Title:
Insulated beverage container for beer bottles
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The present invention is directed generally to an apparatus to insulate beverage containers, and more particularly to a design which may sustain a temperature gradient from the ambient over a designed time frame. In a particular embodiment of the invention, the insulated beverage container when housing a cooled liquid beverage initially in the range of 40 degrees Fahrenheit and ambient temperature no more than 80 degrees, the temperature of the liquid beverage will not rise more than 10 degrees for a period of 45 minutes with the insulating cap sealing the beverage container. Similarly, the same insulated beverage container when housing a heated beverage initially in the range of 160 degrees Fahrenheit, and ambient temperature no less than 20 degrees, the temperature of the liquid beverage may not cool more than 10 degrees for a period of 45 minutes with the insulating cap sealing the beverage container.


Inventors:
Martin, Jerry D. (Minnetonka, MN, US)
Application Number:
13/999036
Publication Date:
07/31/2014
Filing Date:
01/06/2014
Assignee:
MARTIN JERRY D.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47G23/03
View Patent Images:
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Claims:
I claim:

1. An insulated beverage container comprising: an insulating cylinder with an open top, closed bottom, and thin walled lateral surface with dimensions to accommodate a beverage; said closed bottom and thin walled lateral surface fabricated from a material with a thermal conductivity in the range of 0.2 to 0.35; and, thickness of said closed bottom and thin walled lateral surface sufficient to generate an insulation R value in the range of 7.5 to 8.5.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the closed bottom and thin walled lateral surface are manufactured from polyurethane rubber with a thickness in the range of 20 to 30 millimeters.

3. The device of claim 1 wherein the closed bottom and thin walled lateral surface are manufactured from nitrile rubber with a thickness in the range of 20 to 30 millimeters.

4. The device of claim 1 wherein the closed bottom and thin walled lateral surface are manufactured from silicone rubber with a thickness in the range of 20 to 30 millimeters.

5. The device of claim 1 wherein the closed bottom and thin walled lateral surface are manufactured from glass fiber filled silicone rubber with a thickness in the range of 20 to 30 millimeters.

6. The device of claim 1 wherein the insulated beverage container when housing a beverage container with cooled liquid beverage initially in the range of 35 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit and ambient temperature no more than 80 degrees, the temperature of the liquid beverage will not rise more than 10 degrees for a period of 45 minutes

7. An insulated beverage container comprising: an insulating cylinder with an open top, bottom surface with small central drainage hole to pass spillage, and thin walled lateral surface with dimensions to accommodate a beverage; said bottom surface and thin walled lateral surface fabricated from a material with a thermal conductivity in the range of 0.2 to 0.35; thickness of said bottom surface and thin walled lateral surface sufficient to generate an insulation R value in the range of 7.5 to 8.5; and, said bottom surface and thin walled lateral surface manufactured from polyurethane rubber with a thickness in the range of 20 to 30 millimeters.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/849,642 filed Jan. 30, 2013, which hereby is incorporated herein in its entirety by reference thereto.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed generally to an apparatus to insulate beer bottle containers, and more particularly to a design which may sustain a temperature gradient for chilled liquids from the ambient over a significant time frame.

BACKGROUND

A variety of insulated containers have been used to hold hot drinks and hot foods. Disposable paper or synthetic resin drinking cups have become extremely common. Simple paper cups are quite acceptable for holding cold or lukewarm beverages, but they present problems when used for hot drinks such as coffee or tea, which may be in the range of 170 to 175 degrees Fahrenheit in temperature. In such cases the user tends to grasp the cup between the thumb and forefinger at the upper and lower extremities of the cup, so as to avoid grasping the cup sidewall. While this alleviates the problem to some extent, it is extremely awkward and may result in spillage of the hot liquid onto the user.

Another approach resorted to in the past with paper cups has been the provision of a paper handle secured to the cup sidewall. These handles do provide a means of cup manipulation without directly grasping the cup sidewall; nevertheless, they present significant problems inasmuch as manufacturing costs are increased and because such handles tend to break away from the cup body during use, potentially spilling hot coffee for example on the holder.

Other design approaches to insulate heated beverages have dual walled constructions in which an inner container is attached to an outer container to create an intermediate air gap. Examples of such beverage containers include U.S. Pat. No. 2,895,636 to Martin; U.S. Pat. No. 3,861,565 to Rickmeier, Jr.; U.S. Pat. No. 4,151,923 to Bernardi; U.S. Pat. No. 4,595,437 to Yamimoto; U.S. Pat. No. 4,618,066 to Vail; and British Patent No. GB 582,294 to Court, and U.S. Pat. No. 3,684,123 to Bridges, which discloses a double wall beverage mug. None of these documents, however, disclose a double wall beverage mug for containing hot or cold beverages without potential spillage on the user and having a base portion substantially wider than the mouth portion of the mug.

Similarly, the desirability of consuming a can of beer or soda in a chilled state, regardless of the temperature of the environment in which these beverages are served, has prompted the development of devices to insulate these chilled beverages during consumption. One such device of contemporary popularity is a can holder molded into an insulative cup configuration suitable for receiving a beverage can. Such insulative cups are most popular outdoors where an uninsulated beverage would quickly absorb the heat of the environment.

Several such devices used for chilling beverage cans include: U.S. Pat. No. 4,620,426 issued to Pitchford et al.; U.S. Pat. No. 5,564,583 issued to Kelley et al.; and U.S. Pat. No. 4,741,176 issued to Johnson et al. The problem with each of these inventions is that they contain a multitude of parts, require some preparation before use and generally introduce inconveniences in dispensing and closing, particularly if the user of these devices is using them while simultaneously engaging in sports, handiwork, or other activities requiring one free hand, or to repeatedly set down and pick up the beverage without fear of spilling the contents.

