Title:
Traffic signal
United States Patent 2290695


Abstract:
The present invention relates to improvements in a traffic signal, and its principal object is to provide a manually operated signal that may be safely handled by a person standing on the sidewalk. My signal is particularly intended for use by school boys who are on traffic duty and who are...



Inventors:
Marcus, Robert R.
Application Number:
US33743040A
Publication Date:
07/21/1942
Filing Date:
05/27/1940
Assignee:
Marcus, Robert R.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
G08G1/09
View Patent Images:



Description:

The present invention relates to improvements in a traffic signal, and its principal object is to provide a manually operated signal that may be safely handled by a person standing on the sidewalk. My signal is particularly intended for use by school boys who are on traffic duty and who are located at different intersections surrounding the school to periodically stop traffic so as to make it safe for the school children to cross at the 1( intersection.

At the present time, it is the custom of these traffic boys to stand on the side walk and to either jump into the traffic lane or to lean forward to give the stop signal, very often at grave 1I risk of their lives and safety.

It is proposed in the present invention to provide a manually operated stop signal, which may be safely handled from the side walk and allows the traffic boy to hold a stop signal over the 2 traffic lane without any danger to himself.

It is further proposed to provide a traffic signal of the character described which can be conveniently swung horizontally through an angle of 90 degrees or more so that a traffic boy stand- 2 ing on the corner of the sidewalk may easily swing the signal from one street to an intersection street.

Another object of my invention is to provide a signal in the form of a standard, the lower end of which is anchored to the surface of the sidewalk by the foot of the operator in such a manner that the standard may be swung about a horizontal axis for lowering the same over the traffic lane, and on a vertical axis for swinging the standard from one street to another.

It is further proposed to provide a signal in the form of a standard having a "stop" signal thereon at its upper end, and an intermediate portion of the standard carrying an arm adapted to be gripped by the operator for manipulating the standard.

And finally it is proposed to provide a signal in the form of a standard, the lower end of which is anchored to the side walk by the foot of an operator occupying a foot rest or stirrup arranged in such a manner with respect to the standard that if the latter should be accidentally struck by a passing automobile it would automatically free itself from the foot of the operator.

Further objects and advantages of my invention will appear as the specification proceeds, and the novel features thereof will be fully set forth in the claims hereto appended.

The preferred form of my invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, forming part of this application, in which: Figure 1 shows a side elevation of my "stop" signal in. vertical position, an inclined position being indicated in dotted lines; Figure 2, an end elevation of the same; and Figure 3, a vertical section, on an enlarged scale, through the lower portion of the signal. 0 While I have shown only the preferred form of my invention, I wish to have it understood that various changes or modifications may be made within the scope of the claims hereto attached, without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Referring to the drawing in detail, my stop signal I comprises in its preferred form, a stirrup 2 having a short bar 3 projecting forward from the bottom thereof, a bracket 4 pivoted 0 to the bar, as at 5, and having a horizontal section 6 and a vertical section 1, a standard 8 pivoted to the vertical section, as at 9, and having a suitable indicating means 10 at the upper end thereof, and a manipulating arm II pivoted .5 to the standard, as at 12.

The stirrup 2 may be made of any suitable form, and is here shown as a slightly raised bottom 13 curved downwardly at the ends 14, and then upwardly, as at 15 to form parallel flanges 16 I6 fastened upon one another by a rivet 17.

The form of the stirrup, which is intended to receive a boy's foot, as shown in Figure 1, may be modified, and as a matter of fact, the upper portion may be omitted altogether, leaving only 35 slight projections at the sides of the foot.

The bar 3 is secured to the bottom member 13 by the rivet 18, and this connection is preferably made in such a manner as to allow of little or no play of the bar with respect to the stirrup. 40 The bracket 4 is freely swingable on the pivot 5 and is twisted, as at 19, to allow its upper vertical section to lie in the vertical plane passing through the center line of the stirrup.

The standard 8 which is preferably made of 45 wood, is bifurcated, as at 20, to straddle the vertical section 7 of the bracket and is freely swingable on its pivot 9.

The upper end of the standard is also bifurcated, as at 21, to receive the "stop" signal, which 50 is here shown as a metallic disc received between the legs of the standard, and riveted thereto, as at 22. The word "Stop" is printed on the disc, so as to read horizontally, when the standard occupies the angular position of Figure 1. 55 The operating arm II is preferably made of metal, and is forked at one end, as shown at 23, to straddle the standard and to receive the pivot 12. The other end of the arm is also bifurcated, as at 24, to receive the hand-grip 25.

The operation of my invention will be readily understood from the foregoing description.

The traffic boy, while standing on the sidewalk near the corner thereof, will place his foot in the stirrup in the manner shown in Figure 1, whereby the stirrup is anchored to the sidewalk surface. In inactive position, the standard will stand upright, as shown in full lines in Figure 1.

If the traffic boy intends to give a "stop" signal, e he drops the standard over the traffic lane in the manner shown in dotted lines in Figure 1, manipulating the standard by means of the arm II.

To change the signal, so as to cover the traffic of an intersecting street, he merely swings the arm horizontally on the pivot 5, through an angle of 90 degrees, or whatever the angle of the intersection may be.

If some passing automobile should accidentally strike the "stop" signal, the standard will turn on the pivot 5, and if the shock is particularly violent, so as to drag the signal along, the stirrup will automatically free itself from the foot, inasmuch as the pivot 5 is somewhere near the front edge of the foot, and there will be no tendency to bind, as there might be if the pivot 5 were 3 placed directly underneath the stirrup.

I claim: 1. A traffic signal comprising a foot rest having a foot-confining recess, a standard secured relative thereto with freedom of swinging move- .3 ment in a vertical plane and having a signal thereon, and a manipulating arm pivoted to the standard intermediate its length and operable by a person occupying the foot rest.

2. A traffic signal comprising a foot rest, a bar extending forward therefrom approximately to the front of a foot occupying the rest, a bracket having a horizontal section pivoted to the front S end of the bar for swinging movement in a horizontal plane and having a vertical section rising from the front end of the horizontal section, a standard pivoted to the vertical section for swinging movement in a vertical plane an ad having a signal at its upper end, and manipulating means for the standard operable by a person occupying the foot rest for moving the standard about either of the pivots.

3. A traffic signal comprising a foot rest, a bar extending forward therefrom approximately to the front of a foot occupying the rest, a bracket having a horizontal section pivoted to the front end of the bar for swinging movement in a horizontal plane and having a vertical section rising from the front end of the horizontal section, a standard pivoted to the vertical section for swinging movement in a vertical plane and having a signal at its upper end, and manipulating means for the standard operable by a person occupying the foot rest for moving the standard about either of the pivots, the manipulating means comprising an arm pivoted to the standard intermediate its length and having gripping means at the free end thereof.

!0 4. A traffic signal comprising a foot-rest, a bar extending forward therefrom approximately to the front of a foot occupying the foot rest, a bracket having a longitudinal section pivoted to the front end of the bar for swinging movement ]5 in a horizontal plane and having a vertical section, and a standard pivoted to the vertical section for swinging movement in a vertical plane and having a signal at its upper end.

ROBERT R. MARCUS.