Title:
Portable music stand
United States Patent 2156489


Abstract:
This invention relates in general to a portable music stand and more particularly to a music stand which may be disassembled and folded up in the form of a small valise, which also may be used to carry music and the like. Musicians who travel from engagement to engagement, and are playing...



Inventors:
Dante, Bonetti
Application Number:
US7737636A
Publication Date:
05/02/1939
Filing Date:
05/01/1936
Assignee:
Dante, Bonetti
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
248/185.1, 292/24
International Classes:
A47B19/00
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Description:

This invention relates in general to a portable music stand and more particularly to a music stand which may be disassembled and folded up in the form of a small valise, which also may be used to carry music and the like.

Musicians who travel from engagement to engagement, and are playing for dances and concerts and the like, must carry with them in addition to their instruments and their music some form of supporting device upon which they can spread the sheets of music from which they are to play. In playing at such engagements it is necessary that the music stand be a very rigid and durable one. Particularly in dance engagements it is common practice to place a large number of different sheets of music on the stand so that the various selected pieces of music in the program may be always at hand and quickly available. It is also necessary that music stands of this character be compact and readily portable when disassembled. Portable music stands which have been previously in use are very light weight in construction and tend to be extremely topheavy when in use, with the result that a great deal of trouble has been experienced due to collapse and overturning of the music stands.

It is an object, therefore, of the present invention to provide a compact readily portable music stand which will be strong and durable when assembled for use. It is also an object of the present invention to provide a music stand which may be utilized in part as a carrying case for the musician's accessories, such as his sheet music, when the stand is disassembled. It is an additional object of this invention to provide a portable music stand which will be commodious and capable of supporting large quantities of sheet music when the stand is in assembled position. It is furthermore an object of this invention to provide a stand which is very quickly and simply assembled and disassembled and does not tend to become top-heavy when used. It is another object of the present invention to provide a portable music stand which is attractive in appearance when assembled and ready for use.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will more fully appear from the following detailed description, which, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, will disclose to those skilled in the art the construction and operation of a preferred form of the present invention.

Fg. 1 is a perspective view of one preferred form of the present invention in closed position. Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the embodiment shown in Fig. 1 showing the music stand set up in operative position.

Fig. 3 is a partial side view of the embodiment shown in Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of another preferred embodiment of the present invention showing that embodiment in closed position.

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the top of the embodiment shown in Fig. 4 showing that embodiment in open position. Fig. 6 is a partial cross section view of the embodiment shown in Fig. 5 about the line 6-6 of Pig. 5.

Fig. 7 is a partial detail view of the back of the embodiment shown in Figs. 4 and 5 showing the method of attaching the swivel head thereto.

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of the embodiment shown in Fig. 1 showing the arrangement of the disassembled parts therein.

Fig. 9 is a partial cross section view of the embodiment shown in Fig. 1 about the line 9-9 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 10 is a partial cross sectional view of the embodiment shown in Fig. 2 about the line 10-10 in Fig. 2. Fig. 11 is a detail perspective view showing a preferred form of handle member embodied in the present invention.

Fig. 12 is a plan view of the under side portion of the handle member shown in Fig. 11, showing the handle member in position in the music stand.

Fig. 13 is a detail view of the embodiment shown in Fig. 1 showing in perspective the method of attaching a swivel head thereto. Fig. 14 is a cross sectional view of the embodiment shown in Fig. 10 about the line 14-14 of Fig. 10.

The embodiment shown in Fig. 1 comprises a box-like satchel or valise i, which is provided with a suitable handle 2 and is formed in two hollow box-like halves 3 and 4, respectively, which hingedly fit together along the center line 5. Along one end of the face 6 of the portion 3 is a closely fitting flap member 7 which fits tightly in the side of the valise when the same is closed. A similar flap member 8 is located in the other half 4 of the device. The valise is adapted to be opened out flat as shown in Fig. 2, and the flaps 7 and 8 folded down to form shelves therefor, the two halves of the valise forming the two wings of the music stand. The standard 10 as shown in more detail in Figs. 2, 8, and 10, comprises a plurality of interfitting parts, each part being of such size that when disassembled they 65 may be conveniently placed inside of one of the box-like halves of the satchel as shown in Fig. 8.

This standard 10 is assembled from its parts and attached to the box-like portion of the valise, as shown in Fig. 3, in such a manner that the valise or case will be rigidly held in extended position to form the rack or "head" member of the music stand.

The standard 10 comprises a heavy triangular base portion I , into which a plurality of feet 12 are removably inserted. The base 11 has a centrally located, internally threaded hole 13 into which an upright section 14 may be threaded at one of its ends. The other end of the upright portion is adapted to receive a second upright portion 15. The second upright member 15 is preferably provided with an adjustment member 16. A rod-like third upright portion 17 is adapted to slidingly fit into the adjustment member 16, whereby the height of the stand from the floor may be varied. The third upright member 17 is provided at its upper end with a swivel head 18, which is adapted to clampingly engage the boxlike portion of the music stand.

