Title:
STRAP-ON CHILD CARRIER WITH SUPPORT SEATING ELEMENT
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A child carrier device includes a support seat affixed to a fastening strap adapted to be worn around a waist area and wherein the support seat is configured to substantially support the weight of a child, and a restraining strap detachably coupled above the support seat and configured to provide upper body support.



Inventors:
Cha, Steve (Franklin Lakes, NJ, US)
Application Number:
13/772894
Publication Date:
08/21/2014
Filing Date:
02/21/2013
Assignee:
CHA STEVE
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
224/159
International Classes:
A47D13/02
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
SCHMIDT, PHILLIP D
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Cha & Reiter, LLC (17 Arcadian Avenue Suite 208, Paramus, NJ, 07652, US)
Claims:
What is claimed:

1. A child carrier device comprising a support seat affixed to a fastening strap adapted to be worn around a waist area and wherein the support seat is configured to substantially support the weight of a child; and a restraining strap located above the support seat and configured to provide upper body support.

2. The child carrier device according to claim 1, wherein the fastening strap includes a stiffening element.

3. The child carrier device according to claim 2, wherein the stiffening element is a continuous flat strip along the length of the fastening strap.

4. The child carrier device according to claim 2, wherein the stiffing element is plurality of lateral stiffening elements located at predetermined intervals along the length of the fastening strap.

5. The child carrier device according to claim 1, wherein the seat includes a non-slip cover material.

6. The child carrier device according to claim 1, wherein the seat includes a hollow configured to provide a secure seating surface.

7. The child carrier device according to claim 1, wherein the restraining strap is configured to be attached to around a waist area in a continuous detachable loop fashion.

8. The child carrier device according to claim 1, wherein the restraining strap is configured to be attached to a user by shoulder straps.

9. The child carrier device according to claim 1, wherein the restraining strap is configured to be attached to a user by a wearable vest garment.

10. The child carrier device according to claim 1, wherein the seat is adapted to be worn around a waist area in a plurality of different positions.

11. The child carrier device according to claim 1, wherein the seat is formed of a rigid material such as one selected from the group comprising plastic, fiberboard or reinforced cardboard.

12. The child carrier device according to claim 1, wherein the restraining strap is detachably coupled to the support.

13. The child carrier device according to claim 17, wherein the support seat further comprising a pocket for storage.

14. A child carrier device comprising a support seat affixed to a fastening strap adapted to be worn around a waist area, and wherein the support seat is configured to substantially support the weight of a child; a carrier compartment integrally coupled above the support seat, and a strap coupled to the carrier compartment to fasten around an upper body.

15. The child carrier device according to claim 14, wherein the strap is configured as a more than one piece.

16. The child carrier device according to claim 14, wherein the strap is a shoulder strap.

17. The child carrier device according to claim 16, wherein the strap is a garment vest.

18. A child carrier device for providing a structure for partially supporting the weight of the child comprising a support seat affixed to a fastening strap adapted to be worn around a waist area, wherein the fastening strap includes a stiffing element and wherein the support seat is configured to substantially support the weight of a child.

19. The child carrier device according to claim 18, wherein the seat is adapted to be worn around a waist area in a plurality of different positions.

20. The child carrier device according to claim 18, wherein the support seat further comprising a pocket for storage.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of Invention

The present invention relates to a strap on child carrier that provides both straps for securing the child and an additional feature of a rigid shelf support structure for assisting in bearing the load of the secured child.

2. Description of the Related Art

It is known to utilize strap on child carriers that hold a child for an adult, so that the adult can have greater mobility and flexibility with their arms while holding the child. Such strap-on carriers typically take the form of a compartment carrier device, or a sling. Typically, the sling device is configured to completely wrap the child's body. The sling may include openings placed in appropriate positions for the child's arms and legs to protrude through the sling while the child's torso is supported by the sling, thus allowing the child's arms and legs to move freely. Alternate versions may completely cover or support the child without leaving any openings for arm and legs.

Typically, the sling type child carriers will hold the child on the front of the adult, and are usually appropriate for small newborn infants, although there are alternate types which may be used with larger children. The soft infant carriers are typically constructed of a fabric material configured as a sling. The sling will wrap around the adults over one or both shoulders and envelope the child like a blanket and support the child within the sling.

