Title:
Outrigger pole holder
United States Patent 3889908


Abstract:
A hand operated pole holding apparatus mounted on a plane surface is used to support and position a pole in any desired angular position relative to the mounting surface.



Inventors:
LARSON ARVID
Application Number:
05/435105
Publication Date:
06/17/1975
Filing Date:
01/21/1974
Assignee:
LARSON; ARVID
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
248/278.1, 403/57, 403/97, 403/103
International Classes:
A01K97/10; F16M13/02; (IPC1-7): F16M13/00
Field of Search:
248/38,40,42,43,44,45,183,186 269
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
3304037Mounting base for marine antennas1967-02-14Candela
3010687Fishing pole holder1961-11-28Hagberg



Primary Examiner:
Schultz, William H.
Claims:
What I claim is

1. A pole holder, particularly useful for holding outrigger poles comprising;

2. A pole holder as described in claim 1 including;

Description:
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Pole holding devices, such as utilized by fishermen for holding outrigger poles are required to secure the pole in a variety of positions. One problem associated with such a device is that position changes are constantly required, under a variety of atmospheric and sea conditions. Hence, if the device is not easily operated or requires the use of tools, the operator may have to subject himself to more danger and/or discomfort than he desires. Another problem is that the operator never knows whether the base will be mounted on a horizontal, vertical or sloping surface and therefore requires an apparatus whose set of positions is not dependent on the position of the base.

It is an object of this invention to provide a means by which a pole may be rigidly fixed in any angular position relative to its base, irrespective of the position of the mounting means.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a means of locking and unlocking the pole's position which operates quickly, easily and dependably, without the use of tools.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A pole held in a tube that is secured to one face of a crown-gear is free to rotate and to be secured at any position in the plane of the crown-gear face. The opposite face of the crown-gear is mounted perpendicular to a base and is free to rotate and to be secured with respect to the base. Thus the pole-tip is free to rotate to any position on the surface of a hemisphere defined with the holding device as its center and the mounting surface as its base. A sleeve which is attached to the outrigger distal portion locks into a base for holding the outrigger in the vertical position.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is an exploded pictorial view of the pole holder.

FIG. 2 shows the pole holder as it might be mounted on a vertical surface on a boat in the down position.

FIG. 3 shows the pole holder as it might be mounted on a vertical surface on a boat in the vertical position.

FIG. 4 shows a pole holder as it might be mounted on a vertical surface on a boat in the fishing position.

FIG. 5 is an exploded view of the outrigger pole tip sleeve.

FIG. 6 shows the pole holder and the outrigger pole tip sleeve holding an outrigger pole.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Referring to the drawings, and particularly to FIG. 1, all parts are made of a suitably strong and non-corrosive material, such as, but not restricted to brass or bronze, which may be chrome-plated for appearance.

A tubular member 11 is rigidly secured to webbed connecting bar 12, of crown-gear 16. It may be welded, formed as an integral part of, or fastened as shown with a nut 14 and bolt 13, which passes through hole 15 in tubular member 11 and through hole 17 bored in webbed connecting bar 12. The tubular member 11 is the receptical of the root of the outrigger pole 10. The root of outrigger pole, when in use, abuts against the top of webbed connecting bar 12.

The teeth of crown-gear 16 are designed to securely lock with the complimentary teeth of crown-gear 18. When unlocked, the crown-gear 16 and consequently the outrigger pole 10 are free to rotate in a plane perpendicular to the axis of bolt 40.

Bolt 40 passes through hole 31 in handle 28 through hole 29 in crown-gear 18, through threaded hole 19 in crown-gear 16 and is secured on the back of crown-gear 16 by nut 30. When the handle 28 is in the horizontal position, the circumferentially sloping cam surfaces 32 of handle 28 abut against their complimentary cam surfaces 20 on the back of crown-gear 18 and pull crown-gear 16 firmly against crown-gear 18, thus securing crown-gear 16 and consequently the outrigger pole 10 from further rotation about the axis of bolt 40.

Base 23 is fastened to surface 25 with screws that pass through countersunk holes 24.

The circular pressure flange 21 of crown-gear 18 is rotatably fitted into seat 22 of base 23 such that crown-gear 18 and consequently outrigger pole 10 are free to rotate in a plane perpendicular to the axis of seat 22.

Slots 33 in clamp-ring 34 allow it to be easily slipped over crown-gear 18. Bolt 35 passes through hole 36, spacer 37, and into threaded hole 27 in base 23, such that it's end is flush with the bottom of base 23. Bolt 38 passes through hole 42 in handle 39, then through threaded hole 26 such that the end of bolt 38 is flush with the bottom of base 23.

When handle 39 is positioned perpendicular to the major-axis of clamp-ring 34, the circumferentially sloping cam surfaces 41 of handle 39 abut with their complimentary cam surfaces 44 on clamp-ring 34, thereby locking pressure flange 21 in seat 22, securing crown-gear 18, and consequently, outrigger pole 10 from further rotation about the axis of seat 22.

As handle 39 is rotated counter-clockwise, from above, the force exerted on pressure flange 21 is reduced and crown-gear 18 is free to rotate about the axis of seat 22 to any position desired.

FIG. 2 shows the apparatus mounted on a vertical surface as it would look if one viewed it from the top. The axis of the outrigger pole 10 is parallel to the keel of the vessel, indicated by arrow 9. To position the outrigger pole 10 in the vertical plane, as it would be in normal traveling, the operator pushes down on handle 39, rotates the pole 10 to vertical position and pulls up on handle 39. The apparatus, and the outrigger pole 10 are now locked in the vertical position as shown in FIG. 3 and will remain so.

To move the outrigger pole 10 from the vertical position, FIG. 3 to the normal fishing position, FIG. 4, the operator pushes handle 28 to the right, rotates the outrigger-pole 10 approximately 45° to the right and then pulls up on handle 28. The apparatus and the outrigger pole 10 are now in the normal fishing configuration, FIG. 4, and will remain so.

As shown in FIG. 5, in order to prevent the tip of an outrigger pole 10 from vibrating excessively when in the verticle position, sleeve 50 is placed around the pole and secured to it by bolt 52. Sleeve 50 is supported by an L-shaped member 54. The base 56 of L-shaped member 54 fits into seat 58 in base member 60. Base member 60 has circumferencially sloping cam surfaces 62 used in conjunction with complementary circumferencially sloping cam surfaces 64 on handle 66, all as described above, the only difference being that one of the cam surfaces 62 on base member 60 is interrupted on base 60 and continued as 62' on the upper side of base 56 of L-shaped member 54. Base member 60 is secured to the deck or cabin by screws through holes 68.

Thus when base 56 is set in seat 58 and handle 66 is rotated so that cam surfaces 64 and 62' abut, the pole tip is secured and excessive vibration is prevented.

The instant invention has been shown and described herein in what is considered to be the most practical and preferred embodiment. It is recognized, however, that departures may be made therefrom within the scope of the invention and that obvious modifications will occur to a person skilled in the art.