Title:
Methods and Systems for Score Consistency
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
Provided are methods and systems for determining score consistency.


Inventors:
Davies, Sarah (Villanova, PA, US)
Wang, Duan (Huntington, NY, US)
Pacheco, Andrada (Danbury, CT, US)
Application Number:
13/286099
Publication Date:
10/04/2012
Filing Date:
10/31/2011
Assignee:
DAVIES SARAH
WANG DUAN
PACHECO ANDRADA
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
706/46
International Classes:
G06Q40/02; G06N5/02
View Patent Images:
Foreign References:
WO2006099492A2
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A method for determining score consistency, comprising: a. generating a first score for each of a plurality of entities using a first scoring algorithm; b. generating a second score for each of the plurality of entities using the first scoring algorithm; c. assigning each of the plurality of entities to one of a first plurality of risk groups based on the first score and one of a second plurality of risk groups based on the second score, wherein the first and second pluralities of risk groups have corresponding risk groups; d. determining a first score consistency value based on the number of entities in each of the corresponding risk groups in the first and second pluralities of risk groups; and e. outputting the first score consistency value.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein the plurality of entities is a plurality of consumers.

3. The method of claim 1, wherein assigning each of the plurality of entities to one of a first plurality of risk groups based on the first score and one of a second plurality of risk groups based on the second score wherein the first and second pluralities of risk groups have corresponding risk groups comprises: ranking the plurality of entities by first score, resulting in a first ranked list; ranking the plurality of entities by second score, resulting in a second ranked list; dividing the first ranked list into a first portion and a second portion, wherein the first portion represents a first risk group and the second portion represents a second risk group of the first plurality of risk groups; and dividing the second ranked list into a first portion and a second portion, wherein the first portion represents the first risk group and the second portion represents the second risk group of the second plurality of risk groups.

4. The method of claim 3, wherein determining a first score consistency value based on the number of entities in each of the corresponding risk groups in the first and second pluralities of risk groups comprises: determining the total number of entities assigned to corresponding risk groups in the first and second pluralities of risk groups; and dividing the total number of entities assigned to corresponding risk groups in the first and second pluralities of risk groups by the number of the plurality of entities, resulting in the first score consistency value.

5. The method of claim 4, wherein determining the total number of entities assigned to corresponding risk groups in the first and second pluralities of risk groups comprises: identifying entities located in both the first portion of the first ranked list and the first portion of the second ranked list; and identifying entities located in both the second portion of the first ranked list and the second portion of the second ranked list.

6. The method of claim 1, wherein outputting the first score consistency value comprises displaying the first score consistency value on a display device.

7. The method of claim 1, further comprising repeating a-e using a second scoring algorithm to generate a second scoring consistency value.

8. The method of claim 7, further comprising comparing the first and second scoring consistency values to determine which scoring algorithm provides more consistent scores.

9. The method of claim 1, wherein the first score and the second score are obtained from a first credit reporting company.

10. The method of claim 1, wherein the first score is obtained from a first credit reporting company and the second score is obtained from a second credit reporting company.

11. A method for determining score consistency, comprising: generating a first score for each of a plurality of entities using a first scoring algorithm; generating a second score for each of the plurality of entities using a second scoring algorithm; assigning each of the plurality of entities to one of a first plurality of risk groups based on the first score and one of a second plurality of risk groups based on the second score wherein the first and second pluralities of risk groups have corresponding risk groups; determining a number of entities in each of the corresponding risk groups in the first and second pluralities of risk groups; determining a total number of entities assigned to corresponding risk groups in the first and second pluralities of risk groups; dividing the total number of entities assigned to corresponding risk groups in the first and second pluralities of risk groups by the number of the plurality of entities, resulting in a score consistency value; and outputting the score consistency value.

