Title:
Signal system
United States Patent 2085807


Abstract:
The invention herein disclosed relates to a signaling system and in particular to a system in which various directional signals are actuated for the purpose of directing a course of procedure. b In many instances it. is desirable to direct the course of action of people. This is particularly...



Inventors:
Lindsey, William D.
Application Number:
US69305333A
Publication Date:
07/06/1937
Filing Date:
10/11/1933
Assignee:
SEALAND CORP
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
340/517, 340/525, 340/593
International Classes:
G08B5/22; G08B5/36
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Description:

The invention herein disclosed relates to a signaling system and in particular to a system in which various directional signals are actuated for the purpose of directing a course of procedure.

b In many instances it. is desirable to direct the course of action of people. This is particularly true in such cases as the evacuation of a building in which a dangerous condition exists. For example, upon the existence of a fire in a building it is important and desirable that the building be evacuated as quickly as possible. In order to do this most efficiently, it is necessary to direct the course of action of the occupants of the building.

Such direction should include continuous information as to the passages to be followed in order to reach the exit and where there is more than one way in which the -occupants may leave the building, it is very desirable that the direction of their movements in evacuating the building be through that passage and towards that exit which is away from the fire.

By the invention herein disclosed, there is provided a series of directional signals which may be used to indicate the direction it is desired that people take under certain conditions. The signals are automatically operated, upon the existence of a condition dangerous to people in a particular vicinity, to indicate the direction in which the people should take to avoid the danger. For example, in accordance with the invention, these directional signs may be used in conjunction with a fire alarm system for the purpose of directing the evacuation of the building upon the existence of a fire. In such a system the building is divided into a number of zones and there are signals placed in all passageways of the building so that there is a signal visible from every point in every passageway. These directional signals are automatically illuminated to direct the occupants of the building towards that exit away from the fire. With such signals there would normally be an orderly evacuation of the building and the chances of a panic occurring are greatly reduced. The directional signals are electrically controlled and may be electrically supervised.

Normally the signals are connected such that upon the operation of the system for the purposes of initiating a signal to indicate the existence of the fire, the directional signals are simultaneously operated.

In one system which forms an embodiment of this invention and which is particularly adapted for directing the evacuation of a building upon the existence of a fire, there is included special exit signs and directional signals. The exit signs are two-compartment signs. On the face of one compartment there is the normal green exit sign with an arrow, and on the face of the other compartment there is a "stop" sign. These exit signs are provided for installation at the entrance to each stairway on each floor of the building. Each stairway that may be used for an exit becomes the center of a vertical zone or section of the building. In each exit sign there is a light for illuminating the sign. Normally the light in the compartment which carries the "stop" sign is not illuminated. In the compartment carrying the exit sign, there is, in accordance with this specific system, two lights, one which operates from a storage battery and the other which operates from the 110 volt supply in the building. The battery-operated light is provided in case of failure of the 110 volt supply and is automatically lighted when the 110 volt supply fails. In conjunction with these exit signs there is used a series of directional signs which include two arrows on the face thereof pointing in opposite directions. Each arrow is illuminated by a separate and distinct light. If the distance between stairways and halls in the building is such that a stairway indicator is not readily visible from any and all points in the hall, one or more of these double arrow boxes are mounted in the hall. The double arrow boxes are preferably such in number and location that one double arrow box or a stairway indicator is visible from each and every point in the exit passage.

Normally, the lights in the directional boxes and the lights in the "stop" compartment of the exit box and the light served by the battery in the exit compartment are electrically supervised to insure that they are always in proper condition for operation. The supervision of these lights includes a series circuit which includes the lights and a source of electrical energy, the battery. The resistance in the series circuit is such that the lights are not illuminated by the current flowing therethrough. Upon the existance of a condition which requires the illumination of these supervised lights, the series circuits are transformed into parallel circuits and the lights are illuminated. This condition exists for the "stop" lights on the exit sides of any particular zone when a fire occurs in that zone. When the fire occurs in the zone and is automatically detected or a manual signal is operated, electrical control means shift the series connection of the lights in the "stop" compartment to a parallel control.

At the same time the lights in the directional arrow boxes behind the arrows which would point away from this zone are also shifted to a parallel connection so that they are illuminated and serve as a visual directional signal directing people away from the zone and towards another zone and exit. The controls for the directional signal boxes of the several zones are interconnected for the proper operation of these directional signals. The supervised circuits including the lights include control means which when the circuit is broken for any reason such, for example, as a burned out. filament in one of the lights, operates to initiate a signal both locally and remotely that upon operation indicates trouble existing in the particular circuit which it designates.

Such a system is illustrated in the accompanying drawings and a detailed description of this system is given below from which the exact operation of the specific system may be ascertained.

In the drawings: Fig. 1 is a front elevation of an exit signal box; Fig. 2 is an elevation of the same with the front plate removed; Fig. 3 is a front elevation of a directional signal box; Fig. 4 is an elevation of the same with the front cover removed; and Fig. 5 is a wiring diagram of the system in which these are used.

