Title:
Safety-coated glass bottle
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Provided is a shatter-resistant glass bottle for transporting stored liquids. In particular, the invention is a safety-coated glass bottle with a wide-mouthed body and a detachable lid, providing a consumer with easy access to the reservoir of the bottle for adding items such as ice cubes, tea bags, and pieces of fruit.



Inventors:
Himelstein, Walter D. (Owings Mills, MD, US)
Application Number:
13/200488
Publication Date:
03/29/2012
Filing Date:
09/23/2011
Assignee:
HIMELSTEIN WALTER D.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
215/329
International Classes:
B65D23/08; B65D41/04
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20080279724Freshness indicator for beverage and food containersNovember, 2008Dicarlo
20080274434GAS APPLIANCENovember, 2008Burdsall et al.
20070012646Vessel capJanuary, 2007Horike
20060151420Nipple adapter for a bottle comprising a screw neckJuly, 2006Espenschied
20090065468Resin-made storage containerMarch, 2009Hata et al.
20080116165Expansible Bottle StopperMay, 2008Lin
20010035387Universal baby bottle capNovember, 2001Sutcliffe-noyd
20060131254Container with sealable finishJune, 2006Perez
20010032850Pump actuated sealing systemOctober, 2001Neuner
20070235405Nursing deviceOctober, 2007Al-thallab
20060086758Universal hydration systemApril, 2006Coles



Primary Examiner:
WALKER, NED ANDREW
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MONTGOMERY, MCCRACKEN, WALKER & RHOADS, LLP (1735 Market Street PHILADELPHIA PA 19103)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A shatter-resistant glass beverage bottle comprising: a glass body comprising a base, a cylindrical wall, and a threaded top end; a glass lid comprising a threaded connecting end wherein the threaded top end and threaded connecting end are configured for reversible engagement; a dispensing end; and a safety-coating comprising a plastisol.

2. The shatter-resistant glass bottle of claim 1, wherein the plastisol is BPA-free.

3. The shatter-resistant glass bottle of claim 1, wherein the plastisol is phthalate-free.

4. The shatter-resistant glass bottle of claim 1, wherein the plastisol is sanctioned for contact with food.

5. The glass bottle of claim 1 wherein the circumference of the base is substantially similar to the circumference of the threaded connecting end.

6. The shatter-resistant glass bottle of claim 1, wherein the base comprises an interior surface and an exterior surface.

7. The shatter resistant glass bottle of claim 1, wherein the cylindrical wall comprises an interior surface and an exterior surface.

8. The shatter-resistant glass bottle of claim 1, wherein the top end comprises an interior surface and an exterior surface.

9. The shatter-resistant glass bottle of claim 1, wherein the connecting end comprises an interior surface and an exterior surface.

10. The shatter-resistant glass bottle of claim 1, wherein the dispensing end further comprises a cap.

11. The shatter-resistant glass bottle of claim 8, wherein the lid is configured for reversible engagement with the dispensing end.

12. A shatter-resistant glass beverage bottle comprising: a glass body comprising a base, a cylindrical wall, and a top end; a glass lid comprising a connecting end, wherein the width of the connecting end is commensurate in width with the top end; a dispensing end; and a safety-coating comprising a plastisol.

13. The shatter-resistant glass bottle of claim 12, wherein the plastisol is sanctioned for contact with food.

14. The shatter-resistant glass bottle of claim 12, wherein the top end is wide-mouthed.

15. The shatter-resistant glass bottle of claim 12, wherein the connecting end is threaded.

16. The shatter-resistant glass bottle of claim 12, wherein the top end comprises grooves configured to permit complementary attachment to a threaded connecting end.

17. The shatter-resistant glass bottle of claim 12, wherein the bottle is configured to attach the connecting end to the top end by means other than threads and complementary grooves.

18. The shatter-resistant glass bottle of claim 12, wherein the safety coating is applied to at least one portion of an exterior surface of the glass body.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present invention claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/386,231 filed on Sep. 24, 2010, which is incorporated herein in its entirety by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to reusable, impact and shatter resistant, durable, glass containers for use with storage and consumption of beverages.

