Title:
Tool suspension
United States Patent 2212695


Abstract:
This invention relates to a suspension and torque resisting fixture for portable power actuated tools. The principal object and purpose of my inSvention is to provide a fixture whereby the larger size and more powerful electric and pneumatic nut-setters, stud-setters and similar tools can...



Inventors:
Nash, William W.
Application Number:
US25525839A
Publication Date:
08/27/1940
Filing Date:
02/08/1939
Assignee:
INDEPENDENT PNEUMATIC TOOL CO
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B23B45/14; B25H1/00
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Description:

This invention relates to a suspension and torque resisting fixture for portable power actuated tools.

The principal object and purpose of my inSvention is to provide a fixture whereby the larger size and more powerful electric and pneumatic nut-setters, stud-setters and similar tools can be suspended for operation with greater convenience and safety and completely eliminate the danger of injury to the operators from torque strains when the tool is overloaded as when the automatic clutch releases on the tightening or setting of the work.

In carrying out the objects of my invention, I provide a fixture in which an arm element connects the tool to an overhead support and which arm element is of a non-rotatable construction to absorb any torque strains which may be impressed on the tool and thus relieve the operator of the necessity of "fighting" the torque as when manual effort is depended upon to hold the tool at the work as heretofore.

A further object of my invention is to make this arm element extensible so that the tool may be raised and lowered to be up out of the way when not in use and brought down to the desired working level when in use.

A further object of my invention is to combine a counter-balancing device with the arm ele-. ment to balance the weight of the tool when at its working level and lift the tool up out of the way when raised.

A further object of my invention is to employ a counter-balancing device of the enclosed spiral spring and drum type to facilitate the production of a simple and compact tool suspension fixture.

A further object of my invention is to rockably or hingedly connect the arm element to its load frame at the overhead support so that the tool may be swung backwardly and forwardly and to either side to increase the area which may be reached by the tool.

A further object of my invention is to connect the tool to the lower end of the arm by a yoke and thus enable the tool to be adjusted into either a vertical or horizontal position.

A further object of my invention is to connect the yoke to the arm by a yoke bracket and thus adapt the fixture to the suspension of tools with different handle arrangements.

The invention consists further in the features hereinafter described and claimed.

In the accompanying drawingFig. 1 shows a tool suspended from an overhead supported by my improved suspension and torque resisting fixture; Fig. 2 is a larger view of the fixture with parts broken away and in section, respectively, to more clearly show the details of construction; Fig. 3 is a horizontal sectional view taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 2; Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view taken on line 4-4 of Fig. 2; Fig. 5 is a top plan view of the yoke bracket employed in the assembly shown in Figs. 1 and 2; Fig. 6 is a side view showing a tool held in a horizontal position with respect to its supporting yoke; and Fig. 7 shows another form of yoke bracket to be later described.

In the drawing, I indicates the arm element of my improved fixture, and 2 indicates the trolley which suspends the arm from an overhead track-way 3. The arm I is extensible consisting, in the embodiment shown, of a plurality of telescopically connected sections 4, 4. The latter are tubular, sliding one within the other, to provide a maximum travel when open and the minimum head room when closed. The extensibility of the sections 4 is controlled by co-acting stops on the respective sections. These stops, in the structure shown, comprise abuttable shoulders 5, 6 within the sections. The latter may be formed to provide the stops; or sleeve elements may be fixed in the tubes for that purpose.

The trolley 2 comprises a frame member preferably in the form of a stout cylindrical bar 7, to the opposite ends of which are secured brackets 8, 8 extending above the bar and providing supports for the wheels or rollers 9, 9 for the trolley. When the overhead track-way 3 is in the form of an I-beam as shown, the trolley has a pair of wheels at each end of the bar 7. In this arrangement, flanged wheels are employed and the ends of the bar 7 are flattened by milling or otherwise to provide flat seating surfaces for the brackets 8. The latter may be secured to the bar 7 by bolts 10 and with the brackets individual with respect to the wheels spacer plates (not shown) may be used to space the wheels for I-beams of different widths. The wheels may have ball-bearing mountings on the brackets 8 to reduce friction and provide an easy running assembly. For a tubular track suspension, the trolley structure will be adapted accordingly.