The front and rear plates la and lb of the exit signal or stairway indicator I are each divided transversely at the longitudinal center and have cut therethrough the word "Stop" at one side of the dividing line and the word "Exit" with a downwardly or laterally pointing arrow at the other side. The opening forming the word "Stop" is covered by a red filter screen, and the opening forming the word "Exit" and the arrow are covered with a green filter screen. The interior of the sign is divided into two compartments in accordance with the division of the plates. One compartment Ic is enclosed by that portion of the plates l a and Ib having the word "Stop" thereon, and the other compartment Id enclosed by that portion of the plates la and lb having the exit sign thereon. Within the compartment Id there is mounted two sockets 2 and 3 which receive electric light bulbs 4 and 5 respectively. In the compartment Ic that is covered by the "stop" sign there is a signal light socket 6 which receives an electric light 7.

The electric lights 4 and 7 are thirty-two volt lights and the electric light 5 is a 110 volt light.

The directional signal 8 shown in Figs. 4 and 5 is a box-like structure and has a front cover plate 8a which is divided longitudinally at the transverse center and has an opening on each side of the longitudinal dividing line which openings are covered with a green filter screen. These arrows are parallel to one another and in the assembled and mounted sign lie one above the other. The interior of the signal is divided into two compartments by a partition wall 8b which forms the dividing line between the directional arrows in the front cover plate 8a. In the upper compartment there is the light socket 9 which carries a light 10, and in the lower compartment there is a socket I I which carries a light 12. The lights 10 and 12 are for the purpose of illuminating the compartments and rendering the arrows visible by virtue of the illumination behind the arrow-like openings.

The system in which these signal boxes are used is illustrated in Fig. 5. In installing this system each stairway that may be used for an exit is made the center of a vertical zone or building section and the building is divided up into a number of zones corresponding to the number of stairways that may be used for exits.

In each zone there is mounted on each floor, preferably secured to the ceiling, an exit sign or stairway indicator. Also on each floor and located between the stairways there is mounted the directional signals. The number and location of these directional signals on any particular floor should be such that there is a directional signal visible from every point of every passageway on the floor. If this condition exists with respect to the stairway indicators, that is, if all stairway indicators are visible from every point of every passage on a particular floor there is not the necessity for the directional signal because these directional signals are for the purpose of guiding the occupants to the stairway indicators. When so mounted, the signals are connected up in accordance with the system illustrated in Fig. 5. This system illustrates the connection of the signals of a single zone and their interconnection with the electrical control of another zone. In the system illustrated, there is utilized two current supplies, the ordinary 110 volt supply for illuminating the lights 5 in the exit compartment of the stairway indicators, and a thirty-two volt supply represented by a battery for illuminating the lamps 4 and 7 of the stairway indicators and the lamps 10 and I of the directional signals.

This thirty-two volt battery also supplies the supervisory current for supervising these latter lamps and the circuits thereto. The lights 5 are normally illuminated to indicate the exit from the building. Upon the failure of the 110 volt supply, the emergency lamps 4 in the exit compartment of the stairway indicators are lighted.

The exit compartment lights 5 are supplied with current at 110 volts from connectors I4a and 14b which connectors are connected to and represent an A. C. supply of current at 110 volts. This 110 volt supply to the lamps 5 of the exit compartment of the stairway indicators is through an electrical control for cutting out the supply in the event of the existence of a fire. The supply is therefore subject to a relay 15 and the circuit to the lamps 5 which are connected in parallel includes a conductor Al connecting the terminal 14Ib to movable contact 15a on the relay 15. The movable contact cooperates, and is normally in engagement with a fixed contact I 5b which is connected by a conductor A2 to another relay 16.

The relay 16 is connected in series with the 110 volt supply circuit and it is normally energized and acts as a supervisory relay. From this relay the 110 volt circuit is continued by a conductor A3 which is connected to the relay and which constitutes a line wire for supplying the several lamps 5 of the stairway indicators. The other feed wire A4 included in this 110 volt circuit is connected to a movable contact 15c on the relay 15 which cooperates with a contact 15d and to which it normally is connected. The contacts 15c and 15d connect together the conductor A4 and a conductor A5 which with the conductor A3 constitute the line wires for supplying the stairway indicators. In the system illustrated there are three such stairway indicators 17, 18 and 19. The lamp 5 of the indicator IT is connected through a branch circuit including the conductors al and a2 to the lines A3 and A5. A similar branch circuit including the conductors a3 and a4 connects the lamp 5 of the indicator 18, and conductors aS and a6 connect the lamp 5 of the indicator 19, the several lamps being connected in parallel to the lines A3 and AS. Through this circuit to the 110 volt lamps 5 of the stairway indicator signs, the exit signs of the stairway indicators are continuously illuminated and appear green in color.

