Title:
Sawdust burner feeder
United States Patent 2354647


Abstract:
This invention relates to a sawdust feeder. At the present time, sawdust burners are used on kitchen stoves and heaters and these burners have very small hoppers for holding sawdust. This means that they have to be filled a number of times each day with sawdust usually brought up from the...



Inventors:
Hough, Blusson Ronald
Application Number:
US43756642A
Publication Date:
08/01/1944
Filing Date:
04/03/1942
Assignee:
Hough, Blusson Ronald
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
192/150, 222/56, 414/327
International Classes:
B65G65/42
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Description:

This invention relates to a sawdust feeder.

At the present time, sawdust burners are used on kitchen stoves and heaters and these burners have very small hoppers for holding sawdust.

This means that they have to be filled a number of times each day with sawdust usually brought up from the basement: This is tiring and very annoying, to say nothing of the necessity of sweeping up sawdust which has fallen on the floor.

An object of the present invention is the provision of apparatus for 'feeding sawdust from. a relatively large hopper in the basement to the small hopper of a sawdust burner on a kitchen stove.

Another object is the provision of a sawdust feeder which is not very liable to become clogged.

Another object is the provision of a sawdust feeder operated by an electric motor and including means for automatically shutting off the motor should the apparatus become clogged.

A further object is the provision of a device of the nature described of simple and inexpensive construction.

With these and other objects in view, the present invention consists essentially of a feeder device for sawdust burners having relatively small hoppers, comprising a large storage hopper remote from the burner, a tubular casing extending from the storage hopper to the burner hopper, said casing communicating with the interior of each hopper, an endless belt in the casing and extending over pulleys at each end thereof, a plurality of paddles projecting outwardly from the belt, means for moving the belt over the pulleys to convey sawdust on the paddles from the storage to the burner hopper, and means in the burner hopper for controlling the movement of the belt in accordance with the amount of sawdust in said hopper, as more fully described in the 4 following specification and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is an elevation of the sawdust feeder, Figure 2 is a side view thereof,Figure 3 is a vertical section through the burner 4 hopper, Figure 4 is a vertical section through the burner hopper taken at right angles to Figure 3, Figure 5 is an enlarged view, partly in section, of the storage hopper, Figure 6 is an enlarged fragmentary section taken through the lower end of the casing, Figure 7 is an enlarged detail of the automatic switch-off, and Figure 8 is a wiring diagram. 5g Referring more particularly to the drawings, 10 is an ordinary kitchen stove and II is a sawdust burner of any desired type, mounted on the stove and having a sawdust hopper 12. A relatively large sawdust storage hopper 13 is located at a point remote from the sawdust burner, usually in the basement as shown.

A tubular casing 14 extends from the hopper 13 to the hopper 12 and communicates with the io interior of each hopper. The casing preferably opens into the back of the storage hopper and into the side of the burner hopper. An endless belt 15 is positioned in the casing 14 and extends around pulleys 16 at each end thereof. This belt actually travels over a spacer 17, see Figure 5, extending between the upper and lower pulleys 16, and said belt has a plurality of paddles 18 projecting outwardly therefrom. These paddles are preferably slightly flexible and they project 2o outwardly from the belt to the inner surface of the wall of the casing.

The casing 14 opens into the back of the hopper 13 so that the sloping bottom 20 and sides 21 of the hopper direct the sawdust towards the casing. The sides of the casing in the hopper are preferably cut back, as at 22, so that the paddles 18 project into the hopper. As these paddles move upwardly, they lift sawdust from the hopper, and the front of the casing is preferably open to a point above the hopper in order that some of the sawdust may fall back into the hopper. This prevents too much sawdust being raised at one time, thus reducing the possibility of jamming.

If desired, a scraper 23, see Figure 6, having a pbinted end 23d may bear against the lower pulley 16. This scraper slopes toward each side of the casing and is adapted to remove any sawdust which may adhere to the pulley and to direct said sawdust out of the casing through openings 24 0 in the sides of the latter.

The belt 15 is operated by an electric motor 25 mounted adjacent the top of the casing 14, although, if desired, the motor may be positioned at the lower end of the casing. The motor turns 5 a pulley 26 which may be connected directly to a pulley 27 fixedly mounted on the shaft of the upper pulley 16 of the belt. Of course, if the motor is located at the bottom of the casing, the pulley 27 would be mounted on the shaft of the 0 lower pulley 16. The pulley 26 is, however, preferably connected by a belt 28 to a relatively large pulley 30 mounted on a stub shaft 31 while another pulley 32 fixedly mounted on the shaft, is connected by a belt 33 to the pulley 27. By referring to Figure 7, it will be seen that the pulley 30 is freely mounted on the shaft 31 and has an internal thread 34 riding in a spiral groove 35 formed in the shaft and extending towards the end thereof remote from the pulley 32. A coil spring 36 lies between the pulley 30 and a washer 31 held on the threaded outer end of the shaft by a nut 38. A lug 40 projecting outwardly from the side of the pulley 30 adjacent the periphery thereof, is adapted to operate a switch 41 located in the circuit of the motor, whei the pulley moves towards the outer end of the sthu'shaft.

