Title:
BACKPACK AND SLEEPING BAG
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A backpack may include a main body that defines a main compartment that may be accessed by a closure mechanism. The backpack may incorporate a secondary panel and a sleeping bag. The secondary panel may be permanently or removably attached to the backpack. The sleeping bag may be permanently or removably attached to the secondary panel. The secondary panel and the backpack may define a space to receive the sleeping bag. The secondary panel may conform to the shape of the backpack while the sleeping bag is received between the secondary panel and the backpack.



Inventors:
Teixeira, George (Warren, RI, US)
Application Number:
13/786161
Publication Date:
09/05/2013
Filing Date:
03/05/2013
Assignee:
Samsonite IP HOldings S.a r.I. (Luxembourg, LU)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A45F4/08
View Patent Images:
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20090206117Magnetic Wrist Band ApparatusAugust, 2009Chan
20080217367Fluid packSeptember, 2008Lillie
20070228091Back support with straps that is changeable with storage areaOctober, 2007Shawen
20050242142Eyeglass purseNovember, 2005Stoller
20040099702Compartmented belt buckle for storing folded eyeglassesMay, 2004Conner
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Primary Examiner:
WAGGENSPACK, ADAM J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DORSEY & WHITNEY, LLP - Denver (INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY DEPARTMENT 1400 Wewatta Street Suite 400, Denver, CO, 80202-5549, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A backpack comprising: a main body that defines a main compartment; a secondary panel selectively joined to the main body; the secondary panel configured to be selectively moved relative to the main body between a first position where the secondary panel and the main body define a substantially enclosed space and a second position where the secondary panel and the main body do not define the substantially enclosed space; a sleeping bag joined to the secondary panel and received in the substantially enclosed space; and when the secondary panel is in the second position, the sleeping bag is selectively configurable to be positioned into an operative state.

2. The backpack of claim 1, wherein the secondary panel is selectively detachable from the main body.

3. The backpack of claim 1, wherein the sleeping bag is detachable from the secondary panel.

4. The backpack of claim 1, wherein the secondary panel comprises an outer surface, and the outer surface is formed using the same material forming a portion of an outer surface of the main body.

5. The backpack of claim 1, wherein the secondary panel comprises at least one piece of cushion material forming a portion of an outer surface of the secondary panel.

6. The backpack of claim 1, wherein the secondary panel comprises a strap joined to an outer surface of the secondary panel.

7. The backpack of claim 1, further comprising a securing mechanism selectively joining the secondary panel to the main body when the secondary panel is in the second position.

8. The backpack of claim 7, wherein the securing mechanism comprises at least one of a strap, a strap with an adjustable length, or a shoulder strap removably joined to the secondary panel.

9. The backpack of claim 8, wherein the securing mechanism is joined adjacent to a corner of the secondary panel distal the main body of the backpack.

10. The backpack of claim 1, wherein the sleeping bag comprises a top layer and a bottom layer, and the secondary panel forms a portion of the bottom layer of the sleeping bag.

11. The backpack of claim 1, wherein the sleeping bag comprises at least one of a cushion layer, a foam material, or an insulating material.

12. The backpack of claim 1, wherein the sleeping bag is folded three times to be received in the substantially enclosed space defined by the secondary panel and the main body.

13. The backpack of claim 1, further comprising a hood joined to the sleeping bag.

14. The backpack of claim 13, wherein the sleeping bag comprises a top layer and a bottom layer, and the hood is joined to an end of the top layer of the sleeping bag.

15. The backpack of claim 14, wherein the top layer comprises an opening/closure mechanism extending between two adjacent edges of the top layer.

16. The backpack of claim 13, wherein the hood is placed over the main body of the backpack when the secondary panel is moved to the second position.

17. The backpack of claim 1, wherein the secondary panel is joined to the main body along a bottom edge or a side edge of the secondary panel and selectively moved by pivoting the secondary panel relative to the main body along the bottom edge or the side edge of the secondary panel.

18. The backpack of claim 1, wherein the secondary panel is joined to the main body by a zipper or by sewing the secondary panel to the main body along at least a portion of a bottom edge or a side edge of the secondary panel.

19. The backpack of claim 18, wherein the zipper runs along at least a portion of, up to the entirety of, a perimeter of the secondary panel.

20. The backpack of claim 19, further comprising a securing feature that releasably secures a zipper pull of the zipper to the main body.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/606,864, entitled “BACKPACK AND SLEEPING BAG” and filed on Mar. 5, 2012, which is hereby incorporated in its entirety by reference as though fully disclosed herein.

TECHNOLOGICAL FIELD

The technological field generally relates to apparatuses for carrying items, and more particularly to backpacks.

BACKGROUND

Backpacks are often used to carry various objects in a convenient manner. Sometimes the objects may include a sleeping bag or such. The sleeping bag carried therein may take up a substantial amount of the space of the backpack and may reduce the space of the backpack that may be used for carrying other contents. Accordingly, it may be desirable to join the sleeping bag to the backpack in a manner that does not reduce the amount of space available for storing objects in the compartments of the backpack.

SUMMARY

Described herein is a backpack or an apparatus for carrying items incorporating a sleeping bag, an accessory for a backpack, and a method for using the same.

In some examples, a backpack may include a main body, a secondary panel and a sleeping bag. The main body may define a main compartment. The secondary panel may be selectively joined to the main body. The secondary panel may be configured to be selectively moved relative to the main body between a first position and a second position. In the first position, the secondary panel and the main body may define a substantially enclosed space. In the second position, the secondary panel and the main body may not define the substantially enclosed space. The sleeping bag may be joined to the secondary panel and may be received in the substantially enclosed space. When the secondary panel is in the second position, the sleeping bag may be selectively configurable to be positioned into an operative state.

In some examples, the secondary panel may be selectively detachable from the main body.

In some examples, the sleeping bag may be detachable from the secondary panel.

In some examples, the secondary panel may include an outer surface. The outer surface may be formed using the same material forming a portion of an outer surface of the main body.

In some examples, the secondary panel may include at least one piece of cushion material forming a portion of an outer surface of the secondary panel.

In some examples, the secondary panel may include a strap joined to an outer surface of the secondary panel.

In some examples, the backpack may further include a securing mechanism selectively joining the secondary panel to the main body when the secondary panel is in the second position.

In some examples, the securing mechanism may include at least one of a strap, a strap with an adjustable length, or a shoulder strap removably joined to the secondary panel.