12. The method of claim 11, wherein the plurality of entities is a plurality of consumers.

13. The method of claim 11, wherein assigning each of the plurality of entities to one of a first plurality of risk groups based on the first score and one of a second plurality of risk groups based on the second score wherein the first and second pluralities of risk groups have corresponding risk groups comprises: ranking the plurality of entities by first score, resulting in a first ranked list; ranking the plurality of entities by second score, resulting in a second ranked list; dividing the first ranked list into a first portion and a second portion, wherein the first portion represents a first risk group and the second portion represents a second risk group of the first plurality of risk groups; and dividing the second ranked list into a first portion and a second portion, wherein the first portion represents the first risk group and the second portion represents the second risk group of the second plurality of risk groups.

14. The method of claim 11, wherein determining the total number of entities assigned to corresponding risk groups in the first and second pluralities of risk groups comprises: identifying entities located in both the first portion of the first ranked list and the first portion of the second ranked list; and identifying entities located in both the second portion of the first ranked list and the second portion of the second ranked list.

15. The method of claim 11, wherein outputting the score consistency value comprises displaying the score consistency value on a display device.

16. The method of claim 11, wherein the first score and the second score are obtained from a first credit reporting company.

17. The method of claim 11, wherein the first score is obtained from a first credit reporting company and the second score is obtained from a second credit reporting company.

18. A system for determining score consistency, comprising: a memory configured for storing scoring consistency data; and a processor, configured for performing steps comprising a. generating a first score for each of a plurality of entities using a first scoring algorithm; b. generating a second score for each of the plurality of entities using the first scoring algorithm; c. assigning each of the plurality of entities to one of a first plurality of risk groups based on the first score and one of a second plurality of risk groups based on the second score wherein the first and second pluralities of risk groups have corresponding risk groups; d. determining a first score consistency value based on the number of entities in each of the corresponding risk groups in the first and second pluralities of risk groups; and e. outputting the first score consistency value.

19. The system of claim 18, further comprising repeating a-e using a second scoring algorithm to generate a second scoring consistency value.

20. A computer readable medium having computer executable instructions embodied thereon for determining score consistency, comprising: a. generating a first score for each of a plurality of entities using a first scoring algorithm; b. generating a second score for each of the plurality of entities using the first scoring algorithm; c. assigning each of the plurality of entities to one of a first plurality of risk groups based on the first score and one of a second plurality of risk groups based on the second score wherein the first and second pluralities of risk groups have corresponding risk groups; d. determining a first score consistency value based on the number of entities in each of the corresponding risk groups in the first and second pluralities of risk groups; and e. outputting the first score consistency value.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED PATENT APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/042,808, which was filed on Mar. 5, 2008 (now allowed), which claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/026,487 filed Feb. 2, 2008, herein incorporated by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND

Typical real estate underwriting procedures require three credit scores for assessing a consumer's credit worthiness, one score from each of the three credit reporting companies (CRCs). Lenders require that these scores are not only predictive of credit risk but also are highly consistent in their absolute value. Scoring algorithms that provide inconsistent scores can increase the risk exposure that a lender takes on and offers the borrower less attractive products and pricing.

Inconsistent scores occur largely due to score algorithm differences among CRCs, timing submission and content variations in data reported by creditors. A credit score for a consumer can vary by more than 60 points between the CRCs.

Measuring score consistency is challenging for the reasons stated previously and additionally due to the fact that scores often use different ranges. Thus, for example, a consumer may score 650 using two different algorithms yet have very different risk profiles. It is possible that the former algorithm has a range of 300 to 700 where 650 indicates low risk and the latter algorithm has a range of 600 to 900 where 650 indicates high risk.

As lenders look to improve the quality of their underwriting processes, a framework is necessary for evaluating the consistency of generic risk score algorithms.

