Title:
METHOD OF MAKING PERFUMED GOODS
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The present invention relates to methods of designing and making perfumed products and perfume raw materials for use in products and perfume raw materials selected by such methods and the use of same.



Inventors:
Hollingshead, Judith Ann (Batavia, OH, US)
Madhav, Prakash J. (Maineville, OH, US)
Stanton, David Thomas (Hamilton, OH, US)
Application Number:
15/196081
Publication Date:
10/20/2016
Filing Date:
06/29/2016
Assignee:
The Procter & Gamble Company (Cincinnati, OH, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
G06F17/50; A61K8/33; A61K8/34; A61K8/35; A61K8/37; A61Q13/00; A61Q15/00; A61Q19/10; C11B9/00; C11D3/50; C11D11/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
YU, HONG
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY (Global IP Services Central Building, C9 One Procter and Gamble Plaza CINCINNATI OH 45202)
Claims:
1. A method comprising: a.) using a malodour reduction value determined by mathematical modelling to select one or more perfume raw materials; b.) combining and/or processing said one or more perfume raw materials with one or more additional materials to form a product.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein said product is a consumer product.

3. The method of claim 1 wherein said mathematical modelling comprises a technique selected from the group consisting of multiple linear regression, genetic function method, generalized simulated annealing, principal components regression, non-linear regression, projection to latent structures regression, neural networks, support vector machines, logistic regression, ridge regression, cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, decision trees, nearest-neighbor classifier, molecular similarity analysis, and combinations thereof.

4. The method of claim 3 wherein said mathematical modelling comprises a technique selected from the group consisting of multiple linear regression, genetic function method, generalized simulated annealing, principal components regression, non-linear regression, projection to latent structures regression, neural networks, support vector machines, logistic regression, ridge regression and combinations thereof.

5. The method of claim 4 wherein said mathematical modelling comprises a technique selected from the group consisting of multiple linear regression, projection to latent structures regression, neural networks and combinations thereof.

6. The method of claim 5 wherein said mathematical modelling comprises multiple linear regression.

7. The method of claim 1 wherein said mathematical modelling comprises entering molecular descriptors into a multiple linear regression equation.

8. The method of claim 1 wherein said mathematical modelling provides a malodour reduction value that is the log of the reciprocal molar response.

9. The method of claim 1 wherein said mathematical modelling is sufficiently accurate to provide a malodour reduction value of at least 0.5.

10. The method of claim 1 wherein said mathematical modelling is sufficiently accurate to provide a malodour reduction value of from 0.5 to about 10.

11. The method of claim 1 wherein said mathematical modelling is sufficiently accurate to provide a malodour reduction value of from about 1 to about 10.

12. The method of claim 1 wherein said mathematical modelling is sufficiently accurate to provide a malodour reduction value of from about 1 to about 5.

13. The method of claim 1 wherein said mathematical modelling is sufficiently accurate to provide a Universal malodour reduction value.

14. The method of claim 1 wherein said one or more additional materials is selected from the group consisting of surfactants, color care polymers, deposition aids, surfactant boosting polymers, pH adjusters, product color stabilizers, preservatives, solvents, builders, chelating agents, dye transfer inhibiting agents, dispersants, enzymes, and enzyme stabilizers, catalytic materials, bleach, bleach activators, polymeric dispersing agents, clay soil removal/anti-redeposition agents, brighteners, suds suppressors, dyes, UV absorbers, perfume and perfume delivery systems, structure elasticizing agents, thickeners/structurants, fabric softeners, carriers, hydrotropes, oligoamines, processing aids, hueing agents, pigments and mixtures thereof.

15. The method of claim 2 wherein said consumer product is selected from the group consisting of baby care, beauty care, fabric & home care, family care, feminine care, health care, snack and/or beverage products or devices.

16. The method of claim 1, wherein the said mathematical method uses the one or more of the following equations:
MORV=−8.5096+2.8597×(dxp9)+1.1253×(knotpv)−0.34484×(e1C2O2)−0.00046231×(idw)+3.3509×(idcbar)+0.11158×(n2pag22); a)
MORV=−5.2917+2.1741×(dxvp5)−2.6595×(dxvp8)+0.45297×(e1C2C2d)−0.6202×(c1C2O2)+1.3542×(CdCH2)+0.68105×(CaasC)+1.7129×(idcbar); b)
MORV=−0.0035+0.8028×(SHCsatu)+2.1673×(xvp7)−1.3507×(c1C1C3d)+0.61496×(c1C1O2)+0.00403×(idc)−0.23286×(nd2); and c)
MORV=−0.9926−0.03882×(SdO)+0.1869×(Ssp3OH)+2.1847×(xp7)+0.34344×(e1C3O2)−0.45767×(c1C2C3)+0.7684×(CKetone). d)

17. A consumer product produced by the method of claim 1.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to methods of designing and making perfumed products and perfume raw materials for use in products and perfume raw materials selected by such methods and the use of same.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Perfumed products are typically designed and/or formulated using empirical methods or basic modeling methodologies. Such efforts are time consuming, expensive and, in the case of empirical methodologies, generally do not result in optimum designs/formulations as not all components and parameters can be considered. Furthermore, aspects of such methods may be limited to existing components. Thus, there is a need for an effective and efficient methodology that obviates the short comings of such methods. The modeling systems described herein meet the aforementioned need as they can be used to determine the malodour reduction capability of perfume raw materials that can be used to produce new and superior perfumed products. In addition, such modeling systems are faster and more efficient.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to methods of designing and making perfumed products and perfume raw materials for use in products and perfume raw materials selected by such methods and the use of same.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Definitions

As used herein, “MORV” means malodour reduction value.

As used herein, Universal malodour reduction value means for, a material respective material, all four MORV equations yield a value of at least 0.5.

As used herein “product” means a perfume delivery system and/or a consumer product.

As used herein “consumer products” includes, unless otherwise indicated, articles, baby care, beauty care, fabric & home care, family care, feminine care, health care, snack and/or beverage products or devices intended to be used or consumed in the form in which it is sold, and is not intended for subsequent commercial manufacture or modification. Such products include but are not limited to home décor, batteries, diapers, bibs, wipes; products for and/or methods relating to treating hair (human, dog, and/or cat), including bleaching, coloring, dyeing, conditioning, shampooing, styling; deodorants and antiperspirants; personal cleansing; cosmetics; skin care including application of creams, lotions, and other topically applied products for consumer use; and shaving products, products for and/or methods relating to treating fabrics, hard surfaces and any other surfaces in the area of fabric and home care, including: air care, car care, dishwashing, fabric conditioning (including softening), laundry detergency, laundry and rinse additive and/or care, hard surface cleaning and/or treatment, and other cleaning for consumer or institutional use; products and/or methods relating to bath tissue, facial tissue, paper handkerchiefs, and/or paper towels; tampons, feminine napkins; products and/or methods relating to oral care including toothpastes, tooth gels, tooth rinses, denture adhesives, tooth whitening; over-the-counter health care including cough and cold remedies, pain relievers, pet health and nutrition, and water purification; processed food products intended primarily for consumption between customary meals or as a meal accompaniment (non-limiting examples include potato chips, tortilla chips, popcorn, pretzels, corn chips, cereal bars, vegetable chips or crisps, snack mixes, party mixes, multigrain chips, snack crackers, cheese snacks, pork rinds, corn snacks, pellet snacks, extruded snacks and bagel chips); and coffee and cleaning and/or treatment compositions.

As used herein, the term “cleaning and/or treatment composition” includes, unless otherwise indicated, tablet, granular or powder-form all-purpose or “heavy-duty” washing agents, especially cleaning detergents; liquid, gel or paste-form all-purpose washing agents, especially the so-called heavy-duty liquid types; liquid fine-fabric detergents; hand dishwashing agents or light duty dishwashing agents, especially those of the high-foaming type; machine dishwashing agents, including the various tablet, granular, liquid and rinse-aid types for household and institutional use; liquid cleaning and disinfecting agents, including antibacterial hand-wash types, cleaning bars, mouthwashes, denture cleaners, car or carpet shampoos, bathroom cleaners; hair shampoos and hair-rinses; shower gels and foam baths and metal cleaners; as well as cleaning auxiliaries such as bleach additives and “stain-stick” or pre-treat types.

