Title:
Steel floor truss
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The present invention is a steel floor truss system for buildings, especially residential homes, wherein the truss includes a steel top member, or chord, extending between two vertical bearings. Typically, a vertical bearing is an inside (interior) or outside (foundation wall) steel stud, in which case, the steel chord is fastened to the top of the vertical steel stud, typically via a metal plate which overlaps and is screwed to both the chord and the stud. In some embodiments, however, a vertical bearing may be a concrete or cinder block (CMU) wall, and, in this case, the steel chord is fastened to the concrete or cinder block wall, for example, by being fastened to bolts extending up from the top or out from the side of the wall, or by interfitting into recesses made in the top of the wall. The truss of the present invention also includes a set of steel struts, or webs, each of which extends on one end of the web from a location on the steel chord away from an end thereof, down on the other end of the web to near the bottom of a vertical bearing. One of the webs extends from a first location on the chord nearer the foundation wall to near the bottom of the foundation vertical bearing. The other web extends from a second location on the chord nearer the interior bearing to near the bottom of the interior bearing. The webs are fastened to the chord and in the case where the vertical bearing is a steel stud, to the steel stud via metal screws. In the case where the vertical bearing is a concrete or cinder block wall, the web is secured to the wall, for example by being fastened to bolts extending out from the side of the wall, or by being placed in a corner between a top surface of a concrete pad at the bottom of the wall, and side surface of the wall at its bottom.



Inventors:
Webb, Eric (Boise, ID, US)
Application Number:
09/752484
Publication Date:
03/14/2002
Filing Date:
12/31/2000
Assignee:
WEBB ERIC
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/634, 52/690, 52/691
International Classes:
E04B5/10; E04C3/07; E04C3/11; E04C3/04; (IPC1-7): E04B1/18; E04B5/10; E04B5/18; E04C3/02; E04C3/30; E04H12/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
SLACK, NAOKO N
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Pedersen and Company, PLLC (Boise, ID, US)
Claims:

I claim:



1. A metal floor truss comprising: a vertical metal stud with a bottom end and a top end; a horizontal metal top chord member supported at one end thereof by said top end of said vertical metal stud; a metal plate connecting said one end of said horizontal metal top chord member with said top end of said vertical metal stud; and a metal web connected at its top end to, and extending angularly downwardly from, said horizontal metal top chord member at a point away from said one end of said horizontal metal top chord member, and connected at its bottom end to said bottom end of said vertical metal stud.

2. The metal floor truss of claim 1, wherein said vertical metal stud is adjustable at its said top end.

3. The metal floor truss of claim 1 wherein insulation is applied to the top of said truss.

4. A metal floor truss comprising: a horizontal metal top chord member adapted to be supported at one end thereof by a foundation wall; a metal web connected at its top end to and extending angularly downwardly from said horizontal metal top chord member at a point away from said one end of said horizontal metal top chord member, and adapted to be supported at its bottom end by the bottom of said foundation wall.

5. The metal floor truss of claim 4 wherein insulation is applied to the top of said truss.

Description:

DESCRIPTION

[0001] This application claims priority of my prior, co-pending provisional patent application U.S. Ser. No. 60/174,098, filed Dec. 31, 1999, entitled “Steel Floor Truss,” which provisional patent application is hereby incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] 1. Field of the Invention

[0003] This invention relates generally to building construction. More specifically, this invention relates to a steel floor truss system for buildings, especially residential homes.

[0004] 2. Related Art

[0005] U.S. Pat. No. 4,457,118 (Bowen) discloses a combined, integral wooden foundation wall and floor joist system. The outside end vertical bearings of the floor joists are made of “allweather” wood, and receive treated plywood sheathing nailed to them to make the foundation wall.

[0006] In addition there have been numerous designs for floor truss systems made of steel. See, for example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,544,464 (Dutil) for a composite steel and concrete floor system.

[0007] Still, there is a need for a simple, economical and effective steel floor truss system. This invention addresses that need.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0008] The present invention is a steel floor truss system for buildings, especially residential homes. The truss comprises a steel top member, or chord, extending between two (2) vertical bearings. Typically, a vertical bearing is an inside (interior) or outside (foundation wall) steel stud. In this case, the steel chord is fastened to the top of the vertical steel stud, typically via a metal plate which overlaps and is screwed to both the chord and the stud. In some embodiments, however, a vertical bearing may be a concrete or cinder block (CMU) wall. In this case, the steel chord is fastened to the concrete or cinder block wall, for example, by being fastened to bolts extending up from the top or out from the side of the wall, or by interfitting into recesses made in the top of the wall.

