Title:
Golf training club and method
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The golf training club is a golf club which can be any of the standard clubs, including 2-9 irons, pitching wedges, approach wedges (lob), sand wedges, and woods (1, (driver), 2 and 3), wherein the club head size is reduced relative to the standard club head size for that particular club. Other than reducing the club head size, and more particularly the club head face dimensions, in all other respects the club is of standard specifications; i.e., the shaft length, lie and loft angles and club weight should be as close to a standard club specification as possible. A method of using the golf training club includes performing a select number of golf shots with a golf club having reduced club face dimensions of height and width relative to the standard height and width dimensions of a corresponding standard sized golf club and thereafter performing a selected number of golf shots with a corresponding standard sized golf club. The contrast presented by the sequential use of the golf training club of the present invention followed by the corresponding standard sized golf club enhances the visual acuity of the golfer and is believed to ultimately result in an improved golf shot, which is the goal of the invention.



Inventors:
Gallagher, Brian (Loveland, OH, US)
Application Number:
09/927031
Publication Date:
03/14/2002
Filing Date:
08/09/2001
Assignee:
GALLAGHER BRIAN
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B53/00; A63B53/04; A63B69/36; A63B15/00; (IPC1-7): A63B69/36
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
DUONG, THANH P
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
WOOD, HERRON & EVANS, L.L.P. (Cincinnati, OH, US)
Claims:

What is claimed is:



1. A golf training club, comprising: a golf club having a straight cylindrical shaft extending from a handle to a club head, said club head having a rigid club face adapted to contact a golf ball, said club face having height and width dimensions less than the height and width dimensions of a corresponding standard regulation sized golf club and wherein the shaft length, loft and lie angles and club weight of said golf club are substantially identical to those of the corresponding standard regulation sized golf club.

2. The golf training club of claim 1 further comprising a shaft that is frequency-matched to a player.

3. The golf training club of claim 1 wherein the club face is metallic.

4. The golf training club of claim 1 wherein said club face dimensions are reduced relative to the club face dimensions of the corresponding standard sized golf club in an amount ranging from about 20% to about 50%.

5. The golf training club of claim 4 wherein said reduction in club face dimensions is in the range of about 25% to about 45%.

6. The golf training club of claim 5 wherein said reduction in club face dimensions is approximately 25% in height and 45% in width.

7. The golf training club of claim 1 wherein said club is a 7-iron.

8. The golf training club of claim 1 wherein said club is a 2-iron.

9. The golf training club of claim 1 wherein said club is a 3-iron.

10. The golf training club of claim 1 wherein said club is a 4-iron.

11. The golf training club of claim 1 wherein said club is a 5-iron.

12. The golf training club of claim 1 wherein said club is a 6-iron.

13. The golf training club of claim 1 wherein said club is a 8-iron.

14. The golf training club of claim 1 wherein said club is a 9-iron.

15. The golf training club of claim 1 wherein said club is a sand wedge.

16. The golf training club of claim 1 wherein said club is a pitching wedge.

17. The golf training club of claim 1 wherein said club is an approach wedge.

18. The golf training club of claim 1 wherein said club is a 1 -wood.

19. The golf training club of claim 1 wherein said club is a 3-wood.

20. The golf training club of claim 1 wherein said club is a 5-wood.

21. A set of golf training clubs, comprising: more than one golf club selected from the group consisting of 2-9 irons, pitching wedge, approach wedge, sand wedge, and 1, 3 and 5-woods, wherein each of said golf training clubs has a straight cylindrical shaft extending to a club head, said club head having a rigid club face adapted to contact a golf ball, said club face having reduced club face dimensions of height and width relative to the height and width dimensions of a corresponding standard regulation sized golf club and wherein the shaft length, loft and lie angles and club weight closely approximate those of the corresponding standard regulation sized golf club.