As used herein, the term “situs” includes paper products, fabrics, garments and hard surfaces.

As used herein, the articles “a”, “an”, and “the” when used in a claim, are understood to mean one or more of what is claimed or described.

Unless otherwise noted, all component or composition levels are in reference to the active level of that component or composition, and are exclusive of impurities, for example, residual solvents or by-products, which may be present in commercially available sources.

All percentages and ratios are calculated by weight unless otherwise indicated. All percentages and ratios are calculated based on the total composition unless otherwise indicated.

It should be understood that every maximum numerical limitation given throughout this specification includes every lower numerical limitation, as if such lower numerical limitations were expressly written herein. Every minimum numerical limitation given throughout this specification will include every higher numerical limitation, as if such higher numerical limitations were expressly written herein. Every numerical range given throughout this specification will include every narrower numerical range that falls within such broader numerical range, as if such narrower numerical ranges were all expressly written herein.

Products

A method comprising:

    • a.) using an malodour reduction value determined by mathematical modelling to select one or more perfume raw materials;
    • b.) combining and/or processing said one or more perfume raw materials with one or more additional materials to form a product.
      is disclosed.

Preferably, said product is a consumer product.

Preferably, said mathematical modelling comprises a technique selected from the group consisting of multiple linear regression, genetic function method, generalized simulated annealing, principal components regression, non-linear regression, projection to latent structures regression, neural networks, support vector machines, logistic regression, ridge regression, cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, decision trees, nearest-neighbor classifier, molecular similarity analysis, and combinations thereof.

Preferably, said mathematical modelling comprises a technique selected from the group consisting of multiple linear regression, genetic function method, generalized simulated annealing, principal components regression, non-linear regression, projection to latent structures regression, neural networks, support vector machines, logistic regression, ridge regression and combinations thereof.

Preferably, said mathematical modelling comprises a technique selected from the group consisting of multiple linear regression, projection to latent structures regression, neural networks and combinations thereof.

Preferably, said mathematical modelling comprises multiple linear regression.

Preferably, said mathematical modelling comprises entering molecular descriptors into a linear regression equation.

Preferably, said mathematical modelling provides a malodour reduction value that is the log of the reciprocal molar response.

Preferably, said mathematical modelling is sufficiently accurate to provide a malodour reduction value of at least 0.5, preferably from 0.5 to about 10, more preferably from about 1 to about 10, most preferably from about 1 to about 5.

Preferably, said mathematical modelling is sufficiently accurate to provide a Universal malodour reduction value.

Preferably, said mathematical method uses the one or more of the following equations:


MORV=−8.5096+2.8597×(dxp9)+1.1253×(knotpv)−0.34484×(e1C2O2)−0.00046231×(idw)+3.3509×(idcbar)+0.11158×(n2pag22); a)


MORV=−5.2917+2.1741×(dxvp5)−2.6595×(dxvp8)+0.45297×(e1C2C2d)−0.6202×(c1C2O2)+1.3542×(CdCH2)+0.68105×(CaasC)+1.7129×(idcbar); b)


MORV=−0.0035+0.8028×(SHCsatu)+2.1673×(xvp7)−1.3507×(c1C1C3d)+0.61496×(c1C1O2)+0.00403×(idc)−0.23286×(nd2); and c)


MORV=−0.9926−0.03882×(SdO)+0.1869×(Ssp3OH)+2.1847×(xp7)+0.34344×(e1C3O2)−0.45767×(c1C2C3)+0.7684×(CKetone). d)

Preferably, said one or more additional materials is selected from the group consisting of surfactants, color care polymers, deposition aids, surfactant boosting polymers, pH adjusters, product color stabilizers, preservatives, solvents, builders, chelating agents, dye transfer inhibiting agents, dispersants, enzymes, and enzyme stabilizers, catalytic materials, bleach, bleach activators, polymeric dispersing agents, clay soil removal/anti-redeposition agents, brighteners, suds suppressors, dyes, UV absorbers, perfume and perfume delivery systems, structure elasticizing agents, thickeners/structurants, fabric softeners, carriers, hydrotropes, oligoamines, processing aids, hueing agents, pigments and mixtures thereof.

Preferably, said consumer product is selected from the group consisting of baby care, beauty care, fabric & home care, family care, feminine care, health care, snack and/or beverage products or devices.

Preferably, said consumer product may comprise from about 0.00025% to about 30% of a perfume made using the information provided by the models disclosed herein.

Preferably, a consumer product produced by any method disclosed herein is disclosed method.

Additional Materials for Products

While not essential for the purposes of the present invention, the non-limiting list of materials illustrated hereinafter are suitable for use in the instant products and may be desirably incorporated in certain embodiments of the invention, for example to assist or enhance cleaning performance, for treatment of the substrate to be cleaned, or to modify the aesthetics of the cleaning composition as is the case with colorants, dyes or the like. The precise nature of these additional components, and levels of incorporation thereof, will depend on the physical form of the product and the nature of the operation for which it is to be used. Suitable adjunct materials include, but are not limited to, surfactants, color care polymers, deposition aids, surfactant boosting polymers, pH adjusters, product color stabilizers, preservatives, solvents, builders, chelating agents, dye transfer inhibiting agents, dispersants, enzymes, and enzyme stabilizers, catalytic materials, bleach, bleach activators, polymeric dispersing agents, clay soil removal/anti-redeposition agents, brighteners, suds suppressors, dyes, UV absorbers, perfume and perfume delivery systems, structure elasticizing agents, thickeners/structurants, fabric softeners, carriers, hydrotropes, oligoamines, processing aids, hueing agents, pigments.

As stated, not all of the aforementioned materials are required for the aforementioned products. Thus, certain embodiments of Applicants' products do not contain one or more of the following materials: surfactants, color care polymers, deposition aids, surfactant boosting polymers, pH adjusters, product color stabilizers, preservatives, solvents, builders, chelating agents, dye transfer inhibiting agents, dispersants, enzymes, and enzyme stabilizers, catalytic materials, bleach, bleach activators, polymeric dispersing agents, clay soil removal/anti-redeposition agents, brighteners, suds suppressors, dyes, UV absorbers, perfume and perfume delivery systems, structure elasticizing agents, thickeners/structurants, fabric softeners, carriers, hydrotropes, oligoamines, processing aids, hueing agents, pigments. However, when one or more of said materials are present, such one or more materials may be present as detailed below:

Bleaching Agents—

Bleaching agents other than bleaching catalysts include photobleaches, bleach activators, hydrogen peroxide, sources of hydrogen peroxide, preformed peracids. Examples of suitable bleaching agents include anhydrous sodium perborate (mono or tetra hydrate), anhydrous sodium percarbonate, tetraacetyl ethylene diamine, nonanoyloxybenzene sulfonate, sulfonated zinc phtalocyanine and mixtures thereof.

When a bleaching agent is used, the compositions of the present invention may comprise from about 0.1% to about 50% or even from about 0.1% to about 25% bleaching agent by weight of the subject cleaning composition.

Surfactants—

The compositions according to the present invention may comprise a surfactant or surfactant system wherein the surfactant can be selected from nonionic surfactants, anionic surfactants, cationic surfactants, ampholytic surfactants, zwitterionic surfactants, semi-polar nonionic surfactants and mixtures thereof.

The surfactant is typically present at a level of from about 0.1% to about 60%, from about 1% to about 50% or even from about 5% to about 40% by weight of the subject composition.

Builders—

The compositions of the present invention may comprise one or more detergent builders or builder systems. When a builder is used, the subject composition will typically comprise at least about 1%, from about 5% to about 60% or even from about 10% to about 40% builder by weight of the subject composition.