A hanger I I connects the upper end of arm I to the trolley bar 7 and is held from displacement along the bar by collars 12, 12 fixed on the bar at the opposite ends of the hanger. Set screws (one being shown at 13 in Fig. 2) are employed for fixing the collars to the bar at 6 the ends of the hanger. The latter is positioned mid-way the length of the bar I to centralize the connection of the arm i to the bar.

The cylindrical connection of the hanger to the bar allows the arm I to be swung to either side of the track 3, the trolley and the track being parallel as shown.

A lug 14 on the hanger extends into the upper section 4 of the arm I and is connected to said section by an axis member in the form of a bolt 16 15. With the lug !4 in the plane of the track 3, the bolt 15 is at right angles to the track and thus the arm I may be swung forwardly and backwardly in the direction of the track. The extent of this movement is controlled by the clearance allowed between the upper edge of the arm I and the hanger 1 I at its connection with the lug 14. The arm I being relatively long when fully extended requires but a slight clearance for a wide swing at the lower end of the. 26 arm.

A yoke 16 at the lower end of the arm I attaches a tool to the arm. The yoke is connected to the arm by a yoke bracket, the design of which determines the mounting of the tool axis with respect to the track 3.- In Figs. 1, 2, 5 and 6, the yoke bracket IT connects the yoke 18 to the arm with the yoke parallel to the track 3 and the tool axis extends transversely to the trackway when the tool is swung to a horizontal position as shown in Fig. 6. In Fig. 7, the yoke bracket 18 connects the yoke 14a to the arm I with the yoke in right angular relation to the track 3 and thus the tool axis is parallel to the track when in a horizontal position.

The yoke bracket 7 is in the form of a casting having a channel 19 on its underside and a socketed lug 20 in its upper side. The mid-portion of the yoke 16 is secured in the channel 19 by bolts 21, while the lower section 4 of the arm 1 is secured in the lug 20 by a bolt 22. For adjustment, the yoke 16 may be split or divided transversely and when so made the ends of its separable sections overlap in the channel 19 and are secured together and to the bracket by the bolts 21 as indicated by the dotted lines in Fig.

2. The bolt openings in the yoke sections are in the form of slots to permit adjustment of the yoke sections towards and from each other. The slots are also indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 2. The yoke 16 supports a tool, marked 23 in Fig. 1, by having the side arms of the yoke engage the side handles 24, 25 of the tool. The yoke arms are apertured to fit over these handles, one of which in an electric tool as shown carries the 80 switch mechanism for turning on and off the electric current to the motor within the tool.

In a pneumatic tool, the pressure fluid is supplied to the tool through one of the handles, the latter also containing the throttle valve for controlling the operation of the tool. With a split yoke, the latter on being separated may be applied to the tool.

The apertures in the side arms of the yoke provide a trunnion-like mounting for the tool and the latter may be adjusted about the axis of its handles while suspended from the arm 1.

Hence, the tool may be used in a vertical position extending downwardly as shown in Fig. 1 or the tool may be used in a horizontal position as shown in Fig. 6. A short cable or rod section 26 may be used to hold the tool horizontal if desired. The tool has an eye fixture 27 for one end of this holder, while the eye 28 at the arm is in the head of the bolt 22.

In the yoke bracket 18, the arm socket 29 is offset to one side of the yoke 16a. This enables the yoke to be attached to the arm I with the yoke in crossing relation to the track 3 instead of being parallel thereto and in the vertical plane of the track as provided by the yoke bracket 17. In the yoke bracket 18, the socket member 29 is connected to the yoke 16a by an intervening bar element 30. The latter may be longitudinally ribbed for strength and to provide a mount for the arm socket 29 as shown. The casting which forms this socket may be welded to the bar 30 over the rib or be otherwise secured thereto. The yoke 16a may have a fixed length or it may be adjustable in which case a suitable bolting arrangement would be employed for attaching the e0D yoke to the bar 30.

