Title:
Shoe lasting mechanism
United States Patent 2012634


Abstract:
This invention relates to shoe lasting mechanism. An object of the invention is the provision of generally improved and more satisfactory mechanism, of simple and sturdy form, for the rapid and efficient lasting of shoes of various kinds. Another object of the invention is the provision of...



Inventors:
Miller, George W.
Application Number:
US65052533A
Publication Date:
08/27/1935
Filing Date:
01/06/1933
Assignee:
Miller, George W.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A43D9/00; A43D23/02
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Description:

This invention relates to shoe lasting mechanism. An object of the invention is the provision of generally improved and more satisfactory mechanism, of simple and sturdy form, for the rapid and efficient lasting of shoes of various kinds.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a last jack and associated parts, of such form and construction as to be especially adapted for the lasting of shoes by a method employing wires or other ligatures.

Still another object is the provision of a last jack so designed and constructed that it may tilt in a substantially vertical plane on a substantially horizontal axis, to shift a shoe to different positions for performing different operations upon it, in addition to revolving in a substantially horizontal plane about a substantially vertical axis, to change the position of the shoe end 2u for end.

A further object is to provide various improvements and refinements in details of construction so that an efficient, sturdy, and smoothly operating mechanism results.

To these and other ends the invention resides in certain improvements and combinations of parts, all as will be hereinafter more fully described, the novel features being pointed out in the claims at the end of the specification. In the drawings: Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a shoe lasting mechanism constructed in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention; Fig: 2 is a side elevation of the jack portion of such mechanism, with the shoe last indicated diagrammatically; Fig. 3 is a plan of the parts shown in Fig. 2; Fig. 4 is a horizontal section taken substantially on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1; Fig. 5 is a vertical section taken substantially on the line 5-5 of Fig. 4; Fig. 6 is a vertical section taken substantially on the line 6-6 of Fig. 4; Fig. 7 is a plan of a fragment of the mechanism shown in Fig. 4, on a somewhat larger scale, illustrating the jack holding clutch in its released position; Fig. 8 is a vertical section taken substantially 5O on the line 8-8 of Fig. 3; Fig. 9 is a view of a fragment of the wire pulling and twisting mechanism in its open position, and Fig. 10 is a similar view with the wire gripping jaws closed.

The same reference numerals throughout the several views indicate the same parts.

This application is a continuation in part of my co-pending application for patent on Shoe lasting device, Serial No. 401,526, filed October 22, 6 1929. The wire pulling and twisting mechanism, shown in this present application to aid in a complete understanding of the invention, is not claimed per se in this present application, but forms the subject matter of the claims of my said co-pending application.

According to one known method of lasting shoes, a ligature (preferably in the form of a wire) is secured to the shoe upper near the lower edge of the upper, and when the shoe upper is placed on the last, the ligature is drawn tight and held in a tightened position (as by twisting the ends of the wire, for example) in order to pull the lower edge of the shoe upper over the edges of the last and hold the upper against an insole, for example, during the drying of cement or adhesive used to hold the upper to the insole.

Such a method of lasting shoes is disclosed in my U. S. patent for Method of making shoes, No. 1,757,537, granted May 6, 1930, on an application filed April 29, 1929.

The mechanism of the present invention is particularly adapted for the lasting of shoes according to the above mentioned method, although it is capable also of other uses. . Referring now to Fig. 1 of the drawings, there is shown a suitable table or support 20 on which a frame or bed plate 21 is placed. This frame 21 carries a pair of guideways 22 (Figs. 1, 3, 4 and 8) in which a jack base or plate 23 is slidably mounted. This base 23 has a substantially cylindrical upstanding portion 24 on which is seated a member 25 which may be described as a turntable. The member 25 has a portion 26 extending downwardly from the center thereof and seated in a central opening in the cylindrical portion 24 of the base, as best seen in Fig. 8, and a retaining member 27 is held in place by suitable means, such as the machine screws 28, so that the turntable is held in effective position upon the base portion 24, but is permitted to rotate freely relative to the base portion about a substantially vertical axis.

