Title:
PORTABLE DEVICE FOR MEASURING BLOOD PRESSURE AND METHOD THEREOF
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A portable blood pressure measuring apparatus and a method therefor are provided. A method for measuring blood pressure by an electronic device includes measuring a blood pressure of a user; measuring a Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) using a pulse wave and an ElectroCardioGram (ECG) signal of the user, wherein the pulse wave is measured by an optical sensor, and the ECG signal is measured by an ECG electrodes portion; and compensating the blood pressure using the PWV.



Inventors:
Cho, Jae-geol (Gyeonggi-do, KR)
Application Number:
14/452152
Publication Date:
11/20/2014
Filing Date:
08/05/2014
Assignee:
SAMSUNG ELECTRONICS CO., LTD.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A61B5/00; A61B5/022; A61B5/0285; A61B5/0402
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
TRAN, THO Q
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
THE FARRELL LAW FIRM, P.C. (290 Broadhollow Road Suite 210E Melville NY 11747)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A method for measuring blood pressure by an electronic device, the method comprising: measuring a blood pressure of a user; measuring a Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) using a pulse wave and an ElectroCardioGram (ECG) signal of the user, wherein the pulse wave is measured by an optical sensor, and the ECG signal is measured by an ECG electrodes portion; and compensating the blood pressure using the PWV.

2. The method of claim 1, further comprising displaying the compensated blood pressure.

3. The method of claim 1, wherein measuring the PWV using the pulse wave and the ECG signal comprises calculating the PWV by dividing a distance between a heart of the user and a measured point of the pulse wave by a time between an R peak of the ECG signal and a start point of the pulse wave.

4. The method of claim 1, wherein compensating the blood pressure is performed using one of:
Pbrachial=a+b×Pwrist or finger+c×PWV
Pbrachial=a+b×Pwrist or finger+C×PWV+d×PWV2
Pbrachial=a+b×Pwrist or finger+c×PWV+d×PWV2+e×PWV3, where Pbrachial is a brachial blood pressure measurement, Pradial is a radial blood pressure measurement, PWV is a PWV, and a, b, c, d, and e are empirical constants for compensating the radial blood pressure measurement.

5. An electronic device for measuring a blood pressure, comprising: a blood pressure measurer configured to measure a blood pressure of a user; a Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) measurer configured to measure a PWV using a pulse wave and an ElectroCardioGram (ECG) signal, wherein the pulse wave is measured by an optical sensor, and the ECG signal is measured by an ECG electrodes portion; and a controller configured to compensate the blood pressure using the PWV.

6. The electronic device of claim 5, further comprising a display configured to display the compensated blood pressure.

7. The electronic device of claim 5, wherein the ECG electrode portion comprises three electrodes, two electrodes of the three electrodes being positioned inside of a cuff of the electronic device and a remaining one electrode of the three electrodes being is positioned outside of the cuff.

8. The electronic device of claim 5, wherein the optical sensor comprises a light source and a light receiving device, and wherein the optical sensor is positioned inside of a cuff of the electronic device or at an additional device configured to attach to a finger of the user.

9. The electronic device of claim 5, wherein the PWV measurer calculates the PWV by dividing a distance between a heart of the user and a measured point of the pulse wave by a time between an R peak of the ECG signal and a start point of the pulse wave.

10. The electronic device of claim 5, wherein the controller compensates the blood pressure using one of:
Pbrachial=a+b×Pwrist or finger+c×PWV
Pbrachial=a+b×Pwrist or finger+C×PWV+d×PWV2
Pbrachial=a+b×Pwrist or finger+c×PWV+d×PWV2+e×PWV3, where Pbrachial is a brachial blood pressure measurement, Pradial is a radial blood pressure measurement, PWV is a PWV, and a, b, c, d, and e are empirical constants for compensating the radial blood pressure measurement.

11. A method for measuring blood pressure by an electronic device, the method comprising: measuring a blood pressure of a user; measuring a Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) using a pulse wave, wherein the pulse wave is measured by an optical sensor; and compensating the blood pressure using the PWV so that the blood pressure corresponds to a brachial blood pressure.