These parts of the standard 10, as has been above pointed out, are disassemblable and are adapted to fit into the very small compass of the one side of the box-like portion of the music stand. This box-like portion may be provided C3 with a suitable inside leaf cover 20 which may be hinged down over the opening of this half of the box-like case I. The other half of the carrying case I may be utilized to carry the sheets of music which every musician takes with him to his various engagements. This other compartment may also be provided with a similar inside leaf cover member 21.

When it is desired to set up the music stand the carrying case is opened, the inside leaf cover 20 is folded back and the parts of the standard are removed and fitted together. The leaf 21 is then folded back and the music removed. The handle of the carrying case is capable of being folded inside the carrying case out of sight, as will be later explained. The leaf covers 20 and 21 may be then secured in place by suitable catches provided thereon.

The leaf covers 20 and 21 provide the surface which is visible to the audience as the back of the music stand when the same is in operative position. Therefore, it may be desirable to ornament these surfaces with a suitable design or scroll work. In order that the clamp for attaching the box-like portion to the swivel head may grip the suitable side wall members of the box, rectangular holes 22 and 23 are provided in the cover members 20 and 21.

The collapsible handle, as shown in more detail in Figs. 9, 11, and 12, comprises a suitable leather grip member 25 which is attached at its two ends respectively to the metal loops 26 and 27, respectively. The handle is provided with a base plate 28, on the rear edge of which is mounted a hinge 30. The stationary leaf of the hinge is mounted rigidly to the top inside of the carrying case. The closure edge of the carrying case is of course provided with slight recesses to allow the metal loops 26 and 27 to pass upwardly therethrough. The loops 26 and 27, respectively, pass through the slots 31 and 32 in the base plate 28 and are rigidly mounted on the catch members 33 and 34, respectively. The catch members 33 and 34, respectively, are hingedly mounted on the bottom of the base plate at 34 and 753 36, respectively, and are adapted to swing through a small arc due to a certain amount of play between the slots and the metal loops. The base plate is provided with spring members 37 and 38, respectively, which engage the catch members and urge them respectively toward each other. The other side of the container is provided with suitable detent means 40 and 41, into which the catches may fit. When the carrying case is closed the catches fit into the detent means and hold it in closed position. When it is desired to open the case the metal loop members 31 and 32, respectively, may be urged away from each other. This is possible because of a considerable amount of flexibility in the leather handle. This causes the catch members 33 and 34 to be rotated away from operative engagement with the detent means and they may therefore be withdrawn from the detent means and the case opened.

As the case is opened and the catch members are released from the detent means, the handle is no longer held in upright position since it is obvious that the hinged base plate of the handle will normally rotate downwardly away from the plane of the top of the carrying case unless restrained by engagement of the catch members in the detent means. Thus when the case is opened the whole handle catch assembly will be rotated with the base plate about the hinge 30, down into the interior of the box and may be concealed therein until it is necessary to use the handle catch means again in closing the case and transporting the same.

The outside faces of the box-like case or valise are also provided with two flap members 7 and 8, respectively, as above mentioned. The operation of the flap members is more specifically shown in cross section in Fig. 10. The flap member 8 comprises a shelf member 40. This member is made of fairly thick, substantial material so that it is capable of supporting a considerable weight without bending or yielding. In the forward edge thereof is a small longitudinal hole 41, which is adapted to receive the keeper member 42 on the catch 43 when the flap is in folded up position. This detent and catch means is adapted to hold the flap member in closed position so that it will fit tightly into the side of the valise and form an integral part thereof. At the rear end of the shelf member 40 is a back stop member 44. This back stop member 44 extends perpendicularly away from the shelf member 40 so that the entire flap member 8. assumes an L-shaped cross section. When the flap is in folded up position the back stop member 44 lies C5 inside the box, as shown in dotted lines. The flap member is mounted in the valise by a hinge member 45. The flap member, when it is rotated about the hinge 45, moves outwardly and the heel portion 46 of the shelf member 40 swings 00 down into abutting relationship with the forward edge of the bottom 47 of the valise.

By reference to Fig. 2 it will be seen that some variation in the alignment of the parts might cause the two shelf members 7 and 8 to lie in 6. slightly different planes. This would be undesirable. Therefore an adjustment screw 48 is provided for each of the flaps. It will be seen that as this screw is threaded in and out of the bottom member 47 it will tend to cause the heel portion 47 of the shelf 40 to come into abutting relationship with the head at slightly different positions with respect to rotation around the hinge 45. By adjusting the two adjustment screws, the flaps 7 and 8 may be brought into perfect alignment.