Builders include, but are not limited to, the alkali metal, ammonium and alkanolammonium salts of polyphosphates, alkali metal silicates, alkaline earth and alkali metal carbonates, aluminosilicate builders and polycarboxylate compounds. ether hydroxypolycarboxylates, copolymers of maleic anhydride with ethylene or vinyl methyl ether, 1,3,5-trihydroxy benzene-2,4,6-trisulphonic acid, and carboxymethyloxysuccinic acid, the various alkali metal, ammonium and substituted ammonium salts of polyacetic acids such as ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid and nitrilotriacetic acid, as well as polycarboxylates such as mellitic acid, succinic acid, citric acid, oxydisuccinic acid, polymaleic acid, benzene 1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid, carboxymethyloxysuccinic acid, and soluble salts thereof.

Chelating Agents—

The compositions herein may contain a chelating agent. Suitable chelating agents include copper, iron and/or manganese chelating agents and mixtures thereof.

When a chelating agent is used, the composition may comprise from about 0.1% to about 15% or even from about 3.0% to about 10% chelating agent by weight of the subject composition.

Dye Transfer Inhibiting Agents—

The compositions of the present invention may also include one or more dye transfer inhibiting agents. Suitable polymeric dye transfer inhibiting agents include, but are not limited to, polyvinylpyrrolidone polymers, polyamine N-oxide polymers, copolymers of N-vinylpyrrolidone and N-vinylimidazole, polyvinyloxazolidones and polyvinylimidazoles or mixtures thereof.

When present in a subject composition, the dye transfer inhibiting agents may be present at levels from about 0.0001% to about 10%, from about 0.01% to about 5% or even from about 0.1% to about 3% by weight of the composition.

Dispersants—

The compositions of the present invention can also contain dispersants. Suitable water-soluble organic materials include the homo- or co-polymeric acids or their salts, in which the polycarboxylic acid comprises at least two carboxyl radicals separated from each other by not more than two carbon atoms.

Enzymes—

The compositions can comprise one or more enzymes which provide cleaning performance and/or fabric care benefits. Examples of suitable enzymes include, but are not limited to, hemicellulases, peroxidases, proteases, cellulases, xylanases, lipases, phospholipases, esterases, cutinases, pectinases, mannanases, pectate lyases, keratanases, reductases, oxidases, phenoloxidases, lipoxygenases, ligninases, pullulanases, tannases, pentosanases, malanases, β-glucanases, arabinosidases, hyaluronidase, chondroitinase, laccase, and amylases, or mixtures thereof. A typical combination is an enzyme cocktail that comprises a protease, lipase, cutinase and/or cellulase in conjunction with amylase.

When present in a cleaning composition, the aforementioned adjunct enzymes may be present at levels from about 0.00001% to about 2%, from about 0.0001% to about 1% or even from about 0.001% to about 0.5% enzyme protein by weight of the composition.

Enzyme Stabilizers—

Enzymes for use in detergents can be stabilized by various techniques. The enzymes employed herein can be stabilized by the presence of water-soluble sources of calcium and/or magnesium ions in the finished compositions that provide such ions to the enzymes. In case of aqueous compositions comprising protease, a reversible protease inhibitor can be added to further improve stability.

Catalytic Metal Complexes—

Applicants' compositions may include catalytic metal complexes. One type of metal-containing bleach catalyst is a catalyst system comprising a transition metal cation of defined bleach catalytic activity, such as copper, iron, titanium, ruthenium, tungsten, molybdenum, or manganese cations, an auxiliary metal cation having little or no bleach catalytic activity, such as zinc or aluminium cations, and a sequestrate having defined stability constants for the catalytic and auxiliary metal cations, particularly ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, ethylenediaminetetra (methylenephosphonic acid) and water-soluble salts thereof. Such catalysts are disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,430,243.

If desired, the compositions herein can be catalyzed by means of a manganese compound. Such compounds and levels of use are well known in the art and include, for example, the manganese-based catalysts disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,576,282.

Cobalt bleach catalysts useful herein are known, and are described, for example, in U.S. Pat. No. 5,597,936; U.S. Pat. No. 5,595,967. Such cobalt catalysts are readily prepared by known procedures, such as taught for example in U.S. Pat. No. 5,597,936, and U.S. Pat. No. 5,595,967.

Compositions herein may also suitably include a transition metal complex of a macropolycyclic rigid ligand—abbreviated as “MRL”. As a practical matter, and not by way of limitation, the compositions and processes herein can be adjusted to provide on the order of at least one part per hundred million of the active MRL species in the aqueous washing medium, and will typically provide from about 0.005 ppm to about 25 ppm, from about 0.05 ppm to about 10 ppm, or even from about 0.1 ppm to about 5 ppm, of the MRL in the wash liquor. Suitable transition-metals in the instant transition-metal bleach catalyst include, for example, manganese, iron and chromium. Suitable MRL's include 5,12-diethyl-1,5,8,12-tetraazabicyclo[6.6.2]hexadecane.

Suitable transition metal MRLs are readily prepared by known procedures, such as taught for example in WO 00/32601, and U.S. Pat. No. 6,225,464.

Solvents—

Suitable solvents include water and other solvents such as lipophilic fluids. Examples of suitable lipophilic fluids include siloxanes, other silicones, hydrocarbons, glycol ethers, glycerine derivatives such as glycerine ethers, perfluorinated amines, perfluorinated and hydrofluoroether solvents, low-volatility nonfluorinated organic solvents, diol solvents, other environmentally-friendly solvents and mixtures thereof.

Hueing Dye—

The liquid laundry detergent composition may comprise a hueing dye. The hueing dyes employed in the present laundry care compositions may comprise polymeric or non-polymeric dyes, organic or inorganic pigments, or mixtures thereof. Preferably the hueing dye comprises a polymeric dye, comprising a chromophore constituent and a polymeric constituent. The chromophore constituent is characterized in that it absorbs light in the wavelength range of blue, red, violet, purple, or combinations thereof upon exposure to light. Preferably, the chromophore constituent exhibits an absorbance spectrum maximum from about 520 nanometers to about 640 nanometers in water and/or methanol, and in another aspect, from about 560 nanometers to about 610 nanometers in water and/or methanol.

Although any suitable chromophore may be used, the dye chromophore is preferably selected from benzodifuranes, methine, triphenylmethanes, napthalimides, pyrazole, napthoquinone, anthraquinone, azo, oxazine, azine, xanthene, triphenodioxazine and phthalocyanine dye chromophores. Mono and di-azo dye chromophores are may be preferred.

The hueing dye may comprise a dye polymer comprising a chromophore covalently bound to one or more of at least three consecutive repeat units. It should be understood that the repeat units themselves do not need to comprise a chromophore. The dye polymer may comprise at least 5, or at least 10, or even at least 20 consecutive repeat units.

The repeat unit can be derived from an organic ester such as phenyl dicarboxylate in combination with an oxyalkyleneoxy and a polyoxyalkyleneoxy. Repeat units can be derived from alkenes, epoxides, aziridine, carbohydrate including the units that comprise modified celluloses such as hydroxyalkylcellulose; hydroxypropyl cellulose; hydroxypropyl methylcellulose; hydroxybutyl cellulose; and, hydroxybutyl methylcellulose or mixtures thereof. The repeat units may be derived from alkenes, or epoxides or mixtures thereof. The repeat units may be C2-C4 alkyleneoxy groups, sometimes called alkoxy groups, preferably derived from C2-C4 alkylene oxide. The repeat units may be C2-C4 alkoxy groups, preferably ethoxy groups.

For the purposes of the present invention, the at least three consecutive repeat units form a polymeric constituent. The polymeric constituent may be covalently bound to the chromophore group, directly or indirectly via a linking group. Examples of suitable polymeric constituents include polyoxyalkylene chains having multiple repeating units. Preferably, the polymeric constituents include polyoxyalkylene chains having from 2 to about 30 repeating units, from 2 to about 20 repeating units, from 2 to about 10 repeating units or even from about 3 or 4 to about 6 repeating units. Non-limiting examples of polyoxyalkylene chains include ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, glycidol oxide, butylene oxide and mixtures thereof.

