Title:
Game
United States Patent 2066724


Abstract:
My invention relates to games primarily adapted to be played indoors, and depends upon the use of a ball and certain playing instrumentalities. An object of my invention is to provide a suitably exhilarating and interesting game for use in relatively confined quarters. Another object of my...



Inventors:
Forsyth, George H.
Application Number:
US72223134A
Publication Date:
01/05/1937
Filing Date:
04/25/1934
Assignee:
Forsyth, George H.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F7/00
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Description:

My invention relates to games primarily adapted to be played indoors, and depends upon the use of a ball and certain playing instrumentalities.

An object of my invention is to provide a suitably exhilarating and interesting game for use in relatively confined quarters.

Another object of my invention is to provide a game which will afford the effect of a considerable amount of room available for play but which nevertheless can be utilized in a relatively confined space.

A further object of my invention is to provide a game which incorporates skill in playing to the highest degree and which can be arranged with varying degrees of difficulty to suit it to the entire range of players from the amateur to the expert.

A further object of my invention is to provide a game which can be played indoors without any possibility of damage to the surroundings.

The foregoing and other objects are attained in the embodiment of the invention illustrated in the drawings in whichFig. 1 is a plan of one form of apparatus for use in my game.

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the apparatus shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a detail in cross-section, the plane of section being indicated by the lines 3-3 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a side elevation of a modified form of structure for use with my game.

Fig. 5 is a cross-section, the plane of which is indicated by the lines 5-5 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is a diagrammatic plan of a further modification of apparatus for use in my game.

Fig. 7 is an additionally modified diagrammatic showing of a suitable apparatus.

Fig. 8 is a further modification of a suitable apparatus, shown in diagrammatic plan.

Fig. 9 is a cross-section on a longitudinal plane of a modified apparatus arranged to return the playing ball to the player.

Fig. 10 is the front elevation of a structure such as shown in Fig. 8, for example.

Fig. 11 is a cross-section on a longitudinal vertical plane of a modified form of apparatus.

Fig. 12 is a further modified form of apparatus, the view being a longitudinal cross-section on a vertical plane.

Fig. 13 is a diagrammatic plan of one of the forms of apparatus for playing a modified form of game.

In its preferred form, the game of my inven55. tion comprises a playing court which is divided by a division element into a plurality of alleys, usually two, and it is likewise provided with a transversely extending deflector wall arranged at one end of the court and spaced from the division element. While my game is susceptible of numerous variations in accordance with the desires of the players, and in accordance with the particular advantages of the game which are to be emphasized at any particular time, I have illustrated several embodiments herein which will indicate the general range of usefulness of my invention.

As shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, for instance, I have preferably provided a playing court, generally designated 6, which is fabricated customarily of a generally horizontal playing table 1 arranged at approximately the waist height of a player. The table is provided with the usual number of legs 8 and a reinforcing frame 9. The table is conveniently cut to an appropriate size, for instance 9 ft. by 5 ft. The table provides a court across one end of which there is disposed a plurality of deflector boards II which are preferably arranged at an inclination to the center line 12 of the table.

The boards usually extend in a vertical plane and '2 are upstanding from the table top itself. Supplementing the boards I are side walls 14 which extend forwardly to a point adjacent the front edge of the playing court. In addition to this structure, I preferably provide a dividing wall 16 arranged to be upstanding from the table top and to extend longitudinally thereof along the center line 12. The division wall 16, however, does not extend entirely to the deflector walls I .but stops short thereof in order to provide an opening therebetween.