Other inventions employ refrigerants, multiple layers or dead air space surrounding the beverage can to keep the can insulated. Among those are: U.S. Pat. No. 4,183,226 issued to Moore; U.S. Pat. No. 3,995,445 issued to Huskins; U.S. Pat. No. 5,361,604 issued to Pier et al; and U.S. Pat. No. 4,793,149 issued to Riche. One main problem with each of these receptacles is that the insulating structures require more space and are thus more difficult to hold. In addition, with each of these devices, the top of the receptacle is left open and thus the contents of the beverage within the receptacle are subject to warming, invasion by insects and air-borne debris, and spilling if the receptacle is tipped over. Finally, some of the refrigerating devices require preparation or refrigeration prior to use and are thus inconvenient.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,344,303, issued to Kelly, Jr. is a foam receptacle that may serve its intended purpose, but it is not spill resistant and again, there is no lid. The problem with the above devices is that the top surface becomes a vehicle for heat transfer. Also, without having a lid, the receptacle is not capable of preventing intrusion by insects and airborne debris that may be encountered in many different environments, for example when using an electric saw.

British Patent # GB 2240332, issued to Christopher Rudland, includes a receptacle for a carbonated beverage with a lid. However, the Rudland device has multiple parts, is pressurized, and has a screw-on lid making it inconvenient for rapid, previously described uses, or one-handed operation.

Given this, there is a need for an improvement in the current state of the art that is based on proven data that the consumer can use to choose a technical design based on performance data not just on ornamental design.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Generally, the present invention is directed to an apparatus to insulate beverage containers, and more particularly to a design which may sustain a temperature gradient for chilled liquids from the ambient over a significant time frame.

One embodiment of the present invention describes an insulated beverage container comprising an insulating cylinder with an open top, closed bottom, and thin walled lateral surface with dimensions to accommodate a beer beverage, the closed bottom and thin walled lateral surface fabricated from a material with a thermal conductivity in the range of 0.2 to 0.35, thickness of said closed bottom and thin walled lateral surface sufficient to generate an insulation R value in the range of 7.5 to 8.5, and a removable insulating cap configured to liquid seal the top of the beverage when said beverage is inserted into the insulated beverage container.

The above summary of the present invention is not intended to describe each illustrated embodiment or every implementation of the present invention. The figures and the detailed description which follow more particularly exemplify these embodiments.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention may be more completely understood in consideration of the following detailed description of various embodiments of the invention in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 shows one embodiment of the present invention depicting a lady holding a tall neck beer bottle placed inside the insulated beverage container.

While the invention is amenable to various modifications and alternative forms, specifics thereof have been shown by way of example in the drawing and will be described in detail. It should be understood, however, that the intention is not to limit the invention to the particular embodiments described. On the contrary, the intention is to cover all modifications, equivalents, and alternatives falling within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

One embodiment of an insulated beverage container 10 in accordance with the present invention is depicted schematically in FIG. 1. The container 10 comprises an open top 12, closed bottom 14, thin walled lateral surface 16, and is configured to insulate a cooled beverage 18 when housed in the container 10.

In this configuration of the present invention, the bottom surface 14 and thin walled lateral surface 16 may be manufactured from a material with a sufficiently low thermal conductivity and appropriate thickness to insulate chilled liquid contents of the beverage container 10 and hold the temperature of the chilled liquid below an elevated ambient temperature for an extended period of time. Similarly, the same insulated beverage container 10 may hold the temperature of a heated liquid in beverage container above the ambient temperature for an extended period of time.

In one embodiment of the present invention, the bottom surface 14 and thin walled lateral surface 16 may be manufactured from either polyurethane rubber, nitrile rubber, silicone rubber, or glass fiber filled silicone rubber all of which have a thermal conductivity coefficient in the range of 0.2 to 0.35 W/m*K (Watts/meter*Kelvin). The invention also anticipates additional fluoroelastomers and natural rubber compounds which may be mechanically suitable and with thermal conductivity coefficients in the specified range of 0.2 to 0.35 W/m*K.

In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the thickness of the bottom surface 14 and the thin walled lateral surface 16 may be in the range of 20 to 30 millimeters of polyurethane rubber, sufficient to generate an insulation R value in the range of 7.5 to 8.5. In this configuration, the insulated beverage container 10 when housing a beverage container with cooled beverage initially in the range of 35 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit, and ambient temperature no more than 80 degrees, the temperature of the liquid beverage may not rise more than 10 degrees for a period of 45 minutes.

Similarly, the same insulated beverage container 10 when housing a beverage container 22 with a heated beverage initially in the range of 160 to 180 degrees Fahrenheit, and ambient temperature no less than 20 degrees, the temperature of the liquid beverage may not cool more than 10 degrees for a period of 45 minutes.

The present invention should not be considered limited to the particular examples described above, but rather should be understood to cover all aspects of the invention as fairly set out in the attached claims. Various modifications to the shape and form factors described above, equivalent processes which the present invention may be applicable will be readily apparent to those of skill in the art to which the present invention is directed upon review of the present specification. For example, alternative thicknesses beyond the range of 20 to 30 millimeters may be incorporated in the design to increase the effective insulation R value and thereby increase the time over which the beverage remains cooled. The following claims are intended to cover such modifications and devices.