Perfume Delivery Technologies—

the fluid fabric enhancer compositions may comprise one or more perfume delivery technologies that stabilize and enhance the deposition and release of perfume ingredients from treated substrate. Such perfume delivery technologies can also be used to increase the longevity of perfume release from the treated substrate. Perfume delivery technologies, methods of making certain perfume delivery technologies and the uses of such perfume delivery technologies are disclosed in US 2007/0275866 A1.

Preferably, the fluid fabric enhancer composition may comprise from about 0.001% to about 20%, or from about 0.01% to about 10%, or from about 0.05% to about 5%, or even from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight of the perfume delivery technology. Preferably, said perfume delivery technologies may be selected from the group consisting of: perfume microcapsules, pro-perfumes, polymer particles, functionalized silicones, polymer assisted delivery, molecule assisted delivery, fiber assisted delivery, amine assisted delivery, cyclodextrins, starch encapsulated accord, zeolite and inorganic carrier, and mixtures thereof:
Preferably, said perfume delivery technology may comprise microcapsules formed by at least partially surrounding a benefit agent with a wall material. Said benefit agent may include materials selected from the group consisting of perfumes such as 3-(4-t-butylphenyl)-2-methyl propanal, 3-(4-t-butylphenyl)-propanal, 3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-2-methylpropanal, 3-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-2-methylpropanal, and 2,6-dimethyl-5-heptenal, alpha-damascone, beta-damascone, gamma-damascone, beta-damascenone, 6,7-dihydro-1,1,2,3,3-pentamethyl-4(5H)-indanone, methyl-7,3-dihydro-2H-1,5-benzodioxepine-3-one, 2-[2-(4-methyl-3-cyclohexenyl-1-yl)propyl]cyclopentan-2-one, 2-sec-butylcyclohexanone, and beta-dihydro ionone, linalool, ethyllinalool, tetrahydrolinalool, and dihydromyrcenol; silicone oils, waxes such as polyethylene waxes; essential oils such as fish oils, jasmine, camphor, lavender; skin coolants such as menthol, methyl lactate; vitamins such as Vitamin A and E; sunscreens; glycerine; catalysts such as manganese catalysts or bleach catalysts; bleach particles such as perborates; silicon dioxide particles; antiperspirant actives; cationic polymers and mixtures thereof. Suitable benefit agents can be obtained from Givaudan Corp. of Mount Olive, N.J., USA, International Flavors & Fragrances Corp. of South Brunswick, N.J., USA, or Quest Corp. of Naarden, Netherlands. Preferably, the microcapsule wall material may comprise: melamine, polyacrylamide, silicones, silica, polystyrene, polyurea, polyurethanes, polyacrylate based materials, gelatin, styrene malic anhydride, polyamides, and mixtures thereof. Preferably, said melamine wall material may comprise melamine crosslinked with formaldehyde, melamine-dimethoxyethanol crosslinked with formaldehyde, and mixtures thereof. Preferably, said polystyrene wall material may comprise polyestyrene cross-linked with divinylbenzene. Preferably, said polyurea wall material may comprise urea crosslinked with formaldehyde, urea crosslinked with gluteraldehyde, and mixtures thereof. Preferably, said polyacrylate based materials may comprise polyacrylate formed from methylmethacrylate/dimethylaminomethyl methacrylate, polyacrylate formed from amine acrylate and/or methacrylate and strong acid, polyacrylate formed from carboxylic acid acrylate and/or methacrylate monomer and strong base, polyacrylate formed from an amine acrylate and/or methacrylate monomer and a carboxylic acid acrylate and/or carboxylic acid methacrylate monomer, and mixtures thereof. Preferably, the perfume microcapsule may be coated with a deposition aid, a cationic polymer, a non-ionic polymer, an anionic polymer, or mixtures thereof. Suitable polymers may be selected from the group consisting of: polyvinylformaldehyde, partially hydroxylated polyvinylformaldehyde, polyvinylamine, polyethyleneimine, ethoxylated polyethyleneimine, polyvinylalcohol, polyacrylates, and combinations thereof. Suitable deposition aids are described above and in the section titled “Deposition Aid”. Preferably, the microcapsule may be a perfume microcapsule. Preferably, one or more types of microcapsules, for example two microcapsules types having different perfume benefit agents may be used.

Preferably, said perfume delivery technology may comprise an amine reaction product (ARP) or a thio reaction product. One may also use “reactive” polymeric amines and or polymeric thios in which the amine and/or thio functionality is pre-reacted with one or more PRMs to form a reaction product. Typically the reactive amines are primary and/or secondary amines, and may be part of a polymer or a monomer (non-polymer). Such ARPs may also be mixed with additional PRMs to provide benefits of polymer-assisted delivery and/or amine-assisted delivery. Nonlimiting examples of polymeric amines include polymers based on polyalkylimines, such as polyethyleneimine (PEI), or polyvinylamine (PVAm). Nonlimiting examples of monomeric (non-polymeric) amines include hydroxyl amines, such as 2-aminoethanol and its alkyl substituted derivatives, and aromatic amines such as anthranilates. The ARPs may be premixed with perfume or added separately in leave-on or rinse-off applications. In another aspect, a material that contains a heteroatom other than nitrogen and/or sulfur, for example oxygen, phosphorus or selenium, may be used as an alternative to amine compounds. In yet another aspect, the aforementioned alternative compounds can be used in combination with amine compounds. In yet another aspect, a single molecule may comprise an amine moiety and one or more of the alternative heteroatom moieties, for example, thiols, phosphines and selenols. The benefit may include improved delivery of perfume as well as controlled perfume release. Suitable ARPs as well as methods of making same can be found in USPA 2005/0003980 A1 and U.S. Pat. No. 6,413,920 B1.

Processes of Making Cleaning and/or Treatment Compositions

The cleaning compositions of the present invention can be formulated into any suitable form and prepared by any process chosen by the formulator, non-limiting examples of which are described in Applicants examples and in U.S. Pat. No. 5,879,584; U.S. Pat. No. 5,691,297; U.S. Pat. No. 5,574,005; U.S. Pat. No. 5,569,645; U.S. Pat. No. 5,565,422; U.S. Pat. No. 5,516,448; U.S. Pat. No. 5,489,392; U.S. Pat. No. 5,486,303 all of which are incorporated herein by reference.

Method of Use

The products of the present invention may be used in any conventional manner. In short, they may be used in the same manner as consumer products that are designed and produced by conventional methods and processes. For example, cleaning and/or treatment compositions of the present invention can be used to clean and/or treat a situs inter alia a surface or fabric. Typically at least a portion of the situs is contacted with an embodiment of Applicants' composition, in neat form or diluted in a wash liquor, and then the situs is optionally washed and/or rinsed. For purposes of the present invention, washing includes but is not limited to, scrubbing, and mechanical agitation. The fabric may comprise any fabric capable of being laundered in normal consumer use conditions. Cleaning solutions that comprise the disclosed cleaning compositions typically have a pH of from about 5 to about 10.5. Such compositions are typically employed at concentrations of from about 500 ppm to about 15,000 ppm in solution. When the wash solvent is water, the water temperature typically ranges from about 5° C. to about 90° C. and, when the situs comprises a fabric, the water to fabric mass ratio is typically from about 1:1 to about 100:1.

EXAMPLES

The MORV models require the execution of the winMolconn program, version 1.1.2.1 (Hall Associates Consulting, http://www.molconn.com/index.html). The following is a description of how to execute the program and generate the required descriptors.