In utilizing this structure in playing the game of my invention, two players occupy positions substantially in alignment with each of the alleys 17 and 18 into which the court is divided by the dividing wall 16. A single ball is utilized, and each player is provided with a bat. A player, for instance one adjacent to the alley 18, bats the ball along the broken line 19 of Fig. 1, with the object of having the ball deflected by the rear wall 11 and having the ball traverse the alley I1 to be returned by the player standing adjacent to such alley. In accordance with the path of the ball as indicated by the broken line 19, however, the ball returns to the alley 18 without interference. Upon this occurrence the ball must be handed to the other player who repeats the maneuver but utilizes the alley T1. On the other hand, in the event the ball is dispatched along the broken line 21 of Fig. 1, it deflects from the wall II and travels through the alley II in a position to be returned by the bat of the player standing adjacent to such alley. The paths of other typical shots are likewise illustrated in Fig. 1. The game proceeds with this fundamental maneuver as its basis. The ball is required to traverse a relatively long path, due to the horseshoe shape of the playing court, so that a full swing of his bat can be utilized by the player in order to gain full benefit and exercise from playing the game. It is not only strength that is required, but skill as well, since the caroming and deflection of the ball are matters of judgment and finesse.

Furthermore, the fact that the side walls and the end walls virtually enclose the table makes it unnecessary to provide other protection for the surroundings, such as furniture and the like, and prevents loss of the ball.

With the described maneuver as the basis of the game, certain possible mutations of the mechanism, as shown in Figs. 1 to 3, vary the character of the game. For this reason the table top is made up of two sections 22 and 23. Section 23 is connected to section 22 by hinges 24 and can be raised to an inclined position by means of a pawl 26 and ratchet arrangement 27.

The purpose of such inclination is to provide a quicker return to the players of relatively slow balls which ordinarily would roll on the table top, 80 and thus to speed up the playing of the game.

Furthermore, the incline changes the angle of the various deflectors adjacent the far end of the table, so that the possible shots of the ball are varied.

85 I have also arranged it so that, as shown in Fig. 3 and in Fig. 13, a somewhat different character of game can be played, and with additional players if desired. For this reason I provide the table structure with the side walls 14 fastened to the table top by hinges 28, so that the side walls can readily be detached and moved into a symmetrical location as shown in Fig. 13 and by dotted lines in Fig. 1. Furthermore, the dividing wall 16 is likewise made up preferably of two panels 31 and 32, respectively, so that the panel 32 can be moved adjacent the far end of the table.

In this fashion, when the rear or deflector wall II is released by removal of the pins from its hinge connections it can be completely removed and the hingedly-connected leaf panel 33 can be dropped to transform the table into a rectangular structure for use by two or four players. With this arrangement, players stand at the ends of the alleys so formed, with a cross-shot from one alley to the other being one of the objects of the game.

Further, by removal of all of the hinge connections and removal of the side and center panels, there remains a standard table for use in playing other games. There are at least three major modifications or mutations possible with the game structure of my invention.

In Figs. 4 and 5 I show a somewhat modified arrangement comparable to that shown in Figs. 1 to 3. In this form there is provided a table framework 41 to support a table top 42 providing a playing court. The angle of the playing court with respect to the horizontal can be changed as an entirety by lengthening or shortening adjustable legs 43 forming part of the framework 41.

Mounted on the table are a pair of side members 44 and 46 respectively, as well as a centrally disposed dividing wall 47. The dividing wall is movable longitudinally in a slot 48 to increase or decrease the distance between the end of the dividing wall and the end of the table. The slui walls are readily removable by means of hinge connections 49 while the playing table is extended by a flap 51 connected by hinges 52 to the table top proper and in turn carrying a deflector 53 o and a top baffle 54. The parts are all preferably connected by pin and hinge fastenings for ease in assembling and dismantling. The flap 51 and its associated structures are additionally supported by a strut 56 extending to the table frame 41.

In this modification there is provided a transversely extending, generally vertical net 57 which is supported by uprights 58 arranged on the sides of the table and secured thereto by brackets 59. The net extends through slots 61 cut in the side walls, so that the side walls can be moved through an arcuate path into a lowered position to clear the top of the table without interfering with the net. Additionally, brackets 62 are provided adjacent the center of the table, so that the net can be moved to the table center in playing other games. There is provided a cross brace 63 which is attached to each of the side walls 44 and 46 by easily operable fastenings 64 and which spans the playing court in order to afford increased rigidity to the enclosing walls. Customarily, there is provided a resilient binding 66 on the edges of the structure which are immediately presented to the players in order to avoid possible injury thereto or to the playing bat.

