Title:
PROJECTILE TRAP AND SHOOTING RANGE
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A shooting range including a shooting station positioned at one end of a firing lane. A projectile trap is disposed at an opposite end of the firing lane for collecting projectiles fired from the shooting station. The projectile trap comprises a deceleration chamber defined by a first scroll wall and a second scroll wall for dissipating kinetic energy of the projectiles and a funneling portion for directing projectiles into the deceleration chamber. The first scroll wall is curved and has a concave surface. The first scroll wall is positioned so that the concave surface of the first scroll wall generally faces in a direction towards the shooting station. The first scroll wall comprises a steel body substrate and has an enhanced impact resistant portion. The enhanced impact resistant portion has an impact resistant layer comprising a plurality of ceramic particles and a binding material bound to a forward facing surface of the steel body substrate.



Inventors:
Nester, Charles E. (Pittsfield, MA, US)
Application Number:
15/353477
Publication Date:
05/18/2017
Filing Date:
11/16/2016
Assignee:
Vista Outdoor Operations LLC (Farmington, UT, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F41J11/02; F41J13/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GRAHAM, MARK S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Christensen, Fonder, Dardi & Herbert PLLC (33 South 6th Street Suite 3950 Minneapolis MN 55402)
Claims:
We claim:

1. A shooting range, comprising: a shooting station positioned at one end of a firing lane; a projectile trap disposed at an opposite end of the firing lane for collecting projectiles fired from the shooting station; the projectile trap comprising a deceleration chamber defined by a first scroll wall and a second scroll wall for dissipating kinetic energy of the projectiles and a funneling portion for directing projectiles into the deceleration chamber; the first scroll wall being curved and having a concave surface, the first scroll wall being positioned so that the concave surface of the first scroll wall generally faces in a direction towards the shooting station, the first scroll wall comprising a steel body substrate and having an enhanced impact resistant portion, the enhanced impact resistant portion having an impact resistant layer comprising a plurality of ceramic particles and a binding material bound to a forward facing surface of the steel body substrate; the second scroll wall being curved and having a concave surface, the second scroll wall being positioned so that the concave surface of the second scroll wall generally faces in a direction away from the shooting station; the concave surface of the first scroll wall and the concave surface of the second scroll wall cooperating to define the deceleration chamber; the first scroll wall and the second scroll wall positioned with respect to each other to define an entrance slot to the deceleration chamber, the entrance slot being positioned to allow projectiles fired from the shooting station to enter the deceleration chamber; the first scroll wall and the second scroll wall further positioned with respect to each other to define an exit slot from the deceleration chamber, the exit slot being positioned so that gravity causes material from de-energized projectiles to exit the deceleration chamber via the exit slot; the funneling portion of the projectile trap comprising an upper steel plate and a lower steel plate disposed on opposite sides of a horizontal plane to define an entry channel; the upper steel plate being oriented at a first acute angle relative to the horizontal plane and the lower steel plate being oriented at a second acute angle relative to the horizontal plane so that projectiles striking one or both of the steel plates are directed through the entrance slot of the deceleration chamber, wherein a Cross sectional area of the entry channel decreases in a direction of projectile travel; wherein the enhanced impact resistant portion is positioned proximate the entrance slot of the deceleration chamber; and wherein projectiles directed through the entrance slot of the deceleration chamber by the upper steel plate and the lower steel plate strike the enhanced impact resistant layer.

2. The shooting range of claim 1, wherein the particles comprise a material selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, boron carbide, boron nitride, silicon carbide, silicon nitride, and zirconium oxide.

3. The shooting range of claim 1, wherein the particles of the impact resistant layer are bound to the steel body substrate by the binding material.

4. The shooting range of claim 1, wherein: the steel body substrate comprises a first metal alloy; and the binding material comprises a second metal alloy different from the first metal alloy.

5. The shooting range of claim 4, wherein the first metal alloy comprises AR500 steel.

6. The shooting range of claim 4, wherein the first metal alloy and the second metal alloy both comprise chromium.

7. The shooting range of claim 4, wherein the first metal alloy and the second metal alloy both comprise nickel.

8. The shooting range of claim 1, wherein the thermal spraying process comprises a flame spraying process.

9. The shooting range of claim 8, wherein the thermal spraying process comprises a high velocity oxy-fuel spraying process.