The turntable 25, in turn, carries a pair of upstanding flanges 30 slightly spaced from each other so as to receive between them a jack member 31 pivotally connected to the flanges 30 by means of the pivot pin 32, which constitutes a substantially horizontal axis, about which the last 55. jack member 31 may be oscillated to a limited extent.

Adjustable abutment means is preferably provided for limiting the extent of oscillation of the member 31 in both directions. Such means may comprise, for example, an adjusting screw 33 having an end adapted to engage a lug or abutment 34 on the turntable 25 when the member 31 is oscillated to one position as shown in Fig. 1, and another adjusting screw 35 adapted to engage the flat top of the turntable 25 when the jack member 31 is oscillated to the limit of its motion in the opposite direction, as indicated in Fig. 2.

A frictional detent member 36 (Fig. 8) is pressed by a spring 37 against the side of the member 31 at a point somewhat spaced from the pivot 32, so that this detent tends to retain the member 31 frictionally in either position to which it is oscillated. The spring 37 may be held in place- and its tension adjusted by means of a screw plug 38 (Figs. 2 and 8).

The jack member 31 carries both a last spindle and a toe rest. The last spindle, best shown in Fig. 2, is indicated at 40 and is pivoted at 41 to the member 31. An adjusting screw 42 threaded through an arm 43 secured to the last spindle, bears against a lug 44 on the member 31, so that as the screw 42 is screwed further into the arm 43 it tends to move the spindle 41 leftwardly or in a counterclockwise direction, when viewed as in Fig. 2. The end of the spindle 40 which engages with the shoe last (shown diagrammatically at 46) is knurled or otherwise roughened as indicated at 47 so that the socket of the last will be retained on the spindle with greater frictional resistance to displacement, and there will be no likelihood of accidental displacement of the last from the spindle during the various operations such as tightening the wires or other ligatures according to the lasting method above described.

On the jack member 31 there is a guideway 50 along which a toe rest carriage 51 is slidably mounted. A clamping screw 52 is provided for clamping the toe rest carriage in any desired stationary position on the guideway. The toe rest carriage has an upstanding shank '53 provided with a pair of bores 54 extending downwardly from its top. The toe rest, indicated at 55, is provided with a pair of pins which extend downwardly into the bores 54 to hold the toe rest in place on the shank 53. Thus the toe rest itself is detachable readily from the shank 53 of the toe rest carriage and different toe rests of different heights may be readily placed on the shank 53 for lasting different styles or sizes of shoes.

It is seen from the foregoing description that the last spindle 40 is mounted for oscillation with respect to the jack body 31, and that when the adjusting screw 42 is tightened, the last mounted on the spindle is moved in such direction that the shoe upper on the last comes into contact with the toe rest 55. The screw 42 serves not only to move the spindle but also to hold the spindle in the desired position with the shoe upper pressing firmly against the toe rest, the position of which toe rest may be adjusted by moving the carriage 51 along the guideway 50.

It is also seen that the entire spindle 40 and toe rest 55 may be oscillated together as a unit with the body 31, about the substantially horizontal axis constituted by the pivot 32, and also about the substantially vertical axis on which the turntable 25 rotates with respect to the base 24. The horizontal axis 32 may also be described as an axis substantially parallel to, the plane of the sole of the last 46, whereas the substantially vertical axis of the turntable 25 is an axis transverse to the plane of the sole of the last 46.

When the jack is rotated about the vertical axis, it may be latched or positively held in either s one of a plurality of positions, as for example by means of the latch member 60 pivoted at 61 to the turntable and having its lower end normally pressed by the spring 62 into one or the other of a pair of notches 63 placed in the base 24 at diametrically opposite points. The notches 63 are formed in such positions relative to the latch 60 that when the latch is seated in one notch, the last jack will be held in proper position for a lasting operation upon one part of the shoe (such as lasting the heel portion as indicated in Fig. 1).

