Title:
Mobile, Handheld Wireless Communication Device, Smartphone, With Improved Functionality
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A folding, handheld wireless communication device that is designed to be carried in a hip pocket like a wallet. The advent of curved touch-sensitive glass will facilitate the design of wireless devices that conform to the user's body. Wallets have much greater interior volume and surface area than today's smartphones, which are plagued by design compromises that result from the need to tightly pack components into small spaces. The advantages of this novel design include ruggedness, better antennae, a full QWERTY keyboard with a complete set of symbols, a large and removable/replaceable battery, a larger and more-functional display, better speakers and sound, and space to accommodate extra features such as earbuds and their wires.



Inventors:
Lumbard, John Ashmore (Hollis, NH, US)
Application Number:
13/858344
Publication Date:
01/08/2015
Filing Date:
07/05/2013
Assignee:
LUMBARD JOHN ASHMORE
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
455/575.3
International Classes:
H04M1/02
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
LIN, KENNY S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
John A. Lumbard (Box 749 Hollis NH 03049)
Claims:
1. Any folding wireless communication device that is curved, at any radius, for the purpose of carrying it in the user's hip pocket like a wallet.

2. Any folding wireless communication device--with a flat and rigid display screen—that is curved, at any radius, for the purpose of carrying it in the user's hip pocket like a wallet.

3. Any folding wireless communication device--with a curved and rigid display screen—that is curved, at any radius, for the purpose of carrying it in the user's hip pocket like a wallet.

4. Any folding wireless communication device—with a flexible display screen—that is curved, at any radius, for the purpose of carrying it in the user's hip pocket like a wallet.

5. Any folding wireless communication device whose upper surface is curved, at any radius, for the purpose of carrying it in the user's hip pocket like a wallet.

6. Any folding wireless communication device whose undermost surface is curved, at any radius, for the purpose of carrying it in the user's hip pocket like a wallet.

7. Any wireless communication device that is curved to conform to the buttocks of the user.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

N.A.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

N.A.

REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING

N.A.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The design of wireless telephones has always involved compromises, which mostly result from a desire to produce small devices that will fit comfortably in a pocket. The advent of touchscreen smartphones has exacerbated that problem, because users want large screens. It is now possible to manufacture curved touchscreen glass, thus allowing devices that conform to the user's body. Flexible touchscreen glass is not yet available, but a smartphone with a rigid, curved body would fit easily in a hip pocket.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Many users already carry smartphones in their hip pockets, despite an awkward fit and a risk of breakage. This design is for a device that would fit comfortably in a user's hip pocket like a wallet—an accessory that is far thicker than today's wireless devices, and which offers far more surface area when opened. Increased surface area and volume are the solution to the many of the design compromises of today's wireless phones.

This design offers a full QWERTY keyboard; two display screens (one large touchscreen, and a smaller electronic-paper screen for writing messages without draining the battery); an oversized, removable battery; better antennae and thus better reception; and improved sound; all enclosed within a rugged clamshell case that is designed to absorb the shock of a fall without the “Spiderman” damage to the display that is common with today's smartphones.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows the device when open. The large touchscreen of the upper section, backed by a curved sheet of carbon fiber, is clearly visible; as is the smaller electronic-paper screen of the lower section. The user will be able to type messages while viewing a document online. Below the smaller screen is a full QWERTY keyboard, with a full set of the most-commonly-used symbols, all with tactile rubberized buttons that facilitate rapid typing.

When speaking the user would put his or her ear to the earphone in the top right corner of the device, as shown, and speak—with privacy, in a manner similar to the old telephone handset—into the microphone located in the middle of the keyboard. The curve of the display screen will keep it free of the smudging that is common to most of today's devices.

FIG. 2 shows the device in a closed position, with a view of the exterior of the top section. The crown and hinges are padded, and the edges flex to absorb the shock of a fall. The cover for the camera lens can be seen in the bottom left corner.

The user can speak into the phone when closed, via a microphone at the hinge end. There are speakers in the side walls of the phone, so it could be used in speakerphone mode while carried in a breast pocket.

FIG. 3 shows the underside of the device while in closed position. The user would insert the smartphone into his or her hip pocket with the hinges up, and sit on the tapered and flexible corners shown at the bottom of FIG. 3.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

This is a clamshell design; similar to the flip phones that were popular in the years before smartphones were introduced, but significantly larger. The additional size is made possible by the curves of the phone, which allow it to be inserted comfortably in a hip pocket rather than a front pocket. Greater width, length, and thickness allow more display area, a full QWERTY keyboard, and other advantages:

    • 1) The antenna elements used for reception in the 700 MHz band (commonly used for LTE transmission) should ideally be 7.4″ to 8.5″ long. Current smartphones are not long or wide enough for this ideal, and instead use cleverly-designed antennae that are only 70% efficient. A wallet-like form factor can easily offer this length, when opened.
    • 2) Many smartphone users already carry their devices, awkwardly, in their hip pockets. The advent of curved touch-sensitive glass (such as Corning's Willow Glass) will allow the design of wireless devices that conform to the user's body. Curved does not have to mean flexible; many years might pass before flexible displays become a reality, but a curved and rigid screen can be well protected by a folding device that has flexible edges for comfort and ruggedness.
    • 3) The design allows a full QWERTY keyboard with tactile buttons. The keyboard includes punctuation and symbols, delete and backspace buttons, and a navigation button to easily place the cursor where desired.
    • 4) The design offers a large screen, comparable to those in today's most-popular smartphones; as well as a smaller electronic-paper screen, above the keyboard, which can be used to create e-mails and text messages without draining battery power. Alternately both screens can be used at once, to review a document or web page while writing.
    • 5) The wallet-like form factor allows significant thickness, relative to current designs, and a much-greater surface area for screens and for a full-featured keypad. The additional volume can be used for a larger, removable battery; better speakers; and other features.
    • 6) The old-fashioned telephone handset is still the gold standard for comfortable handheld conversation. A carefully-shaped folding hip phone can offer a comparable level of privacy and sound quality, and end the practice of shouting into the air while talking. The curve in the screen also prevents contact between the user's face and the display, thus avoiding smudging.
    • 7) The phone can be carried in a shirt pocket, either for use in speakerphone mode or for listening to music with the built-in MP3 player.
    • 8) Closing the clamshell at the end of a call terminates the phone connection, and turns off power to the display with a certainty and finality that is not found in today's smartphones. The latter require two steps to take the same action, and are thus responsible for a lot of unintended dialing.
    • 9) When closed the clamshell design will protect the two displays from scratches and the “Spiderman” cracking that has become all too common. The displays are mounted on curved-but-rigid sheets of carbon fiber; the exterior shell of the phone is rigid and padded at the crown and hinges, but flexible enough at the edges to absorb a drop from chest level—regardless of orientation at landing.