Computing Molecular Structure Descriptors using winMolconn:

    • 1) Assemble the molecular structure for one or more perfume ingredients in the form of a MACCS Structure-Data File, also called an SDF file, or as a SMILES file
    • 2) Using version 1.1.2.1 of the winMolconn program, running on an appropriate computer, compute the full complement of molecular descriptors that are available from the program, using the SDF or SMILES file described above as input.
      • a. The output of winMolconn is in the form of an ASCII text file, typically space delimited, containing the structure identifiers in the first column and respective molecular descriptors in the remaining columns for each structure in the input file.
    • 3) Parse the text file into columns using Excel® or some other appropriate technique. Each column contains a single descriptor value for each of the molecular structures in the input. The molecular descriptor labels are found on the first row of the resulting table.
    • 4) Find and extract the descriptor columns, identified by the molecular descriptor label, corresponding to the inputs required for each model.
      • a. Note that the winMolconn molecular descriptor labels are case-sensitive.
        Each MORV model may be in the form of a simple multi-variate algebraic equation.
    • 1) Computing the MORV value of perfume raw materials for malodour arising from carboxylic acids:
      • a. For each perfume raw material of interest:
        • i. Using the winMolconn program (version 1.1.2.1), compute the full complement of available molecular descriptors.
        • ii. From the output of winMolconn, extract values of the following molecular descriptors: dxvp9, knotpv, e1C2O2, idw, idcbar, and n2pag22. Note that these descriptor labels are case-sensitive.
        • iii. Using Equation 1, compute the MORV value by substituting the computed winMolconn descriptors values for the corresponding labels shown in the equation.


MORV=−8.5096+2.8597×(dxp9)+1.1253×(knotpv)−0.34484×(e1C2O2)−0.00046231×(idw)+3.3509×(idcbar)+0.11158×(n2pag22) Equation 1:

    • 2) Computing the MORV value of perfume raw materials malodours arising from amines:
      • a. For each perfume raw material of interest:
        • i. Using the winMolconn program (version 1.1.2.1), compute the full complement of available molecular descriptors.
        • ii. From the output of winMolconn, extract values of the following molecular descriptors: dxvp5, dxvp8, e1C2C2d, c1C2O2, CdCH2, CaasC, and idcbar. Note that these labels are case-sensitive.
        • iii. Using Equation 2, compute the MORV value by substituting the computed winMolconn descriptors values for the corresponding labels shown in the equation.


MORV=−5.2917+2.1741×(dxvp5)−2.6595×(dxvp8)+0.45297×(e1C2C2d)−0.6202×(c1C2O2)+1.3542×(CdCH2)+0.68105×(CaasC)+1.7129×(idcbar) Equation 2:

    • 3) Computing the MORV value of perfume raw materials malodour arising from organic sulfur compounds:
      • a. For each perfume raw material of interest:
        • i. Using the winMolconn program (version 1.1.2.1), compute the full complement of available molecular descriptors.
        • ii. From the output of winMolconn, extract values of the following molecular descriptors: SHCsatu, xvp7, c1C1C3d, c1C1O2, idc, and nd2. Note that these labels are case-sensitive.
        • iii. Using Equation 3, compute the MORV value by substituting the computed winMolconn descriptors values for the corresponding labels shown in the equation.


MORV=−0.0035+0.8028×(SHCsatu)+2.1673×(xvp7)−1.3507×(c1C1C3d)+0.61496×(c1C1O2)+0.00403×(idc)−0.23286×(nd2) Equation 3:

    • 4) Computing the MORV value of perfume raw materials for malodours arising from compounds containing an indole moiety:
      • a. For each perfume raw material of interest:
        • i. Using the winMolconn program (version 1.1.2.1), compute the full complement of available molecular descriptors.
        • ii. From the output of winMolconn, extract values of the following molecular descriptors: SdO, Ssp3OH, xp7, e1C3O2, c1C2C3, and CKetone. Note that these labels are case-sensitive.
        • iii. Using Equation 4, compute the MORV value by substituting the computed winMolconn descriptors values for the corresponding labels shown in the equation.


MORV=−0.9926−0.03882×(SdO)+0.1869×(Ssp3OH)+2.1847×(xp7)+0.34344×(e1C3O2)−0.45767×(c1C2C3)+0.7684×(CKetone) Equation 4:

