Title:
Boot rack
United States Patent 2284552


Abstract:
The present invention relates to an improved boot rack and the invention is in the nature of a continuation in part of my application for patent Serial Number 388,843 filed April 16, 1941, and allowed May 27, 1941. The present invention involves a permanent fixture for the support of foot-wear,...



Inventors:
Arenz, Albert N.
Application Number:
US41108441A
Publication Date:
05/26/1942
Filing Date:
09/16/1941
Assignee:
Arenz, Albert N.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
D06/320
International Classes:
A47L23/20
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Description:

The present invention relates to an improved boot rack and the invention is in the nature of a continuation in part of my application for patent Serial Number 388,843 filed April 16, 1941, and allowed May 27, 1941.

The present invention involves a permanent fixture for the support of foot-wear, which fixture is adapted to be rigidly fastened to a wall, or other support, and is designed to receive and suport the foot-wear in inverted or upside down 1 position.

While the rack or fixture is especially designed for suspending boots of various kinds, galoshes, and other "high" foot-wear, the rack is also adapted to accommodate and support, preferably 1 in inverted position, various types of "low" shoes.

The racks are designed for commercial use in displaying foot-wear in salesrooms and store windows where the inverted position of a pair of boots eliminates tendency of the material to 2 wrinkle; for domestic use the racks may be fastened to the wall of a wardrobe or cupboard; and for sportsmen the racks may be fastened in lockers, or on other suitable supports, to temporarily suspend the boots in inverted position, when not in use, or overnight, to facilitate draining and drying out of the foot-wear which may have become wet during the preceding day.

In carrying out my invention I provide a boot rack of the permanently fixed type which comprises a pair of horizontally disposed U-shaped yokes of resilient wire of suitable gage to support and suspend the foot-wear preferably in inverted position. The rack involves the combination with the integral U-shaped yokes of an angle bracket rigidly and permanently affixed to the adjoining yokes by means of which bracket the rack may be attached to a wall, post, or other stationary support, and become a permanent fixture.

The invention consists in the novel combinations and arrangement of parts involving the Ushaped yokes and the bracket as will be set forth and claimed. In the accompanying drawing I have illustrated one complete example of the physical embodiment of my invention in which the parts are combined and arranged according to one mode I have thus far devised for the practical application of the principles of my invention, but it will be understood that changes and alterations may be made in this exemplifying drawing, within the scope of my appended claims,, without departing from the principles of my invention.

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a boot rack embodying my invention, and shown in position for use.

Figure 2 is a top plan view of the rack; Figure 3 is a side view of the rack; and Figure 4 is a Sfront edge view of the rack.

For convenience of description I have referred to the fixture as a boot rack from which the various kinds of foot-wear are suspended or supported, preferably, in inverted or upside down 0 position, but it will be understood that the utility of the fixture is not limited to these specific purposes or uses.

As shown in the various views the rack is fashioned with and includes a pair of complementary, horizontally disposed U-shaped yokes I and 2 that are fashioned in suitable machines or tools, from resilient wire of appropriate dimensions or gage. The yokes are preferably fashioned from a single piece of wire, and the free front ends 3 20 and 4 of the two outer arms of the yokes are flared or spread outwardly. These flared front ends of the resilient yokes are designed to guide the boots as they are inserted in upside down position and heel first into the respective yokes, 25 and the resiliency of the wire yokes permits them to spread laterally away from the longitudinal center of the rack as the boots are forced into the yokes. Thus the semi-circular throat or rear bend of each yoke grasps the inverted boot 30 around its heel portion, and the outer free arms of the resilient yokes, which extend forwardly from the heel toward the toe portion of the boot, press inwardly against the ankle portion of the boot with sufficient force to hold the boot in place 35 with its foot portion above the yoke. The foot portion of the boot is thus supported above the plane of the rack, the narrower ankle portion of the boot is suspended below the rack, and the leg portion and top of the inverted boot of course de40 pend from and below the rack.

The two yokes I and 2 of the rack are joined by a central bend 5 located somewhat to the rear of the front open ends of the yokes, and the parallel adjoining inner arms 6 and 7 of the yokes 45 are of proper length to extend under and support the feet portions of the boots at approximately the ball portions of the foot-wear.

The wire fixture is permanently attached or fastened to a wall of a cupboard, wardrobe, 50 locker, or other appropriate support through the use of an angle bracket fashioned from a flat metal blank with angular arms 8 and 9. The horizontal arm 9 is of proper width to span the distance between the two adjoining arms 6 and Is 1 of the yokes, and the lateral under edges of this arm 9, where they contact with the adjoining arms 6 and 7, are welded as at 10, to form a rigid central structure between the yokes. An integral formation is thus formed between the arms 6 and 7 of the yokes and the arm 9 of the bracket, and this rigid connection between the yokes and the bracket, or attachment of the bracket to the yokes, provides a substantial brace for the fixture and a single support for the two yokes. This substantial support or brace for the yokes maintains the parts in their proper positions, permits the use of wire of comparatively small gage in the manufacture of the rack to insure the required resiliency for the yokes, and at the same time provides a durable fixture for the purpose intended.

The attaching arm 8 of the angle bracket, as shown, is provided with screw holes 1 1, I I, by means of which the fixture is rigidly and permanently fastened to its support, and while this attaching arm is shown as extending upwardly from and at right angles to the brace arm 9 and to the plane of the two yokes, it will be understood. that the angularity, of the attaching arm may be changed, and its position with relation to the brace arm 9 may be changed, without departing from. the principles of my invention.

The brace arm 9 of the bracket at the central part of the rack is of sufficient length so that it may be welded to the yoke arms 6 and 7 to form a rigid and substantial brace, and the angular bracket projects to the rear of the yokes a sufficient distance to accommodate the heels of the boots that are suspended in the yokes. The size of the rack may be varied to accomomdate shoes or boots of different sizes and shapes, but preferably the footwear is supported or suspended in the yokes in inverted or upside down position.

Having thus fully described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is: 1. A boot-rack including a pair of horizontally disposed substantially U-shaped yokes of resilient wire, an angle bracket having a brace-arm rigidly fastened to and extending along a portion of the two adjoining inner arms of the yokes, and said angle bracket also having an attaching arm. 2. A boot rack including a pair of horizontally disposed substantially U-shaped yokes of resilient wire, an angle bracket. having a brace-arm welded to and extending along a portion of the two adjoining inner arms of the yokes,- and said angle bracket also having an upright attaching arm spaced to the. rear of the U-shaped yokes.

ALBERT N. ARENZ.