[0009] The truss of the present invention also comprises a set of steel struts, or webs, each of which extends on one end of the web from a location on the steel chord away from an end thereof, down on the other end of the web to near the bottom of a vertical bearing. One of the webs extends from a first location on the chord nearer the foundation wall to near the bottom of the foundation vertical bearing. The other web extends from a second location on the chord nearer the interior bearing to near the bottom of the interior bearing. The webs are fastened to the chord and, in the case where the vertical bearing is a steel stud, to the steel stud via metal screws. In the case where the vertical bearing is a concrete or cinder block wall, the web is secured to the wall, for example by being fastened to bolts extending out from the side of the wall, or by being placed in a corner between a top surface of a concrete pad at the bottom of the wall, and side surface of the wall at its bottom.

[0010] According to the invention, a simple, economical and effective steel floor truss system is obtained.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0011] FIG. 1 is a schematic side view of one embodiment of the invention with a steel stud outside vertical bearing.

[0012] Details A and A′ are partial views of the embodiment depicted in FIG. 1.

[0013] FIG. 2 is a partial detail view of the embodiment depicted in FIG. 1.

[0014] Detail B is another version of FIG. 2.

[0015] FIG. 3 is a partial, detail cross-sectional view of the connection between a truss according to one embodiment of the invention and a rim joist.

[0016] Detail C is another version of FIG. 3.

[0017] FIGS. 4A and 4B are two (2) partial, detail views of another embodiment of the invention with an adjustable vertical bearing stud.

[0018] Detail D is another version of FIGS. 4A and 4B.

[0019] FIG. 5 is a schematic side view of another, alternative embodiment of the invention with a concrete or cinder block wall outside vertical bearing.

[0020] FIGS. 6-8 are partial schematic side views of several embodiments of the invention with framing insulation applied.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0021] Referring to the Figures, there are depicted several, but not all, embodiments of the present invention.

[0022] In FIG. 1 is depicted an embodiment 10 of the invention with a vertical steel stud 12 for an outside vertical bearing. Steel floor truss 10 has horizontal steel top member, or chord, 14 extending between outside (foundation wall) vertical bearing steel stud 12 and inside (interior) vertical bearing 16. In this case, interior steel stud 16 serves as the inside vertical bearing for two (2) mirror-image floor trusses, right-side truss 10, and left-side truss 10′. Left-side truss 10′ also has steel chord 14′ and outside (foundation wall) vertical bearing steel stud 12′. Therefore, truss 10 of the invention may be single-span, double-span (as depicted in FIG. 1), triple-span, etc. In case of multiple spans, there is no requirement that, for example, right-side truss 10 and left-side truss 10′ be of the same span length—in fact, they may be of different lengths.

[0023] The length of the chord 14 may be between about 8′-28′ for residential construction. Preferably, chord 14 is a steel C-channel 2″ wide by 4″ high, or 2″ wide by 6″ high, 2″ wide by 8″ high, 2″ wide by 10′ high, or 2″ wide by 12′ high. Preferably, chord 14 is 600 cc/16 gauge C-channel (ref.—Metal Stud Manufacturers' Association (MSMA)).

[0024] The length of vertical bearing outside steel stud 12 may be between about 18″-48″ for residential construction. Preferably, stud 12 is a steel C-channel 2″ wide by 4″ deep, or 2″ wide by 6″ deep or 2″ wide by 8″ deep. Preferably, outside stud 12 is also 600 cc/16 gauge C-channel (ref. MSMA).

[0025] Outside steel stud 12 and steel chord 14 are fastened together by overlapping metal plate 24. Preferably, metal plate 14 is 400 cc/16 gauge (ref. MSMA) about 1′ long, with four (4) no. 12 galvanized self-tapping screws on each end. An end, cross-sectional detail view of the connection between outside stud 12 and chord 14 is shown in FIG. 3 and Detail C. Also, outside steel stud 12 and steel chord 14 are fastened together in slightly offset fashion so that rim joist 26 may rest on the top edge of outside stud 12 perpendicularly to chord 14. Then, chord 14 and rim joist 26 are fastened together by framing angle 28. This way, rim joist 26 may secure several floor trusses 10 in parallel fashion, and provides a continuous finish on the outside wall to the set of trusses above the several steel studs 12.