When the latch is seated in the other notch 63, the jack will be turned to a diametrically opposite point (as shown in Fig. 2) in which it will be in proper position for performing another lasting operation on the same shoe (as, for example, lasting the toe of the shoe).

The ligature tightening and twisting mechanism which will be described hereafter, pulls the ligature during the tightening operation, which pull must be resisted by the jack, as otherwise the entire jack would move toward the pulling device. It is desirable not to have the jack permanently mounted in fixed position, but on the contrary to have it shiftable toward and away from the ligature tightening means, in order to make the. machine more flexible and adjustable for efficient operation upon shoes of various sizes.

It is for these purposes of flexibility, adjustability, and efficient operation, that the jack is mounted upon the base member 23 slidable in the guideways 22 of the frame 21. Clutch means is provided, however; for preventing undesired sliding of the base 23 in a direction toward the ligature tightening means, while at the same time suitable mechanism is provided for moving the sliding base 23 backward or forward in either direction along its guideways when desired by the operator. This means for moving and holding the member 23 is best shown in Figs. 3 to 7, inclusive, to which attention is now directed.

A pin 70 projects upwardly from the base slide 23 near the right hand end thereof and is received in a slot 71 of a lever 72 pivoted to the frame 21 at 73. The lever 12 is extended rearwardly for some distance beyond its pivot 73 and is there provided with an oblique end 74. Adjacent this oblique end 74 is an arcuate wall 75 secured to the frame 21, and a roller 76 is placed between the oblique end 74 and the wall 75. A plunger 77 pressed by a coiled spring 37 in a cavity in a yoke 80, tends to move the roller 76 toward the smaller end of the tapered space between the end 74 of the lever and the arcuate wall 75. Thus the roller provides, in effect, a oneway clutch which will permit free oscillation of the lever 72 in a clockwise direction when viewed as in Fig. 4 (which will carry the slide 23 leftwardly), but which will prevent counterclockwise oscillation of the lever 72 by reason of the jamming action of the roller 76 between the lever and the arcuate wall 75.

The yoke or U-shaped member 80 embraces the lever 72 near its oblique end and is secured thereto as by means of the screws 81. It extends upwardly above the top surface of the lever on each side thereof to provide a channel somewhat wider than the width of the lever, as plainly shown in Figs. 5 and 7. In this channel between the arms of the member 80, lies the rear end of an upper a; lever 82 overlying the lever 72 and mounted for oscillation on the same pivot 73. The front end of the lever 82 is extended forwardly to form a convenient handle as shown in Fig. 4, and a pin :g 83 depends from the lever 82 just to the right of the roller 76. When the lever 82 is oscillated in a counterclockwise direction by the rightward movement of its front end, the pin 83, moving leftwardly, will thrust leftwardly on the roller 76 and will thus release or disengage it from its tight jamming action between the lever 72 and the wall 75. Then, slight further counterclockwise movement of the lever 82 will bring the rear end of this lever into contact with the left hand arm of the yoke 80, so that further oscillation of the lever 82 will be transmitted to the lever 72 and will cause corresponding counterclockwise oscillation of the lever 72 and corresponding rightward movement of the jack slide 23. The relative position of the parts when the lever 82 is being operated in this manner is shown in Fig. 7.

If the forward end of the lever 82 be moved leftwardly, to oscillate the lever in a clockwise direction, the right hand rear edge of the lever will come into contact with the right hand part of the yoke 80 and consequently the lever 72 will be correspondingly oscillated to cause leftward movement of the jack slide 23. Thus the lever 82 provides means for moving the jack at will in either direction along its guideways. The only way of moving the jack rightwardly is by moving the lever 82, since if rightward pressure is applied directly to the jack itself, the clutch constituted by the roller 76 and associated parts will hold the jack against rightward movement. Thus the position of the jack is readily adjustable at will but the jack is prevented from moving rightwardly toward the ligature tightening means during the lasting operation.