In some examples, the securing mechanism may be joined adjacent to a corner of the secondary panel distal the main body of the backpack.

In some examples, the sleeping bag may include a top layer and a bottom layer. The secondary panel may form a portion of the bottom layer of the sleeping bag.

In some examples, the sleeping bag may include at least one of a cushion layer, a foam material, or an insulating material.

In some examples, the sleeping bag may be folded three times to be received in the substantially enclosed space defined by the secondary panel and the main body.

In some examples, the backpack may further include a hood joined to the sleeping bag.

In some examples, the sleeping bag may include a top layer and a bottom layer. The hood may be joined to an end of the top layer of the sleeping bag.

In some examples, the hood may be sewn to the top layer of the sleeping bag.

In some examples, the top layer may include an opening/closure mechanism extending between two adjacent edges of the top layer.

In some examples, the hood may be placed over the main body of the backpack when the secondary panel is moved to the second position.

In some examples, the secondary panel may be joined to the main body along a bottom edge or a side edge of the secondary panel. The secondary panel may be selectively moved by pivoting the secondary panel relative to the main body along the bottom edge or the side edge of the secondary panel.

In some examples, the secondary panel may be joined to the main body by a zipper or by sewing the secondary panel to the main body along at least a portion of a bottom edge or a side edge of the secondary panel.

In some examples, the zipper may run along at least a portion of, up to the entirety of, a perimeter of the secondary panel.

In some examples, the backpack may further include a securing feature. The securing feature may releasably secure a zipper pull of the zipper to the main body.

In some examples, an apparatus for carrying items may include a panel and a sleeping bag. The panel may be configured for selective attachment to and detachment from a backpack. The sleeping bag may be configured for operable attachment to and detachment from the panel. The panel may generally conform to an outer surface of the backpack when attached to the backpack.

In some examples, the panel and the backpack may be configured to define a substantially enclosed space. The sleeping bag may be received in the substantially enclosed space.

In some examples, the panel may be sewn to the backpack along a portion of a perimeter of the panel.

In some examples, the panel may be attached to the backpack through a closure mechanism along at least a portion of a perimeter of the panel.

In some examples, the closure mechanism may include a zipper.

In some examples, an accessory for a backpack may include a panel and a sleeping bag. The panel may be configured for selective attachment to and detachment from a backpack. The sleeping bag may be configured for operable attachment to and detachment from the panel. The panel may be configured to selectively pivot relative to the backpack. The backpack and the panel may be configured to define a space suitably sized for receipt of the sleeping bag therein.

In some examples, a method of utilizing a backpack may include the step of selectively at least partially detaching a panel from a backpack to access a sleeping bag that may be operably joined to the panel and that may be contained in a space defined by the backpack and the panel. The method may further include the step of selectively pivoting the panel relative to the backpack and the step of unfolding the sleeping bag.

In some examples, the method may further include a step of placing the panel and the sleeping bag on a support surface.

In some examples, the step of selectively at least partially detaching the panel from the backpack may include unzipping a zipper that may join the panel to the backpack.

In some examples, the step of selectively at least partially detaching the panel from the backpack may include unzipping a zipper along at least three quarters of a perimeter of the panel.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows a front perspective view of a first example of a backpack that incorporates a sleeping bag.

FIG. 2 shows a rear perspective view of the backpack shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3A shows another rear perspective view of the backpack shown in FIG. 1 with the sleeping bag partially unfolded.

FIG. 3B shows a rear perspective view of a second example of a backpack that incorporates a sleeping bag with the sleeping bag partially unfolded.

FIG. 3C shows a rear perspective view of a third example of a backpack that incorporates a sleeping bag with the sleeping bag partially unfolded.

FIG. 4A shows another rear perspective view of the backpack shown in FIG. 1 with the sleeping bag unfolded and unzipped.

FIG. 4B shows another rear perspective view of the backpack shown in FIG. 4A with the sleeping bag unfolded and zipped.

FIG. 4C shows a rear perspective view of a fourth example of a backpack that incorporates a sleeping bag with the sleeping bag unfolded and zipped.

FIG. 4D shows another rear perspective view of the fourth example of the backpack with the sleeping bag unfolded and partially unzipped.

FIG. 4E shows an exploded view of the sleeping bag of the fourth example of the backpack with a user and a main portion of the backpack shown in dashed lines.

FIG. 5 shows an enlarged partial cross section view of the backpack shown in FIG. 1, viewed along line 5-5 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 6A shows an enlarged partial cross section view of the backpack shown in FIG. 1, viewed along line 6A-6A of FIG. 4A.

FIG. 6B shows an enlarged partial cross section view similar to the view shown in FIG. 6A, but differing from FIG. 6A in that it shows a second potential way to connect the sleeping bag to the backpack.

FIG. 7A shows an enlarged partial cross section view similar to the view shown in FIG. 6A, but differing from FIG. 6A in that it shows a third potential way to connect the sleeping bag to the backpack.

FIG. 7B shows a rear perspective view of a fifth example of a backpack that incorporates a sleeping bag and that incorporates a connection between the sleeping bag and the backpack similar to that shown in FIG. 7A.

FIG. 7C shows an exploded view of the fifth example of the backpack shown in FIG. 7B.

FIG. 8 shows a rear perspective view of a sixth example of a backpack that incorporates a sleeping bag.

FIG. 9 shows another rear perspective view of the backpack shown in FIG. 8 with the sleeping bag partially unfolded.

FIG. 10 shows another rear perspective view of the backpack shown in FIG. 8 with the sleeping bag unfolded and unzipped.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Described herein is a backpack with a sleeping bag. The backpack may include one or more compartments. Each compartment may include at least one zipper or other closure mechanism (such as Velcro®). The backpack may also include other features such as side pockets, a compression mechanism, a top handle, a laptop compartment, a cell phone holder, a water bottle holder, and so forth. The rear of the backpack may be padded for comfort. The padding may be incorporated into the sleeping bag. A user may carry the backpack by suspending one or more shoulder straps on his or her shoulders. Each shoulder strap may be positioned at the rear of the backpack and joined at an upper portion of a main body of the backpack. Each shoulder strap may be tapered proximate the upper portion. Such tapering allows a relatively large surface area to contact the person's shoulder (the compression area) while minimizing the length of the strap that is joined to the upper portion of the main body. Each shoulder strap may be joined to either a lower portion or side panel of the main body. In some embodiments, the shoulder strap may be connected to the lower portion or side panel of the main body through an adjustment device, such as an adjustment strap or the like. The backpack may be formed using nylon fabric, natural or synthetic leather or any other suitable material, including, but not limited to, any material used to make soft or hard sided luggage. In some embodiments, the surface of the backpack may be coated with water repellent or water proof material, such as a polyurethane coating and the like.