22. A golf shot training method, comprising: performing a selected number of golf shots with a golf club having a cylindrical shaft extending to a club head, said club head having a rigid club face adapted to contact a golf ball, said club face having reduced club face dimensions of height and width relative to the height and width dimensions of a corresponding standard regulation sized golf club and wherein the shaft length, loft and lie angles and club weight closely approximate those of the corresponding standard sized golf club; and thereafter performing a plurality of golf shots with a corresponding standard sized golf club.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This patent application is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/264,838 filed Mar. 8, 1999 entitled GOLF TRAINING CLUB AND METHOD, which is fully incorporated by reference herein.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0002] The present invention is directed to a golf training club and associated training method. The club and method of this invention are intended to enhance the performance of golfers at all levels, from experienced pros down to beginners, including children. Because one of the keys to golf is the golf swing and the attendant resulting shot, it is imperative in improving the skill of any ability golfer to focus on the golf shot. A very significant part of the golf shot is centered around the visual acuity of the golfer, and another significant portion is the form of the golf swing. The goal of using the clubs and methods of the present invention are to improve the visual acuity aspect of, rather than the mechanics of, the golf swing.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003] By way of background, the following description relates to the visual aspects of athletics in general and golf in particular. The description further touches on how the golf clubs and methods of the present invention can aid in the development of the visual aspect of training for golfers.

[0004] Many so-called physical mistakes may be attributed to visual deficits. Some academic weaknesses may also be a function of poor visual skills or undue fatigue. According to Dr. Paul Planer, an optometrist and on the board of The International Academy of Sports Vision, too often the only concern of coaches, trainers, and some athletes with the visual system is with static visual ability (SVA). This statistical measurement is the ability of the athlete to resolve (identify) a certain sized letter/number on the highest contrast target available (black letters on a white background) on your standard eye chart (i.e., 20/20, etc.). The ability to discern detail in an object is called visual acuity. There are many factors that affect visual discrimination including contrast, lighting, motion, time, color, age, attention ability.

[0005] There are a variety of visual abilities utilized by athletes and non-athletes alike whenever there is a decision to be made involving the coordinated efforts of hand and eye. The following is a synopsis of some of these visual abilities, a couple of easy to administer assessments, visual enhancement exercises to train the athlete's eyes, and how the golf training club and method of the present invention address some of these particular visual abilities.

[0006] Static Visual Acuity—the ability to resolve various sizes of letters/numbers from a standard distance. Although the importance of this stationary ability is minimal in other sports, for golf it is desirable that the athlete have at least 20/15 to 20/10 acuity for resolving the size of the ball from a standard distance (length of club), and determining spatial relationships.

[0007] Dynamic Visual Acuity—the ability to maintain clarity of an object while either the object or the athlete, or both, are in motion (as in a swing). Deficits in this ability can cause perceptions of the object viewed to vary. Slips in clearness can affect timing during a swing.

[0008] Contrast sensitivity—this is the ability of the visual system to discriminate variations in color of the object looked at in comparison with the color of the background the object may be against. In golf, a white ball against a relatively green background during a swing or a putt provides for a sharp contrast and better chance for picking up the ball. As the brightness and color of background merge closer (as in tracking a white ball against a bright, sunny background), the contrast of the ball becomes less. However, in golf, the ability to track the ball in flight is of minimal value except to trace the direction of a shot. This sensitivity is the smallest amount of distinction between object and background that can exist while still distinguished by the athlete. It may be possible to enhance the ability to see the detail on a white ball by practicing with a ball whose color more closely matches the background (green).

[0009] Eye Movement (Ocular Motility)—this is the ability of the athlete to physically shift their eyes from place to place in space rapidly, and accurately without hesitation or fatigue. Athletes keen in this ability can make decisions from a quick glance such as lining up a putt. Deficits in this ability includes taking more than one look in order to make a decision on the next movement. This is a key element in golf.

[0010] Fusion—the eyes send information to the brain where the information is integrated and interpreted as a three-dimension (3-D) phenomenon. The integration of visual information from both eyes into a 3-D image is called fusion. The integration of visual is termed fixation. Our focusing ability is limited to 3 degrees. To get an idea of the size of this visual field, extend your arm straight and forward with your thumb pointing vertically. The width of the thumb (in this position) is an approximation of the size and focus of your visual field. Look at the words of this text—focusing on one word, and the words to either side in your peripheral vision are not in focus.

[0011] Focus Flexibility (Accommodation)—the ability that allows the athlete to change focus from one point in space to another and to maintain precise clarity such as shifting from the hole to the putter and ball during a putt, or from desired target to the ball.

[0012] Fusion Flexibility (Binocularity)—this is the ability to accurately “team” the two eyes together so they perform as one as the athlete glances around, shifts focus, follows the ball.

[0013] Depth Perception—the ability of the athletes to rapidly and accurately utilize fused images from the eyes to judge distance from the ball. Obviously this is closely related to the former three abilities.