In the compartment carrier type, typically the child is supported in a front or rear facing orientation using a device that is strapped to the adult's body using a number of straps, usually over the shoulder and around the waist. These carriers that are intended for larger children typically are constructed with additional support structure and may include a more rigid carrier that can be faced toward the adult or away from the adult so that the child can be held in either orientation. The supports may include any type of lateral or longitudinal stiffeners which assist in making a more structurally sound compartment for carrying the child. These carriers, typically provide a capsule or compartment that the child may be placed into, the compartment is usually a separate structure that can be separated from the straps that retain the carrier to the adult. In this way the carrier can be removed from the adult user without removing the child from the carrier compartment. These carriers also typically are held onto the adult wearing the unit by way of shoulder while the child is suspended with most of weight of child extending from the shoulder straps, and sometimes a waist strap is added for stability.

Referring to FIG. 1, there is shown a typical prior art type carrier depicting the child carrying compartment 100, and shoulder straps 102 and a waist strap 104. The compartment as depicted in FIG. 1 shows opening for both arms and legs, however not all such prior art designs incorporate such openings. The compartment 100 may completely encase the child. Also, the shoulder straps 102 are depicted, which carry the majority of the child's weight in prior art designs, while the waist strap merely provides stability for the lower portion of the compartment 100.

These types of carriers however, both have drawbacks in terms of usability and functional flexibility. First, all of the typical prior art child carriers predominantly rely upon shoulder strap support for support. This can cause a problem for the typical user during extended wear due to the fact that support is provided through the users shoulders and back and thus fatigue and pain can result. Also, according to prior art designs, the majority of the load bearing is carried through the shoulder straps, leading to a concentration of force on the shoulder straps. By concentrating force on the shoulder straps, not only is all the child's weight supported by the adult's torso, thus resulting in pain or injury, but there can also be pain caused by the localization of force and weight on the adult's shoulders. Further, some infants are bigger than their peers so the conventional carriers have limited usage as they grow out quickly at the age of 6 month to 8 month old.

Additionally, due to the design of the prior art carriers, there is little flexibility in how the child can be carried once the child in placed in the sling or compartment. Therefore, it is very difficult to alter the child's position once they are placed in the carrier. Because the child position cannot be altered easily, muscle fatigue and pain for the adult may result and additionally discomfort may result for the child. Moreover, due to complex strap mechanism, it is not intuitive and easy to strap the baby by a user, and even requires two people to strap the baby.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is therefore an objective of the present invention to provide a child carrier that provides an alternate support structure for the child, which more evenly distributes the child's weight over the adult's body, mainly the waste and hip area.

It is therefore a further objective of the present invention to provide a child carrier that provides more flexibility for positions in which the child can be carried and also makes it easier to load the child onto the carrier.

It is therefore a further objective of the present invention to provide a child carrier that provides for the ability of the adult to easily change the positions and also for one adult to easily load the child onto the carrier.

It is therefore a further objective of the present invention to provide a child carrier that minimizes strain on the adult's shoulders and upper torso.

It is therefore a further objective of the present invention to provide a less bulky and easy to use child carrier.

There is therefore provided a child carrier comprising a child carrier device comprising a support seat affixed to a fastening strap adapted to be worn around a waist area and wherein the support seat is configured to substantially support the weight of a child. The child carrier further includes a restraining strap located above the support seat and configured to provide upper body support.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The above and other exemplary aspects, features and advantages of certain exemplary embodiments of the STRAP-ON CHILD CARRIER WITH SUPPORT SHELF according to the present invention will become more apparent to a person or ordinary skill in the art from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a side view of a prior art carrier depicted in use on an adult.

FIG. 2A is a front perspective view of the inventive child carrier according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2B is side perspective view of the inventive child carrier according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2C is a front perspective view of the inventive child carrier according to an embodiment of the present invention having a child placed on the carrier.

FIG. 2D is a perspective view of straps for securing a child using the inventive child carrier according to the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a side view of the inventive child carrier according to an embodiment of the present invention having a child placed on the carrier.