The ligature tightening means itself may now be described, referring particularly to Figs. 1, 9 and 10. It is believed that this means need not be described in minute detail, however, since it is not claimed in this present application but Sforms the subject matter of claims of the above mentioned co-pending application, as previously stated.

Near the right hand end of the frame 21, is a hollow boss 90 receiving a vertical screw 91 the ,0 height of which may be adjusted by rotating the nut 92 controlled by the hand wheel 93. The upper end of this screw 91 carries a fixture 94 to which is pivoted at 95 a yoke 96 provided with guiding portions 97 and 98 in which is slidably and rotatably mounted a tubular member 99. A hand wheel 100 is fixed to the tubular member 99, as by'means of the set screw 101, in a position between the guiding portions 96 and 98. A coiled spring 102 surrounding the tubular member presses rightwardly against the left hand side of the guiding portion 98 (a ball bearing 103 being interposed if desired) and leftwardly against the right hand side of the hand wheel 100 (a similar ball bearing 104 being likewise interposed here if desired). Thus the spring tends to hold the tubular member 99 at the extreme leftward limit of its motion, but without interfering- with rotation of the tubular member in the guides 97 and 98 by means of the hand wheel 100.

Within the tubular member 99 is slidably mounted a rod 105 constantly pressed leftwardly by a spring 106 held in place by a plug 107 secured in the right hand end of the tubular member 99. The rod 105 is free to slide longitudinally 75. in the tubular member 99 through a limited extent determined by the length of a pair of slots 108 extending longitudinally in the tubular member and engaged by a pin 109 fastened through the rod 105 between: the guide 97 and the wheel 100. By reason of this pin and slot connection 108, 109, the rod 105 cannot rotate within the tubular member, 99 but is forced to rotate with the tubular member whenever the latter is rotated by means of the hand wheel 100.

At its left hand end, the rod 105 is provided with, a fixed clamping jaw 115, cooperating with a movable jaw 116 pivoted to the rod at I l and having a tail 118 extending out through a slot 119 in the tubular member 99. When the rod 105 is moved rightwardly with relation to its enveloping tubular member 99 to the position shown in Fig. 9, a spring 120 mounted on the tubular member 99 presses upon the tail 118 to hold the jaw 116 in its open position spaced from the jaw 115, as shown in Fig. 9. When the rod 105 is moved leftwardly relative to the tubular member 99; however, (or when the tubular member 99 is moved rightwardly relative to the rod 105, which amounts to the same thing) then the left hand end of the slot 119 acts as a cam upon the inclined edge of the tail 118 and moves this tail so as to close the jaw 116. firmly against the jaw 115, this position being indicated in Fig. 10.

A cap member 130 is fastened to the right hand end of the tubular member 99, and a headed stud 131 is rotatably mounted in a central opening in this cap. Suitable pulling means such as a chain 132 is fixed to the stud 131 and passes over a pulley 133 mounted at the right hand end of the yoke 96. The chain may be connected, in turn, to a cable or cord 134 extending downwardly around the guide pulley 135 and to a suitable treadle or other means for pulling on the guide when desired. It is apparent from this description that when the cord 134 is slack the spring 102 will force the hand wheel 100 and the tubular member 99 to the extreme leftward limits of their motion. The pin 109, being between the hand wheel and the guide 97, will be forced by the hand wheel against the guide as shown in Fig. 9. The jaws 115 and 116 will then be open so that the ends 140 (Fig. 1) of a ligature such as a wire may be inserted between these jaws. If the cord 134 is now pulled downwardly as by depressing a treadle connected to the cord, the tubular member 99 will be pulled rightwardly against the action of the spring 102. Because of the spring 106, however, the rod 105 will tend ~g to remain in its original position with the pin 109 against the guide member 97. Thus the tubular member 99 will move rightwardly with respect to the rod 105, and the left hand end of the slot 119 will act upon the tail 118 of the jaw 116 to .c close the jaw upon the ligature 140. If the movement of the cord 134 be continued, the rod 105 and the closed jaws will move rightwardly bodily along with the member 99 and the jaws will thus pull rightwardly on the ligature 140, tightening C5 this ligature in the desired manner according to the method of lasting set out in the previously mentioned patent. Then the hand wheel 100 may be rotated a few turns in order to twist the ends of the ligature around each other, so that, when the clamping jaws are released, the ligature will -remain in this tightened position.