[0014] Visual Reaction Time—the time required to perceive and respond to visual stimulation. Involved in this ability is the effectiveness of the athlete to utilize auditory (sound) information to assist in any visual stimulation.

[0015] Central-Peripheral Awareness—sometimes referred to as side vision. This is the ability of the athlete to maintain a “hard focus” on the central task such as striking the ball while screening out the activity to the side such a movement in the gallery. Other sports rely on the athlete's ability to maintain an awareness or soft focus on “side” activity, golf demands that this activity is eliminated from the only task at hand—the ball.

[0016] Eye-Hand-Body Coordination—this ability is related to proprioception, or the ability to have a sense of where limbs are in space without looking at them. This is key when rotating during a swing. The player must “feel” where the hands and feet are without looking. Eye-hand-body then is an integration of the eyes . . . hands . . . and body as a unit. While the eyes must lead and guide the motor (movement system), sense of limb awareness is paramount.

[0017] Visual Adjustability—this relates to the athlete's ability to have a visual system flexible enough to rapidly adjust and guide the body's motor responses quickly and accurately as the surrounding environment changes. A lack of being “tuned into” the body's responses is exemplified in an inability to adjust to unfamiliar courses, surfaces, brightness, time zones, etc. The golfer is almost always at an “away” court (course) disadvantage, which is why practice time is so important prior to a tournament.

[0018] Visualization—familiar to many coaches, the ability to mentally imagine and rehearse situations, actions, and responses that can occur during play, and modify them to be more efficient and correct. As anything, the exercise gets better with practice, and therefore should be done year-round, during games and practices, and away from games and practices. If an athlete cannot visualize, they may be deficient in the ability to learn from mistakes.

[0019] Eye (Sighting) Dominance—everyone has a dominant eye that sends information to the brain slightly faster than the other. This dominant eye directs the movement and fixation of the other eye. Therefore it is prudent for the golfer to position their head in order to have an unobstructed and aligned view of the ball with the dominant eye. In order to test which eye is dominant, extend your arms straight and forward. Form about a 1″ diameter triangular hole by connecting both thumbs and index fingers. Pick a distance object on a wall, and center it between the triangle. Without moving head or hands, close one eye, then the other. The eye that has the object lined up closest to the hole is the dominant eye.

[0020] Visual Search Patterns (Saccades)—how an athlete watches the motion of an object being tracked may help determine what is seen and not seen by an athlete. The types of eye movements used in tracking an object is actually a very complex process. Sports like volleyball rely on Saccadic eye movements in order to observe action. Eyes can follow an object smoothly up to visual angular velocities of about 70 degrees per second. Volleyball again requires visual angular velocities in excess of 500 degrees per second in order to follow the trajectory of a spike. While saccades can reposition eyes to track an object at angular velocities exceeding 700 degrees per second, the eyes “turn off” briefly as they saccade or move to the next fixation. In other words, the eyes move in frame perhaps exemplified in golf when a ball that a person might appear to be focusing on during the tee shot becomes lost momentarily when the eyes were essentially “off” between fixations.

[0021] The athlete should be tested in order to probe for visual deficits and to provide a baseline set of measures should you integrate a visual enhancement program. Tests and measures from a strength, conditioning, movement, or sport standpoint should reflect the movement, energy system, and task-specific demands of the sport. Visual assessments which do not take a dynamic environment into consideration are inadequate to assess visual abilities. Golfers should be tested in the lower region of a gaze since they spend time looking down at the ball in contrast to volleyball players who should be tested in the upper area of their gaze as they ball approaches. It is important now to introduce the concept of Divided Attention. During assessments and drills the athlete should be required to perform an additional task (balancing, solving math problems, game situations, etc.) Known as the “soft focus” while maintaining a “hard focus” on the central task (in this case the visual assessment or exercise).

[0022] The following description relates to various test probes which may be utilized to assess visual acuity.

[0023] SVA or Static Visual Acuity—although the testing only begins here, it is still important. This can be done by a team physician, usually monocularly first, then binocularly at a distance of 20 feet with moderate lighting.

[0024] Ocular Motility Near (Testing “oneness” of eyes)

[0025] Pursuits (Near Vision)—goal: to test and train visual accuracy for tasks occurring in a close visual hemisphere such as blocking and setting

[0026] 1. Targets: small bell on a clear string of nylon or thin black thread.