10. The shooting range of claim 8, wherein the thermal spraying process comprises a plasma spraying process.

11. A method for maintaining or repairing an existing firing range having a shooting station positioned at one end of a firing lane and a projectile trap disposed at an opposite end of the firing lane for collecting projectiles fired from the shooting station, the projecting trap comprising a scroll wall at least partially defining a deceleration chamber, the method comprising depositing a plurality of ceramic particles and a binding material onto a concave surface of the scroll wall to form an impact resistant layer.

12. The method of claim 11, wherein impact resistant layer is applied to the concave surface of the scroll wall while the scroll wall is attached to the bullet trap.

13. The method of claim 11, wherein depositing the plurality of ceramic particles and the binding material onto the concave surface of the scroll wall to form the impact resistant layer, comprises: providing a plurality of ceramic particles and a binding material; creating a plasma plume by passing a flow of gas through an electric arc; directing the plasma plume toward the concave surface of the scroll wall; injecting the ceramic particles and the binding material into the flow of gas so that the ceramic particles and the binding material pass through the plasma plume, wherein heat from the plasma plume causes the binding material to become molten binding material; and depositing the ceramic particles and the molten binding material onto the concave surface of the scroll wall to form an impact resistant layer.

14. The method of claim 11, depositing the plurality of ceramic particles and the binding material onto the concave surface of the scroll wall to form the impact resistant layer, comprises: providing a plurality of ceramic particles and a binding material; providing a flow of gases including a fuel gas and oxygen; igniting the flow of gases create a flame; directing the flow of gases toward the concave surface of the scroll wall; injecting the ceramic particles and the binding material into the flow of gases so that the ceramic particles and the binding material pass through the flame, wherein heat from the flame causes the binding material to become molten binding material; and depositing the ceramic particles and the molten binding material onto the concave surface of the scroll wall to form an impact resistant layer.

15. The method of claim 11, wherein the ceramic particles comprise a material selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, boron carbide, boron nitride, silicon carbide, silicon nitride, and zirconium oxide.

16. The method of claim 11, wherein the ceramic particles become bound to the substrate layer by the binding material.

17. A method of fabricating a scroll wall for a bullet trap, the method comprising: providing a sheet of material; cutting a flat steel plate from the sheet of material; bending the flat steel plate to create a scroll wall having a desired curvature; attaching a strongback to the scroll wall; and depositing a plurality of ceramic particles and a binding material onto a concave surface of the scroll wall to form an impact resistant layer.

18. The method of claim 17, wherein depositing the plurality of ceramic particles and the binding material onto the concave surface of the scroll wall to form the impact resistant layer, comprises:. providing a plurality of ceramic particles and a binding material; creating a plasma plume by passing a flow of gas through an electric arc; directing the plasma plume toward the concave surface of the scroll wall; injecting the ceramic particles and the binding material into the flow of gas so that the ceramic particles and the binding material pass through the plasma plume, wherein heat from the plasma plume causes the binding material to become molten binding material; and depositing the ceramic particles and the molten binding material onto the concave surface of the scroll wall to form an impact resistant layer.

19. The method of claim 17, depositing the plurality of ceramic particles and the binding material onto the concave surface of the scroll wall to form the impact resistant layer, comprises: providing a plurality of ceramic particles and a binding material; providing a flow of gases including a fuel gas and oxygen; igniting the flow of gases create a flame; directing the flow of gases toward the concave surface of the scroll wall; injecting the ceramic particles and the binding material into the flow of gases so that the ceramic particles and the binding material pass through the flame, wherein heat from the flame causes the binding material to become molten binding material; and depositing the ceramic particles and the molten binding material onto the concave surface of the scroll wall to form an impact resistant layer.

20. The method of claim 18, wherein the ceramic particles comprise a material selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, boron carbide, boron nitride, silicon carbide, silicon nitride, and zirconium oxide.

Description:

This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/255,752 filed on Nov. 16, 2015. Said application is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

FIELD OF THE TECHNOLOGY

The present disclosure relates generally to shooting ranges and, more particularly, to shooting ranges including projectile traps.

BACKGROUND

In order to maintain their proficiency with various types of firearms, military personnel, law enforcement officers and others routinely engage in target practice. For many years, target practice was conducted in environments in which there was little concern for recovering the bullets. Firing ranges commonly used a large mound of dirt to decelerate the bullet after it had passed through the target. Such a system was generally safe, in that the dirt was effective in stopping the bullet and preventing injuries.