FIG. 4A is a rear view of the inventive child carrier according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 4B is a rear view of the inventive child carrier according to an alternate embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 4C is a rear view of the inventive child carrier according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 4D is a rear view of the inventive child carrier according to an alternate embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is a rear perspective view of the inventive child carrier according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 6 is a front perspective view of the inventive child carrier according to an alternate embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 7 is a front perspective view of the inventive child carrier according to an alternate embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 8 is a side view of the inventive child carrier according to another alternate embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 9 is a front view of the inventive child carrier according to another alternate embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Exemplary embodiments of the present invention will now be described herein below with reference to the accompanying drawings. In the following description, well-known functions or constructions may not be described in detail when they would obscure appreciation of the present invention by a person of ordinary skill in the art with unnecessary detail of the well-known functions and structures. Also, the terms used herein are defined according to the functions of the present invention as would be understood by a person of ordinary skill in the art. Thus, the terms may vary depending on user's or operator's intention and usage. That is, the terms used herein must be understood based on the descriptions made herein in view of the ordinary level of skill in the art. In all figures, the substantially same elements are given the same reference number, and overlapping descriptions are omitted.

The present invention described hereinafter provides a strap on child carrier of improved design that provides a support shelf seat as a load bearing component together with a plurality of straps that may be configured in a variety of manners for holding the child securely as well as for providing an improved way to adjust how the adult can hold the child. The seat is attached to a fastening strap or belt which is worn by the adult user around the waist and can be positioned on the front or side of an adult so that the child can be shifted into a variety of positions. Additionally, the child can be placed on the seat in either a front or rear facing orientation. There are also provided a variety of straps and restraining bands to assist in holding the child close to the adult's body and securely supported on the seat. Alternately, the adult can utilize only the seat portion without the straps or bands. In this embodiment the seat acts to minimize the weight that the adult must hold with their arms as some of the load bearing is performed by the support seat coupled to a waste belt so that the weight can be more effectively distributed around the waste and hip area when compared to the conventional art. In this embodiment it is particularly easy for the adult to move and re-position the child, and also without the need of another person's help, while still minimizing the stress and strain on the adult's arms and torso by providing the addition load bearing support seat. In this configuration, the present invention is particularly useful for short term use, when a full carrier is not needed or when the adult does not need their arms free for other tasks, but still desires or needs the additional support that the seat provides so as to avoid fatigue and strain on their arms and back.

The support seat can be held on the adult by a band or strap around the adult in a location approximately at the waist such as a belt, and may be made of a lightweight rigid material with sufficient strength to support a child's weight without deformation such as plastic, fiberboard, reinforced cardboard or other such material. Additionally the seat and straps may be covered with a soft fabric, cloth or cloth-like material to provide a comfortable surface that is not abrasive or irritating to the skin while still providing sufficient friction so that the child does not slip off the seat. The material should also be durable and easy to clean. Non-limiting examples include natural and blend textile cloths such as wool, cotton, polyester and nylon or leather or imitation leather fabric. One skilled in the art will however realize that the choices for the exterior covering are not limited to the examples giving herein, but may also include other equivalent fabrics and materials. Padding may also be added for extra comfort. In addition, the seat may be shaped to more securely hold the child by providing a depression or hollow in the seat into which the child can be seated. This depression or hollow will align the child on the seat and maintain the child within the seat edge boundaries.

The strap for holding the support seat to the adult may typically be wide to provide adequate support and even distribution of the load. The seat strap may also include stiffeners in the area where the support seat is attached to the strap to prevent the strap from folding or twisting and to prevent the support seat from pivoting downward under the weight of the child.

The child support straps or bands can include a variety of shapes and configurations that will be described hereinafter which can be used to provide support for the child and thus leave the adults arms free for other tasks, while still providing the additional load bearing support of the seat, so that pressure and force on the adults torso is minimized.

Turning now to FIG. 2A, there is shown a front perspective view of the inventive child carrier according to an embodiment of the present invention. In the view shown in FIG. 2A the child carrier 200 is shown having a seat component 202 and a restraining strap component 204. The seat component 202 and restraining strap component 204 are preferable attached together into a single unit behind the adult user (not seen in this view) although the child carrier may also be implemented in two pieces where the seat component 202 and the restraining strap component 204 are two separate units. The seat component preferably comprises two parts, the seat 206 and the seat fastening strap 208. As stated above, the seat may be made of a lightweight rigid material with sufficient strength to support a child's weight without deformation such as plastic, fiberboard, reinforced cardboard or other such material. Additionally the seat and straps may be covered with a soft cloth or cloth like material. The seat 206 is attached to the fastening strap 208 such that the two components are securely attached and may not be separated or torn apart. The attachment can be carried out by stitching or bonding the two sections together or using other techniques and method known in the art.