With reference to FIGS. 1, 2, and 3A, a backpack 100 that incorporates a sleeping bag 102 may include a main body 104. The main body 104 may define a main compartment that can be opened or closed with a main zipper 106, a pair of main zippers, or any other closure mechanism (such as a hook and loop fastener). Front, rear, and side panels 108, 110, 112 may define the main compartment. The backpack 100 may also include one or more accessory compartments that are defined by the main body 104 and/or joined to the main body 104. Each accessory compartment may be accessed by opening and closing one or more secondary zippers 114 or other closure mechanisms. The backpack 100 may also include one or more side pockets 116 for additional storage. The side pockets 116 may be defined by the main body 104 and/or joined to the main body 104. The side pockets 116 may be formed of a mesh material, or may be formed from material similar to the material used to form the main body 104 of the backpack 100. The side pockets 116 may either be accessed via a closure mechanism, such as a zipper, or may include an opening that can be selectively opened and closed.

In some embodiments, the backpack 100 may have compression mechanisms on the left and right sides of the backpack 100 that allow the user to selectively compress the backpack 100 when the compartments are not full. The compression mechanisms may also provide support to the sides of the backpack 100 when the compartments are full. Each compression mechanism may be configured as two straps. Each strap may be joined to a buckle element on one end and be joined to the main body 104 on the other end. For example, a first strap may be joined to a side panel of the main compartment and a first buckle element. A second strap may be joined to the front panel of the main body 104 and a second buckle element. The second buckle element may be selectively coupled to the first buckle element to join the first strap to the second strap. One or both of the buckle elements may allow the strap to be adjusted, thereby allowing a user to selectively compress or decompress one or more of the main body's compartments by selectively shortening or lengthening the distance between the connection point of a strap to the main body 104 and the respective buckle element of the strap. The straps of the compression mechanism may be joined to the main body 104 in other areas as well. For example, one strap could be joined to the seam between the rear and side panels of the main compartment, with the other strap joined to a side panel of an accessory compartment. Also, the straps may be connected by something other than a buckle element, such as a slider element. The foregoing examples are merely illustrative of some ways to form and/or join a compression element for a backpack and are not intended to be limiting. As such, the backpack 100 may use any suitable compression mechanism that allows for a user to selectively compress and decompress the backpack 100. In some embodiments, the backpack 100 may have more than one compression mechanism on each side of the main body 104, or no compression mechanisms at all.

The backpack 100 may also include a top handle 118 that allows the backpack 100 to be lifted. The top handle 118 may be joined to the main body 104 at the seam between the rear panel 110 and the upper portion of the main compartment, or at any other suitable location. In some embodiments, the top handle 118 may be joined to the main body 104 at the same location as the shoulder straps 120. In some embodiments, the backpack 100 may include a side handle that is joined to the main body 104 at the seam between the rear panel 110 and the side panel 112 of the main compartment, or at any other suitable location.

In continuing reference to FIG. 2, one or more shoulder straps 120 may be configured as two straps 122, 124 and incorporate one or more shoulder strap adjustment mechanisms 126. Each strap 122, 124 of the shoulder strap 120 may be joined to the shoulder strap adjustment mechanism 126 on one end and be joined to the main body 104 of the backpack 100 on the other end. For example, a first strap 122 may be joined to the upper portion of the main body 104 and the shoulder strap adjustment mechanism 126. A second strap 124 may be joined to the lower portion of the main body 104 and the shoulder strap adjustment mechanism 126. The shoulder strap adjustment mechanism 126 may be joined to the first and/or second straps 122, 124 at the end portions of the first and/or second straps 122, 124. The shoulder strap adjustment mechanism 126 may be joined to the first and/or second straps 122, 124 at any suitable portion of the first and/or second straps 122, 124. The shoulder strap adjustment mechanism 126 may be joined to the strap 122, 124 by any suitable connection method, including, but not limited to, sewing, bonding, adhering, snapping, and so on.

The shoulder strap adjustment mechanism 126 may be configured as a slider. The slider may allow a user to selectively increase or decrease the overall length of one or more shoulder straps 120 by selectively shortening or lengthening the distance between the connection point of a strap 122, 124 to the main body 104 and the connection point of a strap 122, 124 to the slider. The shoulder strap adjustment mechanism 126 may include a buckle element that allows the user to selectively connect or disconnect the two straps 122, 124. In some embodiments, one or more straps 122, 124 of the shoulder strap 120 may be connected to the upper and/or lower portion or side panel 112 of the main body 104 through a connecting device, such as a buckle element, a carabiner or the like, that allows the user to selectively connect or disconnect the shoulder strap 120 from the backpack 100. The foregoing examples are merely illustrative of some ways to form and/or join a shoulder strap adjustment mechanism 126 for a shoulder strap 120 and are not intended to be limiting. As such, the backpack 100 may use one or more shoulder straps 120 with any suitable adjustment mechanism 126 that allows for a user to selectively increase and decrease the length of a shoulder strap 120.

With further reference to FIG. 2, the backpack 100 may include a secondary panel 128. This secondary panel 128 and the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100 may be joined through any suitable attaching mechanism and define a space in which a sleeping bag 102 may be positioned. In some embodiments, the attaching mechanism may take the form of, for example, but not limited to, a zipper, hook and loop fasteners, straps and so on. In some embodiments, the secondary panel 128 and the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100 may be attached along one or more edge portions of the secondary panel 128 by sewing, bonding, adhering, snapping, and so on.

The secondary panel 128 may be formed using nylon fabric, natural or synthetic leather or any other suitable material, including, but not limited to, any material used to make soft or hard sided luggage. The material for the secondary panel 128 may be selected to be a material that is flexible and durable. In some embodiments, the material for the secondary panel 128 may be the same as the material used for the main body 104 of the backpack 100 to keep the look and feel of the secondary panel 128 consistent with the look and feel of the backpack 100. In some embodiments, the material for the secondary panel 128 may be selected to match the material used for an outer shell of a bottom layer of the sleeping bag 102. In some examples, the secondary panel 128 may be made of, or supplemented with, a cushioning material 130 (see FIG. 6B) to increase the comfort for a user wearing the backpack 100. A mesh-like material 132 (see also FIG. 6B) may cover the cushioning 130 to improve breathability. The cushioning material 130 may also serve as a cushion when a user sleeps in the sleeping bag 102. In some examples, the entire secondary panel 128 may be made of, or supplemented with, a cushioning material 130. In some examples, the secondary panel 128 may be supplemented with one or more pieces of a cushioning material 130 over selected areas of the secondary panel 128.