12. The method of claim 11, further comprising displaying the compensated blood pressure.

13. The method of claim 11, further comprising measuring an ElectroCardioGram (ECG) signal of a user using ECG electrode portion.

14. The method of claim 13, wherein measuring the PWV using the pulse wave comprises calculating the PWV using the pulse wave and the ECG signal.

15. The method of 14, wherein measuring the PWV using the pulse wave and the ECG signal comprises calculating the PWV by dividing a distance between a heart of the user and a measured point of the pulse wave by a time between an R peak of the ECG signal and a start point of the pulse wave.

16. The method of claim 11, wherein the blood pressure is compensated using one of:
Pbrachial=a+b×Pwrist or finger+c×PWV
Pbrachial=a+b×Pwrist or finger+C×PWV+d×PWV2
Pbrachial=a+b×Pwrist or finger+c×PWV+d×PWV2+e×PWV3, where Pbrachial is a brachial blood pressure measurement, Pradial is a radial blood pressure measurement, PWV is a PWV, and a, b, c, d, and e are empirical constants for compensating the radial blood pressure measurement.

17. An electronic device for measuring blood pressure, comprising: a blood pressure measurer configured to measure a blood pressure of a user; a Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) measurer configured to measure a PWV using a pulse wave, wherein the pulse wave is measured by an optical sensor; and a controller configured to compensate the blood pressure using the PWV.

18. The electronic device of claim 17, further comprising a display configured to display the compensated blood pressure.

19. The electronic device of claim 17, wherein the PWV measurer comprises the optical sensor for measuring the pulse wave.

20. The electronic device of claim 19, wherein the PWV measurer further comprises an ElectroCardioGram (ECG) electrode portion for measuring an ECG signal.

21. The electronic device of claim 20, the ECG electrode portion comprises three electrodes, two electrodes of the three electrodes being positioned inside of a cuff of the electronic device, and a remaining one electrode of the three electrodes being positioned outside of the cuff.

22. The electronic device of claim 19, wherein the optical sensor comprises a light source and a light receiving device, and wherein the optical sensor is positioned inside of a cuff of the electronic device or at an additional device configured to attach to a finger of the user.

23. The electronic device of claim 20, wherein the PWV measurer calculates the PWV by dividing a distance between a heart of the user and a measured point of the pulse wave by a time between an R peak of the ECG signal and a start point of the pulse wave.

24. The electronic device of claim 20, wherein the controller compensates the blood pressure using one of:
Pbrachial=a+b×Pwrist or finger+c×PWV
Pbrachial=a+b×Pwrist or finger+C×PWV d×PWV2
Pbrachial=a+b×Pwrist or finger+c×PWV+d×PWV2+e×PWV3, where Pbrachial is a brachial blood pressure measurement, Pradial is a radial blood pressure measurement, PWV is a PWV, and a, b, c, d, and e are empirical constants for compensating the radial blood pressure measurement.

Description:

PRIORITY

This application is a Continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/570,873, which was filed in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Sep. 30, 2009, and claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §119(a) to Korean Patent Application Serial No. 10-2008-0118604, which was filed in the Korean Intellectual Property Office on Nov. 27, 2008, the entire disclosure of each of which is incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to a portable device for measuring blood pressure and a method therefor. More particularly, the present invention relates to a portable device for measuring wrist or finger arterial pressure corresponding to brachial arterial pressure and a method therefor.

2. Description of the Related Art

Blood pressure is one of the most useful vital signs for human health care. Clinically, blood pressure provides an index by which abnormalities of the circulatory system, including the heart and blood vessels, can be diagnosed. Blood pressure outside a normal range requires consistent care. Arterial pressure changes with cardiac pulsation. The peak pressure the arteries feel when the ventricles are contracting and pushing the blood out into the arteries is called systolic pressure. Even when the ventricles are relaxing and filling back up with blood, the elasticity of the walls of the arteries maintains some blood pressure, and thus the blood pressure does not drop to zero. This lower level of blood pressure is called diastolic pressure.

