipulated by the hand of a user. The band allows the contacts to move relative to one another so that a sound of antlers striking one another is simulated when the call is operated. Also, a method for attracting an animal is providing including the steps of providing a number of contacts bundled to one another, and manually moving the contacts within the hand of a user. Each contact has a non-round cross section so that the call produces a sound similar to the sound of antlers striking one another.



Inventors:
Butler, Terry L. (Neosho, MO, US)
Application Number:
10/037139
Publication Date:
05/16/2002
Filing Date:
10/23/2001
Assignee:
BUTLER TERRY L.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A01M31/00; (IPC1-7): A63H13/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MILLER, BENA B
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
J. David Wharton (Kansas City, MO, US)
Claims:
1. A manually operable game call comprising: a plurality of contacts, each contact having a non-round cross section, and a band bundling said contacts to one another, said band allowing the contacts to move relative to one another when manipulated by the hand of a user, whereby when said contacts are moved they simulate the sound of antlers striking one another.

2. A game call as recited in claim 1, wherein each contact includes a plurality of elongated lobes about the periphery of the contact and a plurality of recesses, each recess located between a pair of adjacent lobes.

3. A game call as recited in claim 2, wherein the radius of curvature of each said lobe is different than the radius of curvature of each said recess.

4. A game call as recited in claim 3, wherein the radius of curvature of each said lobe is greater than the radius of curvature of each said recess.

5. A game call as recited in claim 2, wherein each contact has a pair of opposing ends and an elongated sound passageway between said ends.

6. The game call as recited in claim 1, wherein a first pair of bands bundle said contacts to one another, each band of said first pair weaving among said contacts in a different pattern.

7. The game call as recited in claim 6, wherein each contact includes a first pair of notches about the periphery of the contact, each notch of said first pair adapted to receive one of said bands of said first pair.

8. The game call as recited in claim 6, wherein a second pair of bands bundle said contacts to one another, each band of said second pair weaving among said contacts in a different pattern.

9. The game call as recited in claim 1, wherein said bands are elastic.

10. The game call as recited in claim 2, wherein each contact includes four elongated lobes and four recesses.

11. The game call as recited in claim 2, wherein said lobes are equally spaced about the periphery of each contact and are of similar size to one another.

12. The game call as recited in claim 1, wherein said contacts are rotatable with respect to one another.

13. The game call as recited in claim 12, wherein six contacts are bundled by said band, and wherein said contacts are generally arranged in two rows when said contacts are not rotating relative to one another.

14. The game call as recited in claim 1, further comprising a lanyard coupled with one of said contacts and a releasable clip secured to the lanyard.

15. A method for attracting an animal, said method comprising the steps of: providing a plurality of contacts bundled to one another, each contact having a non-round cross section, and manually moving said contacts with the hand of a user to simulate the sound of antlers striking one another.

16. The method as recited in claim 13, further comprising the step of rotating said contacts relative to one another in said bundle.

17. The method as recited in claim 13, wherein each said contact includes a plurality of lobes about the periphery of the contact and a plurality of recesses, each recess located between a pair of adjacent lobes.

18. The method as recited in claim 17, wherein a plurality of elastic bands bundle said contacts to one another.

19. The method as recited in claim 17, wherein the radius of curvature of each said lobe is different than the radius of curvature of each said recess.

20. The method as recited in claim 19, wherein the radius of curvature of each said lobe is greater than the radius of curvature of each said recess.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/242,563, filed Oct. 23, 2000.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

[0002] “Not Applicable.”

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003] This invention relates to a game call for attracting wildlife during a hunt. More specifically, this invention relates to a hand operated game call producing the sound of antlers striking one another.

[0004] Deer hunters typically employ a number of methods and devices for calling deer within range to be shot by a rifle, bow or other weapon. Many of the calls simulate bleats, grunts, bawls and other sounds originating from a single deer. Other calls simulate the sound of antlers striking one another to produce the sound of male deer fighting to attract other deer. For instance, many hunters strike actual antlers, plastic antler replicas or other objects against one another to simulate the antler sounds produced by antlers striking one another during an actual deer fight.

