Title:
Steering control solenoid structure
United States Patent 2432869


Abstract:
My invention relates to steering control equipment for crafts moving through a fluid medium and more particularly relates to the operating mechanisms for the rudders of torpedoes. The introduction and general use of electric torpedoes also involved the general introduction of solenoid operated...



Inventors:
Elmer, William B.
Application Number:
US58548145A
Publication Date:
12/16/1947
Filing Date:
03/29/1945
Assignee:
WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORP
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
244/87
International Classes:
F42B19/01
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
2051974Radio navigator1936-08-25
2016507Electrically controlled valve and method of operating the same1935-10-08
1622723Valve1927-03-29
1588932Art and apparatus for warfare1926-06-15
1275480N/A1918-08-13
0809796N/A1906-01-09
0479828N/A1892-08-02
0319633N/A1885-06-09



Description:

My invention relates to steering control equipment for crafts moving through a fluid medium and more particularly relates to the operating mechanisms for the rudders of torpedoes.

The introduction and general use of electric torpedoes also involved the general introduction of solenoid operated rudders for torpedoes. The conventional solenoid arrangement used to actuate torpedo rudders and elevators consists of four separate solenoids. These four solenoids are arranged in two pairs, one pair for the elevator rudders and one pair for the steering rudders. Each solenoid has its own magnetic plunger and pull-rod which actuate the steering yokes to deflect the rudders either to port or starboard and actuate the elevating yokes to throw the elevator rudders either up or down all in response respectively to the steering and elevating controls.

The existing equipment is difficult to accommodate in the limited space in the torpedo tail cone and at the bulkhead between the tail cone and afterbody. Further, the existing type of equipment, among a number of other shortcomings, is difficult to manufacture and assemble so that there be no leakage at the bulkhead.

One broad object of my invention is the provision of simpler, more reliable and cheaper electromagnetic rudder actuating means than known heretofore.

Another object is the provision of leak-proof single solenoid rudder-actuating means for torpedo rudders.

It is also an object of my invention to so dispose the rudder actuating equipment in the tail cone of a torpedo to lower the center of gravity of the torpedo.

The objects expressly made are merely illustrative of many other objects and advantages obtained with my invention. Such other objects and advantages will become more apparent from a study of the following specifications and the accompanying drawing in which: Figure 1 is a showing of a torpedo tail cone and a portion of its afterbody, both broken open to illustrate my invention in position; Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of the solenoid construction used to control the rudders; and Fig. 3 is a diagrammatic showing of the electric control circuit for the solenoids used to operate the rudders.

In Fig. 1, I designates the tail cone, and 2 the afterbody of a torpedo. The torpedo has the conventional stabilizing fins 3 and 4 to which the outer trunnions 5 and 6 of the rudders 7 and 8 are secured in suitable bearings, the inner bearings of the rudders being as shown in the tail cone. The rudders are, in themselves, of conventional construction, but the actuating means are radically different from the means heretofore used. The inner ends of the rudders are rigidly secured to the yoke 9 curved so as not to interfere with the driving shaft 10. To this yoke 9 I secure a suitable crank arm II to which I pivotally secure the rudder actuating rod 12.

In the showing in Fig. 1, I have illustrated my invention in connection with the steering rudders. It is to be understood, however, that the elevating rudders or so-called elevators, disposed at right angles to rudders 7 and 8 are provided with a yoke similar to yoke 9 and actuated in the same manner as the steering rudders. Since the two structures are alike, it suffices to show and describe but one pair of rudders.

The actuating rod 12 is rigidly secured as shown in Fig. 2 to the armature 13 slidably disposed within the solenoid means, or assembly, 14.

I rigidly weld or braze an internally threaded magnetic sleeve 15 to the bulkhead 16 disposed between the tail cone and the afterbody. This sleeve 15 is welded to the afterbody in axial alignment with an opening in the bulkhead. In alignment with this opening and to the left end portion of sleeve 15, I braze the stainless-steel tube 17 so that it is open at the right and projects in the direction of the tail cone. To the left end of this stainless-steel tube 17 I braze a closing plug 18 of magnetic material. The tube or sleeve 17 fits against a shoulder in the plug 18 so that the combined structure of sleeve 17 and plug 18 are of like outer diameter throughout their combined lengths.

Over the sleeve 17 I slip the solenoid 19 from the left to abut against the bulkhead and then cover the solenoid with the can 20 of suitable magnetic material. The can 20 is provided with an opening 21 so that the energizing leads for solenoid 19 may enter the can 20. To the left of can 20, I disposed a non-magnetic spacer 22.

Abutting against the non-magnetic spacer 22 I disposed the can 23 with its open end towards the left. This can 23 is of magnetic material like that of the can 20 so that there may be symmetry of the magnetic circuits. Solenoid 24 is then inserted into the can 23 from the left. Can 23 is provided with a suitable opening 25 for the entry of the energizing leads for the solenoid 24.