The counter-balance which is used with the arm I is indicated at 31. This device is preferably of the spiral spring and drum type as on the market and is secured to the trolley bar 7 at one side of the arm I as shown in Fig. 1. The connection between the balancer 3 and the bar 7 may take the form of a lug 32 on the balancer housing extending into a recess 33 in the bar, a key-pin 34 being employed to lock the lug in the recess as detailed in Fig. 2. The cable 35 of the balancer extends to the yoke bracket and is attached thereto so that the cable will lift the tool attached to the arm I and collapse the latter when the spring power of the balance 31 is allowed to turn the drum in a direction to wind-up the cable. The balancer is adjusted to counter-balance the load when the tool 23 is at its working level as indicated in Figs. 1 and 2.

A suitable cable clamp 36 connects the cable to the yoke bracket. The latter in the form IT has an eye 37 in a web 38 to receive the end of the cable 35. In the yoke bracket 18, the bar 30 has an eye 39 over the yoke 16a to receive the cable end. The arm sections 4, 4 have non-rotative connections with each other and with the trolley 2 and the yoke bracket, respectively. The purpose of this is to have the arm absorb any torque strains which may be impressed on the tool and thus relieve the operator holding the tool of the necessity of resisting these forces. The latter are especially severe in the larger size more powerful nut-setters, stud-setters and similar tools when overloaded and unless the operator '5 holding the tool braces himself to take the shock when the clutch releases on the setting or tightening of the work injury to the operator may result. Hence, the danger factor present makes the use of these larger tools a serious problem, -60 which, however, is completely eliminated by the suspension of the tool through the torque resisting arm of my invention.

In the embodiment shown, the arm sections 4 are square in cross-section and similar connections are provided between the arm and the trolley and the yoke bracket, respectively. As shown in Fig. 3, the arm sections interfit and hence rotation between them is prevented by the engagement of their angularly disposed flat walls. As shown in Fig. 2, the lug 14 has flat sides which engage against the flat sides of the arm section into which the lug extends. With this arrangement and the embracing of the trolley bar 7 by the hanger II prevents rotation of arm I with respect to the trolley. Likewise, the arm receiving socket at the yoke bracket is shaped to receive and conform to the square shape of the lower section 4 of the arm. This provides a non-rotative connection between the arm I and the yoke bracket.

With the torque strains absorbed by the arm I and the tool balanced at its working level by the counter-balance 31, the tool may be operated with ease and safety. While the operator must grasp the tool at its handles as heretofore to adjust the tool to and from the work and hold it at the work yet he is free of the weight of the tool and the torque strains which are suddenly thrown on the tool whenever overloaded.

Hence, the tool may be operated with greater convenience and absolute safety as the operator is merely required to manipulate the tool with respect to the work and hold the tool at the work until the clutch automatically releases.

It is to be understood in this connection that the clutch releases when the nut or stud being driven sets or tightens and the tool may thereupon be released from the work and applied to the next nut or stud as the case may be without turning off the power to the tool. The latter may thus be used on production work which requires a continuously operating tool and a rapid shifting of the tool from one piece of work to another. The hinged connection as provided by the hanger iI and the lug 14, gives the tool, even though suspended, a relatively wide area of operation. The tool may be swung to a considerable extent laterally of the track 3 to reach work disposed on opposite sides of the track or the tool may be swung forwardly and rearwardly of the track to reach work disposed out of the normal depending position of the arm I along the length of the track. Also, due to the trolley, the tool and its suspension fixture may be shifted bodily along the track. When the tool is not in use, it is raised up out of the way by the balancer device 31. The arm by reason of its telescopic construction collapses at this time and ample head room is provided below the tool when raised. Also, the yoke allows for the use of the tool either in a vertical or a horizontal position in all adjustable positions of the arm.