More recently, considerable concern has been raised about the lead contained in the bullet. Though the bullet fired into the mound of dirt was safely contained from the point of being a moving projectile with a significant amount of inertial momentum, the lead in the bullet was free to escape into the environment. For example, when a mound containing a number of bullets became wet, lead could leach into surrounding soil and even the groundwater. When a range was used frequently a considerable amount of lead could be released into the environment, thereby injuring wildlife and contaminating groundwater supplies.

One type of shooting range introduced by the Applicant includes projectile traps configured as deceleration trap chamber units. These deceleration trap chamber units are often characterized as snail chambers in that in they have a bullet entry funnel opening toward a shooting station with the funnel at the top of a substantially cylindrical chamber, resembling the cross section of a snail shell. The bullet can enter the substantially cylindrical chamber from the funnel and travel somewhat circularly around the inner periphery of the circular chamber until the bullet loses energy. A slot in the bottom of the chamber allows bullets and fragments to fall into a bin below the chamber. The bullets collected in the bin may be recycled or otherwise disposed of in accordance with environmental regulations, thereby significantly reducing the risks of lead escaping into the environment. Moreover, such shooting ranges may be “wet” with circulating fluid that captures lead dust that could otherwise be air borne.

SUMMARY

In accordance with the present disclosure, devices and assemblies are provided for shooting ranges. Recognizing the hazards of lead bullets, manufacturers and users, such as the military, are opting for lead free or reduced lead bullets. The inventor has recognized that such bullets may have components that are not as malleable or soft as lead, or that have a reduced tendency to fragment. Such conditions are believed to cause increased wear to conventional bullet trap deceleration chamber units. This disclosure provides improved shooting ranges and projectile traps that have enhanced durability and life expectancy, particularly when used to decelerate projectiles in trap chambers.

One embodiment of the present disclosure includes a shooting range including a shooting station positioned at one end of a firing lane. A projectile trap is disposed at an opposite end of the firing lane for collecting projectiles fired from the shooting station. The projectile trap comprises a deceleration chamber defined by a first scroll wall and a second scroll wall for dissipating kinetic energy of the projectiles and a funneling portion for directing projectiles into the deceleration chamber. The first scroll wall is curved and has a concave surface. The first scroll wall is positioned so that the concave surface of the first scroll wall generally faces in a direction towards the shooting station. The first scroll wall comprises a steel body substrate and has an enhanced impact resistant portion. The enhanced impact resistant portion has an impact resistant layer comprising a plurality of ceramic particles and a binding material bound to a forward facing surface of the steel body substrate. The second scroll wall is curved and has a concave surface. The second scroll wall is positioned so that the concave surface of the second scroll wall generally faces in a direction away from the shooting station. The concave surface of the first scroll wall and the concave surface of the second scroll wall cooperate to define the deceleration chamber. The first scroll wall and the second scroll wall are positioned with respect to each other to define an entrance slot to the deceleration chamber. The entrance slot is positioned to allow projectiles fired from the shooting station to enter the deceleration chamber. The first scroll wall and the second scroll wall are also positioned with respect to each other to define an exit slot from the deceleration chamber. The exit slot is positioned so that gravity causes material from de-energized projectiles to exit the deceleration chamber via the exit slot.

The funneling portion of the projectile trap comprises an upper steel plate and a lower steel plate disposed on opposite sides of a horizontal plane to define an entry channel. The upper steel plate is oriented at a first acute angle relative to the horizontal plane and the lower steel plate is oriented at a second acute angle relative to the horizontal plane so that projectiles striking one or both of the steel plates are directed through the entrance slot of the deceleration chamber. The funnel portion is generally funnel shaped so that the cross sectional area of the entry channel decreases in a direction of projectile travel. The enhanced impact resistant portion is positioned so that projectiles directed through the entrance slot of the deceleration chamber by the upper steel plate and the lower steel plate strike the enhanced impact resistant layer after passing through the entrance slot. For this purpose, the enhanced impact resistant portion may he positioned proximate the entrance slot of the deceleration chamber.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Embodiments of the disclosure will be better understood by a reading of the Description of Embodiments along with a review of the drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a simplified isometric view showing an illustrative embodiment of a shooting range;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged isometric view showing a portion of the projectile trap shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a side view further illustrating the projectile trap shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4A is an enlarged side view further illustrating the first scroll wall and the second scroll wall shown in FIG. 3. FIG. 4B is an enlarged cross-sectional view further illustrating a portion of the first scroll wall shown in FIG. 4A; and

FIG. 5A through FIG. 5D are a series of stylized perspective views illustrating example methods in accordance with this detailed description and apparatus associated with those methods.