At the extreme left end of the assembly, I disposed the cover plate 26 of magnetic material similar to the magnetic material of the'bulkhead, and then rigidly fastened the cover 26 to the plug 18 by means of the bolt and nut assembly 27 shown. At the sleeve 15 I disposed the sleeve nut 28, having a guide opening 29 at the left for guiding the actuating rod 12. The sleeve nut 28 is of magnetic material having, its magnetic characteristics matched to the magnetic characteristics of the bolt and nut assembly 21 and the cover plate 26 so that the magnetic circuits for the two solenoids 19 and 24 are symmetrical.

During steering operation, the steering control actuates the movable contact element 30 to connect the solenoids 19 and 24 to the battery B, depending upon the direction in which the rudder is to be thrown. Furthermore, the greater the departure of the torpedo from the desired course, the more sections of the resistors 31 and 32 are shunted with the result that the solenoids, depending upon which one is at the moment energized, are energized more strongly when the torpedo has departed a greater amount from its desired course.

It will be noted that I have provided a unitary structure comprising a single solenoid means consisting of two axial lined magnetically symmetrical solenoids acting on *a single armature.

Since but one solenoid assembly is used for each pair of control surfaces, these two assemblies may be mounted at the lower portion of the bulkhead as shown for one in Fig. 1, thereby lowering the center of gravity of the torpedo, and thereby inherently adding to the stability of operation of the toroorpedo. orsome purposes it is desirable to give the rudders a small biasing force. This I provide by the use of a relatively weak spring 33.

While I have limited my discussion to the steering rudders only, I am not to be limited to but one embodiment of my invention. It is readily apparent that others, particularly after having had the benefit of the teachings of my invention, may devise similar unitary solenoid structures for actuating the rudders of a torpedo. I;, therefore, do not wish to be limited to the particular showing herein made, but wish to be limited by the scope of the claims hereto appended.

I claim as my invention: 1. In apparatus for operating the rudder means of a torpedo having a tail-cone and a bulkhead disposed transverse of the forward region of the tail-cone, in combination, conventional rudder means mounted in the aft region of the tail-cone of the torpedo, actuating means for angularly deflecting the rudder means with reference to the longitudinal axis of the torpedo, said actuating means including a pair substantially like axially aligned contiguously disposed solenoids mounted. on the forward face of the bulkhead, a non-magnetic sleeve at its outer 6( periphery at the aft end hermetically sealed to the bulkhead over an opening in the: bulkhead and its forward end being sealed and projecting into said solenoids, an armature disposed in. said sleeve and normally symmetrically disposed with 61 reference to said solenoids, a mechanical coupling connected to the armature and projecting through the open end of the sleeve, an opening in the bulkhead Into the aft region of the tail-cone and being connected to the rudder means,, and 7 means for selectively energizing said solenoids.

2. In apparatus for operating the rudder means of a torpedo having -a cone-shaped aft region and a bulkhead disposed transverse of the forward part of the -cone-shaped region., in qcqI- 7 bination, rudder actuating means mounted in the aft part of the cone-shaped region, said bulkhead having an opening therein, control means for operating the rudder actuating means, said last named means including a non-magnetic sleeve at its outer periphery at its aft end hermetically sealed and rigidly connected to the walls of the opening in the bulkhead and the forward end being sealed, a pair of axially aligned contiguously disposed solenoids disposed over the sleeve and fixed thereto, an armature disposed in the sleeve, a mechanical coupling interconnecting the armature and the rudder actuating means, and means for selectively energizing said solenoids.

3. In apparatus for operating the rudder means of a torpedo having a cone-shaped aft region and a bulkhead disposed transverse of the forward part of the cone-shaped region, in combination, rudder actuating means mounted in the aft part of the cone-shaped region, said bulkhead having an opening therein, control means for operating the rudder actuating means, said last named means including, a non-magnetic sleeve having its aft end hermetically secured to the walls of the opening in the bulkhead, a seal p ing plug in the forward end of. the sleeve, a pair of axially aligned solenoids disposed in spaced relation on the sleeve, magnetic housing means for the solenoids secured to the sealing plug, an armature symmetrically disposed with reference to the solenoids within the sleeve, a mechanical coupling between the armature and rudder actuating means, and means for selectively energizing said solenoids.