An operating plate 42, see Figures 3 and 4, is hingedly suspended in the hopper 12 near thei back thereof. This plate has pivots 43 at-its. upper edg6 which extend through the sides of the hopper. One of the pivots 43 is bent outside the hopper into a crank 44 which is connected'bya link 45 to the operating lever 46 of a switch 47 mounted on the outer surface of the hopper 12.

This switch also is in the circuit of the motor 25.

The plate 42 has a counterweight 48 along its upper edge which leans towards the rear of the hopper so that there is a tendency for the lower end of the plate to6 swing, in the opposite direction a little past the vertical. When sawdust in the hopper presses, against the plate, the latter is pivoted towards the back pf the hopper, as indicated in broken lines in Figure 4. Wires 50 extending outwardly from the opposite sides of the plate 42 .adjacent its pivot, are bent downwardly and extend past the lower edge of the plate in the spaces between the sides of the plate and the hopper.

In use, the hopper 13 is large enough that it need be filled with sawdust only once in awhile as compared to the number of times the hopper 12 requires filling. When the switch 41 is turned on, the motor 25 moves the belt 15 until the burner hopper 12 is filled. As the sawdust is directed into the burner hopper, the pressure against the plate 42 builds. up until the hopper is almost full, at which time the pressure is sufficient to pivot the plate towards the rear wall of the hopper. This turns the crank 44, which in turn, moves the lever 46 to shut off the switch 47, thus stopping the motor 25.

When the level of the sawdust in the burner hopper drops below a certain point, the counterweight 48 causes the plate 42 to pivot outwardly sufficiently to turn the crank 44 back to turn on the switch 47 to start the motor and the belt.

While the conveyor belt is in motion the paddles 18 lift sawdust from the storage to the burner hopper. The fact that the casing 14 is open a short way above the hopper 13, reduces the possibility of jamming since any excess of sawdust falls back into the hopper., Sawdust is, however, made of small solid particles which are bound to get between the edges of the paddles and the casing wall. These paddles are made flexible so that they will bend and release or pass over any such particles without causing any trouble. The scraper 23 helps to prevent sawdust from accumulating around the lower pulley 16, and the wires.50 on the sides of the operating plate, prevent sawdust from clogging up the space between said sides and the walls of the hopper. In the event that the belt might become jammed or overloaded, means has been provided for automatically shutting off the motor. If the belt stops while the motor is running, the stub shaft 31 stops but the pulley 30 keeps turning. The thread 34 riding in the spiral groove 35, causes the pulley to move towards the outer end of the shaft until the lug 40 operates the switch 41 automatically to shut off the motor. When the belt is cleared, the apparatus is again set into operation by turning on the switch 41.

Figure 8 diagrammatically illustrates the wiring for the sawdust feeder. The switches 41 and 47 are in series in the circuit of the motor so that the latter is stopped if either switch is turned off. Switch 41 is normally closed and the motor is then controlled by switch 47. If it is desired to stop the apparatus entirely, the switch 41 may be turned off. A circuit having a switch 51 therein, is provided, which by-passes the switch - 47 so that, if desired, the motor may be set into operation regardless of the setting of the latter switch. With this arrangement, a person may fill the burner hopper with sawdust without wait:ing until it has first been emptied.

SFrom.;the above, it will readily be seen that simple and inexpensive means has been provided for feeding sawdust from a relatively large storage hopper to the small hopper of a sawdust burner mounted on a stove or heater, and that this apparatus is not very likely to become clogged:or overloaded but is automatically shut off if such an event does take place.

Various modifications may be made in this invention without departing from. the spirit thereof or the scope of the claims, and therefore, the exact forms shown are to be taken as illustrative only and not in a limiting sense, and it is desired that only such limitations ,shall be placed thereon as are disclosed in the prior art or are set forth in the accompanying claims.

What I claim as my invention is: 1. A feeder device for sawdust burners having relatively small hoppers, comprising a large storage hopper remote from the burner, a tubular casing extending from the storage hopper to the burner hopper, said casing communicating with the. interior of each hopper, an endless belt in the casing and extending over pulleys at each end thereof, a plurality of paddles projecting outwardly from the belt, means for moving the belt over the pulleys to convey sawdust on the paddles from the storage to the burner hopper, a plate hingedly mounted in the burner hopper for controlling the belt moving means in accordance with the amount of sawdust in said hopper, and a wire extending outwardly and downwardly from each LO side of the plate in the space between the sides thereof :and the walls of the hopper.