DESCRIPTION OF THE EMBODIMENTS

In the following description, like reference characters designate like or corresponding parts throughout the several views. Also in the following description, it is to be understood that such terms as “forward,” “rearward,” “left,” “right,” “upwardly,” “downwardly,” and the like are words of convenience and are not to be construed as limiting terms.

Referring now to the drawings in general and FIG. 1 in particular, it will be understood that the illustrations are for the purpose of describing a preferred embodiment of the invention and are not intended to limit the invention thereto. FIG. 1 is a simplified isometric view showing an illustrative embodiment of shooting range 10 in accordance with this detailed description. In the illustrative embodiment of FIG. 1, shooting range 10 includes four firing lanes 12. In FIG. 1, four shooting stations 14 can be seen positioned at one end of the firing lanes 12. With reference to FIG. 1, it will be appreciated that shooting stations 14 are defined by lane dividers 16. A projectile trap 100 is disposed at an opposite end of the firing lanes for collecting projectiles fired from the shooting stations 14.

The projectile trap 100 comprises a deceleration chamber 102 defined by a first scroll wall 104 and a second scroll wall 106 for dissipating kinetic energy of the projectiles fired from the shooting stations. The projectile trap 100 also comprises a funneling portion 108 for directing projectiles into the deceleration chamber 102. With reference to FIG. 1 it will be appreciated that the first scroll wall 104 is curved and has a concave surface. In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the first scroll wall 104 is positioned so that the concave surface generally faces in a direction towards the shooting stations 14. In some useful embodiments, the first scroll wall 104 comprises a steel body substrate and has an enhanced impact resistant portion. The enhanced impact resistant portion may have an impact resistant layer comprising a plurality of ceramic particles and a binding material bound to a forward facing surface of the steel body substrate.

With reference to FIG. 1, it will be appreciated that the second scroll wall 106 is curved and has a concave surface. In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the second scroll wall 106 is positioned so that this concave surface generally faces in a direction away from the shooting stations 14. The concave surface of the first scroll wall 104 and the concave surface of the second scroll wall 106 cooperating to define deceleration chamber 102. Shooting range 10 of FIG. 1 may be located indoors or outdoors. When shooting range 10 is located outdoors, limited access to the shooting range 10 may be provided by fencing and supplemented, in part, by projectile trap 100.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged isometric view showing a portion of the projectile trap 100 shown in the previous figure. The projectile trap 100 comprises a deceleration chamber 102 defined by a first scroll wall 104 and a second scroll wall 106 for dissipating kinetic energy of the projectiles fired from the shooting stations. The projectile trap 100 also comprises a funneling portion 108 for directing projectiles into the deceleration chamber 102.

In the embodiment of FIG. 2, the first scroll wall 104 has a concave surface 120A and the second scroll wall 106 has a concave surface 120B. The concave surface 120A of the first scroll wall 104 and the concave surface 120B of the second scroll wall 106 cooperate to define deceleration chamber 102. In some useful embodiments, the first scroll wall 104 comprises a steel body substrate and has an enhanced impact resistant portion. The funneling portion 108 of the projectile trap 100 comprises an upper steel plate 126 and a lower steel plate 128. The upper steel plate 126 and the lower steel plate 128 are arranged so projectiles striking one or both of the steel plates are directed into the deceleration chamber 102 defined by the concave surface 120A of the first scroll wall 104 and the concave surface 120B of the second scroll wall 106.

FIG. 3 is a side view further illustrating the projectile trap 100 shown in the previous figure. The projectile trap 100 comprises a deceleration chamber 102 defined by a first scroll wall 104 and a second scroll wall 106 for dissipating kinetic energy of the projectiles fired from the shooting stations. The projectile trap 100 also comprises a funneling portion 108 for directing projectiles into the deceleration chamber 102.

In the embodiment of FIG. 3, the first scroll wall 104 has a concave surface 120A and the second scroll wall 106 has a concave surface 120B. The concave surface 120A of the first scroll wall 104 and the concave surface 120B of the second scroll wall 106 cooperate to define deceleration chamber 102.

The first scroll wall 104 and the second scroll wall 106 are positioned with respect to each other to define an exit slot 124 from the deceleration chamber 102. The exit slot 124 is positioned so that gravity causes material from de-energized projectiles to exit the deceleration chamber 102 via the exit slot 124.