The fastening strap 208 is preferably constructed of a soft flexible material such that it may easily be wrapped around the user and fastened to the user's body in the same manner as a belt. Typical materials known in the art for such straps may include nylon, polypropylene, canvas or other materials known to one skilled in the art. While the fastening strap 208 is constructed of a soft material, there are also provided stiffeners 210 to prevent the seat from being pushed or pivoted downward under the weight of a child. Alternatively, the stiffeners 210 may be provided inside the fabric of the fast strap 208 and the seat 206 as a single piece or two pieces. The stiffeners 210 may typically be plastic, metal, reinforced cardboard, fiberboard or any material providing adequate rigidity and stiffness to counteract the weight of an infant, a toddler, or a child. The stiffeners 210 may be either a single piece that extends the full length of the fastening strap 208 and is flexible in the longitudinal direction so that the fastening strap 208 can bend to wrap around the user while also being rigid in the lateral direction to prevent bending, folding or twisting of the fastening strap. Alternatively, the stiffeners 210 may be a single piece inside the seat 206 and the strap 208. Alternately the stiffeners 210 may be comprised of a plurality of stiffening columns that are arranged vertically along the length of the fastening strap 208. In either configuration, the stiffeners 210 are positioned to prevent the fastening strap 208 from rolling or folding over due to the force applied to the seat component 206 by the weight of the child and to prevent the seat component 206 from pivoting down due to the weight of the child. In addition the stiffener piece or columns act to evenly distribute the force applied to the seat by the weight of the child along the length of the belt and in that way provides a structure that is both comfortable for the user to wear as well as provide adequate support for the seat 202. The stiffeners 210 may be located on the exterior of the fastening strap 208 or may be installed within the fastening strap 208 and covered by the exterior material.

Further, the fastening strap 208 can be fastened around the waste or hip area of a user using a releasable attachment mechanisms, which may include but are not limited to hook and loop fasteners, buckle, snaps, buttons, laces, belt type fastener, zippers, velcro, and the like know to those stilled in this art or any combination thereof. Similarly, the restraining strap component 204 can use any of the aforementioned attachment means or any combination thereof.

In FIG. 2B, there is shown a side view of the inventive carrier positioned and fastened to an adult user. In the depiction of FIG. 2B, the inventive carrier is shown positioned on the users side. In other words, the support seat component 202 can be rotated around the users hip. In this position, the user may optionally hold the child with one arm while the child is seated facing the user or facing outwardly, leaving the other arm free, or may use the restraining strap 204 to secure the child, leaving both arms free. In the depiction of FIG. 2A the inventive carrier is shown without a child carried on the seat component 202, while FIG. 2C depicts a front view of the inventive carrier with a child placed on the support seat and secured against the adult's body by the restraining strap 204. As shown in FIG. 2D, the restraining strap 204 may be comprised of one strap or two or more straps. In either configuration the straps may be used by wrapping them around the user's body and around the child as shown in FIG. 2C. Depending on the design, the thickness of the retraining strap 204 can varied. The restraining strap may be further affixed by any attachment mechanism known in the art for attaching or closing open ends of material together. These releasable attachment mechanisms, which may include but are not limited to hook and loop fasteners, buckle, snaps, buttons, laces, belt type fastener, zippers, velcro, and the like know to those stilled in this art or any combination thereof.

Turning now to FIG. 3 there is shown a close-up side view of the inventive child carrier depicting the seat component 206 and seat fastening strap 208 and the restraining strap component 204. Also seen in this view is the back portion of the restraining strap component 204 which wraps around the adult user and also around the child to securely restrain the child. Thus the combination of the restraining strap 204 and the seat component 202 securely hold the child against the user's body without placing any pressure on the adult's shoulders and the child's back. By having a seat component 206 as a load bearing surface the weight of the child is mostly supported on the seat, while the restraining strap acts to prevent the child from falling forward and also further supports the weight of the child to reduce the back pressure when mounted on the seat component 206. The strap provides extra support by holding the child against the adult user sufficiently to add a component of vertical support in addition to preventing the child from tipping forward (horizontal support). However, because the seat component 206 provides most of the load bearing capacity (vertical support), the restraining strap 204 need not be tighten excessively such that it would place excessive force on the child or adult user. It should be further noted that the baby can be fastened in a reverse direction to face the adult while fastened by the strap 204.