With reference to FIG. 2, one or more pieces of a cushioning material 130 may be placed over the top left region and/or the top right region 134 of the secondary panel 128 where a user's shoulder blades may engage the backpack 100 when the user carries the backpack 100 on his or her back using the shoulder straps 120. One or more pieces of a cushioning material 130 may also be placed over the lower region 136 of the secondary panel 128 (see also FIG. 6B) where a user's lower back may engage the backpack 100 when the user carries the backpack 100 on his or her back using the shoulder straps 120. At one or more of the cushioned regions 134, 136 (i.e., the top left corner region, the top right corner region, or the lower region) of the secondary panel 128, one or more pieces of a mesh-like material 132 may cover the cushioning.

The one or more pieces of the mesh-like covering materials 132 may be joined to the secondary panel 128 by sewing, bonding, adhering, using a zipper, and any suitable connection method. For example, one or more portions of the perimeter edge of one piece of the mesh-like covering material 132 may be joined to portions of the perimeter edge 138 of the secondary panel 128, and other portions of the perimeter edge of the one piece of the mesh-like covering material 132 may be joined to the outer surface 140 of the secondary panel 128. Thus, the one or more pieces of the mesh-like covering material 132 and the secondary panel 128 may form one or more pockets for containing the cushioning material 130. In some examples, each piece of the cushioning material 130 may also be joined to the secondary panel 128 by joining the perimeter edge thereof to the secondary panel 128 by sewing, bonding, adhering, using a zipper, or any suitable connection method to reduce movement of the cushioning material 130 contained between the mesh-like covering material 132 and the secondary panel 128. In some examples, one or more additional stitches 142 crossing a surface area of the mesh-like material 132 may be used to join the mesh-like covering material 132 and the cushioning material 130 under to the secondary panel 128 to further reduce movement of the cushioning material 130.

With continued reference to FIG. 2, the secondary panel 128 may further include a strap 144 positioned at a central region of the secondary panel 128. Each end of the strap 144 may be positioned under a cushioning material 130 at one of the top and/or right corner regions 134 of the secondary panel 128. The strap 144 may be joined to the secondary panel 128 using the same connection method that joins the perimeter edge of the cushioning material 130 to the secondary panel 128. The strap 144 may be configured with a length substantially the same as the span of the strap 144 such that the strap 144 may substantially rest against the secondary panel 128. The strap 144 may be made of a single layer of thin and flexible or elastic material such that when a user carries the backpack 100 on his or her back, the user may not feel any discomfort that may be caused by the strap 144. Given the flexibility of the strap 144 and the secondary panel 128, a user may tuck his or her fingers under the strap 144 and hold the strap 144 when attaching and/or detaching the secondary panel 128 to and/or from the main body 104 of the backpack 100.

The secondary panel 128 may be generally rectangular shaped or any other suitable shape. The width of the secondary panel 128 may be substantially the same as, or narrower than, the width of the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100. The height of the secondary panel 128 may be the same as or less than that of the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100 so that the top edge of the secondary panel 128 may fit below the top ends of the shoulder straps 120. The bottom ends of the shoulder straps 120 may be coupled to the secondary panel 128 or may be coupled to the rear panel 110, bottom panel, side panel 112 or any other suitable location of the backpack 100.

A zipper may be provided along one or more edges of the secondary panel 128 as an attaching mechanism to attach the secondary panel 128 to the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100. In some examples, a zipper may be provided along top, left, and right edges of the secondary panel 128 to attach the secondary panel 128 to the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100. The secondary panel 128 may be sewn or connected through any other suitable connection method along its bottom edge portion to the lower portion of the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100. This way the secondary panel 128 may be permanently attached to the backpack 100. In some examples, a zipper may be provided along the entire perimeter edge of the secondary panel 128 to removably join the secondary panel 128 to the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100.

With reference to FIGS. 3A, 3B, 3C, 4A, 4B, 4C, 4D, and 4E, uses of the backpack 100 and the sleeping bag 102 will be described.

With reference to FIG. 3A, when a user unzips the zipper 146 along the top, left, and right edges 148, 150, 152 of the secondary panel 128, the secondary panel 128 and a folded or rolled up sleeping bag 102 may be placed in a position generally perpendicular to the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100 by pivoting the secondary panel 128 about its bottom edge 154. The secondary panel 128 and the sleeping bag 102 may be tilted at any angle with respect to the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100 as the user may desire. In this configuration, the backpack 100 and the sleeping bag 102 may function as a chair. The folded sleeping bag 102 may serve as a cushion for added comfort, and the main body 104 of the backpack 100 may serve as a back support for the user.

In some examples, a securing mechanism may be provided on one or both sides of the backpack 100 to maintain the angle between the secondary panel 128 and the main body 104 of the backpack 100 as the user leans against the main body 104 of the backpack 100. With reference to FIG. 3B, the securing mechanism may take the form of one or more straps 156. Each strap 156 may be positioned at the left or right sides of the backpack 100. One end of the first strap 156 may be joined to the upper left corner of the main body 104 by any suitable connection method, including, but not limited to, sewing, bonding, adhering, snapping, and so on, and the other end of the first strap 156 may be joined adjacent to the front left corner of the secondary panel 128 distal the main body 104 of the backpack 100 using a similar or any suitable connection method. The second strap 156 may be similar to the first strap 156 and may be provided at the right side of the backpack 100. The length of each strap 156 may be selected to allow the secondary panel 128 to pivot away from the main body 104 of the backpack 100 for at least 90 degrees before the strap 156 straightens. The tension within the strap 156 may maintain the angle between the secondary panel 128 and the main body 104 of the backpack 100. Any suitable length of the strap 156 may be selected to allow for a different angle between the secondary panel 128 and the main body 104 of the backpack 100.