4. In apparatus for operating the rudder means of a torpedo having an afterbody, a tailcone, and a bulkhead of magnetic material disposed transversely of the tail-cone near the junction of the. tail-cone and afterbody, provided with an opening below the longitudinal axis of the torpedo, in combination, rudder actuating means disposed in the aft region of the tail-cone, control means for operating the rudder actuating means, said last named means including a nonmagnetic sleeve at its aft outer peripheral end hermetically sealed to the walls of the opening in the bulkhead, a closure for the forward end of the sleeve, a solenoid disposed on the sleeve adijacent the bulkhead, a cup-shaped magnetic cover disposed over the solenoid so that the open end abuts against the bulkhead, an annulus of non-magnetic material disposed against the bottom of the cup-shaped cover, a second cupshaped cover of magnetic material disposed on the sleeve so that the open end is disposed in the forward direction with the bottom of the cupshaped cover against the annulus of non-magnetic material, a second solenoid disposed on the 0 sleeve and within the second cup-shaped cover, a closure of magnetic material secured to the plug in the forward end of the sleeve for closing the open end of the second cup-shaped cover, an armature in the sleeve, a connecting link between 5 the armature and rudder actuating means, and means for selectively energizing either of- the solenoids.

5. In apparatus for operating: the rudder means of a torpedo having an afterbody, a tail-cone, and 0 a bulkhead of magnetic material disposed transversely of the tail-cone- near the junction of the tail-cone and after-body, provided with an opening below the longitudinal axis of the torpedo, in combination, rudder actuating means disposed 5 in the aft region of the tail-cone, control means for operating the rudder actuating means, said last named means including a non-magnetic sleeve at its aft outer peripheral end hermetically sealed to the walls of the opening in the bulkhead, a closure for the forward end of the sleeve, a solenoid disposed on the sleeve adjacent the bulkhead, a cup-shaped magnetic cover disposed over the solenoid so that the open end abuts against the bulkhead, an annulus of non-magnetic material disposed against the bottom of the cupshaped cover, a second cup-shaped cover of magnetic material disposed on the sleeve so that the open end is disposed in the forward direction with the bottom of the cup-shaped cover against the annulus of non-magnetic material, a second solenoid disposed on the sleeve and within the second cup-shaped cover, a closure of magnetic material secured to the plug in the forward end of the sleeve for closing the open end of the second cup-shaped cover, an armature in the sleeve, a connecting link between the armature and rudder actuating means, means for selectively energizing either of the solenoids, and means for varying the energization of the solenoid selected to be energized. 6. In apparatus for operating the rudder means of a torpedo having a generally cone-shaped aft region, a bulkhead of magnetic material disposed transverse of the cone-shaped region, said bulkhead having an opening therein disposed below the longitudinal axis of the torpedo, in combination, an internally threaded annulus disposed in registry with the opening in the bulkhead, said annulus being hermetically sealed at its forward end to the bulkhead, a sleeve nut, having a bearing region, threaded into the aft end of the annulus, a non-magnetic guide sleeve closed at the forward end and open at the aft end, the aft end being hermetically secured to the inner surface of the annulus, a pair of like solenoids disposed in spaced relation on the guide sleeve, independent magnetic circuits for the solenoids, means for securing the solenoids and magnetic circuits on the guide sleeve, an armature disposed in the guide sleeve, rudder actuating means in the aft region of the torpedo, a connecting link extending through the bearing means in the sleeve nut, between the armature and the rudder actuating means, and means for selectively energizing either of said solenoids.

7. In apparatus for operating the rudder means of a torpedo having a generally cone-shaped aft region, a bulkhead of magnetic material disposed transverse of the cone-shaped region, said bulkhead having an opening therein disposed below Sthe longitudinal axis of the torpedo, in combination, an internally threaded annulus disposed in registry with the opening in the bulkhead, said annulus being hermetically sealed at its forward end to the bulkhead, a sleeve nut, having a bearing region, threaded into the aft end of the annulus, a non-magnetic guide sleeve closed at the forward end and open at the aft end, the aft end being hermetically secured to the inner surface of the annulus, a pair of like solenoids disposed in spaced relation on the guide sleeve, independent magnetic circuits for the solenoids, means for securing the solenoids and magnetic circuits on the guide sleeve, an armature disposed in the guide sleeve, rudder actuating means in the aft region of the torpedo, a connecting link extending through the bearing means in the sleeve nut, between the armature and the rudder actuating means, means for selectively energizing either of said solenoids, and means for varying the magnitude of the energization of said solenoids.

WILLIAM B. ELMER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent: UNITED STATES PATENTS Number 319,633 2,051,974 1,588,932 479,828 1,275,480 2,016,507 809,796 1,622,723 Name Date Sims ------------ June 9, 1885 Warner ---------- Aug. 25, 1936 Blair -----------_ June 15, 1926 Mumford -- __--------- Aug. 2, 1892 Seymour --------- Aug. 13, 1918 McFall et al. ------- Oct. 8, 1935 Grabosch ------__ _ Jan. 9, 1906 Johnson --------- Mar. 29, 1927