As heretofore stated, the lamps 4 in the exit compartment of the stairway indicators are provided for emergency purposes, particularly in the event of the failure of the 110 volt supply. These lights are normally connected in a closed circuit with a thirty-two volt battery 20 and a supervisory relay 21. The several lamps are connected in a series circuit so that the resistance through the circuit is such that the current flowing therethrough is insufficient to illuminate the lamps; it is, however, sufficient to maintain the relay 21 operated. This circuit includes the positive and negative line wires BI and B2 which are supplied with current from the battery 20 through connectors 20a and 20b. A conductor B3 connects a connector 22a, on a panel 23 on which the connectors 20a and 20b are mounted, with the positive line wire B . The connector 22a is connected by a conductor B4 to one side of the thirty-two volt lamp in the exit compartment of the stairway indicator 17 and the other side of the lamp is connected by a conductor B5 to a connector 22b mounted adjacent the connector 22a on the panel.

. 30 The connector 22b is connected to another connector 22c by a conductor BS. The connector 22c is also connected by a conductor BE to one side of the lamp in the exit compartment of the stairway indicator 18. The other side of the lamp in the exit compartment of this stairway indicator is connected by a conductor B8 to a connector 22d which is also connected by a conductor B9 to a connector 22e which is connected by a conductor BIO to one side of the thirty-two volt lamp in the exit compartment of the sign 19. The other side of the lamp in the compartment of this stairway indicator is connected through a conductor B I to a contactor 22f which is also connected through a conductor B 2 to one side of the relay 21. The other side of the relay 21 is connected through a conductor B 1 to the negative wire B2.

It will thus be seen that there is a closed series circuit including the source of energy represented by the battery 20, the three lamps in the exit compartment of the stairway indicators 17, 18 and 19 corresponding to the lamp 4 in the indicator 1, and the relay 2 1.

The relay 21 has two pairs of cooperating fixed and movable contacts 2 a and 21b and 2ic and 2 6d. These contacts are normally separated but become engaged upon the opening of the series circuit just described and the deenergization of the relay 21, and they control an individual, immediate local signal and a remote general signal for the purpose of indicating trouble in this circuit. The local signal is specific to the particular circuit and the remote signal is general to the stairway indicators and directional signals and is located on the main panel of the system in which these directional signals form a part. It is to be noted that the filaments of the lamps form a part of the circuit and consequently the lamps are supervised.

A similar series circuit includes the thirty-twc volt lamps in the stop compartment of the stairway indicators which correspond to the lamps 1 of the indicator 1, the battery 20 and the supervisory relay 24. This circuit includes the positiv( wire BI, a conductor CI which connects the conductor BI and a connector 25a, a conductor C! which connects the connector 25a and one side of the lamp in the stop compartment of the stairway indicator 19, a conductor C3 which connects the other side of the lamp and a connector 25b, a conductor connecting the connector 25b and a connector 25c, a conductor C5 connecting the connector 25e and one side of the light in the stop compartment of the stairway indicator 18, a conductor C6 connecting the other side of the light, and a connector 25d, a conductor C7 which connects the connector 25d and a connector 25e, a conductor C8 connecting the connector 25e and one side of the lamp in the stop compartment of the stairway indicator 11, a conductor C10 connecting the other side of the lamp in the stop compartment of this stairway indicator with a connector 25f, a conductor C I connecting the connector 25f with one side of the relay 24 and a conductor C12 connecting the other side of the relay 24 with the conductor B13. The relay 24 also has two pair of fixed and movable contacts 24a and 24b and 24c and 24d. These fixed and movable cooperating contacts are normally held out of engagement by the energized relay 24.

They control an immediate signal specific to the particular circuit, and the remote general signal.

Similar circuits include the lamps in the double arrow directional boxes 26, 27 and 28 which form a part of the portion of the system allocated to the zone illustrated in the drawings. These directional arrow boxes are mounted in the passageways of the building so that the arrows are one above the other. As heretofore stated the boxes making up the casings of these signs are divided longitudinally into two compartments and in each compartment there is a separate individual light.

The series circuit to the lights in the upper compartments of the siz boxes 26, 27 and 28, which illuminate and render visible the arrows pointing away from the stairway exit indicated by the stairway indicators, includes a supervisory relay 29. This circuit is made up of the positive line wire BI, a conductor DI which connects the positive line wire BI to a connector 30a, a conductor D2 connecting the connector 30a and one side of the lamp in the upper compartment of the sign 26, a conductor D3 connecting the other side of the lamp in the upper compartment of the sign 26 to a connector 30b, a conductor D4 connecting the connector 30b and a connector 30c, a conductor D5 connecting the connector 30c with one side of the lamp in the upper compartment of the sign 27, a conductor DS connecting the other side of the lamp in the upper compartment of the sign 27 with a connector 30d, a conductor D7 connecting the connector 30d and the connector 30e, a conductor D8 connecting the connector 30e and one side of the light in the upper compartment of the sign 28, a conductor D9 connecting the other side of the light in the upper compartment of the sign 28 with a connector 30f, a conductor DiO connecting the connector 30f and one side of the relay 29, and a conductor DII connecting the other side of the relay to the conductor D13. The relay 29 also includes two pair of fixed and movable contacts 29a-29b and 29c-29d which control a specific, immediate trouble signal and the remote general signal. The series circuit to the lights in the lower Scompartments of the signs 26, 27 and 28 which illuminate an arrow pointing towards the exit - indicated by the exit signs and a supervisory reSlay 31 for these lights is completed through connectors 32a to 32f inclusive. This circuit includes the positive line wire BI, a conductor El connecting line wire BI to the connector 32a, a conductor E2 connecting the connector 32a with one side of the lamp in the lower compartment of the sign 28, a conductor E3 connecting the other side of the lamp in the lower compartment of the sign 28 with the connector 32b, a conductor E4 connecting the connectors 32b and 32c, a conductor E5 connecting the connector 32c with one side of the lamp in the lower compartment of the sign 27, a conductor E6 connecting the other side of this lamp to the connector 32d, a conductor E7 connecting the connectors 32d and 32e, a conductor E8 connecting the connector 32e and one side of the light in the lower compartment of the sign 26, a conductor E9 connecting the other side of the light in the lower compartment of this sign with the connector 32f, a conductor El0 connecting the connector 32/ to one side of the relay 21 and a conductor El I connecting the other side of the relay to the conductor B 13. The relay 31 like the other supervisory relays has two pairs of cooperating fixed and movable contacts 31a and 31b and 31c and 31 d which control an immediate specific signal and the remote general signal.