BACKGROUND

Disclosed herein is a glass bottle with a safety coat for use in drinking applications where normally glass bottle breakage causes a hazard.

With growing worldwide concern over topics such as waste disposal and environmental sustainability, an increased emphasis has been placed on the utilization of recyclable materials. However, despite this concern, products made from recyclable materials still end up in landfills on a daily basis. Plastics, glass, and metals are all materials frequently recycled and converted into new products, yet products made from these materials are commonly disposed of in standard trash receptacles, thus negating the benefits of the materials used in their construction. As a result, in addition to social pressure to use recyclable materials, modern consumers are also under increasing social pressure to reuse products whenever possible. The upshot of these competing pressures has been an increase in the production of environmentally-friendly and reusable products such as water bottles.

In recent years, consumers have had increased opportunities to purchase reusable water bottles constructed of a variety of materials, including, but not limited to glass, plastic, and various metals. With respect to plastics and metals, there has been a growing concern over the possibility of substances leaching out of an internal liner or the material of the water bottle itself and into the stored liquid. While some of these substances are innocuous, others affect the flavor or taste of the stored liquid, and yet others pose a significant health risk to the consumer. With respect to glass bottles, a major concern has been the issue of safety and the potential for injuries being sustained from contact with shards of glass.

Standard glass containers have a problem due to the fragile nature of glass; impact weakness yields a higher likelihood of breakage and the creation of shards of glass with sharp or jagged edges. These glass shards pose a safety risk, in that not only may shards of glass cut the flesh externally, but if they were accidentally ingested, they could cause internal damage.

Although aluminum is light in weight and non-breakable, it has been known to leach harmful substances and chemicals when heated or when in contact with acidic liquids. Additionally, some studies have linked aluminum exposure to Alzheimer's disease. To decrease the health risks posed by using aluminum in beverage containers, aluminum bottles may be lined with a different material. However, if the lining is torn or scratched, the stored liquid is then exposed to the aluminum itself, making it possible for aluminum to leach out. Liners can also retain flavors, which may in turn alter the taste of the stored liquid.

Many companies won't release information about the liners used in their aluminum bottles, nor the materials from which the liners are made. Plastic resins and baked-on epoxies are commonly used to line aluminum bottles, however certain formulations of these contain chemicals such as Bisphenol A (hereinafter referred to as “BPA”), which leach into the stored liquid. Ceramic is another material used to line aluminum bottles; however its composition is rigid and therefore prone to cracking.

Stainless steel is also used in the production of water bottles, though several of its characteristics make it less than ideal for such purposes. Due to its conductive nature, if a stainless steel water bottle is not insulated, heat emitted from the stored liquid will be transferred from the interior to the exterior of the bottle and make it difficult to comfortably hold. As with aluminum, there are also leaching issues with the use of stainless steel, with many manufacturers cautioning against allowing salty or acidic foods to remain in a stainless steel container for this very reason. As a result, stainless steel alters the taste of some liquids. Further, stainless steel contains chromium and nickel, elements to which some individuals are allergic. Finally, due to adhesion issues between certain paints and metal surfaces, paint-based designs applied to metal water bottles are susceptible to damage if not handled with care.

Glass drinking containers often make use of sleeves, sheaths and/or bases made from various substances to offset the fragility of glass. There are several drawbacks to these additional components: they (1) can provide space for bacteria to grow, (2) are not always dishwasher safe, and (3) can minimize recyclability. Opaque sleeves or sheaths also prevent the user from seeing the contents of the bottle. Additionally, an increased number of accessories or parts, such as a sleeve or sheath, results in greater work to assemble or dissemble the bottle. As the materials used to make many of these exterior sleeves and sheaths are often not dishwasher safe, usage of a sleeve or sheath also increases the amount of work required to clean a water bottle. Utilization of sleeves or sheaths also increases storage requirements when the water bottle is not in use.

Some glass drinking containers also have non-standard opening sizes, whether wider or narrower than commonly used. Wide openings increase the difficulty of drinking from the water bottle without spillage. Conversely, narrow openings increase the difficulty of cleaning the water bottle and limit the ability to add objects such as ice cubes or lemon wedges to the stored liquid.

