Title:
Helical Deer Rattle
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A Helical Deer Rattle is disclosed. The rattle is made of two staves having tines of high-density polymer that replicates the density and mass of deer antlers. Each staff has a single helix-shaped tine. The two tines are formed so that they can be screwed together for silent transportation and easy storage. To use the rattle, a hunter strikes and rubs the two tines together to create the sound of deer antlers clashing, thus calling deer to the hunter. Each staff may have a handle with a guide groove, which holds the tine of other staff when the staves are screwed together. A cord may be included with each handle, to further assist in securing the tines to the handles of the other staff.



Inventors:
Del Guercio, Andrew Charles (Media, PA, US)
Application Number:
15/637024
Publication Date:
02/01/2018
Filing Date:
06/29/2017
Assignee:
Del Guercio Andrew Charles
International Classes:
A01M31/04; A01M31/00
View Patent Images:
US Patent References:
8734198N/A2014-05-27
8684787N/A2014-04-01
20080318488N/A2008-12-25
20040244152N/A2004-12-09
6769211N/A2004-08-03
6289626N/A2001-09-18
5928056N/A1999-07-27
5555664N/A1996-09-17
5000430N/A1991-03-19
4850928N/A1989-07-25
4610641N/A1986-09-09
1168987N/A1916-01-18
0646403N/A1900-03-27



Primary Examiner:
BALDORI, JOSEPH B
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ELMAN TECHNOLOGY LAW, P.C. (P. O. BOX 209 SWARTHMORE PA 19081)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A rattle adapted to be used percussively to simulate the sound of antlers clashing or scraping, the rattle comprising: a first staff comprising a first tine formed of a solid, high density polymer in the shape of a helix; and a second staff comprising a second tine formed of a solid, high density polymer in the shape of a helix; wherein the first tine and the second tine are formed so that, when the tip of the first tine and the tip of the second tine are aligned with one another, the first tine and the second tine can be turned and moved towards one another so that the first tine and the second tine intertwine, thereby securing the first staff and second staff together for compact and silent transportation.

2. The rattle of claim 1, wherein the first staff further comprises a first handle connected to the first tine, the first handle having a first handle core and a first guide groove around the first handle core, wherein the second staff further comprises a second handle connected to the second tine, the second handle having a second handle core and a second guide groove around the second handle core, wherein the first handle is formed so that, when the second tine is intertwining with the first tine, the second tine travels through the first guide groove, and wherein the second handle is formed so that, when the first tine is intertwining with the second tine, the first tine travels through the second guide groove.

3. The rattle of claim 2, further comprising: a first plurality of protuberances on the exterior of the first tine; and a second plurality of protuberances on the exterior of the second tine.

4. The rattle of claim 3, further comprising: a first cord extending from the first handle; and a second cord extending from the second handle.

5. The rattle of claim 2, further comprising: a first cord extending from the first handle; and a second cord extending from the second handle.

6. The rattle of claim 1, further comprising: a first plurality of protuberances on the exterior of the first tine; and a second plurality of protuberances on the exterior of the second tine.

7. The rattle of claim 6, further comprising: a first cord extending from an end of the first staff; and a second cord extending from an end of the second staff.

8. The rattle of claim 1, further comprising: a first cord extending from an end of the first staff; and a second cord extending from an end of the second staff.

9. A method of calling a wild animal with a rattle, the rattle comprising: a first staff comprising a first handle and a first tine extending from the first handle, the first tine being formed in the shape of a helix, and a second staff comprising a second handle and a second tine extending from the second handle, the second tine being formed in the shape of a helix, wherein the first tine and the second tine are formed so that, when the tip of the first tine and the tip of the second tine are aligned with one another, the first staff and the second staff can be turned and moved towards one another so that the first tine and second tine intertwine with one another, thereby securing the first staff and second staff together; the method comprising: striking the first tine against the second tine to simulate the sound of antlers clashing.

10. The method of claim 9, the rattle further comprising: a first plurality of protuberances on the exterior of the first tine; and a second plurality of protuberances on the exterior of the second tine.

11. The method of claim 9, further comprising: rubbing the first tine against the second tine.

12. The method of claim 11, the rattle further comprising: a first plurality of protuberances on the exterior of the first tine; and a second plurality of protuberances on the exterior of the second tine.