As disclosed in Fig. 6, I have provided a modification of the structure which incorporates the customary playing court 71 and the side walls 72 and 73, but in which the rear or deflector wall 74 is made up of a plurality of panels such as 76 and 77 supported just above the top of the table and hingedly connected together, as at 78. The structure can be left in the full line position with a generally monoplanar baffle or deflector wall 74, or, by advancing the side walls 72 and 73 into the dotted line position, the panels 76 and 77 are made to assume positions as an inclination to the central stationary panel 74 so that a plurality of deflecting planes or facets is provided. Additionally, the center dividing wall 79 is extensible to decrease the opening between the end of the dividing wall and the deflector wall 74. As the opening is decreased, the difficulty of the game is increased. Also, removable inclined ramps 80 can be provided to afford additional deflecting surfaces.

In Fig. 7 there is shown a still further modified form in which the table top 81 is provided with suitable side walls 02 and 83. These walls merge into a pair of deflector panels 84 and 86 which are arranged to closely surround but to be spaced from a dividing wall 87 which likewise is spaced away from the front of the structure.

In Fig. 8 there is shown a comparable arrangement in which there are provided four deflector panels 91 to 94, inclusive. For this arrangement the deflector panels are symmetrical about a center line at acute angles thereto, and present a large number of possibilities in making difficult shots. An inclined ramp 96 acts as an additional deflector and is spaced from the deflectors 91-94 to provide a downwardly sloping chute 97 for returning the ball along the sides of the table.

As shown in Fig. 9, any one of the preceding arrangements can be used, with the further modification that while the playing table 101 is generally planar nevertheless it is provided with an extension in the form of an inclined plate 102 which is so spaced from the end of the playing table 101 as to provide a polygonal aperture 103 and which is likewise spaced from the deflector panel 104 to provide an aperture 106. A ball which has not sufficient velocity to be returned to a player during the course of play rolls over the edge of the panel 102 through the opening 106 or rolls down the panel 102 through the opening 103.

In either case the ball is returned to the player along an inclined ramp i01 leading to a receiving pocket 108. In this figure there is an upper or top panel 109 shown, which serves as an additional deflector and increases the possibility of making carom or deflected shots, and, further, there are ridges 110 extending transversely of the table 101 and of the panel 109 to define a constricted throat through which play must occur, and which themselves serve as additional deflectors for the ball.

In Fig. 10 I have disclosed the use of a supplemental covering such as canvas I1 on the deflector wall, together with marking strips 12 and 113 to demark zones of play. These zones are useful in complicating the scoring of the game and for the use of players in accurately positioning their shots.

In Fig. 11 there is disclosed a structure in which the playing court is planar but in which the upper closure wall 121 is provided with panels 122 and 123 which are inclined and offer additional deflecting surfaces. In this modification there is provided a net 124 which is spaced above the playing table a sufficient distance to permit a relatively slow, rolling ball to pass thereunder or a relatively fast ball to pass thereover, but which will intercept any ball travelling in an intermediate zone.

In Fig. 12 there is shown an arrangement in which the playing table 131 terminates in an upwardly inclined panel 132 merging with a deflector wall 133. This is likewise for the purpose of providing an additional and angularly disposed deflector surface.

I claim: 1. A game comprising an elongated playing table, an upstanding deflector wall extending across one end of said table, said deflector wall including a plurality of movable sections, side walls upstanding from but adapted to occupy any one of several positions along the sides of said table, and a longitudinal dividing wall upstanding from said table, said dividing wall including a plurality of sections relatively movable longitudinally of said table.

