Title:
Hydraulic elevator construction
United States Patent 2319126


Abstract:
My present invention relates to novel hydraulic elevator construction and has, for one of its principal objects, the provision of suitable structures that may be installed without the necessity of sinking plunger cylinders in the ground. The expense of sinking plunger cylinders is an important...



Inventors:
Grote, Alfred W.
Application Number:
US42642842A
Publication Date:
05/11/1943
Filing Date:
01/12/1942
Assignee:
PORTLAND COMPANY
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B66B9/04
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Description:

My present invention relates to novel hydraulic elevator construction and has, for one of its principal objects, the provision of suitable structures that may be installed without the necessity of sinking plunger cylinders in the ground.

The expense of sinking plunger cylinders is an important factor that varies with each installation although such expense may generally be anticipated by conventional tests. Frequently, however, because of quicksand or the like or because of existing structural limitations, the sinking of the plunger cylinders is either impossible or undesirable.

In accordance with my invention, I provide an elevator that consists of a plurality of plunger and cylinder assemblies each adapted to provide the desired elevator rise. To avoid the expense of sinking the cylinders in the ground, the cylinders are disposed in the assembly with their upper ends extending above the lower station a distance depending on such factors as their length, the relation of the stations to each other, and the manner in which the cylinders are supported. I connect the car to the upper ends of the plungers to support it at the lower station when the plungers are in their retracted position.

The plunger and cylinder assemblies are disposed relative to each other to effect a desired distribution of the weight of the car and its load relative thereto.

My invention has the advantage that while permitting the use of relatively small and inexpensive plunger and cylinder assemblies, it provides safe and efficient elevator constructions adaptable for installation under a wide range of conditions and at a substantially constant expense.

While I may employ any number of plunger and cylinder assemblies and provide any desired means for connecting the elevator car to the ends of the plungers, I have shown in the accompanying drawing an illustrated embodiment of my invention from which its essential characteristics and its novel features and advantages will be readily apparent.

In the drawing: Fig. 1 is a top plan view of an elevator installation in accordance with my invention.

Fig. 2 shows the installation of Fig. 1 in side view as seen from line 2-2, and Fig. 3 is an enlarged view showing certain details of a car and the structure for supporting it in a depending position relative to the plungers.

At I, I have indicated a well way having a suitable base or foundation 2 and typical stations 3 and 4. The well way structure supports guide rails 5 located midway of its sides. Buffer springs S are seated on the base 2.

In order to support the car C, I provide a plurality of cylinders 6 for the plungers 1, each adapted to provide the desired elevator rise.

While the cylinders 6 may be supported on the base 2 and within the well way I, I have shown them as mounted on separate bases 8 exteriorly o0 thereof. The cylinders 6 and the plungers 7 are positioned relative to each other to effect the desired distribution of the weight of the car C and its load relative thereto and where, as in the embodiment of my invention shown in the drawing, the plunger and cylinder assemblies are employed, these are mounted adjacent each side of the well way I and preferably on opposite sides of a center line defined by the guide rails 5.

As my invention avoids the necessity of sinking the cylinders 6 in the ground, their upper ends extend a substantial distance above the lower station 3.

To support the car C, I provide means connected to the ends of the plungers 7 adapted to support the car C at the lower station 3 when the plungers 7 are in their retracted position.

While the means employed varies with the number of plunger and cylinder assemblies employed, their disposition relative to the car C and the construction of each car, as shown in the drawing, I may rigidly interconnect the ends of the plungers 7 as by an I beam 9 extending diagonally under and rigidly attached as at 10 to the top cross head II. As shown in Figs. 1 and 3, the cross head 1 may consist of a pair of oppositely disposed channel members 12 connected through gusset plates 13 to stiles 14. The stiles 14 are interconnected at their lower ends by the bottom cross head 15 comprising a pair of oppositely disposed channels 16. The cross heads 11 and 15 carry guide shoes 17 and 18 respectively.