The change in the connection of the several groups of lights from a series to a parallel connection is controlled in each instance by a relay.

The connection of the lights in the exit compartment of the stairway indicators is changed from series to parallel by the operation of a relay 33. The relay 33 has three pairs of cooperating fixed and movable contacts 33a-33b, 33c-33d and 33e-33/ which are brought into engagement upon the operation of the relay and which upon becoming engaged change the connection from a series to a parallel connection. The movable contacts 33b and 33d of the relay 33 are connected to the negative line wire B2 and the movable contact 33f is connected to the positive line wire B i. The three fixed contacts 33a and 33c which cooperate with the movable contacts 33b and 33d and the fixed contact 33e which cooperates with the movable contact 33f are connected to the connectors 22c, 22e and 22f respectively. The contact 33a and the connector 22c are connected by a conductor Fl. The con- tact 33b is connected by a conductor F2 to the connector 22/ and the contact 33e is connected by a conductor F3 to the contactor 22e. Thus upon the operation of the relay 33 the connectors 22a, 22d and 22e will be connected to the positive side of the battery and the connectors 22b, 22c and 22/ will be connected to the negative side of the battery. The several lights in the exit compartments will therefore be connected in parallel with the battery.

The lights in the stop compartment of the stairway indicator signs are similarly connected in parallel upon the operation of a relay 34.

The relay 34 has three pairs of fixed and movable contacts 34a-34b, 34c-34d, and 34e-34f which upon engagement connect the lights in the stop compartments in parallel. The movable contacts 34b and 34d are connected by a conductor GI to the negative line wire B2 and the movable contact 34f is connected by a wire G2 to the positive line wire Bl. The stationary contacts 34a, 34b and 34e are connected respectively to conductors G3, G4 and G5 which are respectively connected to connectors 25c and 25b, connector 25/ and connectors 25d and 25e. Upon the operation of the relay and the closing of these three pairs of fixed and movable contacts it will be apparent that the contactors 25/, 25b and 25c will be connected to the negative side of the battery through the conductor Gi and the line wire B2 and the connectors 25a, 25d and 25e will be connected to the positive side of the battery through the conductors G5, G2 and the line wire B . The lamps in the stop compartment will therefore be connected in parallel with the battery and will be illuminated upon the operation of the relay 34. The lights in the upper compartments of the directional signals 26, 27 and 28 are controlled by a relay 35 in the same manner as the lights in the stop compartment are controlled by the relay 34. The relay 35 has three fixed contacts 35a, 35c and 35e which cooperate respectively with the movable contacts 35b, 35d and 35f. The movable contacts 35b and 35d are connected to the negative line wire B2 and the movable contact 35/ is connected to the positive line wire B . The three fixed contacts 35a, 35c and 35e are respectively connected to the connectors 30b and 30c, 30/ and 30d, and 30e by the respective contactors HI, H2 and H3.

From this arrangement it will be observed that upon the operation of the relay 35 the connectors 30b, 30c and 30/ will be connected to the negative side of the battery and the connectors 30a, 30d and 30e will be connected to the positive side of the battery. Thus, the lights in the upper compartments of the directional signals will be illuminated.

The lights in the lower compartments of the directional signals 26, 27 and 28 are controlled by a relay 36. This relay includes movable con- 35: tacts 36b and 36d which are connected in common to the negative line wire B2 and a movable contact 36f which is connected to the positive line wire BI. These three movable contacts cooperate respectively with stationary and fixed con- 4o tacts 36a, 36c and 36e. The fixed contacts 36a, 36c and 36e, which are engaged by the movable contacts upon the energization of the relay 36, are respectively connected through conductors II, 12 and 13 to the common connectors 32b and 32c, the conductor E 9, which is connected to the connector 36/, and the common connectors 32d and 32e. In this case, the engagement of the fixed and movable contacts of the relay 36 effects the connection of connectors 32b, 32c and 32f with the negative line wire B2 and the connection of the contacts 32d and 32e with the positive line wire B1. The connector 32a being connected through the conductor El to the positive line wire BI, the several lamps of the lower compartment of the signal lights 26, 27 and 28 are connected in parallel with the battery 20. The relay 36 therefore upon being energized effects the illumination of these lamps.

