Title:
Syringe
United States Patent 2324898


Abstract:
The present invention relates to new and useful improvements in syringes of a type adapted primarily for injecting mineral oil into the rectum of a person for treating the lower bowel, and the invention has for its primary object to provide a transparent container adapted to contain a predetermined...



Inventors:
Anderson, Charles A.
Application Number:
US38852041A
Publication Date:
07/20/1943
Filing Date:
04/14/1941
Assignee:
Anderson, Charles A.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
239/373, 604/243, 604/275, 604/911
International Classes:
A61M3/02
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Description:

The present invention relates to new and useful improvements in syringes of a type adapted primarily for injecting mineral oil into the rectum of a person for treating the lower bowel, and the invention has for its primary object to provide a transparent container adapted to contain a predetermined quanity of the oil so that the quantity of oil discharged from the syringe may be ascertained and also for providing a connection for a rubber bulb to the tube for the purpose of supplying the necessary pressure to eject the fluid therefrom and arranged so that the liquid will not come into contact with the bulb.

A further important object of the present invention is to provide a handle for the transparent container and forming a support for the rubber bulb, the handle and bulb being arranged for simultaneous gripping by the hand of a person.

A still further object is to provide a device of this character of simple and practical construction, which is efficient and reliable in performance, relatively inexpensive to manufacture and otherwise well adapted for the purposes for which the same is intended.

Other objects and advantages reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawing forming part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in whichFigure 1 is a side elevational view of a syringe embodying my invention, and Figure 2 is a fragmentary elevational view of the lower end of the transparent tube or container for the oil.

Referring now to the drawing in detail, the numeral 5 designates a glass tube or container adapted to contain a predetermined quantity of mineral oil, one end of the tube being tapering as shown at 6 and formed with a reduced extension 7 which is roughened on its outer surface as shown at 8 for frictionally gripping one end of a rubber hose 9 which has the nozzle 10 attached to its other end.

The upper end of the glass tube is flared as shown at I and adapted for receiving a cork or stopper 12 tightly fitted therein.

One end of a rigid tube 13 passes through the cork for conmunication with the interior of the tube 5, the other end of the tube 13 having a section of flexible tubing 14 attached thereto for connecting the nozzle end 15 of a rubber bulb 16 to the cork or stopper. As shown to advantage in Figure 1 of the drawing, the tube 13 is bent to extend laterally with respect to the tube 5.

Secured to the tube 5 adjacent the flared end II is a ring member T1 to the diametrically opposite sides of which is fixedly attached the forked ends 18 of a wire handle 19 by soldering or other suitable method of attaching, the outer end of the handle being formed with a substantially ring-like portion 20 within which the bulb 16 is adapted to rest. The ring 20 is of substantially oval form and of a size slightly less than that of the bulb 16 so that the bulb will not pass through the ring. The forked portion 18 extends downwardly from the handle member 19 and projecting upwardly from the handle is a hook member 21 adapted to engage over the tube 13 to prevent ejection of the cork from the tube 5 by pressure created therein by the bulb. In order to remove the cork for refilling the tube 5, the cork is turned to move the tube 13 from under the hook 21 and the cork may then be withdrawn from the tube 5.

When using mineral oil or similar substances in a syringe of this character it is important to prevent the oil from entering the rubber bulb, as the latter rapidly deteriorates from contact with the oil. Accordingly, this objection is avoided by providing the connection between the tube of oil and the bulb as above described.

The handle enables the tube of oil to be held in an upright position to determine the amount of oil discharged therefrom. The device is intended for the self-administering of mineral oil by way of the rectum. When: using the syringe, the tube 5 is filled with mineral oil to the desired level and the nozzle 10 inserted in the rectum, the handle 19 and bulb 16 being grasped so as to hold the tube in an upright position in front of the patient in order that the volume of oil fed from the tube may be observed. By squeezing the bulb 16, the oil will be forced from the tube outwardly of the nozzle 10.

SIt is believed the details of construction, advantages and manner of use of the device will be readily understood from the foregoing without further detailed: explanation.

What I claim is: 1. A syringe comprising a tubular liquid container having a nozzle attached at one end, a closure in the other end of the container, a rubber bulb connected to the closure and adapted to communicate with the container through the closure, a handle underlying and supporting the bulb, and means carried by the handle for retaining the closure in position.

2. A syringe comprising a tubular liquid container having a nozzle attached at one end, a closure in the other end of the container, a rubber bulb connected to the closure and adapted to communicate with the container through the closure, a handle underlying and supporting the bulb, and a rigid extension on the handle for securing the closure in position.

CHARLES A. ANDERSON.