As the car C may be of any desired type, I have not described it in detail, but it will be noted that the stiles 14 are midway of its sides so that the weight of the car C is centered with respect to the stiles 14 and accordingly to the guide rails 5. At 19, I have indicated bracing straps interconnecting the sills 20 of the car C and the stiles 14. By this construction, I ensure that the car C is both centrally guided and rigidly supported and it will be appreciated that the diagonal relationship of the beam 9 to the cross head II depends on the relation of the plunger and cylinder assemblies to the guide rails 5. Where the guide rails 5 and the plunger and cylinder assemblies are substanaially in transverse alinement, the cross head 1 may obviously be directly connected to the plungers 7 and in some installations, the cross head II may be omitted and the stiles 14 connected to adjacent plunger or plungers.

Any desired means may be employed for delivering fluid under pressure to the cylinder 6 to raise the car C or for controlling the escape of fluid therefrom. Accordingly, I have not shown such means in detail nor have I shown the control system. It is, however, essential to provide for the equalization of pressures in the cylinders 6 to equalize the travel of the plungers 7. I effect this result by providing the delivery and exhaust conduit 21 with branch conduits 22 connected to the cylinders 6. The branch conduits 22 are of the same length thereby ensuring the equalization of the pressure of the fluid delivered to the cylinders 6. 0i In accordance with my invention, I am able to provide efficient elevator structures that may be easily installed since the foundations for the cylinders may be established where convenient making the many advantages of hydraulic ,:; elevators available where the sinking of the plunger cylinders is either impossible or undesirable.

What I therefore claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is: : 1. An elevator assembly for supporting an elevator car in its well way to serve a plurality of stations, said assembly comprising a pair of transversely alined guide rails supported by the well way structure and defining a center line ;,, of car support, a cylinder laterally of each side of said car, said cylinders being on opposite sides of said center line and being mounted with substantially their entire length disposed above the level of the bottom station, a plunger in each cylinder, said cylinders and said plungers being of sufficient length to permit said car to be raised from its bottom station to its top station, means to support said car, said means including a pair of stiles connected to said car midway 4; of its sides and guide shoes carried by said stiles in engagement with said rails, and means rigidly connecting said car supporting means to the ends of said plungers.

-2. An elevator assembly for supporting an elevator car in its well way to serve a plurality of stations, said assembly comprising a pair of transversely alined guide rails supported by the well way structure and defining a center line of car support, a cylinder laterally of each side of said car, said cylinders being on opposite sides of said center line and being mounted with substantially their entire length disposed above the level of the bottom station, a plunger in each cylinder, said cylinders and said plungers being of sufflcieint length to permit said car to be raised from its bottom station to its top station, means supporting said car in a balanced position, said means comprising a pair of stiles, top and bottom cross heads interconnecting said stiles, and guide shoes carried by said stiles in engagement with said rails, and a beam rigidly interconnecting the ends of said plungers and being disposed diagonally under said top cross head and attached thereto.

3. The assembly of claim 2 in which a guide shoe is provided adjacent the top and bottom of each stile.

4. The assembly of claim 2 in which the top cross head comprises oppositely disposed channel members, the beam is an I beam and mutually contacting portions of adjacent flanges of the beam and the channel members are interconnected.

5. In an elevator assembly for supporting an elevator car in its well way to serve a plurality of stations, a pair of guide rails supported on opposite sides of said well way, a cylinder laterally of each side of said car and each being mounted with substantially its entire length disposed above the level of the bottom station, a plunger in each cylinder, said cylinders and said plungers being of sufficient length to permit said car to be raised from its bottom station to the upper station, supporting means connected to said plungers and to said car, guide shoes carried by said car in engagement with said rails, said casings and said guide rails being so disposed that a line between said casings intersects a line between said guide rails.

6. The elevator assembly of claim 5 in which the guide rails define a center line of car support and the cylinders are located on opposite sides of the center line.

ALFRED W. GROTE.