The relays 33 and 36 are jointly controlled by the relays 16 and 34. The relay 16 controls the connection of one side of the relays 33, 35 and 36 to the negative line wire B2. The control of this connection is effected through a pair of cooperating fixed and movable contacts I e and 16/ which are normally separated due to the energization of the relay 16. The movable contact 16f is connected to the conductor GI and thus to the negative line wire B2. The contact 16e which cooperates with the contact 16f is con- T nected to a conductor JI to. which one side of each of the relays 33, 35 and 36 is connected in common. The relay 34 controls the connection of the relays 33 and 36 with the positive line wvire B I. This connection is controlled through Is5, two pairs of fixed and movable contacts 34g--34h and 34i-34j. The movable contacts 34ah and 34j are connected in common to the conductor G2 and thus to the positive line wire B 1. The contact 34g is connected by a conductor J2 to the coil of the relay 33 and the coil of the relay 36 is connected through a conductor J3 to the contact 34i. The contacts 34g and 34h and 34i and 34j are normally in engagement so that the coils of the relays 33 and 36 are normally connected to the positive side of the battery. If therefore the relay 16 is deenergized while the relay 34 remains deenergized, the relays 33 and 36 will be operated. If however the relay 34 is operated simultaneously with the deenergization of the relay 16, the relays 33 and 36 will remain deenergized and ineffective.

When a fire occurs in the zone served by the stairway indicators the relay 34 is energized si-multaneously with the deenergization of the relay 16 as will hereinafter appear. When this condition exists, the relays 33 and 36 are cut out of the circuit by the relay 34 but the relay 35 which is not controlled by the relay 34 is energized and effects the illumination of the lights in the upper compartments of the directional signals which illuminate the arrows pointing away from the zone of the fire represented by the stairway indicators and the relay 34 effects the illumination of the lights in the stop compartment of the exit signs. The connection of the relay 35 to the positive side of the line and thus across the battery is controlled by a relay 37 which, in another zone having signals duplicating those illustrated and located to the right of the zone indicated by the illustrated exit signs, corresponds to the relay 34. The coil of the relay 35 is connected through a conductor J4 to a fixed contact 37a of the relay 37. The fixed contact 37a is normally in engagement with a movable contact 37b which is connected to the conductor G2 and thus to the positive side of the battery. If therefore the relays 34 and 16 are simultaneously operated, the relays 33 and 36 will remain deenergized and inoperative but the relay 35 will be energized and effect the parallel connection of the lights in the upper compartments of the directional signals 26, 27 and 28.

The relay 34 is energized upon the existence of a fire in the zone served by the stairway indicators 17, 18 and 19 and the directional signals 26, 27 and 28. For each zone, there is a separate and distinct fire circuit so that each zone is independent. The circuit for initiating the operation or energization of the relay 34 may be either a manual or automatic circuit or both. The latter type of circuit is illustrated for the operation of the relay 34. One side of the coil of the relay 34 is connected to the positive conductor G2 through the coil of a relay 38, the coil of the relay 34 being connected to the conductor G2 in series with the relay 38. This connection includes a conductor KI which connects one side of the coil of the relay 38 with the conductor G2, and a conductor K2 which is connected by a conductor K3 to one side of the relay 34. The conductor K2 is also connected by a conductor K4 to one side of the relay 37 so that there is a series parallel connection between the relay 38 and the relays 34 and 37, the relays 34 and 37 being connected in parallel and this parallel connection being in series with the relay 38. The other side of the relay 34 is connected through a conductor K5 to a connector 39. The connector is in turn connected to a stationary contact 40a of a fire relay 40 by a conductor K6. A movable contact 406 of the relay 40 cooperates with the contact 40a and this latter contact is connected through a conductor K7 to the negative side of the battery through a connector 1e on the panel 23. The contacts 41a and 42b are normally separated and are brought into engagement upon the energization of the relay 40. A similar circuit (not shown) located in another zone is utilized to control the relay 3T. This circuit includes the conductor KS' which connects the relay and a connector 39'.

The relay 48 is included in a circuit which includes a conductor Li which connects one side of the coil of the relay 4d to the connector 20d and thus to the positive side of the battery 20, a conductor L2 which connects the other side of the coil of the relay 40 with a supervisory relay 4 , a conductor L3 which connects the relay 41 with one element L4 of a thermo-responsive or fire detecting cable 42, a conductor L5 which connects the other end of the element L4 with one side of a resistance 43, a conductor L6 which connects the other side of the resistance 43 with one side of another element L7 of the fire detecting cable 42 and a conductor LS which connects the other end of the element L? with the conductor K7 and thus to the negative side of the battery. This is the supervised automatic fire circuit disclosed in the copending application Serial No. 388,148, filed August 24, 1929, for Fire detecting systems. The resistance of the circuit is such that the supervisory relay 41 is normally energized but the fire relay 40 is normally deenergized.