SUMMARY

In one aspect, provided are methods and systems for determining score consistency, comprising generating a first score from data obtained from a first credit reporting company for each of a plurality of entities using a first scoring algorithm, generating a second score from data obtained from a second credit reporting company for each of a plurality of entities using the first scoring algorithm, assigning each of the plurality of entities to one of a first plurality of risk groups based on the first score and one of a second plurality of risk groups based on the second score, wherein the first and second pluralities of risk groups have corresponding risk groups, determining a first score consistency value based on the number of entities in each of the corresponding risk groups in the first and second pluralities of risk groups, and outputting the first score consistency value.

Additional advantages will be set forth in part in the description which follows or may be learned by practice. The advantages will be realized and attained by means of the elements and combinations particularly pointed out in the appended claims. It is to be understood that both the foregoing general description and the following detailed description are exemplary and explanatory only and are not restrictive, as claimed.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification, illustrate embodiments and together with the description, serve to explain the principles of the methods and systems:

FIG. 1 is an exemplary operating environment;

FIG. 2 is an exemplary method for determining score consistency;

FIG. 3 is another embodiment of an exemplary method for determining score consistency; and

FIG. 4 is another embodiment of an exemplary method for determining score consistency.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Before the present methods and systems are disclosed and described, it is to be understood that the methods and systems are not limited to specific synthetic methods, specific components, or to particular compositions, as such may, of course, vary. It is also to be understood that the terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only and is not intended to be limiting.

As used in the specification and the appended claims, the singular forms “a,” “an” and “the” include plural referents unless the context clearly dictates otherwise. Ranges may be expressed herein as from “about” one particular value, and/or to “about” another particular value. When such a range is expressed, another embodiment includes from the one particular value and/or to the other particular value. Similarly, when values are expressed as approximations, by use of the antecedent “about,” it will be understood that the particular value forms another embodiment. It will be further understood that the endpoints of each of the ranges are significant both in relation to the other endpoint, and independently of the other endpoint.

“Optional” or “optionally” means that the subsequently described event or circumstance may or may not occur, and that the description includes instances where said event or circumstance occurs and instances where it does not.

Throughout the description and claims of this specification, the word “comprise” and variations of the word, such as “comprising” and “comprises,” means “including but not limited to,” and is not intended to exclude, for example, other additives, components, integers or steps. “Exemplary” means “an example of” and is not intended to convey an indication of a preferred or ideal embodiment.

Disclosed are components that can be used to perform the disclosed methods and systems. These and other components are disclosed herein, and it is understood that when combinations, subsets, interactions, groups, etc. of these components are disclosed that while specific reference of each various individual and collective combinations and permutation of these may not be explicitly disclosed, each is specifically contemplated and described herein, for all methods and systems. This applies to all aspects of this application including, but not limited to, steps in disclosed methods. Thus, if there are a variety of additional steps that can be performed it is understood that each of these additional steps can be performed with any specific embodiment or combination of embodiments of the disclosed methods.

The present methods and systems may be understood more readily by reference to the following detailed description of preferred embodiments and the Examples included therein and to the Figures and their previous and following description.

Traditional generic risk scores are subject to large variations across CRCs. These variations can be driven from three sources: 1) differences in data submission by lenders and other entities; 2) differences in data classification by CRCs; and 3) differences in the score algorithms in place at each CRC. Further, different scores use different ranges to measure risk. A consistent predictive score enables lenders to implement optimal credit decision strategy, reduces confusion for the consumers when evaluating their own credit profile and helps regulators gauge lending exposure more precisely.

In one aspect, provided herein are methods and systems for measuring the consistency of a generic risk score algorithms across multiple CRCs. In one aspect, the methods and systems provided can utilize a ranking that an entity achieves based on the entity's score and its position relative to all other entity scores in a particular portfolio. An entity can be, for example, a consumer, a company, a country, a group of consumers, a group of companies, a group of countries, and the like. For example, if a consumer receives a score that ranks the consumer in the top 10% of a scored population of consumers for two different risk scoring algorithms, then for this consumer, the algorithms are highly consistent in risk assessment. Conversely, if the consumer receives a score from a first algorithm that ranks the consumer in the top 10% of the scored population according to a score range for the first algorithm and a score from a second algorithm that ranks the consumer in the bottom 10% of the scored population according to a score range for the second algorithm, then the algorithms are highly inconsistent.