Example Calculations

Example 1

Selecting Perfume Ingredients Having Desirable Malodour Reduction Values

The structures of the following perfume raw materials (PRMs) are entered into a ChemBioFinder™ database by sketching or by importing the structures from a compatible file format: (3R,3aS,7S,8aS)-3,8,8-trimethyl-6-methyleneoctahydro-1H-3a,7-methanoazulene; (1S,4aR,8aR)-1-isopropyl-4,7-dimethyl-1,2,4a,5,6,8a-hexahydronaphthalene; (1R,4S,4aR,8aR)-4-isopropyl-1,6-dimethyl-1,2,3,4,4a,7,8,8a-octahydronaphthalen-1-ol; (1S,2S)-1,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-yl isobutyrate; (3R,3aS,6R,7R,8aS)-3,6,8,8-tetramethyloctahydro-1H-3a,7-methanoazulen-3-yl formate; (3R,3aS,6R,7R,8aS)-3,6,8,8-tetramethyloctahydro-1H-3a,7-methanoazulen-6-yl acetate; (Z)-3-methyl-2-(pent-2-en-1-yl)cyclopent-2-en-1-one; (1R,4S,4aS,6R,8aS)-4,8a,9,9-tetramethyloctahydro-1,6-methanonaphthalen-1(2H)-ol; 1-((2S,3S)-2,3,8,8-tetramethyl-1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8-octahydronaphthalen-2-yl)ethan-1-one; 4-(4-hydroxy-4-methylpentyl)cyclohex-3-ene-1-carbaldehyde; (1R,2R,4S)-1,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-yl propionate; 4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethyl-1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydrocyclopenta[g]isochromene; (2E,6E)-nona-2,6-dien-1-ol; (3Z,6Z)-nona-3,6-dien-1-ol; (E)-3-methylcyclopentadec-4-en-1-one; (Z)-oxacycloheptadec-8-en-2-one; (E)-oxacyclohexadec-13-en-2-one; ethyl 3-methyl-3-phenyloxirane-2-carboxylate; (E)-8-(1H-indol-1-yl)-2,6-dimethyloct-7-en-2-ol; p-tolyl hexanoate; 7-methoxy-2H-chromen-2-one; (2E,6E)-3,7,11-trimethyldodeca-2,6,10-trien-1-ol; allyl 3-cyclohexylpropanoate; 3,7-dimethylocta-1,6-dien-3-yl benzoate; (Z)-1-(2,2-dimethyl-6-methylenecyclohexyl)but-2-en-1-one; methyl 2-((1S,2S)-3-oxo-2-pentylcyclopentyl)acetate; 4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol; (E)-3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-dien-1-yl benzoate; 2-ethoxynaphthalene; 1-phenylpentan-2-ol; (E)-dec-4-enal; ethyl palmitate; 2,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde; phenethyl 2-methylbutanoate; (Z)-dec-4-enal; benzyl benzoate; 7-methoxy-3,7-dimethyloctanal; (E)-3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-dien-1-ol; 2-methyl-1-phenylpropan-2-yl butyrate; 3,7-dimethyloct-6-en-3-ol; 3-methoxy-3-methylbutan-1-ol; ethyl 6,6-dimethyl-2-methylenecyclohex-3-ene-1-carboxylate; pentyl (Z)-3-phenylacrylate; 2-propylheptanenitrile; 6,6-dimethoxy-2,5,5-trimethylhex-2-ene; 2,5,6-trimethylcyclohex-3-ene-1-carbaldehyde; 2-methyl-5-(prop-1-en-2-yl)cyclohex-2-en-1-one; (E)-4-(2,2-dimethyl-6-methylenecyclohexyl)-3-methylbut-3-en-2-one; (E)-hex-2-en-1-ol; 6-methylquinoline; 2-isopropyl-5-methylphenol; (2S,5R)-2-isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexan-1-one; 2,6,6-trimethylbicyclo[3.1.1]hept-2-ene; 3,7-dimethyloctan-3-ol; 3,7-dimethylocta-1,6-dien-3-ol; (E)-3,7-dimethylocta-4,6-dien-3-ol; 1,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-one; isopropyl 2-methylbutanoate; (R)-2-methyl-5-(prop-1-en-2-yl)cyclohex-2-en-1-one; 2-phenylethan-1-ol; (R)-1-methyl-4-(prop-1-en-2-yl)cyclohex-1-ene; (Z)-1-((1R,2S)-2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-3-en-1-yl)but-2-en-1-one; (1R,2S)-2-(tert-butyl)cyclohexan-1-ol; 5-methylheptan-3-one; (2S,5S)-2-isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexan-1-one; 1,3,3-trimethyl-2-oxabicyclo[2.2.2]octane; (E)-1-(1-ethoxyethoxy)hex-3-ene; dibutyl phthalate; (E)-2-isopropyl-5-methylhex-2-enal; 1,1-diethoxydecane; (2E,6E)-3,7,11-trimethyldodeca-2,6,10-trien-1-yl acetate; p-cymene; 2,6-dimethyloct-7-en-2-ol; 2-phenoxyethan-1-ol; 2-ethoxy-4-formylphenyl acetate; 1-methyl-4-(prop-1-en-2-yl)cyclohexan-1-ol; 3,7-dimethyloctane-1,7-diol; (Z)-3-methyl-4-(2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-1-en-1-yl)but-3-en-2-one; (Z)-4-(2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-1-en-1-yl)but-3-en-2-one; (Z)-hex-3-enal; hexanal; hexan-3-ol; ethyl (Z)-2-methylbut-2-enoate; ethyl pentanoate; 2-(tert-butyl)cyclohexyl acetate; (2-methoxyethyl)benzene; hexyl isobutyrate; 3,7-dimethyloctyl acetate; pentyl 2-hydroxybenzoate; 2-isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexan-1-ol; butyl acetate; allyl hexanoate; phenyl acetate; 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde; butyl butyrate; 2-methylbutan-1-ol; ethyl heptanoate; 2,6-dimethylhept-5-enal; 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)butan-1-one; benzaldehyde. The set of structures are exported in the form of a MACCS structure-data file (SDF) formatted text file. The program winMolconn (version 1.1.2.1) is used to compute the following set of molecular structure descriptors: c1C1C3d, c1C1O2, c1C2C3, c1C2O2, CaasC, CdCH2, CKetone, dxvp5, dxvp8, dxvp9, e1C2C2d, e1C2O2, e1C3O2, idc, idcbar, idw, knotpv, n2pag22, nd2, SdO, SHCsatu, Ssp3OH, xp7, xvp7, where c1C1C3d is a count of single bonds between a carbon atom with one double bond and two single bonds to non-hydrogen atoms (═C<) and a methyl carbon atom (—CH3), c1C1O2 is a count of single bonds between a methyl (—CH3) carbon atom and an oxygen atom with two single bonds, c1C2C3 is a count of single bonds between a carbon atom with three bonds to non-hydrogen atoms (>CH—) and a methylene (—CH2—) carbon atom, c1C2O2 is a count of single bonds between a methylene (—CH2—) carbon atom and an oxygen atom with two single bonds, CaasC is a count of aromatic carbon atoms single-bonded to one other non-hydrogen atom, CdCH2 is a count of methylene groups (—CH2—), CKetone is a count of ketone functional groups, dxvp5 is the valence-corrected difference 5th-order path molecular connectivity index, dxvp8 is the valence-corrected difference 8th-order path molecular connectivity index, dxvp9 is the valence-corrected difference 9th-order path molecular connectivity index, e1C2C2d is the sum of the bond-type electrotopological state index values for single bonds between a carbon atom with one double bond and one single bond to non-hydrogen atoms (═CH—) and a methylene (—CH2—) carbon atom, e1C2O2 is the sum of the bond-type electrotopological state index value for single bonds between a methylene (—CH2—) carbon atom and an oxygen atom with two single bonds, e1C3O2 is the sum of the bond-type electrotopological state index values for single bonds between a carbon atom with three bonds to non-hydrogen atoms (>CH—) and an oxygen atom with two single bonds, idc is a Bonchev-Trinajstic information index, idcbar is a Bonchev-Trinajstic information index, idw is a Bonchev-Trinajstic information index, knotpv is the subgraph distance between xvc3 and xvpc4 where xvc3 is the valence-corrected 3rd-order molecular connectivity index and xvpc4 is the valence-corrected 4th-order path-cluster molecular connectivity index, n2pag22 is the count of path 2 subgraphs with path terminal vertex delta values of 2 and 2, nd2 is the count of vertices with a delta value of 2, SdO is the sum of the electrotopological state index values for sp2 oxygen atoms, SHCsatu is the sum of the hydrogen atom electrotopological state indexes for hydrogen atoms on sp3 carbons that are also bonded to sp2 carbon atoms, Ssp3OH is the sum of the electrotopological state index values for oxygen atoms bonded to sp3 carbon atoms, xp7 is the 7th-order path molecular connectivity index, and xvp7 is the valence-corrected 7th-order path molecular connectivity index. The MORV values are then compute using Equations 1-4 described above. The results are tabulated. The resulting table is sorted such that compounds yielding a MORV value of 0.5 or greater for all four equations are grouped at the top of the list, followed by compounds yielding a MORV value of 0.5 or greater for any three of the equations, followed by compounds yielding a MORV value of 0.5 or greater for any two of the equations, followed by compounds yielding a MORV value of 0.5 or greater for any single equation, followed by compounds yielding MORV values of less than 0.5 for all four equations. The process results in placing the most desirable compounds at the top of the list and the least desirable at the bottom.