The valise, after it is in opened-up position and the stand has been set up, must be rigidly mounted on the stand, as has been above pointed out, in a manner so that it will form a "rack" or "head" portion of the music stand. This is accomplished by the clamp and swivel head assembly shown in detail in'Figs. 10 and 13. A pair of clamp guides 50 and 51 are rigidly mounted on the inside side walls 52 and 53 of the valise. The valise of course is hinged about a plurality of hinges 54. Thus the side walls 52 and 53 come into abutting relationship when the valise is opened out flat. Thus the two clamp guides 50 and 51 fall into the position relative to each other as shown in Fig. 13. A detent depression 55 is provided in the clamp guide 50. A suitable Ushaped clamped member 56 is provided. The clamp member 56 is just wide enough to encompass the thickness between the engagement surfaces of the two clamp guides 50 and 51, and is of sufficient width to slide into it between the guideways of the clamp guides. This clamp member is also provided with a retention screw 57, which is so located on the clamp that when the clamp is fully in place in the clamp guides, the retaining screw may be screwed forward in the clamp to engage the detent depression 55. The heel portion of the clamp 58 is provided with a centrally disposed hole 60 through which a suitable pivot pin 81 may pass. The back surface of the heel member 58 is provided with a plurality of gear teeth 62. The heel member is adapted to fit rotatingly within the swivel head 18, as shown in Fig. 10. The swivel head is also provided with an elevator screw 63, which passes through the swivel head and has a centrally located worm screw 64, which engages the gear teeth 62 on the heel member of the clamp. Rotation of the elevator screw 63 causes the clamp member to rotate in the swivel head about the pin 61. This rotation of the clamp member causes the opened-out valise, or head portion of the music stand, to rotate, whereby the angle of the music stand with respect to the floor may be varied to suit the requirements of the individual musician.

It is similarly desirable, as has been above pointed out, to vary the height of the rack or head portion from the floor to accommodate the needs of the individual musician. For this purpose, as has been above pointed out, the rod member 17 is slidable within the section 15 of the standard. A suitable clamp member 16 is provided at the top of the section 15 of the standard. This clamp member comprises a circular sleeve 65 adapted to encircle the rod 17. A clamp screw 66 passes through the portion of the sleeve 65 which is threaded to receive it. The inside portion of the clamp in the proximity of the threaded portion is provided with a recess 67. The head of the clamp screw 66 has an enlarged portion 68 which is adapted to fit into the recess. This prevents the clamp screw from being crowded back out of the sleeve entirely and becoming lost. A clamp shoe 70 is disposed inside the sleeve 65.

This shoe preferably has an arcuate cross section so as to clampingly fit the rod 17 more accurately. This clamp shoe 70 is impelled forward by the enlarged portion 68 on the clamp screw as the clamp screw is threaded up into the sleeve member 65. In order that the clamp shoe may not be lost out of the sleeve when the stand is disassembled, an extension member 71 is provided on the bottom thereof. This extension member is adapted to slide freely in a suitable hole provided in the sleeve. A small screw 72 is adapted to fit into the extension 71. This screw 72 is provided with a head which is substantially larger than the hole through which the extension passes. Thus the clamp shoe 70 is free to move toward and away from the rod 71 within the sleeve and yet cannot fall completely out of the sleeve and become lost. Another embodiment of the invention is shown in Figs. 4 to 7, inclusive. In this embodiment the stand and swivel head are substantially the same as above described in connection with the previous embodiment; the difference being in the arrangement of the valise which forms the head or rack member of the music stand. This embodiment, as shown in closed position in Fig. 4, comprises a box-like valise member 80, which in external appearance is very similar to that previously described. This is also provided with a handle 81 which is substantially similar to the handle 2 described above. The handle 2 is likewise adapted to fold into the interior of the valise when the same is in opened-up position. Each half of the valise, however, is provided with two holes 82 and 83 as shown in Fig. 4. These holes are adapted to receive the means 84 by which the swivel head of the stand is adapted to the valise in order to form a head for the music stand.

The valise 80 contains interior hollow halves as described in connection with the previous embodiment, in which the parts of the stand may be kept, and also in which music or accessories may be kept. When the valise is opened as shown in Fig. 5 the interior hollow halves are provided with leaf covers 85 and 86, respectively. These leaf covers are similar to the leaf covers 20 and 21 described in connection with the previous embodiment. However, they are somewhat shorter than the length of the interior compartment. A flat shelf member 87 is hingedly mounted in the bottom of each half as shown in Fig. 6. Thus when the stand is in set-up position the leaf covers are raised up and the shelf members 87 folded down. The cover 86 is then returned over the opening to form the back rest of the music stand and also serve to hold the shelf member 87 in opened-down position. The swivel head in this embodiment, as shown in Fig. 7, is provided with a heel portion 90 which is substantially similar to the heel portion 58, as described in connection with previous embodiment, and has the same gear-toothed rear end portion adapted to engage the elevator screw. The forward portion of this swivel head member, however, consists of a base plate 91 on which are mounted two pins 92 and 93, respectively, and two mounting screws 94 and 85, respectively. The pins fit into suitable hole members 82 in the back of the valise. The screw members fit into threaded sleeves 83 mounted in the back of the valise. Thus the back of the valise may be securely mounted against the base plate 91 and affixed to the standard of the music stand.