I. Systems

FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating an exemplary operating environment for performing the disclosed method. This exemplary operating environment is only an example of an operating environment and is not intended to suggest any limitation as to the scope of use or functionality of operating environment architecture. Neither should the operating environment be interpreted as having any dependency or requirement relating to any one or combination of components illustrated in the exemplary operating environment. One skilled in the art will appreciate that respective functions can be performed by software, hardware, or a combination of software and hardware.

The present methods and systems can be operational with numerous other general purpose or special purpose computing system environments or configurations. Examples of well known computing systems, environments, and/or configurations that can be suitable for use with the system and method comprise, but are not limited to, personal computers, server computers, laptop devices, and multiprocessor systems. Additional examples comprise set top boxes, programmable consumer electronics, network PCs, minicomputers, mainframe computers, distributed computing environments that comprise any of the above systems or devices, and the like.

The processing of the disclosed methods and systems can be performed by software components. The disclosed system and method can be described in the general context of computer-executable instructions, such as program modules, being executed by one or more computers or other devices. Generally, program modules comprise computer code, routines, programs, objects, components, data structures, etc. that perform particular tasks or implement particular abstract data types. The disclosed method can also be practiced in grid-based and distributed computing environments where tasks are performed by remote processing devices that are linked through a communications network. In a distributed computing environment, program modules can be located in both local and remote computer storage media including memory storage devices.

Further, one skilled in the art will appreciate that the system and method disclosed herein can be implemented via a general-purpose computing device in the form of a computer 101. The components of the computer 101 can comprise, but are not limited to, one or more processors or processing units 103, a system memory 112, and a system bus 113 that couples various system components including the processor 103 to the system memory 112. In the case of multiple processing units 103, the system can utilize parallel computing.

The system bus 113 represents one or more of several possible types of bus structures, including a memory bus or memory controller, a peripheral bus, an accelerated graphics port, and a processor or local bus using any of a variety of bus architectures. By way of example, such architectures can comprise an Industry Standard Architecture (ISA) bus, a Micro Channel Architecture (MCA) bus, an Enhanced ISA (EISA) bus, a Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) local bus, an Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP) bus, a Peripheral Component Interconnects (PCI) bus, a PCI-Express bus, a Personal Computer Memory Card Industry Association (PCMCIA), Universal Serial Bus (USB) and the like. The bus 113, and all buses specified in this description can also be implemented over a wired or wireless network connection and each of the subsystems, including the processor 103, a mass storage device 104, an operating system 105, Scoring Consistency software 106, Scoring Consistency data 107, a network adapter 108, system memory 112, an Input/Output Interface 110, a display adapter 109, a display device 111, and a human machine interface 102, can be contained within one or more remote computing devices 114a,b,c at physically separate locations, connected through buses of this form, in effect implementing a fully distributed system.

The computer 101 typically comprises a variety of computer readable media. Exemplary readable media can be any available media that is accessible by the computer 101 and comprises, for example and not meant to be limiting, both volatile and non-volatile media, removable and non-removable media. The system memory 112 comprises computer readable media in the form of volatile memory, such as random access memory (RAM), and/or non-volatile memory, such as read only memory (ROM). The system memory 112 typically contains data such as Scoring Consistency data 107 and/or program modules such as operating system 105 and Scoring Consistency software 106 that are immediately accessible to and/or are presently operated on by the processing unit 103.

In another aspect, the computer 101 can also comprise other removable/non-removable, volatile/non-volatile computer storage media. By way of example, FIG. 1 illustrates a mass storage device 104 which can provide non-volatile storage of computer code, computer readable instructions, data structures, program modules, and other data for the computer 101. For example and not meant to be limiting, a mass storage device 104 can be a hard disk, a removable magnetic disk, a removable optical disk, magnetic cassettes or other magnetic storage devices, flash memory cards, CD-ROM, digital versatile disks (DVD) or other optical storage, random access memories (RAM), read only memories (ROM), electrically erasable programmable read-only memory (EEPROM), and the like.