[0027] 2. Technique: move the target in front of the athlete in a random motion in various positions of gaze from arm's reach distance to their forehead

[0028] 3. Observe: watch for loss of fixation on the bell (hint: eyes will wander), head movement, crossing or closing one or both eyes.

[0029] 4. Divided Attention: have the athlete solve math problems, game situational tactics, balance on two tennis balls or one leg, etc. on top of the requirement and record the effects.

[0030] Saccades (Near Vision)

[0031] 1. Targets: same as pursuits except use at least two of them requiring the athlete to shift eyes on command back and forth to each bell.

[0032] 2. Observe: same as pursuits, but look at eyes to determine if they “overlook” or “undertook” the target and how quickly they get back to the central target bell. Doe sit just take a glance (through visualizing the previous position, or is there time spent looking).

[0033] 3. Divided Attention: same as above.

[0034] Near To Far

[0035] 1 . Targets: Use the dangled bell as the near target. The far target can be any small target at least 10 feet away such as a snellen chart (typical eye chart), clock's hand, person holding fingers or juggling numbered/colored balls, people on the street and the clothes they are wearing, targets you have drawn, etc. Upon direction, the athlete is to shift his visual attention from the bell to the distance target, etc. The goal is to train the athlete to obtain more information from a glance as in lining up a putt.

[0036] 2. Divided Attention: same as above and use your imagination. Just reproduce when re-testing.

[0037] Binocularity—Near Point of Convergence (Eye Teaming)

[0038] 1. Target: Brock string

[0039] 2. Technique: the athlete holds the end of a string with two colored beads on the tip of his/her nose. Have the athlete focus on one of the beads. Record how many strings the athlete reports and if possible where the strings meet (if at all) within the field of vision. The athlete should see two strings at all times, in all distances, in all directions of the string, and for them to meet each other at the bead as opposed to in front or beyond the bead. At times one of the strings may cross the other further/closer or above/below the other or one string may disappear or crossing points fluctuate. Start with the string attached in a straight line to a fixed location, then proceed downward which is more specific to the game of golf.

[0040] 3. Evaluate: record if the strings cross beyond where the bead is located, in front where the bead is located. If the string seen by the athlete coming from the left side appears above the plane, record this as right hyper. If the string appearing above the plane appears above the plane of the bead, record as left hyper. Note if the string disappears—when and where.

[0041] 4. Distances: distance bead is at 20 feet, the intermediate bead is at 10 feet, and the near bead is at 3 feet from the athlete's face.

[0042] The next category, visualization, will include not only an assessment, but how the “assessment” can then be used as a task-specific visual training aid for golf.

[0043] Visualization—the ability to mentally rehearse and perform an athletic situation. In this situation, the athlete will quickly process information and physically perform a movement. Since the athlete may have to perform a different action than what he or she sees—they must—in a matter of milliseconds, mentally rehearse that movement. The golfer should take themselves for a mental rehearsal of the course and individual holes while focusing on the swing techniques. They should take a close mental note on the feel of a properly struck ball.

[0044] Central-Peripheral Awareness—maintaining focus on a central task while screening out information to the sides is especially good for putting.

[0045] Visual Concentration and Reaction—the goal of this drill is to force the athlete to perform a golf motor task correctly with less information. You will need a blackened room, strobe light, golf balls, and net. The only light will be a strobe light. Set the strobe intervals at a very short (fast) setting so the resultant light in the room is steady. Gradually lengthen the strobe intervals to slower settings that will allow for longer periods of time between flashes (i.e., less light in the room) and reduced information processing time.

[0046] Colored Ball Drill: use three balls each with a different color of green. After several drives or putts with these balls, contrast with a standard white ball.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0047] In its very broadest aspects, the golf training club of the present invention is a golf club which can be any of the standard clubs, including 2 through 9 irons, pitching wedges, approach wedges (lob), sand wedges, and woods (1 (driver), 2 and 3), wherein the club head size is reduced relative to the standard or regulation club head size for that particular club. Other than reducing the club head size, and more particularly, the club head face dimensions, in all other respects the club is of standard specifications. More particularly, the shaft length, lie and loft angles and club weight should be as close to a standard club specification as possible. Thus, by maintaining the club specifications for the clubs of the present invention identical to the specifications for a standard club of the same type, with the exception of the club face dimension, the golfer only needs to adapt to the reduced club face size when using the clubs of the invention. Therefore the golfer's swing will not be adversely affected due to any differences in weight, length, etc. of the club.