By operating in this manner, one portion of the shoe may be lasted, such as the heel portion, when the shoe is positioned as in Fig. 1. It will be noted that when lasting the heel portion of a shoe of this shape, the jack is tilted up to the position plainly indicated in Fig. 1, in which the shoe is at the proper angle for the most advanta-5 geous pull upon the ligature. After the heel-ligature has been tightened in the desired manner, the jack may be tilted down to the position shown in Fig. 2, by oscillating it about the axis 32, and when the latch 60 is released the jack may be revolved about the vertical axis to a diametrically opposite position, at which time the shoe will be in the most advantageous position for pulling upon and tightening a similar ligature around the toe portion of the shoe.

When adjusting the shoe to proper position for lasting, the last jack may be moved back and forth readily by manipulation of the lever 82 to bring the ligature on the shoe to exactly the right position with respect to the clamping jaws 115 and I 16 of the tightening means; yet when a pull is exerted by the tightening means the last jack will not move rightwardly along its guideways but any such movement will be adequately resisted by the clutch constituted by the roller 76 and associated parts.

Thus it is seen that simple and advantageous mechanism has been provided for rapid and efficient lasting of shoes according to the method above mentioned. It is seen that the tilting of the jack is particularly advantageous when lasting women's shoes or other shoes in which the heel ligature is at a different angle from the toe ligature, since the shoe may be tilted to one position for the most advantageous pull upon one ligature and shifted to another position (in addition to turning it end for end) for the most advantageous direction of pull upon the other ligature.

While one embodiment of the invention has been disclosed, it is to be understood that the inventive idea may be carried out in a number of ways. This application is therefore not to be limited to the precise details described, but is intended to cover all variations and modifications thereof falling within the spirit of the invention or the scope of the appended claims.

I claim: 1. In a shoe lasting device, the combination with a last jack for holding a last, of a guideway along which said last jack is movable, one-way holding mechanism preventing movement of said jack in one direction along said guideway by force applied to said jack, said mechanism being ineffective to prevent movement of said jack in an 5 opposite direction by force applied to said jack, and means for moving said jack at will in either direction along said guideway.

2. In a shoe lasting device, the combination with a frame, of a last jack movable with respect CO to said frame, a lever operatively connected to said jack to move therewith, one-way clutch means normally preventing movement of said lever in one direction to prevent movement of said jack in one direction, and means including a secC5 ond lever for releasing said one-way clutch means to permit movement of said first lever in the normally prevented direction.

3. A last jack comprising, in combination, a Sbase member, a last supporting member pivotally 7mounted on said base member, and positive latch means for holding said last supporting member immovably either in a position in which the toe of a last supported by said supporting member points Sin one direction, or in a substantially reversed position in which said toe of said last points in the opposite direction.

4. A last jack comprising a base, a last holding member, a toe rest for cooperating with a shoe upper on a last held by said holding member, said ' holding member being pivotally mounted for oscillation with respect to said toe rest, screw means for forcing a last held on said holding member in a direction toward said toe rest and for positively holding it against movement in a reverse direction, and means for mounting said holding member and toe rest for bodily oscillation together about an axis substantially parallel with the plane of the sole of a last held by said holding member, so that a shoe on said last may be shifted 16 to different positions for performing different operations upon it.