In some examples, each strap 156 may be configured as an adjustable strap. Each strap 156 may include a first or upper segment 158 and a second or lower segment 160. The upper end of the upper segment 158 may be joined to the top left/right corner of the main body 104, and the lower end of the lower segment 160 may be joined to the front left/right corner of the secondary panel 128. The lower end of the upper segment 158 and the upper end of the lower segment 160 may be operably coupled to a buckle element or a slider 162. The buckle element 162 may allow the length of at least one of the first and/or second segments 158, 160 between the buckle element 162 and the end joined to the main body 104 or the secondary panel 128 to be adjustable, thereby allowing the angle between the main body 104 and the secondary panel 128 to be adjusted. In some examples, the buckle element 162 may be a releasable buckle that may allow the lower end of the upper segment 158 and the upper end of the lower segment 160 to be disconnected.

With reference to FIG. 3C, the angle between the main body 104 and the secondary panel 128 may be maintained by temporarily joining the lower end of the shoulder strap 120 to the front left/right corner of the secondary panel 128. In this example, the lower end of one or both of the shoulder straps 120 may be provided with a clasp 164, such as a lobster clasp. A loop or ring structure 166, such as a D ring, may be provided at the lower left/right corner of the main body 104 at one of the side surfaces of the main body 104. Another loop or ring structure 168, such as another D ring, may be provided at the front left/right corner of the secondary panel 128. When the user desires to carry the backpack 100 and the sleeping bag 102 on his or her back using the shoulder straps 120, the lobster clasp 164 provided at the lower end of each shoulder strap 120 may engage the D ring positioned at the lower left/right corner of the main body 104. When the user desires to use the backpack 100 and the sleeping bag 102 as a chair, the user may disengage the lower end of each shoulder strap 120 from the lower left/right corner of the main body 104 by disengaging the lobster clasp 164 from the D ring 166 at the lower left/right corner of the main body 104, and engage one or both of lobster clasps 164 at the lower ends of the shoulder straps 120 with the D rings 168 located at the front left/right corners of the secondary panel 128. In some examples, it is sufficient to engage only one of the shoulder straps 120 with the secondary panel 128 while the other shoulder strap 120 may be used as a dog leash, or such.

With reference to FIGS. 4A, 4B, 4C, 4D, and 4E, when the user unzips the zipper 146 along the top, left, and right edges 148, 150, 152 of the secondary panel 128, pivots the secondary panel 128 about the bottom edge 154 thereof to the ground, and unfolds the sleeping bag 102, the user may use the sleeping bag 102 like any other sleeping bag. The main body 104 of the backpack 100 joined to the sleeping bag 102 may be used as a head rest (see FIGS. 4B, 4C, 4D, and 4E). To provide added comfort to the user, a cushioning layer 170 may be added to the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100 (see FIG. 6B). The outer surface of the rear panel 110 of the main body 104 may also be formed using a relatively soft material, such as silk, nylon, polyester, cotton, fleece, silk, velvet, and so on. When using the main body 104 of the backpack 100 as a head rest, the user may also use one of the securing mechanisms described above for positioning the main body 104 of the backpack 100 and the sleeping bag 102 at any angle relative to each other.

With reference to FIGS. 4A, 5, 6A, 6B, and 7A, the sleeping bag 102 may include a top layer 172 and a bottom layer 174. The top layer 172 and the bottom layer 174 may be formed by folding one piece of material in half. Alternatively, the top layer 172 and bottom layer 174 may be formed separately and joined together along one or more of their sides by, for example, but not limited to, sewing, bonding, adhering, using a zipper, and any suitable connection method. The width of the sleeping bag 102 may be consistent from one end of the sleeping bag 102 to the other end or may vary along its length to accommodate different body shapes of a user. In some examples, the sleeping bag 102 may be tapered along its length, with one end (for example, the foot end) narrower than the other (for example, the head end), or vice versa. In some examples, the width of the top layer 172 of the sleeping bag 102 may be substantially the same as the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102. In some examples, the width of the top layer 172 of the sleeping bag 102 may be different, such as wider than, the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102. The bottom layer 174 may be configured with a width similar to, or slightly narrower than, the width of the secondary panel 128. The top layer 172 may be configured with a greater width so as to create enough space between the top and bottom layers 172, 174 for a user (see FIGS. 4B, 4C, 4D, and 4E).

The top layer 172 of the sleeping bag 102 may include an opening/closure mechanism 176. The opening/closure mechanism 176 may take the form of, for example, but not limited to, a zipper. The zipper or other opening/closure mechanism 176 may be incorporated into the top layer 172 along its center, off center, along one or more sides of the top layer 172, or any other suitable location that allows for a user to selectively create an enclosed space between the top and bottom layers 172, 174 of the sleeping bag 102 so that a user may position at least a portion of the user's body therein. The zipper or other opening/closure mechanism 176 may extend from one end of the top layer 172 to the other end along the length of the sleeping bag 102. The zipper or other mechanism 176 may only extend partially along the length of the sleeping bag 102. In the case where the opening/closure mechanism 176 may be incorporated along one or more sides of the top layer 172, the opening/closure mechanism 176 may also serve to connect the top layer 172 to the bottom layer 174 along one or more sides of the top and bottom layers 172, 174 of the sleeping bag 102 or serve to connect the top and bottom layers 172, 174 of the sleeping bag 102 to the respective top and bottom layers of another sleeping bag.

With reference to FIGS. 4C, 4D, and 4E, the sleeping bag 102 may further include a hood 178 joined to the head end of the top layer 172 of the sleeping bag 102. With reference to 4E, the hood 178 may include a generally arched body 180 and an end panel 182 joined to the arched body 180. The arched body 180 may include two opposing arched edges 184 following the arch shape of the arched body 180 and two opposing bottom edges 186 each joining one end of one of the arched edges 184 to an adjacent end of the other one of the arched edges 184. One of the arched edges 184 of the arched body 180 may be joined to an arch-shaped portion 188 of the perimeter edge of the end panel 182 of the hood 178. The end panel 182 may include a bottom edge 190 joined between the two opposing bottom edges 186 of the arched body 180. The other one of the arched edges 184 of the arched body 180 may be joined to the head end 192 of the top layer 172 of the sleeping bag 102 so as to join the hood 178 to the sleeping bag 102. The hood 178 may be permanently joined to the sleeping bag 102 by sewing, bonding, adhering, and so on. The hood 178 may be releasably joined to the sleeping bag 102 by using a zipper, snap button, Velcro® tapes, and so on (see FIG. 4E). In some examples, the hood 178 may be formed as an integral part of the top layer 172 of the sleeping bag 102.