The balancer device 39 is constructed to lock automatically when the tool is raised to its top position. When the tool is wanted, it is merely pulled down and is balanced when at its working level which is the position at which the tool is usable. In lowering the tool, the lock is first released by a quick lift and jerk to start the tool downward. The stops 5, 6 also have the advantage of providing a safety device should the balancer, cable or its connections fail. Most of the load strain is dissipated throughout the 0 length of the tube sections 4 before reaching the load frame, that is, the trolley bar 7. The balancer spring lifts the load of the tool when it is raised up out of the way, the operator being merely required to start the tool upwardly from its balanced position at working level.

The torque resisting and tool suspension fixture herein shown and described is simple in construction and operation and effectively performs its intended functions. In practice, fixtures embodying my invention have been manufactured with torque arms having an available travel range from 3 to 6 feet and with load capacities from 30 to 120 pounds. The fixture is a compact unit taking up the minimum of space both when open and closed. Moreover, the single torque arm facilitates the connections between the trolley and the yoke bracket and permits the use of yokes which will accommodate tools with different handle arrangements. Other and further advantages of my improved fixture will be apparent to those skilled in the art to which my invention pertains.

The drum in the balancer device is shown at 40 in Fig. 1, while the spiral spring which turns the drum in a direction to wind-up the cable 35 to lift the tool and collapse the arm I is shown at 41. The balancer construction is similar to that shown in my co-pending application Serial No. 174,639 filed November 15, 1937 now Patent No. 2,152,969 granted April 4, 1939. The details of construction and arrangement of parts shown may be variously changed and modified without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention, except as pointed out in the annexed claims. I claim as my invention: 1. The combination with an overhead trackway and a trolley mounted to run thereon, of a portable motor driven tool containing its driving motor and the tool spindle driven thereby, an arm for suspending the tool from said trolley, a hanger for connecting the upper end of the arm to the trolley, means pivotally connecting the hanger to the trolley and to the upper end of the arm, respectively, on transversely disposed axes, one extending in the direction of the travel of the trolley on the track-way and the other substantially normal thereto whereby the arm may be swung for adjustment either transversely or longitudinally of said track-way, and means ag for attaching the tool to the lower end of the arm and disposing the tool for use below the arm, said hanger and the trolley holding the arm against axial rotation to resist any torque strains which may be impressed on the arm by the tool motor in the operation thereof. 40 2. The combination with an overhead trackway, of a trolley mounted to run thereon and having a frame member provided with a horizontally disposed cylindric bearing portion, a portable motor driven tool containing its driving mo- 45 tor and the tool spindle driven thereby, an arm for suspending the tool from said trolley, a hanger embracing the cylindric bearing portion of the frame member and adjustable axially thereof, said hanger having a depending rigid 50 lug element, means pivotally connecting the upper end of the arm to said lug element on an axis transversely to said bearing portion, and means for attaching the tool to the lower end of the arm and disposing the tool for use below the 55 arm, said hanger and the trolley holding the arm against axial rotation to resist any torque strains which may be impressed on the arm by the tool motor in the operation thereof.

3. The combination with an overhead support, 60 of a portable motor driven tool containing its driving motor and the tool spindle driven thereby, an arm for suspending the tool from said support, means for attaching the tool to the lower end of the arm and disposing the tool for 65 use below the arm, and means connecting the upper end of the arm to said support on a pair of transversely disposed axes whereby the arm may be swung for adjustment about either axis, said means holding the arm through said axes 70 against axial rotation so that the arm-may resist any torque strains which may be impressed thereon by the tool motor in the operation thereof.