The funneling portion 108 of the projectile trap 100 comprises an upper steel plate 126 and a lower steel plate 128 disposed on opposite sides of a horizontal plane H to define an entry channel 130. The upper steel plate 126 is oriented at a first acute angle relative to the horizontal plane H and the lower steel plate 128 is oriented at a second acute angle relative to the horizontal plane H so that projectiles striking one or both of the steel plates are directed into the deceleration chamber 102. With reference to FIG. 3, it will be appreciated that funnel portion 108 is generally funnel shaped so that the cross sectional area of the entry channel 130 decreases in a direction of projectile travel PT. The direction of projectile travel PT is illustrated with an arrow in FIG. 3.

The first scroll wall 104 and the second scroll wall 106 are positioned with respect to each other to define an entrance slot 122 to the deceleration chamber 102. The entrance slot 122 is positioned to allow projectiles passing through entry channel 130 between upper steel plate 126 and lower steel plate 128 to enter the deceleration chamber 102.

In the embodiment of FIG. 3, the first scroll wall 104 comprises a steel body substrate and has an enhanced impact resistant portion 132. The enhanced impact resistant portion 132 is positioned so that projectiles directed through the entrance slot 122 of the deceleration chamber 102 by the upper steel plate 126 and the lower steel plate 128 strike the enhanced impact resistant portion 132 after passing through the entrance slot 122. With reference to FIG. 3, it will be appreciated that the enhanced impact resistant portion 132 is positioned proximate the entrance slot 122 of the deceleration chamber 102.

FIG. 4A is an enlarged side view further illustrating the first scroll wall 104 and the second scroll wall 106 shown in the previous figure. FIG. 4B is an enlarged cross-sectional view further illustrating a portion of first scroll wall 104. FIG. 4A and FIG. 4B may be collectively referred to as FIG. 4.

In the embodiment of FIG. 4, the first scroll wall 104 has a concave surface 120A and the second scroll wall 106 has a concave surface 120B. The concave surface 120A of the first scroll wall 104 and the concave surface 120B of the second scroll wall 106 cooperate to define a deceleration chamber 102. The first scroll wall 104 and the second scroll wall 106 are also positioned with respect to each other to define an entrance slot 122 to the deceleration chamber 102. The entrance slot 122 is positioned to allow projectiles to enter the deceleration chamber 102.

In some useful embodiments, the first scroll wall 104 comprises a steel body substrate 140 and has an enhanced impact resistant portion 132. The first metal alloy may comprise, for example, AR500 steel. The enhanced impact resistant portion 132 is positioned so that projectiles directed through the entrance slot 122 of the deceleration chamber 102 strike the enhanced impact resistant portion 132 after passing through the entrance slot 122. With reference to FIG. 4, it will be appreciated that the enhanced impact resistant portion 132 is positioned proximate the entrance slot 122 of the deceleration chamber 102.

The enhanced impact resistant portion 132 has an impact resistant layer 134 comprising a plurality of ceramic particles 136 and a binding material 138 bound to a forward facing surface of the steel body substrate 140. In the embodiment of FIG. 4, the ceramic particles 136 of the impact resistant layer 134 are bound to the steel body substrate 140 by the binding material 138. In some useful embodiments, the ceramic particles comprise a material selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, boron carbide, boron nitride, silicon carbide, silicon nitride, and zirconium oxide.

In some useful embodiments, the steel body substrate 140 comprises a first metal alloy and the binding material 138 comprises a second metal alloy different from the first metal alloy. When this is the case, the first metal alloy and the second metal ahoy may both comprise chromium. In some useful embodiments, the first metal alloy and the second metal alloy both comprise nickel. The second metal alloy may comprise cobalt in some useful embodiments.

With reference to FIG. 4, it will be appreciated that the impact resistant layer 134 has a thickness T that is greater than an average dimension of the ceramic particles 136. The impact resistant layer 134 may be formed using a thermal spraying process. Examples of thermal spraying processes that may be suitable in some applications include: flame spraying processes, high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying processes, and plasma spraying process.

FIG. 5A through FIG. 5D are a series of stylized perspective views illustrating example methods in accordance with this detailed description and apparatus associated with those methods. FIG. 5A through FIG. 5D may be collectively referred to as FIG. x.

At FIG. 5A, the first scroll wall is cut to a desired size from a supply of sheet metal stock. In some useful embodiments, the first scroll wall comprises AR500 steel. At FIG. 5B, a bending process is used to give the first scroll wall a curved shape.

At FIG. 5C, a thermal coating process is used to apply an impact resistant layer 134 to a steel body substrate of the first scroll wall. Examples of thermal spraying processes that may be suitable in some applications include: flame spraying processes, high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying processes, and plasma spraying process.