5. A last jack comprising a base, a member mounted for oscillation about a substantially horizontal axis with respect to said base, adjustable means limiting the extent of oscillation of said member in both directions, a last spindle pivotally mounted on said member for oscillation with respect to said member and also for bodily oscillation as a unit with said member, screw means for controlling oscillation of said spindle with respect to said member, and a toe rest adjustably mounted on said member for oscillation bodily therewith.

6. A last jack comprising a base, a last holding member, a toe rest for cooperating with a shoe upper on a last held by said holding member, means for mounting said holding member and toe rest for bodily oscillation together about an axis substantially parallel with the plane of the sole of a last held by said holding member and materially forwardly from the mid point of said last, so that a shoe on said last may be shifted to different positions for performing different operations upon it, and adjustable stop means for limiting the extent of. oscillation of said member with respect to said base.

7. A last jack comprising a base, a member mounted on said base, and a last spindle carried by said member, said member being mounted for oscillation with respect to said base about an axis transverse to the plane of the sole of a last carried by said spindle, and also mounted for oscillation with respect to said base about another axis substantially parallel to said plane of the sole and materially forwardly from the middle of said last.

8. In a shoe lasting device, the combination with a frame, of a guideway, a jack base mounted for movement along said guideway, one-way clutch means for holding said base against movement in one direction along said guideway, a member mounted on said base, and a last spindle mounted on said member, said member being mounted for oscillation with respect to said base about an axis substantially parallel to the plane of the sole of a last carried by said spindle and substantially beneath the toe portion of said last.

9. In a shoe lasting device, the combination with a frame, of a guideway, a jack base mounted for movement along said guideway, a member mounted on said base, a last spindle mounted on said member, said member being mounted for oscillation with respect to said base about an axis substantially parallel to the plane of the sole of a last carried by said spindle, and also mounted for oscillation with respect to said base about an axis substantially transverse to the plane of said sole, frictional means for holding said member in either of a plurality of positions to which it may be oscillated about one of said axes, and latching means for holding said member in either of a plurality of positions to which it may be oscillated about the other of said axes.

.5 10. A shoe lasting jack comprising a base, a member mounted on said base, means on said member for holding a last, and a pivotal connection between said member and said base so that said member may be tilted back and forth with respect to said base, said pivotal connection having a pivotal axis arranged substantially horizontally and located substantially beneath the toe portion of said last, so that by tilting said member about said pivotal axis the heel porI15 tion of said last may be raised or lowered without substantially raising or lowering the toe portion thereof.

11. A shoe lasting jack comprising a base, a member mounted on said base, means on said member for holding a last, a pivotal connection between said member and said base so that said member may be tilted back and forth with respect to said base, adjustable screw means for limiting the extent to which said member may 2 be tilted in either direction, and spring pressed means for frictionally holding said member in either of a plurality of positions to which it may be tilted.

12. A shoe lasting jack comprising a base, a member mounted on said base, means on said member for holding a last, a pivotal connection between said member and said base so that said member may be tilted back and forth with respect to said base, said pivotal connection having a pivotal axis arranged substantially horizontally and located substantially beneath the toe portion of said last, so that by tilting said member about said pivotal axis the heel portion of said last may be raised or lowered without substantially raising or lowering the toe portion thereof, and spring pressed means for frictionally holding said member in either of a plurality of positions to which it may be moved.

13. Shoe lasting mechanism comprising means forming a guideway, a base block mounted for reciprocation along said guideway and held against rotation therein, a turntable mounted on said base block for rotation thereon about a substantially vertical axis, a jack member mounted on said turntable for oscillation thereon about a substantially horizontal axis, means forming a guideway on said jack member, a toe rest mounted for reciprocation along said last named guideway, and a last spindle mounted on said jack member for oscillation thereon about a substantially horizontal axis.

GEORGE W. MILLER.