4. The combination with an overhead support, 75 of a portable motor driven tool containing its driving motor and the tool spindle driven thereby, an arm for suspending the tool from said support, means for attaching the tool to the lower end of the arm and disposing the tool for use below the arm, said means providing a pivotal connection between the tool and the arm whereby the tool may be adjusted with respect to the arm, and means connecting the upper end of the arm to said support on a pair of transversely disposed axes whereby the arm may be swung for adjustment about either axis, said last named means holding the arm through said axes against axial rotation so that the arm may resist any torque strains which may be impressed thereon by the tool motor in the operation thereof.

5. The combination with an overhead support, of a portable motor driven tool containing its driving motor and the tool spindle driven thereby, an arm for suspending the tool from said suport, a yoke for attaching the tool to the lower end of the arm and providing a trunnion mounting for the tool with respect to the arm, and means connecting the upper end of the arm to said support on a pair of transversely disposed axes whereby the arm may be swung for adjustnient about either axis, said means holding the arm through said axes against axial rotation so that the aria may resist any torque strains which may be impressed thereon by the tool motor in the operation thereof.

6. The combination with an overhead trackway and a trolley mounted to run thereon, of a portable motor driven tool containing its driving motor and the tool spindle driven thereby, an arm for suspending the tool from said trolley, a yoke for mounting the tool at the lower end of the arm and providing a trunnion connection between the tool and the arm, means connecting the upper end of the arm to the trolley on a pair of transversely disposed axes whereby the arm may be swung for adjustment about either axis, and a bracket for attaching the yoke to the lower end of the arm with the yoke in a vertical plane and disposed with its trunnion mounting substantially parallel to said track-way, the trolley and the means connecting the upper end of the arm thereto holding the arm through said axes against axial rotation so that the arm may resist any torque strains which may be impressed thereon by the tool motor in the operation thereof.

7. The combination with an overhead trackway and a trolley mounted to run thereon, of a portable motor driven tool containing its driving motor and the tool spindle driven thereby, an arm for suspending the tool from said trolley, a yoke for mounting the tool at the lower end of the arm and providing a trunnion connection between the tool and the arm, means connecting the upper end of the arm to the trolley on a pair of transversely disposed axes whereby the arm may be swung for adjustment about either axis, and a bracket for attaching the yoke to the lower end of the arm with the yoke offset from the arm and disposed with its trunnion mounting in transverse relation to said track-way, the trolley and the means connecting the upper end of the arm to the trolley holding the arm through said axes against axial rotation so that the arm may resist any torque strains which may be impressed thereon by the tool motor in the operation thereof.

8. The combination with an overhead support, of a portable motor driven tool containing its driving motor and the tool spindle driven thereby, an arm for suspending the tool from said support, means for attaching the tool to the lower end of the arm and disposing the tool for use below the arm, means connecting the upper end of the arm to said support on a pair of transversely disposed axes whereby the arm may be swung for adjustment about either axis, said arm being extensible longitudinally consisting of slidably, but non-rotatably connected sections to permit raising and lowering of the tool by the arm Wiith respect to the support, and a spring actuated counter-balancing device carried by the support and connected to the arm for lifting the tool when raised and counter-balancing the tool when lowered to a working level, the means connecting the upper end of the arm to the support holding the arm through said axes against axial rotation so that the arm may resist any torque strains which may be impressed thereon by the tool motor in the operation thereof.

9. The combination with an overhead support, of a portable motor driven tool containing its driving motor and the tool spindle driven thereby, an arm for suspending the tool from said support, means for attaching the tool to the lower end of the arm and disposing the tool for use below the arm, means connecting the upper end of the arm to said support on a pair of transversely disposed axes whereby the arm may be swung for adjustment about either axis, said arm being extensible longitudinally consisting of slidably, but non-rotatably connected sections to permit raising and lowering of the tool by the arm with respect to the support, and a counter-balancing device having a revoluble drum connected to the support adjacent to the arm, a cable connecting the drum to the arm adjacent to the tool, and spring means for turning the drum in a direction to wind-up the cable thereon to lift the tool when raised and counterbalancing the tool when lowered to a working level, the means connecting the upper end of the arm to the support holding the arm against axial rotation through said axes to resist any torque strains which may be impressed on the arm by the tool motor in the operation thereof.

