Title:
Residence elevator
United States Patent 2004060


Abstract:
This invention relates to electric motor driven elevators particularly adaptable for private residences or homes and primarily for a one floor rise of lift, with no overhead cab sustaining and elevating machinery, easily installed in an erected building at a moderate cost, requiring only a...



Inventors:
Brown, Alfred T.
Application Number:
US72731934A
Publication Date:
06/04/1935
Filing Date:
05/24/1934
Assignee:
WARNER ELEVATOR MFG COMPANY
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
74/57, 109/47, 187/288, 254/98
International Classes:
B66B9/02
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Description:

This invention relates to electric motor driven elevators particularly adaptable for private residences or homes and primarily for a one floor rise of lift, with no overhead cab sustaining and elevating machinery, easily installed in an erected building at a moderate cost, requiring only a minimum floor space to be taken from the rooms or hallways for the hatch-way or shaft, usually available from a corner of a room, and inexpensive building alterations, as the cutting of an opening through the second floor flooring and inserting cross header for the joists cut; the boring of a hole through the first floor flooring to traverse an elevating screw therethrough and the building of a light hatch-way enclosure for the two floors served.

An object of the invention is to provide an electric motor driven elevator particularly for private residences, having the lifting power to raise and lower the elevator platform and all the weight thereof supported from below the lower floor served by the elevator to avoid placing any additional load by the installation upon the upper floor joints of the building or the provision of load sustaining framing or shoring as would be necessitated for marking an elevator installation in an erected building having the cab suspended from and elevated by overhead machinery.

Another object of the invention is to provide an elevator primarily for a one floor rise having a load carrying platform centrally mounted upon an elevating screw, the screw operated by a revolving nut transmittingly connected by a belt drive to an electric motor.

Another object of the invention is to provide an elevator with an elevating screw for propelling the cab, the screw connected centrally to the underside of the platform of the cab and extends downwardly therefrom engaging with a revolving self-aligned ball bearing journalled nut supported upon a tubular column into which the screw recedes in its descending traverse, the column carrying all the load of the elevator and serving as a reservoir for holding a supply of oil for lubricating the screw.

Another object of the invention is to provide an elevator with an elevating screw for propelling the elevator cab, the screw driven by a revolving nut in belt transmission with an electric motor.

Another object of the invention Is to provide an elevator with an elevating screw for propelling the elevator cab, the screw driven by a revolving nut, the nut having a drum concentric therewith providing a grooved pulley for a plurality of Belts to transmittingly connect the same with an electric motor and an annular braking surface for applying a brake pressure to the nut, the brake controlled with the control of the motor. Various other features and advantages of the invention will be more fully set forth in the description of the accompanying drawings, in which: Figure 1 is a vertical section of the elevator with the cab in its uppermost limit of travel. Figure 2 is a section on line 2-2, Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a cross section on line 3-3, Figure 1.

Figure 4 is a cross section of the car platform taken on line 4-4, Figure 3.

Figure 5 is a cross section similar to Figure 4 taken on line 5-5, Figure 3 at right angles to Figure 4.

Figure 6 is a side elevation of the motor driven transmission for the elevator cab elevation screw mounted upon the ceiling below the lowermost floor served by the elevator and illustrating a section of the cab platform at its lower limit and resting upon buffer springs.

Figure 7 is a section on line 7-7, Figure 6.

Figure 8 is a top plan view of the transmission for the elevating screw.

Figure 9 is a section on line 9-9, Figure 8.

Figure 10 is a plan view with parts in section of the brake mechanism for the revolving nut.

Figure 11 is a sectional view of safety electric switch devices for .preventing the opening of a hatch door unless the cab is stationed at the door opening and to prevent car starting when the hatch door is open.

Figure 12 is a section on line 12-12, Figure 11. Figure 13 is a section on line 13-13, Figure 9.

Figure 14 is a circuit controlling diagram for the elevator driving motor.

Referring to the drawings, Figures 1 and 2 1llustrate an elevator installation for a private residence preferably for a one floor rise service. I indicates the elevator cab traveling upon guides to support the same. The cab as is customary has its opposite sides, centrally and at the top and bottom-thereof, equipped with shoes 2; slidably engaging vertical stationary guide rails 3, 3, rigidly fixed to the building framing or walls forming the hatchway or closure within which the elevator cab travels.

The construction ofthe cab is optional, preferably .of light weight framing covered with plywood panels, artistically finished and decorated, with a substantial platform which sustains all the load. All driving mechanism is located in a lower floor or basement, or below the lowermost floor served by the elevator and with no overhead machinery connecting with the cab. The body of the cab carries no load, nor are any building alterations required to the uppermost or second floor ceiling, as all the elevating mechanism is below the cab platform.