Optionally, any number of program modules can be stored on the mass storage device 104, including by way of example, an operating system 105 and Scoring Consistency software 106. Each of the operating system 105 and Scoring Consistency software 106 (or some combination thereof) can comprise elements of the programming and the Scoring Consistency software 106. Scoring Consistency data 107 can also be stored on the mass storage device 104. Scoring Consistency data 107 can be stored in any of one or more databases known in the art. Examples of such databases comprise, DB2®, Microsoft® Access, Microsoft® SQL Server, Oracle®, mySQL, PostgreSQL, and the like. The databases can be centralized or distributed across multiple systems. Scoring Consistency data can comprise, for example, credit data for consumers, business, countries and the like. Scoring Consistency data can also comprise, for example, scores determined using a variety of scoring algorithms using credit data.

In another aspect, the user can enter commands and information into the computer 101 via an input device (not shown). Examples of such input devices comprise, but are not limited to, a keyboard, pointing device (e.g., a “mouse”), a microphone, a joystick, a scanner, tactile input devices such as gloves, and other body coverings, and the like These and other input devices can be connected to the processing unit 103 via a human machine interface 102 that is coupled to the system bus 113, but can be connected by other interface and bus structures, such as a parallel port, game port, an IEEE 1394 Port (also known as a Firewire port), a serial port, or a universal serial bus (USB).

In yet another aspect, a display device 111 can also be connected to the system bus 113 via an interface, such as a display adapter 109. It is contemplated that the computer 101 can have more than one display adapter 109 and the computer 101 can have more than one display device 111. For example, a display device can be a monitor, an LCD (Liquid Crystal Display), or a projector. In addition to the display device 111, other output peripheral devices can comprise components such as speakers (not shown) and a printer (not shown) which can be connected to the computer 101 via Input/Output Interface 110.

The computer 101 can operate in a networked environment using logical connections to one or more remote computing devices 114a,b,c. By way of example, a remote computing device can be a personal computer, portable computer, a server, a router, a network computer, a peer device or other common network node, and so on. Logical connections between the computer 101 and a remote computing device 114a,b,c can be made via a local area network (LAN) and a general wide area network (WAN). Such network connections can be through a network adapter 108. A network adapter 108 can be implemented in both wired and wireless environments. Such networking environments are conventional and commonplace in offices, enterprise-wide computer networks, intranets, and the Internet 115.

For purposes of illustration, application programs and other executable program components such as the operating system 105 are illustrated herein as discrete blocks, although it is recognized that such programs and components reside at various times in different storage components of the computing device 101, and are executed by the data processor(s) of the computer. An implementation of Scoring Consistency software 106 can be stored on or transmitted across some form of computer readable media. Any of the disclosed methods can be performed by computer readable instructions embodied on computer readable media. Computer readable media can be any available media that can be accessed by a computer. By way of example and not meant to be limiting, computer readable media can comprise “computer storage media” and “communications media.” “Computer storage media” comprise volatile and non-volatile, removable and non-removable media implemented in any method or technology for storage of information such as computer readable instructions, data structures, program modules, or other data. Exemplary computer storage media comprises, but is not limited to, RAM, ROM, EEPROM, flash memory or other memory technology, CD-ROM, digital versatile disks (DVD) or other optical storage, magnetic cassettes, magnetic tape, magnetic disk storage or other magnetic storage devices, or any other medium which can be used to store the desired information and which can be accessed by a computer.

The methods and systems can employ Artificial Intelligence techniques such as machine learning and iterative learning. Examples of such techniques include, but are not limited to, expert systems, case based reasoning, Bayesian networks, behavior based AI, neural networks, fuzzy systems, evolutionary computation (e.g. genetic algorithms), swarm intelligence (e.g. ant algorithms), and hybrid intelligent systems (e.g. Expert inference rules generated through a neural network or production rules from statistical learning).