Nervousness often results in a high blood pressure measurement when a person visits a clinic. Since blood pressure varies with a variety of factors, it is difficult to get an accurate blood pressure measurement at one time. Hence, a home-use electronic blood pressure monitor is necessary to enable users to constantly measure their blood pressures at their homes. The most widely used automatic electronic blood pressure monitor operates by volume oscillometry. The volume oscillometry scheme measures blood pressure based on oscillations that are generated by raising or dropping pressure to the arteries with use of a cuff. In this measuring method, the cuff pressure at which the pulse arising from cardiac pulsation has a maximum amplitude that is estimated to be a mean blood pressure. Herein, the systolic and diastolic pressures are estimated to be cuff pressures having 45 to 57% and 74 to 82% of the maximum amplitude, respectively.

FIG. 1 is a graph illustrating blood pressure measurements based on oscillation pressures of a cuff. Referring to FIG. 1, the ratio of a systolic amplitude to a maximum amplitude and the ratio of a diastolic amplitude to the maximum amplitude are called characteristic ratios, which vary with individuals. It is known that the characteristic ratios are greatly affected by cuff characteristics, the characteristics of artery vessels, the shape and amplitude of arterial pressure waves, etc.

At present, most blood pressure monitors measure blood pressure in an upper arm at heart level. For measurement convenience, products for measuring blood pressure in a wrist or a finger using a cuff have been developed and commercialized.

Such a wrist- or finger-type blood pressure monitor is smaller than the upper arm-type monitor. Due to the small size, the wrist- or finger-type blood pressure monitor is portable and obviates the need to take off a portion of a patient's clothing for pressure measuring, thus allowing blood pressure measuring at any time. However, because a wrist or finger arterial signal is weaker than a brachial arterial signal, it basically has a low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR). Therefore, the wrist- or finger-type blood pressure monitor is less accurate than the upper arm-type one.

Blood pressure may differ at different artery positions due to a plurality of factors. Hence, the wrist- or finger-type blood pressure monitor may give a different blood pressure measurement from that of the upper arm-type one. As a consequence, blood pressure measurements of the wrist- or finger-type blood pressure monitor may be less reliable to users.

A conventional wrist- or finger-type blood pressure monitor measures an arterial pressure by oscillometry, like the upper arm-type blood pressure monitor. If the blood pressure monitor is precise and the brachial arterial pressure is equal to the wrist- or finger arterial pressure, a pressure at the upper arm should be equal to a pressure at the wrist or finger which is leveled at the heart height.

However, the brachial arterial pressure is different from the wrist or finger arterial pressure due to the characteristics of blood flow, and the differences between individuals.

That is, a measured wrist or finger arterial pressure of a user may be higher or lower than a measured brachial arterial pressure for the same individual.

FIG. 2 illustrates characteristics of blood pressure and waveform changes with respect to the positions of arteries. In FIG. 2, pulse pressure changes with respect to the distances of the arteries to an aorta are shown, as well as pulse pressure changes that vary with age. That is, the difference between systolic and diastolic pressures increases at an artery more remote from an aorta at younger ages due to the overlap of reflective waves. At older ages, the difference is zero or may increase. Even individuals of the same age may differ in the systolic-diastolic difference. Therefore, when a user familiar with the upper arm-type blood pressure monitor popular in clinics uses the wrist- or finger-type blood pressure monitor, for use convenience or portability, he may be confused with blood pressure measurements.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention has been made to address at least the above problems and/or disadvantages, and to provide at least the advantages described below.

An aspect of an embodiment of the present invention provides a portable blood pressure measuring apparatus for giving a user a wrist or finger arterial pressure compensated to correspond to a brachial arterial pressure that differs in individuals, and a method therefor.