Turning now to FIG. 4A, there is shown a rear view of an adult user wearing the inventive child carrier. There is shown the seat component fastening strap 208 and the restraining strap component 204. The seat component fastening strap 208 includes a locking or buckling device 402 for connecting the ends of the fastening strap 208 together. The locking device 402 may be a hook and loop fastener, a buckle such as is commonly used on a belt, buckle, snaps, buttons, velcro, or a zipper, although other types of locking or attaching devices as are known in the art may also be used. The locking device 402 also may include an adjusting mechanism as is known for such devices so that the user may lengthen or shorten the fastening strap as needed to conform to their body. By adjusting the fastening strap the user can conform the fastening strap tightly and securely to their body and waste and thus provide support for the seat component 202. For example, one such means of adjustment would be hook and loop fastener segments which can be overlapped to effectively length or shorten the fastening strap depending on the length of the overlapped segment, alternately a belt buckly type device may also be used.

Also depicted in FIG. 4A is the restraining strap 204 which is wrapped around the user and as previously described, provides extra support by holding the child against the adult user sufficiently to add a component of vertical support in addition to preventing the child from tipping forward (horizontal support). The restraining strap 204 may be comprised on a single piece that is wrapped around the user and affixed using an attachment mechanism as previously described. In one embodiment as shown in FIG. 4A, the restraining strap 204 may be long enough to wrap around not only the user but the child as well as shown in FIG. 2A and FIG. 3. In another embodiment the restraining strap may be comprised of two pieces as shown in FIG. 4D which may be connected to both wrap around the user as well as the child. Here, both the restraining strap 204 and the fastening strap 208 is integrated as one single unit, but it can be detachable separated from each other in according to another embodiment. Any configuration of two restraining straps may be utilized to provide adequate length to wrap around both the adult user and the child. In other words, one longer strap may be used to wrap around the user, while a shorter strap is also provided that can be used to hold the child and provide both horizontal and vertical support. Both of the straps may be provided with attachment mechanisms as described above.

Turning now to FIG. 4B there is shown an alternate embodiment of the present invention wherein the restraining strap 204 may be configured to attach as an over the shoulder strap 412 arrangement. In this alternate embodiment, which may be worn in any number of over the shoulder configurations as shown in FIGS. 4B and 4C, there are provided straps 412 that go over the users shoulders and can be used to restrain the child. In this arrangement the shoulder straps 412 may be attached to a restraining strap 204 to hold the child as will be depicted in FIG. 5. While this alternate embodiment provides over the shoulder straps for the user, the child carrier of the present invention minimizes the force on the user's shoulders by including the seat component 202 which provides most of the load bearing support for the child. Thus, according to the present invention, the load of the child is more evenly distributed over the adult user's body, in particular to the waste and hip area and fatigue and pain can be minimized.

Turning now to FIG. 5, there is shown an alternate embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 5 depicts the child carrier 200, having shoulder straps 412 which are attached to a restraining strap 204. The restraining strap 204 may be adjustable so that it can be lengthen or shorted in order to provide adequate room for the child, but also be tight enough to secure the child and prevent falling. The restraining strap 204 can be detachably released from the shoulder strap using any of the fastening mechanism mentioned throughout the specification. Additionally this embodiment further includes the seat component 202 attached to the seat component fastening strap 208.