II. Methods

In one aspect, illustrated in FIG. 2, provided is a method for determining score consistency. By way of example, the method is described in the context of three CRCs. However, it is contemplated that the methods described herein can be used with less than three CRCs and more than three CRCs. Let GR_Score be any generic risk score which is available from all three CRCs. Let GR_Score_CRC1 denote the GR_Score calculated and pulled from CRC1, GR_Score_CRC2 denote the GR_Score calculated and pulled from CRC2, and GR_Score_CRC3 denote the GR_Score calculated and pulled from CRC3.

Score a random sample of consumers with the condition that GR_Scores are available for each and every record in the sample from all three CRCs at 201. Rank order the population from high score to low score using GR_Score_CRC1 at 202. Assign the population into risk categories using percentage breaks using GR_Score_CRC1 at 203. For example, assign the top scored X1% of the population into a category labeled “Low Risk”, put the next X2% of population into category “Medium Risk”, and the next X3% of population into category “High Risk”, and the rest X4% (the lowest scored) population into category “Very High Risk”, as shown in the table below.

Population GroupsLabelPopulation Breaks
Low RiskLX1%
Medium RiskMX2%
High RiskHX3%
Very High RiskVX4%
TotalX1% + X2% + X3% + X4% = 100%

Similarly, rank order the same population using GR_Score_CRC2 at 204, and assign them into the same risk categories using the same percentage breaks (i.e. X1%, X2%, X3%, X4%) at 205. Rank order the same population using GR_Score_CRC3 at 206, and assign them into the same risk categories using the same percentage breaks (i.e. X1%, X2%, X3%, X4%) at 207.

Determine the number of consumers assigned to the same risk category across CRCs at 208. For example, determine the number of consumers who are categorized as ‘Low Risk’ in CRC 1 and also categorized ‘Low Risk’ in CRC 2 and ‘Low Risk’ in CRC 3. Similarly perform the same determination for the Medium Risk, High Risk and Very High Risk groups.

Divide the number of consumers assigned to the same risk category across CRCs by the total number of consumers in the population at 209, resulting in a score consistency value, also referred to as the score consistency index (SCI hereafter). The SCI can be determined as follows:


SCI (Score Consistency Index)=(N1+N2+N3+N4)/N

wherein N is the total number of consumers in the sample; N1 is the number of consumers who are categorized into “Low Risk” in all three CRCs; N2 is the number of consumers who are categorized into “Medium Risk” in all three CRCs; N3 is the number of consumers who are categorized into “High Risk” in all three CRCs; and N4 is the number of consumers who are categorized into “Very High Risk” in all three CRCs.

In another aspect, illustrated in FIG. 3, provided is an exemplary determination of SCI using 20 consumers (N=20), with the population broken into four equal sized risk groups (so X1%=X2%=X3%=X4%=25%). However, risk groups do not have to be of equal size. SCI will be determined for a hypothesized generic risk score, referred to herein as GR, which is available from each of the 3 CRCs, with a hypothetical score range of 1 to 1000. For each consumer, the GR score from CRC 1 is denoted by GR_CRC1, from CRC 2 denoted by GR_CRC2, and so on. All score values are arbitrary and for illustration purpose only.