In accordance with an aspect of the present invention, a method is provided for measuring blood pressure by an electronic device. The method includes measuring a blood pressure of a user; measuring a Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) using a pulse wave and an ElectroCardioGram (ECG) signal of the user, wherein the pulse wave is measured by an optical sensor, and the ECG signal is measured by an ECG electrodes portion; and compensating the blood pressure using the PWV.

In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, an electronic device is provided for measuring a blood pressure. The electronic device includes a blood pressure measurer configured to measure a blood pressure of a user; a PWV measurer configured to measure a PWV using a pulse wave and an ECG signal, wherein the pulse wave is measured by an optical sensor, and the ECG signal is measured by an ECG electrodes portion; and a controller configured to compensate the blood pressure using the PWV.

In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, a method is provided for measuring blood pressure by an electronic device. The method includes measuring a blood pressure of a user; measuring a PWV using a pulse wave, wherein the pulse wave is measured by an optical sensor; and compensating the blood pressure using the PWV so that the blood pressure corresponds to a brachial blood pressure.

In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, an electronic device is provided for measuring blood pressure. The electronic device includes a blood pressure measurer configured to measure a blood pressure of a user; a PWV measurer configured to measure a PWV using a pulse wave, wherein the pulse wave is measured by an optical sensor; and a controller configured to compensate the blood pressure using the PWV.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The above and other aspects, features and advantages of certain embodiments of the present invention will be more apparent from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a graph illustrating blood pressure measurements based on oscillation pressures of a cuff;

FIG. 2 illustrates characteristics of blood pressure and waveform changes with respect to the positions of arteries;

FIG. 3 illustrates measuring of a Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) using an ElectroCardioGram (ECG) signal and a PhotoPlethysnoGraphy (PPG) signal;

FIGS. 4A, 4B and 4C illustrate pulse wave overlap characteristics according to PWVs;

FIG. 5 is a graph illustrating a relationship between PWV and radial and brachial blood pressures;

FIG. 6A is a graph illustrating a relationship between PWV and radial-brachial systolic pressure difference;

FIG. 6B is a graph illustrating a relationship between PWV and radial-brachial diastolic pressure difference;

FIG. 6C illustrate when the positions of the wrists is lower than the heart level;

FIG. 6D illustrate when the positions of the wrists is same the heart level;

FIG. 6E illustrate when the positions of the wrists is same the heart level;

FIG. 7 is a block diagram of a portable blood pressure measuring apparatus according to an exemplary embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 8 illustrates a portable blood pressure measuring apparatus according to an exemplary embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 9 illustrates a portable blood pressure measuring apparatus according to another exemplary embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 10 is a flowchart illustrating an operation for measuring blood pressure in a portable blood pressure measuring apparatus according to an exemplary embodiment of the present invention; and

FIGS. 11A and 11B are graphs illustrating blood pressures measured by a portable blood pressure measuring apparatus according to an exemplary embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

The matters defined in the description such as a detailed construction and elements are provided to assist in a comprehensive understanding of the embodiments of the invention. Accordingly, those of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that various changes and modifications of the embodiments described herein can be made without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention. Also, descriptions of well-known functions and constructions are omitted for clarity and conciseness. Throughout the drawings, the same drawing reference numerals will be understood to refer to the same elements, features and structures.

To calculate the difference between brachial blood pressure and radial blood pressure, information by which to measure or estimate an individual deviation is necessary in a conventional blood pressure measuring method. The information may be the velocity of pulse waves from which blood pressure is measured. Accordingly, a PWV is used to compensate for an individual radial-brachial pressure difference in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 3 illustrates measuring of a PWV using an ElectroCardioGram (ECG) signal and a PhotoPlethysnoGraphy (PPG) signal. Referring to FIG. 3, the time difference between an R-peak of the ECG signal and start of a PPG signal measured by an optical sensor in a portable blood pressure measuring apparatus carried around a wrist or a finger, namely a Pulse Transit Time (PTT) is the time taken for the PPG signal to reach a measurement spot as the ventricles are contracted. A PWV is calculated by dividing the distance between the heart and the measurement spot of the PPG signal by the PTT. The PWV is widely used as an arterial stiffness index.