2. A feeder device for sawdust burners having relatively small hoppers, comprising a large storage hopper remote from the burner, a tubular 65 casing extending from the storage hopper to the burner hopper, said casing communicating with the interior of each hopper, an endless belt in the casing and extending over pulleys at each end thereof, a plurality of paddles projecting out00 wardly from the, belt, a motor for moving the belt over the pulleys to convey sawdust on the paddles from the storage to the burner hopper, a switch for controlling the motor, a plate bingedly suspended adjacent one edge thereof in the hopper and connected to the switch, a counter weight for the plate tending to swing the plate across the hopper when the sawdust is low to operate the switch to start the motor, said plate being swung back to its normal position by sawdust supplied to the hopper to shut off the motor, and a wire extending outwardly and downwardly from each side of the plate in the space between the sides thereof and the walls of the hopper.

3. A feeder device for sawdust burners having S75 relatively small hoppers, comprising a large storage hopper remote from the burner, a tubular casing extending from the storage hopper to the burner hopper, said casing communicating with the interior of each hopper, an endless belt in the casing and extending over pulleys at each end thereof, a plurality of paddles projecting outwardly from the belt, a motor for moving the belt over the pulleys to convey sawdust on the paddles from the storage to the burner hopper, a switch for controlling the motor, means in the burner hopper for operating the switch to start the motor when the sawdust becomes low in the hopper and to shut off the motor when the hopper is filled, an independent switch for shutting off the motor, and means for turning off said independent switch when the belt is accidently stopped the said last mentioned means comprising a shaft having a spiral groove therein, a pulley freely mounted on the shaft having an internal thread riding in the groove, a washer held on the outer end of the shaft, a spring between the pulley and the washer, a lug extending from the side of the pulley and a switch located in the circuit of the motor adapted to be operated by the lug when the pulley moves axially on the shaft.

4. A feeder device for sawdust burners having relatively small hoppers, comprising a large storage hopper remote from the burner, a tubular casing extending from the storage hopper to the burner hopper, said casing communicating with the interior of each hopper, an endless belt in the casing and extending over pulleys at each end thereof, a plurality of paddles projecting outwardly from the belt, a motor for moving the belt over the pulleys to convey sawdust on the paddles from the storage to the burner hopper, a switch for controlling the motor, a plate hingedly mounted in the hopper and connected to the switch to start the motor when the sawdust becomes low in the hopper and to shut off the motor when the hopper is filled, a wire extending outwardly and downwardly from each side of the plate in the space between the sides thereof and the walls of the hopper, and means for automatically stopping the motor when the belt is accidently stopped.

5. A feeding device for sawdust burners comprising a lower hopper having a substantial vertical back, an upper hopper, a tubular casing rectangular in cross section extending from the lower hopper to the upper hopper extending along the back of the lower hopper and having the inner side open to a point above the top of the lower hopper and having the sides of the casing in the hopper cut back so that any paddles therein may project into the lower hopper, an endless belt in the casing extending over pulleys at each end thereof and carrying a plurality of paddles projecting outwardly therefrom, a motor for moving the belt, a switch for controlling the motor, a plate hingedly suspended adjacent to one edge of the upper hopper and operatively connected to the switch, a counterweight for the plate tending to swing the same to a position which will close the switch, the said plate being designed to be swung to its normal position with the switch open when there is a sufficient supply of sawdust in the upper hopper.

6. A feeder device for sawdust burners having relatively small hoppers, comprising a large storage hopper remote from the burner, a tubular casing extending from the storage hopper to the burner hopper, said casing communicating with the interior of each hopper, an endless belt in the casing and extending over pulleys at each end thereof, a plurality of paddles projecting outwardly from the belt, a motor for moving the belt over the pulleys to convey sawdust on the paddles from the storage to the burner hopper, a switch for controlling the motor, means in the burner hopper for operating the switch to start the motor when the sawdust becomes low in the hopper and to shut off the motor when the hopper is filled, a pulley freely mounted on a shaft, driving means connecting the pulley to the motor, an internal thread in the pulley riding in a spiral groove formed in the shaft, a lug projecting outwardly from the pulley adjacent its periphery adapted to operate the switch, a pulley fixedly mounted on the shaft, and driving means connecting the latter pulley to a belt pulley, whereby the first-mentioned pulley is moved along the shaft by the thread in the spiral groove to cause the lug to shut off the independent switch when the shaft is stopped by the stopping of the belt.

RONALD HOUGH BLUSSON.