13. A method of calling a wild animal with a rattle, the rattle comprising: a first staff comprising a first handle and a first tine extending from the first handle, the first tine being formed in the shape of a helix, and a second staff comprising a second handle and a second tine extending from the second handle, the second tine being formed in the shape of a helix, wherein the first tine and the second tine are formed so that, when the tip of the first tine and the tip of the second tine are aligned with one another, the first staff and the second staff can be turned and moved towards one another so that the first tine and second tine intertwine with one another, thereby securing the first staff and second staff together; the method comprising: rubbing the first tine against the second tine to simulate the sound of antlers being scraped together.

14. The method of claim 13, the rattle further comprising: a first plurality of protuberances on the exterior of the first tine; and a second plurality of protuberances on the exterior of the second tine.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application 62/368,861, filed Jul. 29, 2016.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Deer rattles have become common in the pursuit of wild game. By percussively striking synthetic or natural objects together, the hunter imitates the antler sound of two male deer fighting, with the goal of luring deer within range to be taken. Deer rattles that replicate natural antler construction are large and cumbersome, making them difficult to stow, transport, and use in the field. Alternatively, smaller, more compact rattle devices are known to create excess noise and unrealistic sound.

While full size natural antler replicas create realistic tone and durability, they are difficult to store and transport afield due to size and shape. They are also difficult to master by novice hunters to create authentic deer sounds. Conversely, compact rattle systems lack the natural tone and durability of full size antler replicas.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

I have invented a helical deer rattle that is easy to use, is easy to transport, and produces realistic antler-clashing sounds. The rattle is desirably made of a solid, high-density polymer, including thermoplastics, thermosetting plastics, and fiber reinforced plastics. The rattle is made of two staves, each with a solid helix-shaped tine spiraling around a hollow core in the axis of the helix. In preferred embodiments, each staff has a handle portion extending from one end of the tine. The handle has a core surrounded by a helix-shaped guide groove. The handle core may be solid or hollow.

The tines are formed so that they can be secured together. To do this, the user aligns the tip of one tine with the tip of the other tine. The user turns the staves and pushes them together, screwing the first tine together with the second tine. When the user finishes screwing the tines together, the tines are intertwined, uniting to a single, easily-transportable unit. In preferred embodiments, as the tines are being screwed together, when the tine of one staff reaches the handle of the other staff, the first staffs tine enters a guide groove on the handle of the second staff, and the second staffs tine enters a corresponding guide groove on the handle of the first staff, further securing the staves together.

To use the deer rattle, the user unscrews the tines from one another, separating the transportable unit into its two constituent staves. The user then strikes the tines together, or rubs them together, to create a sound similar to the sound of deer antlers clashing.

In preferred embodiments, there are protuberances on the exterior of the tines on the side of the helix facing away from the hollow core. These protuberances, which may be spike-shaped, protrude from the outside of the tines. These protuberances aid in producing a realistic antler-clashing sound, especially when the tines are rubbed together.

In some embodiments, an elastic cord extends from the handle of each staff. When the user secures the two tines together for transportation or storage, the user wraps the cords around the handle and the tine of the other staff, using a cord lock to create tension in the cord, further securing the tine of the other staff to the handle.

Though increasingly archaic, this document follows the standard dictionary recommendation to use “staves” as the plural of “staff”.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1 is an elevation view of the two staves of the invention, showing the tips of their respective tines proximate to one another.

FIG. 2 is an elevation view of the two staves of the invention, screwed together for storage and transport.

FIG. 3 is an elevation view of the two staves of the invention, separated and ready for use.

FIG. 4 is an elevation view of the two staves of the invention, in an intermediate step of the screwing or unscrewing process.

FIG. 5 is a close-up view of a preferred embodiment of the staff of the invention, illustrating the sound-enhancing protuberances.

FIG. 6 is an elevation view of an embodiment of the invention, showing optional cords used to further secure the tines of the staves to the handles.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 illustrates an embodiment of the invention. There are two staves 20 illustrated, made of solid high-density polymer, which replicates the density and mass of deer antlers. In preferred embodiments, the staves 20 are approximately sixteen inches long. The staves 20 may be longer or shorter in alternative embodiments. Each staff 20 has a handle 14 with a fluted guide track 12 surrounding a handle core 15. The handle core 15 may be solid, like the tines 16, or hollow. Optional retention cords 10, attached to the handles 14, are also illustrated, with their cord locks 41.