MORVMORVMORVMORV
Chemical Name(Eq. 1)(Eq. 2)(Eq. 3)(Eq. 4)
(3R,3aS,7S,8aS)-3,8,8-trimethyl-6-2.454.674.552.16
methyleneoctahydro-1H-3a,7-methanoazulene
(1S,4aR,8aR)-1-isopropyl-4,7-dimethyl-0.982.331.680.81
1,2,4a,5,6,8a-hexahydronaphthalene
(1R,4S,4aR,8aR)-4-isopropyl-1,6-dimethyl-0.981.742.212.74
1,2,3,4,4a,7,8,8a-octahydronaphthalen-1-ol
(1S,2S)-1,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-yl3.221.462.481.21
isobutyrate
(3R,3aS,6R,7R,8aS)-3,6,8,8-4.033.764.833.19
tetramethyloctahydro-1H-3a,7-methanoazulen-3-
yl formate
(3R,3aS,6R,7R,8aS)-3,6,8,8-4.203.634.693.37
tetramethyloctahydro-1H-3a,7-methanoazulen-6-
yl acetate
(Z)-3-methyl-2-(pent-2-en-1-yl)cyclopent-2-en-0.700.550.920.50
1-one
(1R,4S,4aS,6R,8aS)-4,8a,9,9-3.703.034.344.24
tetramethyloctahydro-1,6-methanonaphthalen-
1(2H)-ol
1-((2S,3S)-2,3,8,8-tetramethyl-1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8-2.261.363.262.15
octahydronaphthalen-2-yl)ethan-1-one
4-(4-hydroxy-4-methylpentyl)cyclohex-3-ene-1-1.740.992.571.23
carbaldehyde
(1R,2R,4S)-1,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-3.321.551.890.96
2-yl propionate
4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethyl-1,3,4,6,7,8-1.932.314.464.47
hexahydrocyclopenta[g]isochromene
(2E,6E)-nona-2,6-dien-1-ol1.671.920.701.12
(3Z,6Z)-nona-3,6-dien-1-ol1.671.950.201.15
(E)-3-methylcyclopentadec-4-en-1-one1.590.282.231.11
(Z)-oxacycloheptadec-8-en-2-one0.910.371.041.00
(E)-oxacyclohexadec-13-en-2-one1.090.221.110.87
ethyl 3-methyl-3-phenyloxirane-2-carboxylate0.52−0.850.771.73
(E)-8-(1H-indol-1-yl)-2,6-dimethyloct-7-en-2-ol1.140.121.613.71
p-tolyl hexanoate1.800.770.700.22
7-methoxy-2H-chromen-2-one1.330.720.201.15
(2E,6E)-3,7,11-trimethyldodeca-2,6,10-trien-1-1.441.66−1.091.67
ol
allyl 3-cyclohexylpropanoate1.291.930.86−1.46
3,7-dimethylocta-1,6-dien-3-yl benzoate0.911.97−0.920.63
(Z)-1-(2,2-dimethyl-6-methylenecyclohexyl)but-−0.220.871.790.13
2-en-1-one
methyl 2-((1S,2S)-3-oxo-2-1.420.093.44−0.13
pentylcyclopentyl)acetate
4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol0.182.750.760.37
(E)-3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-dien-1-yl benzoate0.240.93−0.670.51
2-ethoxynaphthalene0.75−0.77−0.671.70
1-phenylpentan-2-ol1.12−0.20−0.160.90
(E)-dec-4-enal2.241.440.31−0.72
ethyl palmitate0.970.141.360.37
2,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde−0.081.191.680.34
phenethyl 2-methylbutanoate1.00−0.860.89−0.39
(Z)-dec-4-enal2.241.440.31−0.72
benzyl benzoate1.200.02−0.100.73
7-methoxy-3,7-dimethyloctanal0.93−0.351.06−1.62
(E)-3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-dien-1-ol0.740.16−1.801.02
2-methyl-1-phenylpropan-2-yl butyrate0.81−0.131.07−0.02
3,7-dimethyloct-6-en-3-ol0.32−1.00−1.651.03
3-methoxy-3-methylbutan-1-ol−1.40−2.590.150.62
ethyl 6,6-dimethyl-2-methylenecyclohex-3-ene-−1.400.271.36−0.64
1-carboxylate
pentyl (Z)-3-phenylacrylate1.45−0.51−0.790.36
2-propylheptanenitrile1.07−0.66−0.63−1.37
6,6-dimethoxy-2,5,5-trimethylhex-2-ene−0.09−1.06−0.051.56
2,5,6-trimethylcyclohex-3-ene-1-carbaldehyde−0.51−0.931.63−0.79
2-methyl-5-(prop-1-en-2-yl)cyclohex-2-en-1-one−0.230.89−0.13−0.84
(E)-4-(2,2-dimethyl-6-methylenecyclohexyl)-3-0.341.530.110.35
methylbut-3-en-2-one
(E)-hex-2-en-1-ol−0.25−0.24−0.010.57
6-methylquinoline0.21−0.58−0.330.78
2-isopropyl-5-methylphenol−0.660.500.92−0.56
(2S,5R)-2-isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexan-1-one−0.39−0.251.19−1.61
2,6,6-trimethylbicyclo[3.1.1]hept-2-ene−0.440.920.03−1.62
3,7-dimethyloctan-3-ol0.28−1.47−0.030.59
3,7-dimethylocta-1,6-dien-3-ol0.130.22−1.710.96
(E)-3,7-dimethylocta-4,6-dien-3-ol0.18−2.08−2.140.98
1,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-one0.450.010.80−0.63
isopropyl 2-methylbutanoate−0.53−2.160.58−0.92
(R)-2-methyl-5-(prop-1-en-2-yl)cyclohex-2-en-−0.230.89−0.13−0.84
1-one
2-phenylethan-1-ol−0.12−0.85−0.631.18
(R)-1-methyl-4-(prop-1-en-2-yl)cyclohex-1-ene−0.211.46−0.94−1.49
(Z)-1-((1R,2S)-2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-3-en-1-−0.190.072.240.13
yl)but-2-en-1-one
(1R,2S)-2-(tert-butyl)cyclohexan-1-ol−1.03−0.360.130.54
5-methylheptan-3-one−0.28−1.640.60−1.56
(2S,5S)-2-isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexan-1-one−0.39−0.251.19−1.61
1,3,3-trimethyl-2-oxabicyclo[2.2.2]octane−1.000.58−0.06−0.94
(E)-1-(1-ethoxyethoxy)hex-3-ene−0.31−0.810.091.62
dibutyl phthalate−0.98−0.960.380.79
(E)-2-isopropyl-5-methylhex-2-enal−0.23−1.150.83−1.86
1,1-diethoxydecane0.09−1.20−0.271.83
(2E,6E)-3,7,11-trimethyldodeca-2,6,10-trien-1-−0.111.09−0.90−0.09
yl acetate
p-cymene−0.41−0.180.51−0.57
2,6-dimethyloct-7-en-2-ol−0.07−0.170.330.68
2-phenoxyethan-1-ol−0.37−1.36−1.271.35
2-ethoxy-4-formylphenyl acetate−0.680.02−0.820.58
1-methyl-4-(prop-1-en-2-yl)cyclohexan-1-ol−0.131.04−0.640.18
3,7-dimethyloctane-1,7-diol0.35−0.95−0.081.87
(Z)-3-methyl-4-(2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-1-en-1-0.28−0.01−1.490.35
yl)but-3-en-2-one
(Z)-4-(2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-1-en-1-yl)but-3-0.14−0.40−1.100.29
en-2-one
(Z)-hex-3-enal−0.250.21−0.05−1.37
hexanal−0.25−0.92−0.51−1.37
hexan-3-ol−1.24−1.90−0.52−0.26
ethyl (Z)-2-methylbut-2-enoate−1.57−2.87−0.81−1.41
ethyl pentanoate−0.78−2.24−0.11−1.18
2-(tert-butyl)cyclohexyl acetate−0.370.33−0.240.04
(2-methoxyethyl)benzene−0.36−1.05−0.03−0.23
hexyl isobutyrate0.36−1.600.28−0.75
3,7-dimethyloctyl acetate0.19−1.05−0.62−2.08
pentyl 2-hydroxybenzoate0.44−0.32−0.430.15
2-isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexan-1-ol−0.250.040.19−0.58
butyl acetate−1.18−2.31−1.50−1.38
allyl hexanoate0.330.180.45−0.99
phenyl acetate−0.02−1.06−1.65−0.70
4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde−0.280.260.08−0.65
butyl butyrate−0.21−2.02−0.17−1.09
2-methylbutan-1-ol−2.19−2.16−0.36−0.29
ethyl heptanoate0.37−1.48−0.11−0.76
2,6-dimethylhept-5-enal0.28−0.83−1.38−1.48
1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)butan-1-one0.280.150.150.27
benzaldehyde−1.01−1.45−1.14−1.07

Example 2

Based upon the information obtained in Example-1, the perfumes in Table 2 below are made. Such perfumes have malodour reduction capabilities yet do not exhibit a perfume character shift.

MRC-AMRC-BMRC-C
Chemical Name(Percent)(Percent)(Percent)
4-(4-hydroxy-4-methylpentyl)-15185
cyclohex-3-ene-1-carbaldehyde
(1R,4S,4aR,8aR)-4-isopropyl-1,6-3.512
dimethyl-1,2,3,4,4a,7,8,8a-
octahydronaphthalen-1-ol
(2E,6E)-nona-2,6-dien-1-ol0.050.070
(E)-3-methylcyclopentadec-4-en-1-30.8453025
one
p-tolyl hexanoate0.0050.0020
3,7-dimethylocta-1,6-dien-3-yl158.59
benzoate
2-ethoxynaphthalene5.551
ethyl palmitate203050
(E)-3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-dien-1-ol107.1288
(E)-hex-2-en-1-ol0.10.30
Total100100100

Example-3

Consumer Products Comprising Perfumes from Example-2

Fabric and Air Refresher Composition

Example 4.3
IngredientExample 4.1Example 4.2(ranges)
Deionized WaterBalanceBalanceBalance
Ethanol3.03.01-5.0%
Lupasol HF+0.06500.06500-0.1%
Diethylene Glycol0.1750.1750-0.2%
Silwet L-76000.10.1000-0.2  
Maleic Acid and/or Citric0.050.050-0.2  
Acid
Koralone B-1190.0150.0150-0.1  
Hydroxypropyl0.6300.6300-2.0%
β-cyclodextrin
Sodium Hydroxide0.0030.0030.001-0.01
Additional Perfume00.4%0-1.0%
Perfume from Example-20.03%0.04%0-0.1%
Total100.000100.000100.000
Lupasol HF Polyethyleneimine (available from BASF)
Silwet L-7600 Organosilicone (available from BASF)
Koralone B-119 19% active aqueous solution of 1,2 Benzisothiazolin-3-one (BIT) in dipropylene glycol and water (available from Dow Chemical)

HDL-Heavy Duty Liquid compositions A-D are prepared with perfume, according to the perfumes shown in Example 2.