[0005] While these calls produce the sound of antlers striking one another, the prior art calls tend to produce noise at undesirable times. For instance, the antlers of the prior art calls may rattle against one another as the hunter moves from place to place, or while the hunter is reaching for a weapon. These undesirable sounds tend to alert deer of the presence of the hunter and drive the deer away from the location of the hunter. Also, the operation of these prior art calls requires a significant amount of movement by the hunter to create the desired sounds. The movement of the hunter may also alert the deer of the hunter and frustrate the hunter's attempt to call the deer within range. Also, the prior art calls are sometimes held within bags or boxes that absorb unwanted odors and undesirable muffle the sound produce by the antler-like components within the bag.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0006] Accordingly, an object of the present invention is to provide a game call having a number of contacts bundled to one another that closely emulates the sound of antlers striking each other.

[0007] A further object of the invention is to provide a deer call that does not produce unwanted sounds when the hunter is moving from one location to another.

[0008] Still another object of the invention is to provide a method of producing the sound of antlers rattling against one another with relative little movement on the part of the user.

[0009] In accordance with these and other objects evident from the following description of a preferred embodiment of the invention, a manually operated game call is provided which includes a number of contacts having a non-round cross section, and at least one band bundling the contacts to one another when manipulated by the hand of a user. The band allows the contacts to move relative to one another so that a sound of antlers striking one another is simulated when the call is operated.

[0010] In another aspect of the invention, a method for attracting an animal is providing including the steps of providing a number of contacts bundled to one another, and manually moving the contacts within the hand of a user. Each contact has a non-round cross section so that the call produces a sound similar to the sound of antlers striking one another.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0011] The following description of the drawings, in which like reference numerals are employed to indicate like parts in various views:

[0012] FIG. 1 is a perspective view a game call constructed in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention demonstrating the placement of a user's hand about the call;

[0013] FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the game call of FIG. 1;

[0014] FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of the game call of the present invention;

[0015] FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of a contact of the game call of the present invention;

[0016] FIG. 5 is a sectional view of the game call taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 3;

[0017] FIG. 6 is a sectional view of the game call taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 3;

[0018] FIG. 7 is a sectional view of the game call of FIG. 5 during operation of the call.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0019] Referring to the drawings in greater detail, attention is first directed to FIG. 1, where a game call generally designated by numeral 10 is shown. Referring to FIG. 2, the game call 10 broadly includes six contacts 12A-E and a number of bands 14, 16, 18 and 20 holding the contacts in a bundle in two equal rows.

[0020] The contacts are preferably formed from plastic and are manufactured by molding two halves and securing the halves to one another. The contacts may also be constructed from other materials having sufficient hardness to produce the requisite antler sounds when contacting one another. As shown in FIG. 5, each contact includes four lobes 22 disposed about the periphery of the contact and extending from one end of the contact to the other. An equal number of recesses 24 are defined between each pair of adjacent lobes 22. The radius of curvature of each lobe 22 is greater than the radius of curvature of each recess 24 so that the lobes do not nest within the recesses of the adjacent contacts when the call is being operated as described below. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, each lobe has a radius of curvature of about 0.218 inches, and each recess has a radius of curvature of about 0.125 inches. An elongated sound passageway 26 is also defined within each contact. The elongated sound passageway extends axially from one end of the contact to the other, and preferably has a circular cross section.

[0021] With reference to FIG. 4, a cutout 28 having an arcuate profile extends about the periphery of each contact 12 near the upper end. As best shown in FIG. 2, a lanyard 30 is secured to the call at the cutout 28 of contact 12A. The lanyard 30 is preferably made from an elastic material and includes a loop 32 at one end that encompasses the cutout 28 of one of the contacts. At the end of the lanyard 30 opposite loop 32, a releasable clip 34 is held on the lanyard at a second loop 36. The releasable clip is of conventional construction, and includes a hook 38 and a shaft 40 moveable with respect to the end of the hook 38. The shaft 40 is spring biased toward the end of the hook 38, and may be moved away from the hook by grasping a pull 42 extending through a slot in the clip, and moving the pull in a direction away from the hook.