ConsumersGR_CRC1GR_CRC2GR_CRC3
Consumer 1739750630
Consumer 2890981730
Consumer 3150366233
Consumer 4460761638
Consumer 5890996988
Consumer 6874379569
Consumer 7762475485
Consumer 8569345651
Consumer 96898123
Consumer 10256569432
Consumer 11334442365
Consumer 12786835998
Consumer 13589489543
Consumer 14489478467
Consumer 15109308508
Consumer 16982820880
Consumer 17590585620
Consumer 18680589591
Consumer 19368490461
Consumer 20678873690

Obtain scores based on generated by a scoring algorithm from data pulled from three CRCs at 301. Sort the population by GR_CRC1, GR_CRC2, GR_CRC3, respectively, and assign them to four risk groups at 302 (i.e. 25% of the population per risk group), the results are shown by the following table:

25% For
Each RiskSorted bySorted bySorted by
GroupGR_CRC1GR_CRC2GR_CRC3
Low Risk
Consumer 16982Consumer 5996Consumer 12998
Consumer 2890Consumer 2981Consumer 5988
Consumer 5890Consumer 20873Consumer 16880
Consumer 6874Consumer 12835Consumer 2730
Consumer 12786Consumer 16820Consumer 20690
Medium
Risk
Consumer 7762Consumer 4761Consumer 8651
Consumer 1739Consumer 1750Consumer 4638
Consumer 18680Consumer 18589Consumer 1630
Consumer 20678Consumer 17585Consumer 17620
Consumer 17590Consumer 10569Consumer 18591
High Risk
Consumer 13589Consumer 19490Consumer 6569
Consumer 8569Consumer 13489Consumer 13543
Consumer 14489Consumer 14478Consumer 15508
Consumer 4460Consumer 7475Consumer 7485
Consumer 19368Consumer 11442Consumer 14467
Very High
Risk
Consumer 11334Consumer 6379Consumer 19461
Consumer 10256Consumer 3366Consumer 10432
Consumer 3150Consumer 8345Consumer 11365
Consumer 15109Consumer 15308Consumer 3233
Consumer 968Consumer 998Consumer 9123

Count the number of consumers who are in the same risk group across all 3 CRCs at 303. For Low Risk, consumers numbered 2, 5, 12, 16 are in the low risk group for all 3 CRCs, so N1=4; for Medium Risk, consumers numbered 1, 17, 18 are in the medium risk group for all 3 CRCs, so N2=3; for High Risk, consumers numbered 13, 14 are in the high risk group for all 3 CRCs, so N3=2; for Very High Risk, consumers numbered 3, 9 are in the very high risk group for all 3 CRCs, so N4=2. Then calculate the SCI by taking the ratio as percentage at 304: SCI=(N1+N2+N3+N4)/N=(4+3+2+2)/20=11/20=55%. SCI Interpretation: 55% of the population are consistently ranked in the same risk tier across the three CRCs.

The methods and systems provided enable lenders to quantitatively compare consistency performance of score algorithms and to factor this information in their overall assessment of the score algorithm's accuracy. The methods and systems provided herein provide several valuable business frameworks for the lending industry. For example, product assignment consistency. Utilizing a simple ‘4 primary tier’ framework, a score can be evaluated for its ability to consistently place a consumer in the appropriate product range given their credit risk profile. Tiers can be defined such that they reflect super prime, prime, near and sub-prime behavior. For example, the super-prime tier could be defined as the top 15% of the population, prime as the next 50%, near-prime as the next 15%, and sub-prime as the final 10%. Another valuable business framework provided by the methods and systems is pricing assignment consistency. A secondary framework can be deployed within any of the above primary tiers to further evaluate the scores' ability to consistently rank the consumer within a specific risk tier (e.g. high, medium, low risk) such that the appropriate pricing can be assigned. The secondary framework is essentially nested within the primary tier.

A framework design using four risk categories logically aligns with business lending strategy, since the majority of lenders categorize their portfolio or prospects into four risk groups and formalize business strategies around that framework. Commonly-used terminology for the four tiers is Super-Prime, Prime, Near-Prime, and Sub-Prime. The absolute definition of these risk groups (in terms of score cuts or population percentage breaks) varies for different lenders, and for different products. For example, the definition of Sub-Prime for a mortgage lender may be quite different from that of a credit card lender. Therefore, it is useful to vary the population percentage breaks for the four tiers to understand the stability of the index. The methods and systems described herein can utilize any number of risk groups and variations of percentage breaks.