It is thought that the invention and numerous of its attendant advantages will be understood from the foregoing description and it is obvious that numerous changes may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of the several parts without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention, or sacrificing any of its attendant advantages, the forms herein described being 5 preferred embodiments for the purpose of illustrating the invention.

What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is as follows: 1. A portable music stand comprising a standard member and a rack, said rack comprising a box-like member having front and back walls joined by side walls, said member being divided into a plurality of sections along a line intermediate of the side walls whereby to divide the member into two box-like sections, hinge means joining divided side wall sections of a side wall whereby the box-like sections are pivotal relatively to open position with the said side wall sections in flatwise, adjacent relationship, and a supporting member attachable to the standard and having forwardly extending arms, said arms being spaced to oppositely engage the said side wall sections in supporting relationship when the said side wall sections are in flatwise adjacent relationship whereby to retain the box-like members in open position while providing a support therefor.

2. A portable music stand comprising a support and a rack, said rack comprising a box-like member having front and back walls joined by side walls, said member being divided into a plurality of sections along a line intermediate of the side walls whereby to divide the member into two box-like sections, hinge means joining divided side wall sections of a side wall whereby the boxlike sections are pivotal relatively to open position with the said side wall sections in general parallelism and their inner sides adjacent said support including a U-shaped clamping member having spaced, forwardly extending arms engageable with the outer sides of said side wall sections to hold the same in said parallel position, and clamping means on the said U-shaped member to releasably clamp the member to said sections.

3. In a portable music stand comprising a standard member and a rack, said rack comprising a box-like member having front and back walls joined by side walls, said member being divided into a plurality of sections along a line intermediate of the side walls whereby to divide the member into two box-like sections, hinge means joining divided side wall sections of a side wall whereby the boxlike sections are pivotal relatively to open position, and shelf members pivotally mounted on said box-like sections adjacent the junctures between the said front and back walls and lower side walls and movable about said pivot from a position completely within the confines of the respective boxlike sections to a position extending from the said sections whereby to support sheet music thereon, said shelf members resting in supported relationship upon the adjacent side wall in said last-named position.

4. In a portable music stand comprising a standard member and a rack, said rack comprising a box-like member having front and back walls joined by side walls, said member being divided into a plurality of sections along a line intermediate of the side walls whereby to divide the member into two box-like sections, hinge means joining divided side wall sections of a side wall whereby the box-like sections are pivotal relatively to open position, shelf members pivotally mounted about a pivot arranged interiorly of said box-like sections on a horizontal axis arranged adjacent the lower wall of said respective sections in normal open position, said shelf members being pivotal from a position entirely within the confines of the box-like sections to a position extending forwardly from the boxlike sections and generally parallel with the said lower wall, said shelf members being of relatively great extent whereby to protrude forwardly from the open face of the said box-like sections to provide an edge support for sheet music, and flat cover members hingedly secured to each box-like section adjacent said intermediate line to permit closure of the open faces thereof in said open position to provide a face support for said music.

5. A foldable music rack and case comprising a box-like member having front and back walls joined by side walls, said member being divided into a plurality of sections along a line intermediate of the side walls whereby to divide the member into two box-like sections, hinge means 80 joining divided side wall sections of a side wall whereby the box-like sections are pivotal relatively to an open position, with front and back walls in general alignment to form a music rack, said front and back walls each including a part fixed to said side walls and a part pivoted relative to said fixed part to complete said walls in one position and to extend at an angle thereto in another position forming a music rest.

6. A foldable music rack and case comprising a box-like member having front and back walls joined by side walls, said member being divided into a plurality of sections along a line intermediate of the side walls whereby to divide the member into two box-like sections, hinge means joining divided side wall sections of a side wall whereby the box-like sections are pivotal relatively to an open position, with front and back walls in general alignment to form a music rack, said front and back walls each including a part fixed to said side walls and a part pivoted relative to said fixed part to complete said walls in one position and to extend at an angle thereto in another position forming a music rest, said pivoted part having an angularly arranged projecting portion associated therewith and positioned to reside in the aperture created by pivotal displacement of the said part from its respective wall.

DANTE BONETTI.