[0048] By way of an example, the specifications for one club of the present invention, which is intended to be the training counterpart for a 7 iron, are as follows: 1

CLUB
SPECIFICATIONRANGEPREFERRED
Loft34 to 38 degrees36 degrees
Lie60 to 64 degrees62 degrees
Weight268 to 272 grams270 grams
Height of face1¼″ to 2″ at center1½″ center
Width of face1½″ to 2½″ from hossel2″ from hossel
Shaft Length24″ to 38″36½″
Shaft Frequency290 to 310 cycles per minute300 CPM
(CPM)

[0049] The foregoing relate to a 7 iron. As will be appreciated, the club head size may vary from the values given plus or minus one quarter to one half inch. Additionally, although a specific range and value for shaft frequency are given, it is contemplated that each club may be frequency-matched for the particular player via techniques well known in the art. By way of further comparison, a standard club face for a 7 iron has a width of 3½″ and a height of 2″. Compared with the 7 iron of the present invention having a width of 2″ and a height of 1½″, this translates to approximately a 43% narrower (width) club face and a 25% shorter (height) club face. While the present invention is not limited to 43% and 25% reductions in the width and height, respectively, dimensions of the club face, it will be appreciated that a substantial club face reduction on the order of these percentages or higher, is within the scope of the present invention. The only limiting factor in the club face dimension reduction is that if the club face is too small, the golfer cannot properly hit a standard golf ball for training.

[0050] With respect to frequency matching of the club shaft to the individual player's ability, such frequency matching in club shafts is known and clubs that are frequency matched are available under the name FreqStick™. In addition to the reduced club face dimensions embodied in the present invention, an additional feature in combination therewith is the frequency matching of the club shaft to the player's ability. Thus, in combination, a reduced club face dimensioned club having a frequency matched shaft is also contemplated as being part of the present invention.

[0051] As a further additional aspect of the invention, the reduced club face dimensioned clubs can be utilized in training with standard sized golf balls or reduced-diameter golf balls. When reduced-diameter golf balls are used, the club face can be even further reduced from the dimensions discussed above. In use, the ball “feels” bigger as it strikes the head of the club and should provide the golfer with a better sense of control and confidence in the application of controlled force.

[0052] As mentioned hereinabove, the present invention is applicable to each and every club in a full set of golf clubs. This includes 1 through 9 irons, pitching wedges, approach wedges (lob), sand wedges, and woods (1, 3 and 5). While the specific dimensions for a club of the present invention have been given with respect to a 7 iron, and a comparative example of the specifications for a standard 7 iron have also been given, the specifications for each of the other standard clubs mentioned are well known in the field of golf. Thus while the specific variances in dimensions of the club face sizes are not given for each of the other golf club types contemplated, it will be appreciated that the reduction in height and width of the golf club face will be in the range of 20 to 50%, and more particularly in the range of 25 to 45%, and even more specifically approximately 25% in height and 45% in width from the standard club face dimensions.

[0053] For additional background, the table below provides the typical ranges for the loft and lie values of standard golf clubs, which are applicable to the clubs of the present invention. These figures are the general standards in the golf field as obtained from a Scotland Golf Loft & Lie Machine. 2

CONTEMPLATED LOFT
RANGE (°)CONTEMPLATED LIE
CLUB TYPE(PREFERRED)RANGE (°) (PREFERRED)
115-19 (17)54-58 (56)
218-22 (20)55-59 (57)
321-25 (23)56-60 (58)
424-28 (26)57-61 (59)
528-32 (30)58-62 (60)
632-36 (34)59-63 (61)
736-40 (38)60-64 (60)
840-44 (42)61-65 (63)
944-48 (46)62-66 (64)
PW (pitching49-53 (51)62-66 (64)
wedge)
SW (sand53-57 (55)62-66 (64)
wedge)
AW58-62 (60)62-66 (64)
(approach
(lob) wedge)
1 wood6-12N/A
(driver)
3 wood13-16N/A
5 wood19-22N/A

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0054] FIG. 1 shows a standard size golf ball;

[0055] FIG. 2 shows a reduced diameter golf ball;

[0056] FIG. 3 shows a side view of an upright standard 7 iron head with the dimension of the club head of the present invention shown in phantom and the loft angle designated; and

[0057] FIG. 4 shows a front view of a standard golf club 7 iron head with the reduced club face dimensions of the present invention shown in phantom and the lie angle for the club designated.