In another aspect, illustrated in FIG. 4, provided are methods for determining score consistency, comprising generating a first score for each of a plurality of entities using a first scoring algorithm at 401, generating a second score for each of the plurality of entities using the first scoring algorithm at 402, assigning each of the plurality of entities to one of a first plurality of risk groups based on the first score and one of a second plurality of risk groups based on the second score wherein the first and second pluralities of risk groups have corresponding risk groups at 403, determining a first score consistency value based on the number of entities in each of the corresponding risk groups in the first and second pluralities of risk groups at 404, and outputting the first score consistency value at 405. The plurality of entities can be, for example, a plurality of consumers, companies, countries, and the like. Risk groups can be, for example, super prime, prime, near and sub-prime. The super-prime group can be defined as the top 15% of the population, prime as the next 50%, near-prime as the next 15%, and sub-prime as the final 10%. In other aspects, risk groups can be preferred and non-preferred. The preferred group can be defined as the top 25% of the population and the non-preferred as the remaining 75%. The number of risk groups and the definitions of risk groups can, and will, vary depending on the application.

In an aspect, the first score and the second score can be obtained from a first credit reporting company. In another aspect, the first score can be obtained from a first credit reporting company and the second score can be obtained from a second credit reporting company. In an aspect, the methods are operative on more than two scores, more than two credit reporting companies, and/or more than two scoring algorithms.

The methods can further comprise repeating 401-405 using a second scoring algorithm to generate a second scoring consistency value. The methods can further comprise comparing the first and second scoring consistency values to determine which scoring algorithm provides more consistent scores.

Assigning each of the plurality of entities to one of a first plurality of risk groups based on the first score and one of a second plurality of risk groups based on the second score wherein the first and second pluralities of risk groups have corresponding risk groups can comprise ranking the plurality of entities by first score, resulting in a first ranked list, ranking the plurality of entities by second score, resulting in a second ranked list, dividing the first ranked list into a first portion and a second portion, wherein the first portion represents a first risk group and the second portion represents a second risk group of the first plurality of risk groups, and dividing the second ranked list into a first portion and a second portion, wherein the first portion represents the first risk group and the second portion represents the second risk group of the second plurality of risk groups.

Determining a first score consistency value based on the number of entities in each of the corresponding risk groups in the first and second pluralities of risk groups can comprise determining the total number of entities assigned to corresponding risk groups in the first and second pluralities of risk groups and dividing the total number of entities assigned to corresponding risk groups in the first and second pluralities of risk groups by the number of the plurality of entities, resulting in the first score consistency value.

Determining the total number of entities assigned to corresponding risk groups in the first and second pluralities of risk groups can comprise identifying entities located in both the first portion of the first ranked list and the first portion of the second ranked list and identifying entities located in both the second portion of the first ranked list and the second portion of the second ranked list.

Outputting the first score consistency value can comprise displaying the first score consistency value on a display device.

While the methods and systems have been described in connection with preferred embodiments and specific examples, it is not intended that the scope be limited to the particular embodiments set forth, as the embodiments herein are intended in all respects to be illustrative rather than restrictive.

Unless otherwise expressly stated, it is in no way intended that any method set forth herein be construed as requiring that its steps be performed in a specific order. Accordingly, where a method claim does not actually recite an order to be followed by its steps or it is not otherwise specifically stated in the claims or descriptions that the steps are to be limited to a specific order, it is no way intended that an order be inferred, in any respect. This holds for any possible non-express basis for interpretation, including: matters of logic with respect to arrangement of steps or operational flow; plain meaning derived from grammatical organization or punctuation; the number or type of embodiments described in the specification.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications and variations can be made without departing from the scope or spirit. Other embodiments will be apparent to those skilled in the art from consideration of the specification and practice disclosed herein. It is intended that the specification and examples be considered as exemplary only, with a true scope and spirit being indicated by the following claims.