FIGS. 4A, 4B and 4C illustrate pulse wave overlap characteristics according to PWVs. A PPG signal generated from ventricular contraction causes a reflective wave at an aortic bifurcation or an aortic termination. As illustrated in FIG. 4A, the magnitude and shape of a PPG signal at a certain spot on an artery are determined by the overlap between the original PPG signal and a reflective wave.

Referring to FIG. 4B, if the PWV is low, the overlap between the reflective wave and the PPG signal does not increase the maximum pressure of the PPG signal. On the other hand, when the PWV is high, as illustrated in FIG. 4C, if the overlap between the reflective wave and the PPG signal increases the maximum pressure of the overlapped wave, that is, the systolic pressure is above the maximum pressure of the original PPG signal, the increase of the PWV also increases the systolic pressure due to the overlap.

The overlap of the PPG signal also depends on the distance from a spot where the reflective wave is generated, as well as the PWV.

If a PPG signal measured at a wrist or a finger near the aortic termination where a reflective wave is created is different from a PPG signal measured at the brachial aorta relatively far from the aortic termination, in terms of magnitude and shape, this difference is caused by a difference in overlap time, as described above.

When the PWV is low, for example, when a wave having the shape illustrated in FIG. 4C is formed at the wrist aorta and a wave having the shape illustrated in FIG. 4B is formed at the brachial aorta, the systolic pressure changes as much as the difference between the maximum pressures illustrated in FIGS. 4B and 4C.

When the PWV increases, the maximum pressure of the wrist or finger aorta increases due to wave overlap. As a consequence, the maximum pressure difference between the wrist or finger aorta and the brachial aorta increases.

If arteriosclerosis causes an extremely high PWV, the waves of the wrist or finger and brachial aortas have the shape illustrated in FIG. 4C. In this case, the maximum pressure difference between the wrist or finger aorta and the brachial aorta may drop.

In general, the difference between the radial or finger artery pressure and the brachial pressure measured at the same height (i.e. the height measured from the heart level) tends to increase as the PWV is higher.

FIG. 5 is a graph illustrating a relationship between PWVs and radial and brachial blood pressures. The graph shows results of a test that was performed to verify the trend that the difference between the radial pressure and the brachial pressure increases with the PWV.

Blood pressures of six persons were measured at heart level using a cuff-based upper arm blood pressure monitor (A&D, UA-767) and a cuff-based wrist blood pressure monitor (Citizen, CH-656C). For each person at the same position, a PWV is measured from the ECG signals of both hands and a PPG signal of a finger measured by a transmissive optical sensor. The PWV and the mean difference between the radial pressure and the brachial pressure were plotted as a graph. As expected, the graph indicates that the difference between the radial pressure and the brachial pressure increases with the PWV.

To find out whether the characteristics illustrated in FIG. 5 also apply to a wider range of PWVs and a wider range of blood pressures, as illustrated in FIGS. 6C, 6D and 6E the positions of the wrists of the six persons were changed with respect to the heart level, thereby causing an about −30 to 40 mm Hg-difference between the radial pressure and the brachial pressure. In the case illustrated in FIG. 6, it is revealed that both the systolic and diastolic pressure differences between the radial pressure and the brachial pressure have a correlation coefficient of about 0.9.

The operation of the portable blood pressure measuring apparatus based on the relationship between the PWV and the radial-brachial difference is described in detail with reference to FIGS. 7 to 10.

FIG. 7 is a block diagram of a portable blood pressure measuring apparatus according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention, FIG. 8 illustrates a portable blood pressure measuring apparatus according to embodiment of the present invention, FIG. 9 illustrates a portable blood pressure measuring apparatus according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention, and FIG. 10 is a flowchart illustrating an operation for measuring blood pressure in a portable blood pressure measuring apparatus according to an preferred embodiment of the present invention.