The platform 4 is supported upon and raised and lowered by a heavy externally threaded steel column or screw shaft 5, preferably of drawn steel tubing, located under the center of the platform to which its upper end is connected. The upper end of the screw column 5 is provided with a stud 6 engaged into the tubular end of the screw column. The stud 6 in turn is socketed into a hub 1 extending centrally for the lower side of the platform framing. The stud is loose in platform socket and in column and cross pinned, forming a universal joint which saves the car from any vibrations of the screw and allows the car to move as a unit on its guides without restraint from the screw.

The lower end of the screw column 5 extends below the flooring of the lowermost floor served by the elevator and axially into a steel tube or cylinder 8, having a capped lower end resting upon a footing at or below the cellar floor. The cylinder 8 carries all the load of the elevator and is partially filled vith oil to insure lubrication of the screw column.

The screw column 5 is elevated or lowered by a revoluble self-aligning ball bearing journalled nut 9 and as shown in Figure 9 integrally constitutes a screw-threaded hub of a driving pulley 10 for rotating the nut. The angle of the thread of the column and nut is such that the weight of a loaded car on the column will not cause it to coast or descend while the nut is at rest and unbraked. The periphery of the nut 9 is counterturned to concentrically receive and seat a bearing collar II of a sensitively self-aligning ball thrust bearing 12 seated and sustained within a journal 13 mounted upon the upper end of the cylinder 8 and also fixed to a laterally extended arm of a bracket 14. The outer bearing collar of the thrust bearing 12 is recessed and secured against displacement within the journal 13 and has an arc form of ball race way in its inner periphery providing a floating journal for the nut, which allows the nut and screw to move as a unit upon any sway or vibration of the screw. This prevents any binding influence between the threads of the screw and nut which would result in rapid wear of the threads and cause added friction, interfering with a smooth rotation of the nut. The bracket 14, as shown in Figure 6, is dependingly fixed or attached to the ceiling or joist framing of the building.

The nut 9 and its rim or pulley 10 is rotated or driven by an electric motor 15 through the medium of a plurality of V belts 1S, 16 engaged with a grooved pulley 17 fixed on the motor shaft and with the pulley or nut rim 10, which has its periphery correspondingly annularly grooved to appropriately engage with the belts. The motor is adjustably mounted upon the bracket 14 and may be of single phase type operated from a lighting circuit.

As shown in Figures 6 and 13 the electric motor 15 is mounted upon the bracket 14 by bolts 18, each engaged through metal-clad elastic washers 19, 19 at relative opposite ends of an elastic bushing I19a encased within a hub or sleeve of the bracket 14 providing a sound insulating mounting for the motor. The motor operates under circuit controlled reversing directions correspondingly imparting rotative motion to the nut for either raising or lowering the screw column and cab connecting therewith.

The nut rim or pulley 10 is of reduced weight to be inert toward continued rotation after the motive power has been cut off, although to insure against overrun and for accurate stopping it is frictionally arrested simultaneously with the stopping control of the motor by a magnetically controlled brake engaging the nut rim or pulley O1. The magnet brake may be of any type of construction and as shown in Figure 10 comprises a magnet 20 mounted upon the bracket 14 operating an armature lever 21 pivoted upon the metallic body of the magnet which is fixed to the bracket 14. The armature lever is pivotally connected to one end of the connecting rod 22 and the opposite end of said connecting rod is pivotally connected to a brake beam 23, pivotally mounted upon the bracket 14 and carries a shoe 24 adapted to be compressively engaged against the periphery of the nut rim or pulley 10.

The brake beam 23 is spring-urged to apply the shoe frictionally against the pulley 19 instantly when the magnet is deenergized, following a general practice in elevators and the brake magnet under circuit control with the driving motor so that the brake is applied when the motor is cut off and released with motor starting. A spring 25 is engaged about the connecting rod 22 having one end bearing against an edge of the brake beam 23 and the opposite end of the spring is housed within a capped sleeve 26 extending laterally from the bracket 14, with the connecting rod 22 traversing the cap of the sleeve. 3 A plural number of platform cushioning buffer springs 27 are suitably seated upon the flooring of the lower floor served by the elevator.

The elevator motor circuit control is preferably of push button operated type, as by control buttons in the cab for either up, down or stopping control and by a call button at each floor. The control system may however be of such type as to meet various requirements and specifically forms no part of the present invention. A simple arrangement sufficient to meet the general demands for a residence elevator may be briefly described and easily comprehended from the diagram illustrated in Figure 14, in which 28, 28 respectively indicate upper and lower floor call button switches for making a control circuit connection with the motor controlling direction and starting switches, not shown, to bring the elevator from one floor to the other at which the user is waiting to enter. 29, 30, 31 represent button control switches in the cab for up and down direction starting and stopping control. 32 is an up hatch limit switch actuated by a cam block on the cab and 33 a similar down hatch limit switch likewise operated by the cab. The hatch and cab doors are provided with suitable switches 34, necessitating door closing before the elevator can be started.