The distance between the opposing bottom edges 186 of the arched body 180 may delineate a width dimension of the arched body 180 or the hood 178. The two arched edges 184 of the arched body 180 may delineate a depth dimension of the arched body 180 or the hood 178. The distance from the apex of the arched body 180 to a support surface that the hood 178 may rest upon may be referred to as the height of the arched body 180 or the hood 178. The hood 178 may be configured with width, depth, and height dimensions greater than respective width, depth, and height dimensions of the main body 104 of the backpack 100. This way the user may place the hood 178 over the main body 104 of the backpack 100 (see FIGS. 4C and 4D). In some examples, the bottom edges of the hood 178 may be temporarily or releasably joined to the bottom periphery of the main body 104 and portions of the side edges of the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102 using a zipper mechanism, snap buttons, Velcro® tapes, and so on for added protection.

To allow a user to move into or get out of the sleeping bag 102 without removing the hood 178 from the main body 104 of the backpack 100, the opening/closure mechanism 176′ of the top layer 172 of the sleeping bag 102 may terminate at the side edge of the top layer 172 (see FIGS. 4C, 4D, and 4E) instead of terminating at a middle portion of the head end 192 of the top layer 172 (see FIG. 4B). Accordingly, the opening/closure mechanism 176′ of the top layer 172 may extend between two adjacent edges (e.g., the bottom edge 194 and the side edge 196) of the top layer 172.

The hood 178 may be made of any suitable material, preferably a relatively flexible material so that the hood 178 may be folded when not in use. In some examples, the hood 178 may be made of a plastic material to keep out dirt, moisture, and so on. The hood 178 may also be made of a fabric material that is waterproof and breathable. In some examples, the hood 178 material may be transparent for visibility. In some examples, the hood 178 material may be tinted or may have a one-way mirror reflective effect to provide privacy to the user and to hide the bag from view. The hood 178 not only protects the head of the user inside the sleeping bag 102 and the bag from nature (e.g., dirt, rain, insects, and so on), it also adds theft security by covering outside pockets of the backpack 100. Furthermore, because the hood 178 is supported by the main body 104 of the backpack 100, the hood 178 and the top layer 172 of the sleeping bag 102 joined thereto may be lifted off the body of the user. This way, the hood 178 and the top layer 172 of the sleeping bag 102 may effectively serve as a tent for the user, giving the user more space for movement and added comfort. Furthermore, due to this increased space, the user may use additional blankets for added warmth and comfort, and the top layer 172 of the sleeping bag 102 may be made of a relatively thin material or even a single layer material (see FIG. 6B), such as a material for making tents, for enhanced compactness.

With reference to FIG. 5, one exemplary way of constructing the sleeping bag 102 will be described. One or both of the top and/or bottom layers 172, 174 of the sleeping bag 102 may be formed by providing fill materials 198 between an outer shell 200 and an inner lining 202 of each layer 172, 174. The outer shell 200 may be formed using, for example, but not limited to, nylon, polyester or any other suitable materials for durability. The outer shell 200 of the top and/or bottom layers 172, 174 may be formed using the same material as the backpack 100 or a different material. In some embodiments, the secondary panel 128 may form a portion of the outer shell 200 of the bottom layer 174. In such embodiments, the remaining portion of the outer shell 200 of the bottom layer 174 may be formed using either the same or a different material than the material used for the secondary panel 128. The outer shell 200 may be optionally treated with a coating material to provide desirable water repellent or waterproof properties. The inner lining 202 for the top and bottom layers 172, 174 may be formed using, for example, but not limited to, nylon, polyester, cotton, fleece, silk or any other suitable material that provides for breathability, warmth and/or comfort.

For each of the bottom and top layers 172, 174 of the sleeping bag 102, a fill material 198 may be optionally provided between the respective outer shell 200 and inner lining 202 of each layer to provide insulation. The fill material 198 may include synthetic fill (for example, but not limited to, Lite Loft™, PrimaLoft™, Polarguard™, MicroLoft™) or natural fill (for example, but not limited to, down) or a combination thereof. The top and/or bottom layers 172, 174 may be divided into multiple compartments by selectively joining the outer shell 200 and the inner lining 202 of the respective layers 172, 174 at predetermined locations to promote uniform distribution of the fill material 198 by, for example, but not limited to, sewing. In some embodiments, the bottom layer 174 may optionally include a cushioning layer 204 (as shown in FIG. 5) that is positioned between the outer shell 200 and the inner lining 202 of the bottom layer 174 to provide additional comfort and insulation for a user. The cushioning layer 204 may be confined to the portion of the bottom layer 174 that coincides with the area of the secondary panel 128, may substantially coincide with the area of the bottom layer 174 that contacts the ground, or may be positioned within any other desired area or space, partial or entire, defined by the inner lining 202 and outer shell 200 of the bottom layer 174. In some embodiments, the cushioning layer 204 may be formed using a foam, such as an open or closed cell foam, or other suitable material. In other embodiments, air may be utilized to form the cushioning layer 204. In such embodiments, a valve may be provided in fluid communication with the space defined by the inner lining 202 and outer shell 200 of the bottom layer 174 to allow air to be selectively added and removed from the space defined by the inner lining 202 and outer shell 200 of the bottom layer 174.

As illustrated in FIGS. 3A, 3B, 3C, and 5, the top and bottom layers 172, 174 of the sleeping may be folded into three folds to fit inside the compartment or other enclosed, or substantially enclosed, space defined by the secondary panel 128 and the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100. More or less folds may be possible to accommodate longer or shorter sleeping bags. In some embodiments, one or more straps may be incorporated into the secondary panel 128 and looped around the folded sleeping bag 102. One or more of the straps may include a buckle and/or a slider that allow a user to selectively adjust the length of the straps thereby selectively compressing the sleeping bag volume and/or holding the folded sleeping bag 102 against the secondary panel 128. One or more of the straps may be formed of an elastic band, nylon fabric, or any other suitable material. In some embodiments, the fill material 198 and/or the cushioning layer 204 may be omitted to reduce the thickness of the top and bottom layers 172, 174 of the sleeping bag 102. In such embodiments, reducing the thickness of these layers 172, 174 may reduce the volume that is required for storing the sleeping bag 102 in the compartment or other enclosed space. Such a volume reduction may be particularly advantageous when the required volume is reduced by reducing the depth of the compartment as measured from the rear panel 110 to the secondary panel 128. To further enhance the minimization of the thickness of the top and bottom layers 172, 174 of the sleeping bag 102, the outer shell 200 and/or inner lining 202 of the top and/or bottom layers 172, 174 of the sleeping bag 102 may be formed from relatively thin materials.