Referring to FIG. 7, a pressure measurer 720 measures a wrist or finger and provides the pressure measurement to a controller 710. Also provided are display 750, memory 740 and keypad 760.

A PWV measurer 730 measures a PWV, including an ECG electrode portion 731 and an optical sensor 732.

The ECG electrode portion 731 includes at least two electrodes. It is assumed that the ECG electrode portion 731 includes three electrodes in accordance with the exemplary embodiment of the present invention. Two of the three electrodes are provided inside a cuff of the portable blood pressure measuring apparatus and the other electrode is provided outside the cuff. Alternatively, one of the three electrodes is inside the cuff, while the other two electrodes are positioned outside the cuff.

The optical sensor 732 includes a light source and a light receiving device. The optical sensor 732 may reside in the cuff or in an additional device attached to a finger.

The structure of the PWV measurer 730 will be described in detail with reference to FIGS. 8 and 9. FIG. 8 illustrates a wrist-type blood pressure measuring apparatus. Three electrodes 731a, 731b and 731c for measuring an EGC signal are added to a conventional blood pressure monitor cuff 770. An optical sensor 732 for measuring a PPG signal is provided inside a cuff 770 that contacts a wrist aorta portion or is provided in an additional device 800 that wraps around a finger.

As illustrated in FIG. 8, regarding ECG electrodes, two ECG electrodes (e.g. a (−) electrode 731a and a GND electrode 731b) are provided at a portion that contacts with an arm around which the cuff 770 is wrapped, and one ECG electrode (e.g. a positive (+) electrode 731c) is provided on a display 750 or outside the cuff 770. Alternatively, the electrode 731c may be positioned inside the cuff 770 and the two electrodes 731a and 731b may be positioned outside the cuff 770.

When blood pressure is measured, the ECG electrodes within the cuff 770 are brought into contact with the arm around which the cuff 770 is wrapped. Therefore, an ECG is measured by contacting a finger from the hand of the arm without the cuff 770.

As illustrated in FIG. 8, pulse waves by which to measure the PWV may be measured by adding a transmissive optical sensor 732a and 732b to the additional device 800 installed to the finger or a reflective optical sensor (a light source 732c and a light receiving device 732d) inside the cuff 770. Especially when a PPG signal is measured at the wrist aorta, it is preferable to dispose the light source 732c and the light receiving device 732d such that the aorta is positioned between the light source 732c and the light receiving devices 732d.

FIG. 9 illustrates a finger-type blood pressure measuring apparatus. Like the writs-type blood pressure measuring apparatus, the finger-type blood pressure measuring apparatus preferably additionally has ECG electrodes 730 inside and outside the cuff 770 in order to measure the PWV. Since the finger aorta is small, oscillation may be measured by use of optical sensors 732a and 732b instead of pressure oscillation of the cuff 770. In this case, the optical sensors 732a and 732b are added inside the cuff 770 to apply the oscillometry method, compared to the wrist-type blood pressure measuring apparatus. The PWV may be measured using the optical sensors 732a and 732b.

However, since the PWV changes when pressure is applied to arterial vessels by pressing the cuff 770, it is preferred that a transmissive or reflective optical sensor is additionally provided in an additional device 800 attached to the tip of the finger, besides the optical sensor within the cuff.

The controller 710 providers overall control to the portable blood pressure measuring apparatus. Upon receipt of a wrist or finger pressure value measured by the pressure measurer 720, the controller 710 controls compensation of the received wrist or finger pressure value using the PWV received from the PWV measurer 730 by an equation for compensating the wrist or finger pressure to correspond to a brachial pressure.

The controller 720 controls the compensated wrist or finger pressure to be displayed on the display 750.

The memory 740 stores the compensation equation which has been selected from among the following compensation equations:


Pbrachial=a+b×Pwrist or finger+c×PWV (1)


Pbrachial=a+b×Pwrist or finger+C×PWV+d×PWV2 (2)


Pbrachial=a+b×Pwrist or finger+c×PWV+d×PWV2+e×PWV3 (3),

where Pbrachial is a brachial blood pressure Pwrist or finger is a blood pressure measured at the wrist or finger, PWV is a PWV, and a, b, c, d and e are empirical constants for compensating the wrist or finger pressure value.