A hatch door switch of very efficient design is herein disclosed and illustrated in Figures 11 and 12 also serving for locking the door closed when the cab is not stationed thereat.

The hatch door switch is actuated or controlled by the cab and comprises a casing 35 preferably secured to the top cross rail of the door jamb. The casing interiorly supports a pair of adjacently disposed contact fingers 36 carried by an insulation mounting fixed to the casing. The contact fingers are spring pressed and engage with a contact plate 37 when the door is closed to complete and maintain a control circuit. The contact plate is carried by an insulation mounting 38 attached upon a rigid latch bar 39 fixed upon the inner side of a door 40. The lower edge of the latch bar 39 is toothed to interlock with a correspondingly toothed latch arm 41 fixed upon a rock shaft 42 journalled in the walls of the casing 35.

A crank arm 43 is fixed upon an outer end of the rock shaft. The free end of the crank arm 43 journals a roller 44 engaged by a cam block 45 mounted upon the top of the elevator cab. The cam block 45 during the travel of the cab when it reaches to engage the roller of the crank arm depresses the crank arm releasing the latch arm from the latch bar on the door, unlocks the door and maintains the same unlocked so long as the cab is stationed at such door. As soon as the cab departs the crank lever is released and the door automatically locked when closed, and the door must be closed to complete or maintain a motor operating control.

The elevating mechanism can also be utilized for dumbwaiter lifts automatically controlled by push buttons at each landing and arranged so that the car can be called to or sent from either floor to the other floor.

The elevating mechanism is very simple in construction and compactly arranged and presents no complications in installing. There are no ropes, chains or cable suspended from overhead sheaves, which would have to be accessible for lubricating. The major parts requiring lubrication are self-lubricated from a supply which need only be replenished after long periods of elevator service. The plural V belt transmitting connection between the motor and a large diameter pulley rimmed nut furnishes a very simple, powerful and silent transmission and in case of electric power failure the pulley can be easily rotated by hand to raise or lower the car to the nearest landing. The entire structure lends itself to be sold and installed at a moderate cost and is not limited to large and expensive residences.

Having described my invention, I claim 1. In an elevator, a cab, an elevating screw for propelling the cab connected to the lower side of the platform of the cab, a revolving self-aligning ball bearing journalled nut for raising and lowering said screw and cab, and transmission means for revolving said nut in reverse directions.

2. In an elevator, a cab, an elevating screw for propelling the cab connected to the lower side of the platform of the cab, and a revolving selfaligning ball bearing journalled nut for raising and lowering said screw and cab, the nut having the drum unitarily concentric therewith for a belt transmission and braking mechanism cooperating with the rim of the drum for withholding rotation upon cessation of the nut transmission.

3. In an elevator, a cab, an elevating screw for propelling the cab connected to the lower side of the platform of the cab, a revolving self-aligning ball bearing journalled nut for raising and lowering said screw and cab, the nut having a drum unitarily concentric therewith for driving and braking said nut, an electric motor in belt driving connection with said drum, and a magnet brake having a shoe for engagement with said drum, controlled with the control of motor to apply the brake with the cutting off of the motive power and vice versa. 4. In an elevator, a cab, a vertically disposed elevating screw for propelling the cab having its upper end connected to the cab at the under side of the platform thereof, a vertically disposed tubular column stationed to have its upper end terminating below the lower floor served by the cab, the screw normally coaxial with the column to recede therein, a journal mounted on the top of the column, a revolvable nut in threaded engagement with said screw and floatingly sustained within said journal, adapting the nut and screw to move as a unit by any vibratory motion of the screw, the nut having a drum concentric therewith providing a belt transmission element for nut rotation and a peripheral braking sur- 38 face for cooperating with a brake to withhold rotation upon cessation of the nut transmission.

5. In an elevator, a cab, a vertically disposed elevating screw for propelling the cab having its upper end connected to the cab at the under side of the platform thereof, a vertically disposed tubular column stationed to have its upper end terminating below the lower floor served by the cab, the screw normally coaxial with the column to recede therein, a journal mounted on the top of the column, a revolvable nut in threaded engagement with said screw and floatingly sustained within said journal, adapting the nut and screw to move as a unit by any vibratory motion of the screw. ALFRED T. BROWN.