[0022] Returning to FIG. 4, each contact 12 includes a first pair of notches 42 and 44 at one end, and a second pair of notches 46 and 48 at the opposing end. At each notch, the contact 12 presents a cylindrical surface at which one of the bands engages the contact. Each band is made of a flexible material such as rubber. The elasticity of the bands holds the contacts to one another when the call is not being operated, yet allows the contacts to move within the bundle during operation of the call as described below. With reference to FIG. 3, bands 14 and 16 are held within notches 42 and 44 of the contacts, respectively. As shown in FIG. 5, first band 14 extends around the outside of contacts 12A and 12C at the end of the first row, and about the central contact 12E of the second row. The second band 16 extends around contacts 12D and 12E at the end of the second row, and about the central contact 12B of the first row. Thus, each contact is held between bands 14 and 12 to bundle the contacts together at the upper ends of the contacts.

[0023] Likewise, with reference of FIG. 3, at the lower ends of the contacts, bands 18 and 20 are held within the notches 46 and 48 of the contacts, respectively. Third band 18 weaves about the contacts in a pattern similar to that of band 16. Specifically, as shown in FIG. 6, band 18 extends around contacts 12D and 12F at the end of the second row, and about the central contact 12B of the first row. Fourth band 20 weaves about the contacts in the same pattern as first band 14. Specifically, band 20 extends around the outside of contacts 12A and 12C at the end of the first row, and about the central contact 12D of the second row. Thus, each contact is held between bands 18 and 20 to bundle the contacts together at the lower ends of the contacts.

[0024] In operation, the hunter places the call between his or her hands as shown in FIG. 1. The hunter's fingers are fully extended and light pressure is applied to the call. Once the call is grasped, the hunter slowly begins to rotate the contacts 12 of the call. As shown in FIG. 7, the lobes 22 of the each contact are generally geared with the recesses 24 of the adjacent contacts. As the hunter rotates the call in the direction of the arrows, contact 12A moves from the first row to the second, and contact 12F moves from the second row to the first row. While the contacts are generally geared to one another, due to the differing curvature of the lobes 22 and recesses 24, the contacts do not nest with one another. Since the contacts do not nest with one another, a number of lines of contact are present when the call is being operated. The percussive sounds produced along the lines of contact closely emulate the sounds of antlers contacting one another during a deer fight.

[0025] Specifically, the slow rotation of the contacts produces the sound of two deer intially engaging one another. After a brief period of slow rotation, the hunter then rapidly rotates the contacts of the call within the bundle to produce the sound of clashing antlers during a deer fight. After the clash is produced, the hunter pauses for a brief moment, and follows with another period of slow rotation followed by a period of rapid rotation. By following this pattern, the game call produces sounds closely simulating all types of antler sounds produced during a deer fight.

[0026] Alternatively, the call may be operated with one hand. For instance, the hunter may hold the call in one hand and roll the call against the hunter's leg or another object. In one handed operation, the call 10 may be tethered to a belt loop of the hunter by the releasable clip (FIG. 2).

[0027] Whether being operated by one or two hands, the sounds produced by the call may be changed by varying the pressure with which the call is held and the rapidity of the hunter's movements. To muffle the sound, the hunter may operate the call with gloves on the hunter's hand or hands. Additionally, the call may be used in conjunction with other deer calls that produce grunts and other sounds associated with deer other than antler sounds.

[0028] The game call and method of the present invention simulates the sounds of antlers striking one another while required limited movement on the part of the hunter. Also, when the call is not being operated, the bands holding the contacts to one another prevent unwanted noise from being produced. Also, the call does not include a bag or box, and thus eliminates the undesirable scents of the prior art calls. Additionally, the call is compact, and may be easily stored by clipping the call to the user.

[0029] From the foregoing it will be seen that this invention is one well adapted to attain all ends and objects hereinabove set forth together with the other advantages which are obvious and which are inherent to the structure. It will be understood that certain features and subcombinations are of utility and may be employed without reference to other features and subcombinations. This is contemplated by and is within the scope of the claims.

[0030] Since many possible embodiments may be made of the invention without departing from the scope thereof, it is to be understood that all matter herein set forth or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative of applications of the principles of this invention, and not in a limiting sense.