[0026] When chord 14 extends between outside stud 12 and inside stud 16, inside stud 16 is also connected to chord 14′ for the mirror-image truss 10′ extending in the opposite direction. In this case, chord 14, chord 14′ and inside stud 16 are all connected together by overlapping plate 24′. Metal plate 24′ is similar in construction to metal plate 24, and the connection among chord 14, chord 14′ and inside steel stud 16 is similar in construction to the connection between chord 14 and outside stud 12.

[0027] When chord 14 extends between outside stud 12 and another outside stud (not shown), the connection between chord 14 and the other outside stud is a mirror image of the connection between chord 14 and outside stud 12, including via plate 24.

[0028] If foundation pad 36 and 36′ are not set exactly at the correct grade or level, then it may be preferred to have an adjustable length feature in outside stud 12 and inside stud 16. This feature is depicted in FIGS. 4A and 4B. There, outside stud 12 is for supporting chord 14. However, due to a lack of accuracy in pouring or setting the concrete for foundation pad 36 (see FIG. 1), a gap 38 exists between the top of stud 12 and bottom of chord 14 when chord 14 is at the proper grade. This gap 38 may be taken up by an adjustable insert 40 which extends upwardly from the inside of outside stud 12. Insert 40 has temporary fastener 42 for securing the grade at the top of the insert until permanent fasteners, typically six (6) galvanized screws, secure the insert to outside stud 12.

[0029] Typically, at the construction site if it is learned that the grade at the top of the foundation pad 36 is too high, then the workers will saw, grind or carve the pad down to the correct grade.

[0030] First steel web 18 extends downwardly from steel chord 14 at first web-chord connection point 20 to near the bottom of outside steel stud 12 at first web-outside stud connection point 22. First web-chord connection point 20 is away from the outside end of chord 14, so that first web 18 extends downwardly between about 30°-60° from horizontal, from connection point 20 to first web-outside stud connection point 22 near the bottom of outside stud 12. At both connection points 20 and 22, the connections are preferably made via four (4) no. 12 galvanized self-tapping screws.

[0031] Second steel web 30 extends downwardly from steel chord 14 at second web-chord connection point 32 to near the bottom of interior steel stud 16 at second web-inside stud connection point 34. Second web-chord connection point 32 is away from the inside end of chord 14, so that second web 30 also extends downwardly between about 30°-60° from horizontal, from connection point 32 to second web-inside stud connection point 34 near the bottom of inside stud 16. At both connection points 32 and 34, the connections are preferably made via six (6) no. 12 galvanized self-tapping screws.

[0032] When first steel web 18 extends down from chord 14 to near the bottom of cinder-block wall 44 instead of outside stud 12 (see FIG. 5), then the lower end of web 18 is adapted to fit snugly in the corner between the top surface 46 of foundation pad 36 and the side surface 48 near the bottom of wall 44.

[0033] When second steel web 30 extends down from chord 14 to near the bottom of inside stud 16 (see FIG. 1), then the lower end of web 30 is adapted by cutting or trimming otherwise the end to accommodate on stud 16 also the corresponding lower end of web 30′, which corresponding lower end 30′ may also be similarly adapted.

[0034] Some details of chord 14, outside stud 12, inside stud 16, first web 18 and second web 30 are described in Table I, following:

[0035] In case electrical or thermal insulation is desired, it may be applied to the framing of the truss of the present invention as depicted in FIGS. 6-8. After framing, outside foundation sheathing 44, outside wall 46 and any desired under-layers, like polyethylene vapor barrier sheet 48, may be applied to the residence under construction according to convention.

[0036] Instead of steel, other conventional metal materials, like, for example, aluminum or iron, may be used for the floor truss of the present invention.

[0037] Although this invention has been described above with reference to particular means, materials and embodiments, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to these disclosed particulars, but extends instead to all equivalents within the scope of the following claims.