However, when the elements LI and L4 are brought together by virtue of a rise in temperature and the resistance 43 is cut out of the circuit, the current flowing through the circuit is sufficient to energize the relay 40 and cause the engagement of the contacts 40a and 40b. The thermo-responsive cable is of the type disclosed in the copending application Serial No. 352,624, filed April 5, 1929, for Cable and method of producing the same. A manual fire alarm box 42' is also provided for the purpose of effecting the operation of the relay 40. This manual fire alarm box which is shown diagrammatically is merely a switch that is connected across the elements L4 and LT of the thermo-responsive cable 42. Upon the closing of this switch the resistance 43 is cut out of the circuit and the full energization of the relay 40 is effected.

When the relay 40 operates in addition to effecting the energization of the relay 34, it effects the energization of the relay 38 which is in series with the relay 34. The relay 38 is as heretofore explained connected in series with each and every one of the relays of the several zones, such as the relay 37, which corresponds to the relay 34. This relay is therefore operated when the operation of a fire circuit is effected, irrespective of which fire circuit is operated. Upon operation, the relay 38 does several things: it effects the operation of the relay 15 to disconnect the 110 volt supply from the zone in which the fire is located and thus the deenergization of the relay 16; and it arranges the circuits so that no trouble signals are operated either locally or remotely. The relay 15 is connected in a circuit which includes a pair of normally separated movable and fixed contacts 38a and 38b of the relay 38. These fixed and movable contacts are brought into engagement upon the energization of the relay 38 and close the circuit to the relay 15. This circuit includes a conductor MI which connects one side of the coil of the relay 15 to the positive conductor G2, a conductor M2 which connects the other side of the coil of the relay 15 with the fixed contact 38b of the relay 38 and the conductor G2 to which the movable contact 38a is connected. It will be evident that upon the engagement of the contacts 38a and 38b the coil of the relay 35 is connected across the thirty-two volt battery and the relay is energized. The energization of the relay separates contacts 15a-!5b and 15c-- 5d which form a part of the 110 volt circuit to the lamps in the exit compartments of the stairway indicators 17, 18 and 19. The contacts 15a and 15b also open the circuit to the relay 16 thus deenergizing this relay.

As heretofore stated, the deenergization of relay 16 through its contacts H6e and 16f connects relays 33, 35 and 36 to the negative side of the battery. The effect of this connection with the simultaneous opening of the contacts 34g-34h and 34i-34j of the relay 34 effects the operation of the lamps in the upper compartment of the directional signals and the contacts 34a to 34f of the relay 34 effects the operation of the lamps in the stop compartments of the stairway indicators 17, 18 and 19. The lights in the exit signs are of course disconnected from the source of the supply and this portion of the sign is no longer illuminated. The arrows in the upper compartments of the directional signs 26, 27 and 28 point away from the stairway or exit zone having the indicators 17, 18 and 19 and in which the fire signal originated.

The trouble signals for this system to assure the production of an informative trouble signal in the event of any disarrangement which would preclude the proper functioning of the exit control system includes local trouble lamps 44, 45, 46, 47 and 48 which are mounted upon the panel 23 with the aforementioned relays and a remote trouble light 49. The local trouble lights 44 to 48 inclusive are specific in their indication and the remote trouble light general in its indication to the exit control system and it is located on the main panel of the fire system which may include various, fire alarms and announcing systems.

There is usually only one main control panel in given premises for a fire detecting and alarm system, but there may be more than one exit indicator control panel. When there is more than one exit indicator panel there is one visual trouble signal 49 for each at the main control panel. The advantage of having a number of exit indicator control panels is the reduction of the length of the wiring between the lights in the signs and their control relays.

Upon the operation of any one of the signals 44 to 48, the signal 49 is also operated. The signal 49 indicates at the remote point that there is 6_ trouble in the stairway indicator or directional signal circuits; the specific signal on the board 23 indicates the particular circuit in which the trouble exists. The operation of the remote trouble light 49 is effected through a relay 50. The circuit to this relay includes the line LI to which one side of the relay is connected and a conductor NI which connects the other side of the relay to a connector 51 mounted on the panel 23. The contactor 51 is connected by a conductor N2 to a movable contact 38d of the relay 38. This movable contact is normally in engagement with a cooperating stationary contact 38c and when the relay becomes energized the contact 38d is separated from the contact 38c and engages a con76 tact 38e. The contact 38c is connected by a conductor N3 to one side of a resistance 52. The other side of this resistance is connected by a conductor N4 to the negative line wire B2. Thus, there is a complete circuit to the relay 50 which is normally deenergized due to the resistance of the circuit, particularly the resistance 52.