ABCD
WT %WT %WT %WT %
IngredientActiveActiveActiveActive
AE1.8S16.316.3128
C11.8 linear alkyl benzene2.82.88
sulfonic acid
HSAS13.613.6022
C24 alcohol, EO92.22.211.8
Citric Acid0.90.921.7
Lactic Acid5.8
C12-C18 Fatty Acid2.31.30.83.0
Protease (55.3 mg/g)1.71.71.71.7
Amylase (25.4 mg/g)0.70.70.70.7
Borax3.63.63.63.6
Calcium Formate0.20.20.20.2
Polyethyleneimine 600, EO201.61.61.6
Polyethyleneimine 600,1.62.01.6
EO24, PO16
DTPA0.30.30.30.3
Tiron ®0.80.80.80.8
Optical Brightener [7]0.30.30.30.3
NaOH4.09.34.09.3
Na Cumene Sulfonate1.11.11.11.1
Na Formate0.20.20.20.2
Aesthetics Dye0.03-1.00.03-1.00.03-1.00.03-1.0
Optional Additional Perfume 0.5-3.0 0.5-3.0 0.5-3.0 0.5-3.0
Perfume from Example-20.15-1.00.15-1.00.15-1.00.15-1.0
Water and SolventBalanceBalanceBalanceBalance
pH5.08.05.08.0
HSAS secondary alkyl sulfate, acid form
DTPA diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA)
Tiron 4,5-Dihydroxy-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid disodium salt monohydrate

Liquid Fabric Enhancer compositions are prepared with perfume, according to the perfumes shown in Example 2.

ABCD
Wt %Wt %Wt %Wt %
IngredientActiveActiveActiveActive
FSA112211814
Low MW alcohol1.953.03.02.28
Structurant2,31.25e0.2f
Optional Additional Free (Neat)1.501.82.01.50
Perfume
Free (Neat) Perfume from0.30.7
Example-2
Optional Additional Encapsulated0.60.6
Perfume4
Encapsulated Perfume from0.60.6
Example-2
Microcapsules comprising1.851.853.7
Perfume and Perfume from
Example-25
Calcium Chloride0.100.120.10.45
DTPA60.0050.0050.0050.005
Preservative (ppm)75555
Antifoam80.0150.150.110.011
Polyethylene imines90.150.050.1
Delivery enhancing0.10.10.20.05
PDMS emulsion100.512.0
Dispersant110.50.2
Organosiloxane5
Front-end Stability Aid12,130.06110.63120.36110.1412
Dye (parts per million ppm)40113040
Ammonium Chloride0.10
Hydrochloric Acid0.0100.010.100.010
Deionized WaterBalanceBalanceBalanceBalance
1N,N-di(tallowoyloxyethyl)-N,N-dimethylammonium chloride.
2Cationic high amylose maize starch-available from National Starch under the trade name HYLON VII ®.
3Cationic polymer available from BASF ® under the name Rheovis ® CDE.
4Encapsulated perfume and encapsulated malodour reducing composition (within PMC) assumes about 32% active
5PMC is a friable PMC with a urea-formaldehyde shell from Encapsys of Appleton USA.
6Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid
719% active aqueous solution of 1,2 Benzisothiazolin-3-one (BIT) in dipropylene glycol and water available from Dow Chemical under the trade name Koralone B-119
8Silicone antifoam agent available from Dow Corning ® under the trade name DC2310.
9Polyethylene imines available from BASF under the trade name Lupasol ®.
10Polydimethylsiloxane emulsion from Dow Corning ® under the trade name DC346.
11Non-ionic such as TWEEN 20 ™ or cationic surfactant as Berol 648 and Ethoquad ® C 25 from Akzo Nobel.
12Organosiloxane polymer condensate made by reacting hexamethylenediisocyanate (HDI), and a, w silicone diol and 1,3-propanediamine, N′-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)-N,N-dimethyl-Jeffcat Z130) or N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N,Ndiisopropanolamine (Jeffcat ZR50) commercially available from Wacker Silicones, Munich, Germany.
13Fineoxocol ® 180 from Nissan Chemical Co.
(14) Isofol ® 16 from Sasol.

Body Wash compositions are prepared with perfume, according to the perfumes shown in Example 2.

ABC
Sodium Laureth-3 Sulfate (as 28%27.85%27.85%27.85%
active)
WaterQ.S.Q.S.Q.S.
Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (as 29%10.3410.3410.34
active)
Cocamidopropyl Betaine B (30%4.014.014.01
active)
Citric Acid0.180.180.18
Sodium Benzoate0.30.30.3
Disodium EDTA0.120.120.12
Methylchloroisothiazolinone/0.040.040.04
Methylisothiazolinone
Sodium Chloride2.351.71.6
Additional Perfume1.2512
Perfume from Example-20.250.1750.25
QS - indicates that this material is used to bring the total to 100%.

Antipersiprant compositions are prepared with perfume, according to the perfumes shown in Example 2.

18.1 Invisible18.2Invisible18.3Invisible18.4Soft18.5Soft18.6Soft
SolidSolidSolidSolidSolidSolid
Aluminum24242426.526.526.5
Zirconium
Trichlorohydrex
Glycine Powder
CyclopentasiloxaneQ.SQ.S.Q.S.Q.S.Q.S.Q.S.
Dimethicone555
CO-1897 Stearyl141414
Alcohol NF
Hydrogenated3.853.853.85
Castor Oil MP80
Deodorized
Behenyl Alcohol0.20.20.2
Tribehenin4.54.54.5
C 18-36 acid1.1251.1251.125
triglyceride
C12-15 Alkyl9.59.55
Benzoate
PPG-14 Butyl6.56.50.50.50.5
Ether
Phenyl33
Trimethicone
White Petrolatum3333
Mineral Oil1.01.01.0
Optional1.00.752.00.751.01.25
Additional Free
(Neat) Perfume
Free (Neat)0.250.350.1750.250.1
Perfume from
Example-2
Beta-Cyclodextrin3.03.0
complexed with
Perfume for
Example-2
Talc Imperial 2503.03.03.0
USP
Polyacrylate1.9
Microcapsule
loaded with
Perfume from
Example-2
QS - indicates that this material is used to bring the total to 100%.

The dimensions and values disclosed herein are not to be understood as being strictly limited to the exact numerical values recited. Instead, unless otherwise specified, each such dimension is intended to mean both the recited value and a functionally equivalent range surrounding that value. For example, a dimension disclosed as “40 mm” is intended to mean “about 40 mm”.

All documents cited in the Detailed Description of the Invention are, in relevant part, incorporated herein by reference; the citation of any document is not to be construed as an admission that it is prior art with respect to the present invention. To the extent that any meaning or definition of a term in this document conflicts with any meaning or definition of the same term in a document incorporated by reference, the meaning or definition assigned to the term in this written document shall govern.

While particular embodiments of the present invention have been illustrated and described, it would be obvious to those skilled in the art that various other changes and modifications can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. It is therefore intended to cover in the appended claims all such changes and modifications that are within the scope of this invention.