10. The combination with an overhead trackway and a trolley mounted to run thereon, of a portable motor driven tool containing its driving motor and the tool spindle driven thereby, an arm for suspending the tool from said trolley, means for attaching the tool to the lower end of the arm and disposing the tool for use below the arm, means connecting the upper end of the arm to said trolley on a pair of transversely disposed axes whereby the arm may be swung for adjustment about either axes, said arm being extensible longitudinally consisting of slidably, but non-rotatably connected sections to permit raising and lowering of the tool by the arm with respect to the trolley, and a spring actuated counter-balancing device carried by the trolley and connected to the arm adjacent to the tool for lifting the tool when raised and counterbalancing the tool when lowered to a working level, the trolley and the means connecting the arm thereto holding the arm through said axes against axial rotation so that the arm may resist any torque strains which may be impressed thereon by the tool motor in the operation thereof.

11. The combination with an overhead trackway and a trolley mounted to run thereon, of a portable motor driven tool containing its driving motor and the tool spindle driven thereby, an arm for suspending the tool from said trolley, means for attaching the tool to the lower end of the arm and disposing the tool for use below the arm, means connecting the upper end of the arm to said trolley on a pair of transversely disposed axes whereby the arm may be swung for adjustment about either axis, said arm being extensible longitudinally consisting of telescopically interfitted, slidably, but non-rotatably connected tubular sections permitting raising and lowering of the tool by the arm with respect to said trolley, and a counter-balancing device having a revoluble drum carried by the trolley adjacent to the arm, a cable connecting the drum to the arm adjacent to the tool, and spring means for turning the drum in a direction to wind-up the cable on the drum to lift the tool when raised and counter-balancing the tool when lowered to a working level, the trolley and the means connecting the arm thereto holding the arm through said axes against axial rotation so that the arm may resist any torque strains which may be impressed thereon by the tool motor in the operation thereof.

12. The combination with an overhead trackway, of a wheel provided trolley mounted to run on said track-way and having a rigidly fixed frame element between said wheels, a portable motor driven tool containing its driving motor and the tool spindle driven thereby, an extensible and collapsible arm consisting of slidably, but non-rotatably connected sections for suspending the tool from the trolley, means for connecting the tool to the lower end of the arm, means connecting the upper end of the arm to the trolley on a pair of axes, one being at the frame element of the trolley and the other being below the frame element and in transverse relation thereto, whereby the arm may be swung for adjustment on either axis, and a counter-balancing device having a housing carried by the trolley frame adjacent to the arm, a revoluble drum mounted in said housing, a cable connecting the drum to the lower end of the arm, and spring means located within the housing and co-acting with the drum to turn the drum in a direction to wind-up the cable thereon to lift the tool when raised and counter-balancing the tool when lowered to a working level, the trolley and the means connecting the arm thereto holding the arm through said axes against axial rotation so that the arm may resist any torque strains which may be impressed thereon by the tool motor in the operation thereof. 13. A suspension fixture of the character described comprising an extensible and collapsible arm consisting of slidably, but non-rotatably connected sections, a hanger at the upper end of the arm for suspending the arm from an overhead support and providing an axis member in substantially normal relation to said arm, means connecting the arm to said axis member and providing a second axis member for the arm below and in transverse relation to the first mentioned axis member, means at the lower end of the arm for attaching thereto a portable motor driven tool containing its driving motor and the tool spindle driven thereby, and a counter-balancing device carried by the hanger adjacent to the arm, said counter-balancing device having connection with the arm adjacent to the tool for counter-balancing the same on the extension of the arm and for lifting the tool on the collapsing of the arm, the connection between the arm and the hanger holding the arm through said axis members against axial rotation to absorb any torque strains which may be impressed on the arm by the tool motor in the operation thereof.

WILLIAM W. NASH.