The light 49 is connected in the circuit O which includes the conductor 01 that connects one side of the light with the connector 41 and thus to the negative side of the battery, a conducor 02 which connects the other side of the light to a stationary contact 50a of the relay 50, a movable contact 50d which cooperates with the relay 50a and is brought into engagement therewith upon the full energization of the relay 50 and the conductor LI to which the movable contact 50b is connected. Thus upon the operation of the relay 58 the trouble light 49 is illuminated.

When the relay 16 is deenergized due to a failure of the 110 volt line, the relay 50 is fully energized and the trouble signal 44 is also energized.

When the relay 16 becomes deenergized, assuming that the relay 38 is not operated, the resistance 52 is shunted out of the circuit N. This is accomplished through the engagement of contacts IGa and 16b which are normally separated by the energization of the relay 16. The contact. 16a is a fixed contact and it is connected by a conductor P1 to the negative line wire B2. The movable contact 16b is connected by a conductor P2 to the conductor N3. Thus when the contacts IGa and 16b are in engagement the circuit to the relay 50 includes the conductor LI, the conductor NI, the conductor N2, fixed and movable contacts 38c and 38d of relay 38, conductor N3, conductor P2, contacts 16a and 16b of relay 16, conductor PI and negative line wire B2. The resistance 52 is thus shunted out of the circuit and the relay 50 becomes fully energized and effects the illumination or energization of the light 49. 40, The light 44 is connected in a circuit which includes fixed and movable contacts 16c and 16d of the relay 16. Upon the deenergization of the relay these contacts are brought into engagement. The contact 16d is directly connected to the conductor GI and thus to the negative side of the battery. The contactor 16c is connected to a conductor QI which is also connected to one side of the light 44. The other side of the light 44 is connected in common with the lights 45, 46, 47 and 48 to a conductor Q2 which is also connected to a fixed contact 38g on the relay 38 which cooperates with a movable contact 38/.

The movable contact 38f is connected to the conductor G2 and thus to the positive line wire BI. Consequently upon the deenergization of the relay 16 with the continued deenergization of the relay 38 the circuit connecting the light 44 to the battery 20 is completed and the light 44 is energized. The light 45 is operated upon the deenergization of the relay 21 which is connected in series with the circuit B that includes the thirty-two volt emergency lamps in the exit compartments of the signs 17, 18 and 19. The circuit to the light 45 includes the conductor N4 to which a movable contact 2 Id of the relay 21 is connected.

Contact 21d cooperates with a contact 21c which is connected by a conductor RI to one side of the light 45, the other side of the light being connected to the conductor Q2 and thus, as heretofore described, through the contacts 38/ and 39g of the relay 38 to the positive side of the battery. The relay 21 also includes contacts 21a and 21b. The contact 21a is connected to the. conductor N4 and the contact 2 Ib is connected to the conductor N3. Upon engagement of these two contacts by the deenergization of the relay 21 the conductors N3 and N4 are connected together by the contacts 21a and 2 b and the resistance 52 is shunted out of the circuit. The relay 50 is thus energized. Contacts 24a and 24b of relay 24, contacts 29a and 29b of relay 29 and contacts 31a and S3b of relay 31 are connected in parallel to the conductors N3 and N4 with the contacts 2 a and 21b of the relay 21.- Upon the deenergization of either of relays 24, 29 and 31 and the engagement of the contacts a and b thereof the resistance 52 is shunted out of the circuit in the same manner as by the engagement of contacts 21 a and 2lb. The circuit to the relay 50 upon the happening of this event, includes conductor LI, relay 50, conductor NI, conductor N2, contacts 38c and 38d of relay 38, conductor N3, contact b of either relay 21, 24, 29 or 31, the corresponding contact a in either of these relays, conductor N4 and negative line wire B2.

The relay 24 has contacts 24b and 24c which are included in the circuit to the light 48. Contact 24d is connected to the conductor N4 and thus to the negative side of the battery and the contact 24c is connected by a conductor SI to the one side of the light 46, the other side of which is connected to the conductor Q2 and thus to the negative side of the battery through the contacts of relay 38. Similarly relay 29 includes contacts 29c and 29d, contact 29c being connected to the conductor N4 and contact 29d being connected to one side of the light 47 through a conductor TI. Contacts 31 c and 31d of relay 31 are likewise included in the circuit to the trouble light 48. This circuit includes the conductor N4 to which the contact 31c is connected, contact 3id which cooperates with contact 31c and a conductor U which connects contact 3Sd to the light 48.

As heretofore described, relays 21, 24, 29 and 31 are supervisory relays of circuits B, C, D and E. Thus the trouble lights 45, 48, 47 and 48 when lighted respectively indicate trouble in the circuits B, C, D and E.