Turning now to FIG. 6, there is shown a further alternate embodiment of the inventive child carrier 200 which includes a wearable vest or garment, 602, a detachable restraining strap 204, a seat component 202 and a seat component fastening strap 208. The vest 602 may be formed as an integral piece with the seat component fastening strap 208 and seat component 202. Alternately in this embodiment the vest 602 may be a separate component from the fastening strap 208 and seat component 202. Likewise, the restraining strap may be a separate piece that is detachable from the vest 602 or may be integrally connected to the vest 602. Additionally, the restraining strap 204 may be adjustable such that the height of the strap 204 relative to the seat component 202 may be varied. In this way the child carrier 200 may be adapted for use with children of varying heights by moving the restraining strap lower for smaller children and higher for larger children. As previously described with respect to other embodiments the restraining strap 204 may be adjustable in length in order to account for use with different size children. In accordance with this embodiment, the restraining strap 204 may be adjustable by providing an attachment mechanism which has a plurality of attachment points. The variable height attachment mechanism may include a hook and loop fastener strip, buttons, snaps or other similar attachment means which can be varied so that the restraining strap can be attached at different heights.

Turning now to FIG. 7, there is show a further alternate embodiment of the inventive child carrier 700. In the embodiment depicted, there is provided a seat component 202, a fastening strap component 208 and a flip up restraining shield 702. In the embodiment depicted in FIG. 7, the flip up shield 702 is attached beneath the seat component 202. The shield 702 is configured in such as way as to provide room for the child's legs to comfortably extend beyond the seat component 202 when the shield is folded into the up position. Once placed in the up position the shield 702 can be held in the upright position by fastening components 704 such as buckles, snaps, button or hook and loop fasteners which can engage with complementary fastening components provided on the user (not shown) for anchoring and holding the restraining shield 704 in an upright position. The complementary fastening components can be provided on the user on a wearable vest, or on a wrap around strap or over the shoulder strap which can be worn by the user. In this way the fastening components 704 can engage with complementary fasteners to hold the restraining shield in an upright position and thus secure the child against the users body. Similarly to other embodiments described earlier, by having a seat component 202 as a load bearing surface the weight of the child is mostly supported on the seat, 206 while the restraining shield 704 acts to prevent the child from falling forward and also further supports the weight of the child. The strap provides extra support by holding the child against the adult user sufficiently to add a component of vertical support in addition to preventing the child from tipping forward (horizontal support) and minimize the back pressure when mounted on the seat 206. However, because the seat component 202 provides most of the load bearing capacity (vertical support), the restraining shield need not be tightened excessively such that it would place too much force on the child or adult user.

The restraining shield 702 may preferably be made from a soft fabric material that is both durable and soft, thereby providing a secure and comfortable restraining device. Such fabrics may include cloths such as wool, cotton, polyester and nylon, although the choices are not limited to such materials.

Turning now to FIG. 8, there is shown a further alternate embodiment of the present invention where in the seat component 202 may be utilized with a prior art child carrier compartment or be integrated into the prior art type carrier as a single piece thus providing a seat support according to the teachings of the present invention. In this embodiment the seat component may be placed under the child in a location such that additional load bearing support is provided by the seat component 202, thereby minimizing the force on the prior art child carrier shoulder straps. In this way the force on the adult user's shoulders and torso is minimized and fatigue and strain can be lessened.

Turning now to FIG. 9, there is shown a further alternate embodiment of the present invention where in the seat component 202 may be utilized separately without any other restraining device optionally. In this embodiment, the adult user will hold the child with one or two hands. In this embodiment the seat component is placed under the child in a location such that additional load bearing support is provided by the seat component 202, thereby minimizing the force on the user's arms and torso and fatigue and strain can be lessened. In this embodiment the seat 206 acts to minimize the weight that the adult must hold with their arms as some of the load bearing is performed by the seat 206. In this embodiment it is particularly easy for the adult to move and re-position the child, while still minimizing the stress and strain on the adult's arms and torso by providing the addition load bearing support seat 206. In this configuration, the present invention is particularly useful for short term use, when a full carrier is not needed; when the child may be alternately carried or set down repeatedly; or when the adult does not need their arms free for other tasks but still desires or needs the additional support that the seat 206 provides so as to avoid fatigue and strain on their arms and back. In this embodiment, the seat 206 can be further provide with a pocket or sealable pocket for storing items.

While the invention has been described in connection with a presently preferred embodiment thereof, those skilled in the art will recognize that many modifications and changes can be made without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention, which accordingly is intended to be defined solely by the appended claims. For example, the strapping mechanism around the shoulder area can be achieved by any known combination of strap means known to artisians as long as the seating element 202 and seat 206 are used in conjunction. Also, the size of the seat 206 can be varied depending on the design preference.