[0058] FIG. 5 shows a front elevational view of one of the golf club of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0059] The golf clubs of the present invention are intended to be used as golf training aids to improve the visual acuity of the player, and thereby improve the golf shot. The method employed to enhance the golfer's shot and visual acuity essentially comprises taking repeated shots with a club of the present invention and thereafter reverting to the corresponding standard sized club for a repeated sequence of shots. More particularly, for example, a golfer may go to the driving range and hit ten balls with a 7 iron of the present invention having reduced club face dimensions and thereafter hit seven shots with a standard sized 7 iron. The contrast presented by the sequential use of the club of the present invention and a standard club is key. It is believed that the repeated use of the golf clubs of the present invention alone will not enhance the visual acuity and therefore will not enhance the golf shot of the golfer as well as the contrast or alternation between using the golf club of the present invention immediately followed by the corresponding standard sized club, although it will certainly provide some benefit to the golfer. While there is believed to be an optimum ratio of practice shots of 10:7 (the club of the present invention to a standard club), this is a person-dependent or person-specific ratio. There may be no specific ratio that is universally applicable to all golfers.

[0060] Generally speaking, the key to golf shot improvement utilizing the clubs and methods of the present invention is the contrast or alternation between hitting golf shots with the club of the present invention and then reverting to the corresponding standard sized club. This is true because the contrast requires the player to develop a high level of concentration on the club face and ball when using the club of the present invention (with or without a reduced size ball) and when they revert to the standard club size, their attention level is at the higher level required for the smaller dimensioned club and therefore enhances their ability and likelihood of hitting a good shot. With visual acuity defined as the ability to visually discern detail in an object, then the golf club of the present invention is designed to enhance this ability to discern detail by altering the information sent to the part of the brain which is responsible for this task. The eyes first send information to the brain where the information is processed and the accompanying motor task follows. If we alter the type of information the eyes gather (as in the size of the club head), then replace that information (standard size club head), the brain is now “tricked” into seeing an object (standard club head) that appears larger than it actually is.

[0061] Thus in its simplest form, the method of the present invention comprises the player taking a set number of golf shots with a reduced club face dimensioned club of the present invention and immediately thereafter taking another set number of shots with the corresponding standard sized club. This alternation can continue with more than one iteration of alternating between the club sizes. Additionally, there is no specific limit on the ratio of number of golf swings taken with the reduced size club and the standard size club. It is believed, however, that at a minimum, at least several shots should be taken with the reduced size club and those should be promptly followed with a similar or slightly lesser number of shots with the standard size club.

[0062] With specific reference to the Figures, FIG. 1 shows a standard dimensioned golf ball and FIG. 2 shows a reduced diameter golf ball which may be utilized in conjunction with the golf training club(s) and method of the present invention.

[0063] FIG. 3 is a side view of an upright standard 7 iron golf club head with the dimensions of the club head of the present invention shown in phantom and the loft angle designated. FIG. 4 shows a front view of the standard 7 iron golf club head shown in FIG. 3 with the reduced club face dimensions shown in phantom and the lie angle for the club designated. Thus there is shown a standard 7 iron golf club head 10 having a standard face dimension 12 and the reduced dimension face of the club of the present invention shown in phantom at 14. As was discussed previously the shaft 16 is preferably frequency matched to the particular player, although that is not a requirement of the present invention.

[0064] FIG. 5 illustrates one of the golf clubs of the present invention. The golf club 20 has a handle 22 at the top thereof, as is conventional. A cylindrical shaft 16 extends linearly downwardly from the handle 22 to the club head 10; the shaft 16 is straight. The shaft 16 maybe tapered as it extends downwardly or may have the same diameter along its entire length. The club head 10 is shown in a solid line in FIG. 5 whereas the club head of a regulation, standard size golf club of the same type is illustrated in dashed lines. The club head 10, in the irons and in most woods, has a club face 26 which is rigid and non-deformable, as is conventional. In the case of irons, the club face 26 is metallic but may be made of other materials within the scope of the present invention.

[0065] While the invention has been described with specific examples and reference to specific dimensions, angles and ratios, but rather persons skilled in the art will appreciate that various modifications and changes may be made to the invention as described herein without departing from the spirit and scope thereof which are defined by the appended claims.





 
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