When the relay 38 is operated, it prevents the operation of any of the trouble signals. As heretofore described, all of the local trouble signals 44, 45, 46, 47 and 48 are connected to the positive side of the battery through normally closed contacts 38f and 38g of relay 38. On the energization of the relay 38 these normally closed contacts are separated and the circuit between the positive side of the battery and the trouble lights 44 to 48 inclusive is broken. Also upon the operation of the relay 38 the movable contact 38d, as heretofore stated, is disconnected from the contact 38c and brought into engagement with the contact 38e. Contact 38e is connected by a conductor VI to one end of a resistance 53. The other end of the resistance is connected by a conductor V2 to the negative line wire B2. Thus upon the operation of the relay 38 the engagement of the contacts 38c and 38d is broken thus preventing the transmission to the general panel of the trouble signal and the resistance 53 is substituted for the resistance 52, thus maintaining the partial deenergization of the relay 50 and consequently the deenergization of the light 49.

It is believed that the operation of the system will be apparent from the above description T thereof. It is to be noted that any number of zones may be interconnected. In such interconnection the compartment behind a green exit sign-or a red stop sign-or a directional arrow-may be controlled not only by relays of its own zone but by relays of a remote zone too; and in this manner the connections may be so arranged that a fire alarm originating either automatically or manually will not only cause the red stop signs in its own zone to be lit, but if the layout of the building's corridors should so demand, the illumination of remote red stop signals located in adjacent zones as well. This remote zone signalling is illustrated in control of relay 35 by the relay 37. In this manner occupants of the buildings who have been notified by signals or announcements to evacuate the building, are directed against entering the stairway located in the zone in which the fire exists and they are directed to a stairway in a zone in which a fire does not exist. The system described above is complemental to the system disclosed in the copending application Serial No. 687,278 of William D. Lindsey, filed August 29, 1933, wherein the firemen are automatically called and directed to the vertical zone that originates the alarm, and the exit control herein explained precludes the outgoing occupants from using the same stairways and egress doorways that have been reserved for the incoming firemen. It will be obvious that various changes may be made by those skilled in the art in the details of the system illustrated above within the principle and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims. I claim: 1. In a signal system, a plurality of electrically operated, directional signals, a source of electrical energy for supplying energy to operate the signals, control means common to the several signals and operative to effect the connection of all the signals to the source of electrical energy to effect the operation of the signals, additional individual control means for each signal operative to open the circuit between the signal and the source of energy and maintain the particular signal inoperative and means for operating the common control means simultaneously with the operation of one of the individual control means, whereby certain of the signals are operated to indicate one direction and the other signals are operated to indicate another direction.

2. In a signal system, a plurality of groups of directional signals each containing, a source of electrical energy for supplying energy to operate the signals, control means for each series of signals within each group and operative to effect the connection of the signals of the series to the source of energy to effect the operation of the series controlled thereby, another control means common to the control means of the several series of signals, and additional control means individual to certain of the first mentioned control means and adapted upon operation to effect the response of such control means to the operation of the second mentioned control means, whereby certain groups of signals indicate one direction and the other groups indicate another direction.

3. In a signal system, a plurality of electrically actuated signals arranged in several groups, a source of electrical energy for supplying energy to operate the signals, a closed electrical circuit for each group of signals including the signals conected in series with the source of energy, cornmon control means for effecting a parallel connection between all of the signals and the source of energy to effect the operation of all the signals, and additional control means individual to each group of signals and operative to effect the continued series connection of its group irrespective of the operation of the common control means.

4. In a signal system, a plurality of electrically actuated signals arranged in several groups, a source of electrical energy for supplying energy to operate the signals, a closed electrical circuit for each group of signals including the signals connected in series with the source of energy, common control means for effecting a parallel connection between all of the signals and the source of energy to effect the operation of all the signals, additional control means individual to each group of signals and operative to effect the continued series connection of its group irrespective of the operation of the common control means, and means for operating the common control means and a group control means simultaneously.

5. In a signal system, a plurality of electrically actuated signals arranged in several groups, a source of electrical energy for supplying energy to operate the signals, a closed electrical circuit for each group of signals including the signals connected in series with the source of energy, control means for each group operative to effect a parallel connection between the signals of the group and the source of energy, other common control means operative to effect the operation of all of the first mentioned control means, and additional control means individual to certain of the groups of the first mentioned control means and operative to effect the control thereof by said second mentioned control means.

6. In a signal system, a plurality of electrically actuated signals arranged in several groups, a source of electrical energy for supplying energy to operate the signals, a closed electrical circuit for each group of signals including the signals connected in series with the source of energy, control means for each group operative to effect a parallel connection between the signals of the group and the source of energy, other common control means operative to effect the operation of all of the first mentioned control means, additional control means individual to certain of the groups of the first mentioned control means and operative to effect the control thereof by said second mentioned control means, and means for effecting the operation of the second mentioned control means and one of the third mentioned control means simultaneously.

7. In a signal system, two directional signals, each signal having indicia for indicating different directions, a plurality of control units, and means operable upon the operation of one of said control units to effect the operation of one of said signals to indicate one direction and the simultaneous operation of the other signal to indicate a different direction.

8. In a signal system, two groups of directional signals, each signal of each group having indicia for indicating different directions, control units for each group of signals, each control unit adapted to effect the operation of a group of signals to indicate one direction, and means operable upon the operation of one of said control units to effect the simultaneous operation of the other group of signals to indicate a different direction. WILLIAM D. LINDSEY.