2. A game to be played by simultaneous competition between a plurality of players using a single ball similar to a table tennis ball, comprising a generally horizontal playing surface wide enough to accommodate two side-by-side players at one end thereof, and a ball-deflecting dividing abutment upstanding substantially vertically from said surface to a height several times the diameter of said ball and extending lengthwise of said surface to divide the surface into a plurality of playing areas one in front of each of said players but said abutment stopping short of the other end of said surface to permit free flight of the ball between said playing areas during competitive play.

3. A game to be played by simultaneous competition between a plurality of players using a single ball similar to a table tennis ball, comprising a generally horizontal playing surface supported at about the height of the player's torsos and of sufficient width to accommodate two sideby-side players at one end thereof, a plurality of ball-deflecting walls substantially vertically upstanding from adjacent one end of said surface in approximately a horseshoe shape, and a ball-deflecting dividing abutment upstanding substantially vertically from said surface and extending lengthwise of said surface to deflect a flying ball but said abutment stopping short of said walls to permit free flight of said ball from one side of said playing surface to the other side thereof during competitive play with said ball. 4. A game adapted to be played by simultaneous competition between a plurality of players using a single ball similar to a table tennis ball, comprising a playing table, an upstanding balldeflecting wall extending substantially vertically and across one end of said table, side walls upstanding from the sides of the table adjacent said ball-deflecting wall, and a dividing wall upstanding from said table between said walls and being approximately parallel thereto, said dividing wall stopping short of said end wall to allow transverse communication of said ball flying from one side of said table to the other during competitive play with said ball.

5. A game adapted to be played by simultaneous competition between a plurality of players using a single ball similar to a table tennis ball, comprising a playing area delimited by upstanding walls and divided into a pair of communicating alleys by a central longitudinal upstanding dividing wall stopping short of said upstanding walls to allow the passage therebetween of a ball in flight during competitive play, the height of each of said upstanding walls being about equal to the width of each of said alleys. 6. A game adapted to be played by simultaneous competition between a plurality of players using a single ball similar to a table tennis ball, comprising a rectangular table the top of which is about level with a player's waist, an upstanding ball-deflecting wall for demarking a pair of alleys on said top, said wall stopping short of the end of said table top to afford communication between said alleys each of which is about half as wide as said top, and upstanding ball-deflecting rebound walls at the sides and end of said table top, the height of said walls being about equal to the width of one of said alleys.

7. A game adapted to be played by simultaneous competition between a plurality of players using a single ball similar to a table tennis ball, comprising a rectangular, approximately horizontal playing surface, rebound walls upstanding approximately vertically from both sides and one end only of said surface, and a central dividing rebound wall extending longitudinally of and approximately vertically from said surface but stopping short of said end rebound wall to allow the flight therebetween of said ball during competitive play. 8. A game adapted to be played by simultaneous competition between a plurality of players using a single ball similar to a table tennis ball, comprising an elongated playing table, and an upstanding ball-deflecting dividing wall extending longitudinally of said table but terminating, short of the end of said table remote from said players to allow transverse flight of said ball during competitive play.

9. In a game to be played simultaneously by side-by-side competing players with a single bounding ball on a court, upstanding abutment walls, and an upstanding longitudinally disposed wall providing interacting lanes of play each extending longitudinally in front of one of said players, said walls being related to each other and of sufficient height to direct a bounding ball from one lane of play to the other.

10. In a game adapted to be played simultaneously by competing players with a single ball, a table top, an end wall, lateral walls, and a wall intermediate of said lateral walls, all of said walls upstanding from said table top to define interacting lanes of play and to divert the ball during its flight to move transversely between said lanes of play.

11. In a game adapted to be played with a single ball on a table top by simultaneously competing players at one end of said table top, an abutment wall at the other end of said table top adapted to divert the ball transversely from one lane of play to another lane of play whether said ball is in initial flight or is bouncing, said lanes being separated by a dividing wall also adapted to divert the ball transversely of said lanes of play. 16 GEORGE H. FORSYTH.