At FIG. 5D, a strongback is attached to the first scroll wall. In the embodiment of FIG. 5D, the strongback includes two flanges and a plurality of stringers formed from C channel. Various processes may be used to attach the strongback to the first scroll wall. In some applications, the strongback is welded to the first scroll wall.

With reference to FIG. 5, it will be appreciated that a method of fabricating a scroll wall for a bullet trap my include providing a sheet of material and cutting a flat steel plate from the sheet of material. The flat steel plate may be bent to create a scroll wall having a desired curvature. A strongback may be attached to the scroll wall, for example, by welding. A plurality of ceramic particles and a binding material may be deposited onto a concave surface of the scroll wall to form an impact resistant layer. Methods in accordance with this detailed description may also include the cleaning the concave surface of the scroll wall and heat treating the scroll wall.

In some embodiments, depositing the plurality of ceramic particles and the binding material onto the concave surface of the scroll wall to form the impact resistant layer may comprise creating a plasma plume by passing a flow of gas through an electric arc, directing the plasma plume toward the concave surface of the scroll wall. A plurality of ceramic particles and a binding material may be injected into the flow of gas so that the ceramic particles and the binding material pass through the plasma plume. Heat from the plasma plume may cause the binding material to become molten binding material. The ceramic particles and the molten binding material may be deposited onto the concave surface of the scroll wall to form an impact resistant layer. In some useful embodiments, the ceramic particles comprise a material selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, boron carbide, boron nitride, silicon carbide, silicon nitride, and zirconium oxide.

In other embodiments, depositing the plurality of ceramic particles and the binding material onto the concave surface of the scroll wall to form the impact resistant layer may comprise providing a flow of gases including a fuel gas and oxygen and igniting the flow of gases create a flame. The ceramic particles and the binding material may be injected into the flow of gases so that the ceramic particles and the binding material pass through the flame. Heat from the flame may cause the binding material to become molten binding material. The ceramic particles and the molten binding material may be deposited onto the concave surface of the scroll wall to form an impact resistant layer.

It is also contemplated that methods in accordance with this detailed description may be used for maintaining or repairing an existing firing range having a shooting station positioned at one end of a firing lane and a projectile trap disposed at an opposite end of the firing lane for collecting projectiles fired from the shooting station, the projecting trap comprising a scroll wall at least partially defining a deceleration chamber. When this is the case, a plurality of ceramic particles and a binding material may be deposited onto a concave surface of the scroll wall to form an impact resistant layer. The impact resistant layer may be applied to the concave surface of the scroll wall while the scroll wall is attached to the bullet trap. When this is the case, the scroll wall does not need to be removed from the bullet trap. Alternately, the method could include detaching the scroll wall from the bullet trap. Detaching the scroll wall from the bullet trap may comprise removing a plurality of fasteners. This maintenance or repair may be performed on “wet” bullet traps which include a circulating fluid that captures lead dust that could otherwise be air borne. When this is the case, a cleaning process may be used to remove lubricant residue which may be left by the circulating fluid from the concave surface of the scroll wall.

Certain modifications and improvements may occur to those skilled in the art upon a reading of the foregoing description. By way of example, while the shooting range shown includes a circular projectile deceleration trap chamber, other types of traps could be used, including, without limitation, the kind having an impact plate design. It should also be apparent that any rounded shape could be used as a projectile trap and the invention is not limited to just circular one sided shapes. Also, the deceleration trap chamber could be made from a series of plates having flat faces, such as shown in U.S. Pat. No. 5,811,718, issued to Bateman. All such modifications and improvements have not been included herein for the sake of conciseness and readability but may properly fall within the scope of the appended claims. Patents incorporated by reference herein for all purposes: U.S. Pat. No. 7,434,811; U.S. Pat. No. 5,486,008; U.S. Pat. No. 5,113,700; and U.S. Pat. No. 8,459,651.

Numerous characteristics and advantages have been set forth in the foregoing description, together with details of structure and function. Many of the novel features 5 are pointed out in the appended examples and claims. The disclosure, however, is illustrative only, and changes may be made in detail, especially in matters of shape, size, and arrangement of parts, within the principle of the disclosure, to the full extent indicated by the broad general meaning of the terms in which the general claims are expressed. It is further noted that, as used in this application, the singular forms “a,” “an,” and “the” include plural referents unless expressly and unequivocally limited to one referent.