In some examples, the secondary panel 128 may be joined to the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102 by sewing or otherwise connecting perimeter edges of the secondary panel 128 to the bottom layer 174. With reference to FIG. 5, the top edge portion 150 of the secondary panel 128 may be connected to the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102 by sewing the top edge portion 150 of the secondary panel 128 to the outer shell 200 of the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102. The top edge portion 150 of the secondary panel 128 may also be sewn to the bottom layer 174 throughout the outer shell 200, the cushioning layer 204, the insulating or other fill material 198, and the inner lining 202 of the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102. The zipper 146 for connecting the secondary panel 128 to the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100 may also be attached to the secondary panel 128 through the same sewing operation. For example, the zipper tape may be sewn between the secondary panel 128 and the outer shell 200 of the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102. Although described herein as being sewn together, the secondary panel 128 and the sleeping bag 102 may be connected by any suitable connecting method including, but not limited to, bonding, adhering, and so on.

In some examples, the sleeping bag 102 may be releasably joined to the secondary panel 128. With reference to FIG. 7C, the secondary panel 128 may include a portion of a zipper 206a positioned at the inner surface thereof. A mating portion of the zipper 206b may be provided at the outer shell 200 of the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102 adjacent to the head end of the sleeping bag 102. By zipping or unzipping the mating portions 206a, 206b of the zipper, the sleeping bag 102 may be attached to or detached from the inner surface of the secondary panel 128. Although one zipper is shown at the inner surface of the secondary panel 128 forming in general a rectangular shape, multiple zippers may be used to define any suitable shapes or configurations. The multiple zippers may be parallel to each other or may form an angle with each other. In some examples, the sleeping bag 102 and the secondary panel 128 may also be joined using hook and loop fasteners, snap buttons, or the like, instead of or in addition to zipper mechanisms. When the sleeping bag 102 is releasably joined to the secondary panel 128, the sleeping bag 102 may be stored away when not in use to reduce the weight and volume of the backpack 100. Furthermore, a releasable connection between the sleeping bag 102 and the secondary panel 128 may allow use of different types of sleeping bags with the same backpack 100 for different purposes.

With reference to FIG. 6A, the bottom edge portion of the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100, the rear edge portion of the bottom panel 208 of the backpack 100, the bottom edge portion 154 of the secondary panel 128, and an end of the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102 may be sewn together. In some examples, a binding 210 may be utilized to cover the edge portions of the different panels 110, 128, 208 and the end of the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102. In some examples, the edge portions of the different panels 110, 128, 208 and the end of the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102 may point toward the inside of the compartment formed by the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100 and the secondary panel 128 of the backpack 100, and the binding 210 may be contained within this compartment. In some examples, the edge portions of the different panels 110, 128, 208 and the end of the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102 may point toward the outside of the compartment formed by the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100 and the secondary panel 128, and the binding 210 may prevent the wear and tear of the edge portions and the end of the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102 from happening. Although sewing is described herein as an exemplary connecting method, any other suitable connecting methods including, but not limited to, bonding, adhering, snapping, and so on may be used.

With reference to FIG. 6B, a hinge element 212 may be used to join the sleeping bag 102 and the secondary panel 128 to the main body 104 of the backpack 100 for improved flexibility. One longitudinal edge of the hinge element 212, the bottom edge portion of the secondary panel 128, and the end of the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102 may be sewn together. A binding may be utilized to cover the edge portions of the hinge element 212, the secondary panel 128, and the end of the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102. The other longitudinal edge of the hinge element 212, the bottom edge portion of the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100, the rear edge portion of the bottom panel of the backpack 100, and/or an edge piping may be sewn together. In some examples, the edge portions of the different panels, the hinge element 212 and/or the edge piping may point toward the inside compartment of the backpack 100. One of the inner linings 202 of the rear panel 110 or the bottom panel of the backpack 100 may be positioned over the edge portions. Although sewing is described herein as an exemplary connecting method, any other suitable connecting method including, but not limited to, bonding, adhering, snapping, and so on may be used.

The hinge element 212 may be made of any suitable flexible material. The hinge element 212 may include an outer layer 214 and an inner layer 216. The outer layer 214 may be formed using, for example, but not limited to, nylon, polyester or any other suitable material for flexibility and durability. The inner layer 216 may be formed using, for example, but not limited to, nylon, polyester, cotton, fleece, silk or any other suitable material that provides for flexibility and comfort. In some examples, the hinge element 212 may include only one layer.

With reference to FIG. 7A, the bottom edge 154 of the secondary panel 128 may be releasably joined to the backpack 100 using a bottom zipper 218. The bottom zipper 218 may extend along the length of the bottom edge 154 of the secondary panel 128. A zipper tape of the bottom zipper 218 may be connected to the bottom edge portion 154 of the secondary panel 128 and the end portion of the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102. Another zipper tape of the bottom zipper 218 may be connected to the bottom edge portion of the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100 and the rear edge portion of the bottom panel 208 of the backpack 100. The zipper tapes and the respective edge portions of different panels 110, 128, 208 and/or the end of the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102 may be connected by sewing, bonding, adhering, snapping, and or any other suitable connecting method. Bindings 210 may be used to cover the edges portions of the different panels 110, 128, 208 and/or the end portion of the bottom layer 174 of the sleeping bag 102. When the zipper teeth joining the respective zipper tapes engage, the bottom edge of the sleeping bag 102 and the secondary panel 128 may be connected to the backpack 100.

With reference to FIGS. 7B and 7C, the bottom zipper 218 may be the same zipper 146 that is used along the top, left, and right edge portions 148, 150, 152 of the secondary panel 128 for attaching the secondary panel 128 to the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100. This way, the entire sleeping bag 102 and/or the secondary panel 128 may be removed from the rear panel 110 of backpack 100 by selectively disconnecting all of the zipper teeth of the zipper 146, 218. This feature provides a user with the capability to completely disconnect the secondary panel 128 and the sleeping bag 102 from the backpack 100 when it is not desired to have the sleeping bag 102 joined to the backpack 100. As described earlier, the sleeping bag 102 may be further disconnected from the secondary panel 128 if the user desires (FIG. 7C). The capability of disconnecting the sleeping bag 102 and/or the secondary panel 128 from the backpack 100 may allow the user to hang the sleeping bag 102 from another object or store the sleeping bag 102 in a large sack during long periods of storage to maintain the insulation properties of the sleeping bag 102. The capability to disconnect the sleeping bag 102 entirely from the secondary panel 128 and/or the backpack 100 may also allow a user to attach a different sleeping bag to the secondary panel 128 and/or the backpack 100 or to sleep in the sleeping bag 102 without the sleeping bag 102 remaining attached to the secondary panel 128 and/or the backpack 100.