Extending from the handle 14 of each staff 20 is a tine 16. The tines 16 may be between six and ten inches long. In preferred embodiments, the tines 16 are ten inches long. The tines 16 have the shape of a helix, which provides a large sound-generating section in compact volume. The shape of the tines 16 allows them to be screwed together and intertwine with one another, securing the staves 20 together and producing a single unit 30 (see FIG. 2). The solid tines 16 extend around a hollow core 17 in the axis of the tine's helix. The hollow core 17 has a diameter of one-half inch to two inches, depending on the embodiment. In preferred embodiments, the diameter is one inch. The tine tips 26 are also illustrated.

By using helix-shaped tines 16, the invention is able to replicate natural antler sounds, while reducing overall size, weight, complexity, and unintended noise. The helical mono-tined design replicates natural antler sparring sound when struck or rubbed together.

To intertwine the staves 20, the user positions the staves 20 as shown in FIG. 1, with the tine tips 26 positioned adjacent to and co-linear with one another. The user pushes the staves 20 together while turning them in a screwing motion. The tine 16 of each staff 20 intertwines with the tine 16 of the other staff 20. FIG. 4 illustrates the invention part of the way through the screwing process. In preferred embodiments, once a tine 16 has been intertwined far enough to reach the handle 14 of the other staff 20, the tine 16 is further guided by the guide track 12 of the other staffs handle 14 to the tine's storage & transportation position.

FIG. 2 illustrates the embodiment of the invention previously illustrated in FIG. 1, once the intertwining of the tines 16 is complete and a single unit 30 is formed. The unit 30 is easy to transport and easy to store, and importantly, produces minimal noise during transport.

To use the deer rattle, the user unscrews the staves 20 from one another (if not already apart) and strikes and/or rubs the tine 16 of one staff 20 with the tine 16 of the other staff 20. If the cords 10 are included, the user may wrap the cords 10 around his or her wrists to prevent dropping the staves 20 during use.

FIG. 3 shows the staves 20 apart, ready for use. FIG. 3 also illustrates the optional cords 10 and cord locks 41. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 3, the handle 14 is shown, with a helix-shaped guide groove 12 surrounding a handle core 15. The helix-shaped tine 16 spirals around the hollow core 17 in the axis of the tine's helix. The tine tips 26 are also illustrated.

FIG. 4 illustrates an embodiment of the invention in an intermediate stage of the screwing and unscrewing processes. The tines 16 are partially intertwined with one another; the staves 20 are being held together at this stage, but not as securely as in the completed stage (see FIG. 2). In this embodiment, the handles 14 are included on each staff 20, with the guide groove 12 surrounding a handle core 15. The tines 16, including their tips 26, are not in the guide grooves 12. From this stage, the user can further screw the staves 20 together to create an easily-stored and easily-transported unit 30 (see FIG. 2) or unscrew the staves 20 for use (see FIG. 3).

FIG. 5 illustrates a portion of a tine 16 of a preferred embodiment of the invention. On the exterior of the tine 16, facing away from the hollow core 17, are protuberances 18. Like the tine 16 and the handle 14 (not illustrated in this Figure), the protuberances 18 are formed of high-density polymer. When the user strikes or rubs the tines 16 together, the protuberances 18 aid in creating a realistic antler-clashing sound.

FIG. 6 illustrates the use of the optional cord 10 to retain a tine 16 to the handle 14 of the other staff 20, once the tines 16 have been screwed together to create a transportable rattle unit 30, as shown in FIG. 2. The cord 10 has two ends, which extend from the handle 14. In this Figure, the user has twisted the cord 10 and wrapped it around the handle 14 before placing the cord 10 over the tip of the tine 26 of the other staff 20. The user then moves the cord lock 41 down the cord 10 in the direction of the handle 14. The user moves the cord lock 41 until the cord 10 is sufficiently tense to hold the tine 16 of the other staff 20 to the handle 14 of the cord's staff 20.

Other embodiments are possible. The handle 14 and the handle core 15 may be entirely omitted, and the entire staff 20 may be a helical tine 16. In such embodiments, the cord 10 and cord lock 41 would be omitted, or the cord 10 would attach to one end of the tine 16.

Additionally, the invention could be used as a percussive instrument or for tissue manipulations in physical therapy or massage.