The compensation equation can also be empirically selected by a developer of the portable blood pressure measuring apparatus. The developer determines the correlation coefficients between wrist or finger and brachial pressure difference and the PWV for both systolic and diastolic pressures, selects an equation that approximates the wrist or finger pressure to the brachial pressure from among the equations as described above, and stores the equation in the memory 740. Alternatively, the developer derives more than the above compensation equations by performing testing based on an equation Pbrachial=f(Pwrist or finger, PWV), pursuant to the relationship between PWV and wrist or finger-brachial pressure difference illustrated in FIG. 6.

In accordance with an embodiment of the present invention, the memory 740 stores all of equations 1 through 3 so that only a user-selected equation is used in pressure measuring mode, and the memory 740 preferably also stores the compensated radial pressure.

The display 750 displays the wrist or finger pressure compensated to correspond to the brachial pressure in the pressure measuring mode. The keypad 760 includes function keys by which functions of the portable blood pressure measuring apparatus are set.

A blood pressure measuring operation of the portable blood pressure measuring apparatus illustrated in FIGS. 7, 8 and 9 is described in detail with reference to FIG. 10.

FIG. 10 is a flowchart illustrating an operation for measuring blood pressure in a portable blood pressure measuring apparatus according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

Referring to FIG. 10, upon selection of pressure measuring mode by key input of the keypad 760, the controller 740 senses the pressure measuring mode and transitions the portable blood pressure measuring apparatus to a pressure measuring mode in step 1001.

The pressure measurer 720 measures a wrist or finger pressure by the oscillation of the cuff and transmits the wrist or finger pressure to the controller 740 in the pressure measuring mode in step 1002.

In step 1003, the PWV measurer 730 measures a PWV through the ECG electrode portion 731 and the optical sensor 732 and provides the PWV to the controller 740.

Upon receipt of the wrist or finger pressure and the PWV, the controller 740 compensates the wrist or finger pressure to correspond to a brachial pressure utilizing the compensation equation stored in the memory 740, in step 1004.

In step 1005, the controller 740 displays the compensated wrist or finger pressure on the display 750.

FIGS. 11A and 11B are graphs illustrating blood pressures measured by a portable blood pressure measuring apparatus according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention. In FIG. 11, in the case of an about −30 to 40 mm Hg difference between the radial pressure and the brachial pressure as illustrated in FIG. 6, the pressure difference is decreased by the procedure of FIG. 10. The compensation equation used herein is equation 1.

As is apparent from the above description, the portable blood pressure measuring apparatus and method of the present invention effectively eliminate the difference between a radial pressure and a brachial pressure for individuals using a PWV. Therefore, the radial pressure is compensated to correspond to the brachial pressure, for the user. Since consistency is secured between an upper arm blood pressure monitor used in a clinic and a wrist-type or finger-type blood pressure monitor, instant blood pressure measurement and management is obtained.

Embodiments of the present invention can also be embodied as computer-readable codes on a computer-readable recording medium. The computer-readable recording medium includes data storage devices that store data for subsequent use by a computer system. Examples of the computer-readable recording medium include, but are not limited to, Read-Only Memory (ROM), Random-Access Memory (RAM), CD-ROMs, magnetic tapes, floppy disks, optical data storage devices, and carrier waves (such as data transmission through the Internet via wired or wireless transmission paths). The computer-readable recording medium can also be distributed over network-coupled computer systems so that the computer-readable code is stored and executed in a distributed fashion. Also, function programs, codes, and code segments for accomplishing the present invention can be easily construed as within the scope of the invention by programmers skilled in the art to which the present invention pertains.

While the present invention has been shown and described with reference to certain embodiments of the present invention thereof, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes in form and details may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention as defined by the appended claims and their equivalents.