With further reference to FIGS. 7B and 7C, when the zipper 146, 218 used for attaching the secondary panel 128 to the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100 extends along all four edges portions 148, 150, 152, 154 of the secondary panel 128, the zipper 146, 218 may be configured to start from one bottom corner of the secondary panel 128, such as the bottom right corner of the secondary panel 128. The zipper 146, 218 may extend and zip along the bottom, left, top, and right edge portions 148, 150, 152, 154 of the secondary panel 128 for attaching the secondary panel 128 to the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100. In some examples, a securing feature 220 may be provided at the side panel 112 of the backpack 100 adjacent to the bottom left corner of the secondary panel 128 (see FIG. 7B where the lower halves of the shoulder straps 120 are removed to show the securing feature 220). The securing feature 220 may include a strap, one end of which may be joined to the side panel and the other end of which may be releasably joined to the first end using a snap button to form a loop. When the zipper 218 for attaching the secondary panel 128 to the backpack 100 is zipped along the bottom edge portion 154 of the secondary panel 128, the strap may be positioned through an opening formed in the pull tab 222 of the zipper 146 to secure the pull tab 222 thereto. This way, a user may use the backpack 100 and the sleeping bag 102 as a chair (such as shown in FIGS. 3A, 3B, and 3C) or as a sleeping bag 102 (such as shown in FIGS. 4A, 4B, 4C, 4D, and 4E) without worrying that the secondary panel 128 and/or the sleeping bag 102 may be accidentally detached from the backpack 100. Other securing features 220 may be used to releasably secure the zipper pull 222 to the backpack 100, including hook and loop fasteners, buttons, slots and straps, or any other suitable securing mechanism.

In some examples, the zipper 146, 218 may be configured to start from the bottom left corner of the secondary panel 128. The zipper 146, 218 may extend and zip along the left, top, right, and bottom edge portions 148, 150, 152, 154 of the secondary panel 128 for attaching the secondary panel 128 to the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100. The securing feature 220 may be provided at the side panel 112 of the backpack 100 adjacent to the top left corner of the secondary panel 128. Other suitable locations of the zipper starting point and the securing feature 220 may be contemplated.

FIGS. 8-10 show another embodiment of a backpack 100 that incorporates a sleeping bag 102. As illustrated in FIGS. 8-10, a zipper 224 may be provided along the top, right, and bottom edge portions 148, 150, 152 of the secondary panel 128 for attaching the secondary panel 128 and the sleeping bag 102 included therein to the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100. The left edge portion 148 of the secondary panel 128 may be permanently connected to the backpack 100, and the sleeping bag 102 may unfold along the width direction of the backpack 100 instead of unfolding along the depth direction of the backpack 100. This may allow for the creation of a wider sleeping bag 102 without changing the dimensions of the backpack 100 since the height of a backpack 100 is often greater than its width. In some of these embodiments, the right edge portion 152, rather than the left edge portion 148, of the backpack 100 may be permanently joined to the rear panel 110 of the backpack 100. When being unfolded, the sleeping bag 102 may be laid over one of the shoulder straps 120 or below both of the shoulder straps 120. In some embodiments, one or more ends of the shoulder straps 120 may include a connecting device, such as a buckle element, clasp, carabiner or the like, that allows the user to easily and quickly disconnect the shoulder straps 120 from the backpack 100 when using the sleeping bag 102 and reconnect the shoulder strap 120 to the backpack 100 to carry the backpack 100.

There are many advantages/uses of the configuration of the backpack as described herein. Carrying a sleeping bag in a space defined by a secondary panel and the rear panel of a backpack may increase the amount of space available in the main compartment of the backpack for carrying other contents. Providing the backpack with a secondary panel and a sleeping bag allows the entire assembly to be used as a chair, a sleeping bag with a head rest, or any other use a user may see appropriate. Moreover, the backpack and/or the sleeping bag may be camouflaged for military use or for hunting purpose. Furthermore, the backpack as described herein may be used as an emergency backpack. The main compartment of the backpack may be used for storing water, food, medicines, and such, and the sleeping bag may provide temporary shelter to homeless disaster victims. The compactness of the configuration of the backpack and the sleeping bag as described herein allows for easy transportation and storage.

A variety of embodiments and variations of structures and methods are disclosed herein. Where appropriate, common reference numbers and words were used for common structural and method features. However, unique reference numbers and words were sometimes used for similar or the same structural or method elements for descriptive purposes. As such, the use of common or different reference numbers or words for similar or the same structural or method elements is not intended to imply a similarity or difference beyond that described herein.

References to “top,” “bottom,” “side,” “front,” “back”, “lower,” and “upper,” as well as any other relative positional or directional descriptor are given by way of example to aid the reader's understanding of the particular embodiment(s) described. They should not be read to be requirements or limitations, particularly as to the position, orientation, or use of the invention unless specifically set forth in the claims. Connection references (e.g. attached, coupled, connected, joined, and the like) are to be construed broadly and may include intermediate members between a connection of elements and relative movement between elements. As such, connection references do not necessarily infer that two elements are directly connected and in fixed relation to each other, unless specifically set forth in the claims. In some instances, components are described with reference to “edges” or “ends” having a particular characteristic or being connected with another part. Those skilled in the art will recognize that the disclosed embodiments are not limited to components which terminate immediately beyond their points of connection with other parts.

The apparatus and associated method in accordance with the present invention has been described with reference to particular embodiments thereof. Therefore, the above description is by way of illustration and not by way of limitation. Accordingly, it is intended that all such alterations, variations, and modifications of the embodiments are within the scope of the present invention as defined by the appended claims. In methodologies directly or indirectly set forth herein, various steps and operations are described in one possible order of operation, but those skilled in the art will recognize that steps and operations may be rearranged, replaced, or eliminated without necessarily departing from the spirit and scope of the disclosed embodiments.





 
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