As a result, until the present invention, there remained an unmet need for shatter resistant, reusable, glass water bottles which could safely be used to store hot or cold liquids, whether basic, acidic, or neutral, without imparting unto them any undesirable substances or flavors, while at the same time offering a user the ability view the contents of the water bottle and add or remove items such as ice cubes, tea bags, and lemon wedges without unnecessary hindrance.

SUMMARY

The glass bottle with a safety coat described herein comprises a reusable glass bottle to be repeatedly filled with liquids of any type that would normally be used in a glass container. The unique application of providing a safety coating on a glass bottle, specifically for use in public places, provides a reusable glass container that eliminates the need to use, and subsequently throw away, single-use containers such as disposable water bottles. Use of the glass bottle with a safety coat will save potentially hundreds if not thousands of pre-filled plastic bottles from being used and disposed of in a landfill.

In one embodiment, the safety coat comprises a plastisol/polymer coating applied to the exterior of a glass bottle, improving upon the bottle by making it both impact and shatter resistant.

In one embodiment, the safety coat is applied by dipping, spraying, or painting the clear plastisol coating. In another embodiment, the bottle is then either heat treated or air dried to cure the safety coating. One process that is used and widely practiced is heating a fluidized bed filled with powder of a plasticized polyvinyl chloride or ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer or polymers or plastisol or other appropriate synthetic material. After removing the bottle from the fluidized bed, the material sticks to the bottle forming a clear coherent continuous coating.

The foregoing summary provides an exemplary overview of some aspects of the invention. It is not intended to be extensive, or absolutely require any key/critical elements of the invention. Additional objects, advantages and novel features of the invention will be set forth in part in the description, examples and figures which follow, all of which are intended to be for illustrative purposes only, and not intended in any way to limit the invention, and in part will become apparent to those skilled in the art on examination of the following, or may be learned by practice of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The foregoing summary, as well as the following detailed description is explained with reference to the accompanying drawings. It should be understood, however, that the invention is not limited to the precise arrangements and instrumentalities shown.

FIG. 1 shows one embodiment of the safety coated glass bottle 100 of the present invention comprising a glass body 102 with a base 104, a connecting end 106, a dispensing end 108 and a safety coat 112.

FIG. 2 shows cross-sectional view of the safety-coated glass bottle 100, with the safety coating 112 shown with respect to its location relative to the exterior of glass body 102, after having been applied thereto.

FIG. 3 shows a threaded detachable lid with screw-off cap 114, wherein the lid is adapted to accommodate a plastic straw.

FIG. 4 shows an alternative embodiment of the glass bottle 100 wherein the lid further comprises a lid handle 404.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

For the purposes of this disclosure, the term “bottle” shall be understood to mean a vessel, whether produced by the consumer or commercially available, suitable for storing liquid materials. The term “glass” shall be understood to refer to a non-crystalline, solid material including, but not limited to, materials made from silica, acrylic, polycarbonate, and polyethylene terephthalate. The terms “safety coat” and “safety-coated” are used interchangeably and refer to a coating on a glass bottle that renders the glass bottle both impact and shatter-resistant. The terms “consumer” and “user” are used interchangeably and shall be understood to refer to any individual who would carry the safety-coated water bottle or consume liquids from it. The terms “stored liquid,” “beverage,” and “drink” are used interchangeably and shall be understood to refer to any liquid, colloid, suspension, emulsion, or combination of liquids and solids, stored or intended to be stored in the safety-coated water bottle and intended for consumption or other use by the user. The term “shard of glass” shall be understood to mean a piece of glass, smaller in size than the water bottle, with rough, jagged, or sharp edges, formed from the breaking or shattering of the bottle, and posing a threat to the health of the consumer or a third party. The term “plastisol” shall be understood to mean a substance comprising a mixture of a resin and a plasticizer, which is molded, cast, or made into a continuous film by application of heat.

In one embodiment, the safety-coated glass bottle 100 comprises a lid 116 that secures to a portion of the top of a glass body 102 of glass bottle 100. In another embodiment, the lid further comprises a cap. In another embodiment, safety-coated glass bottle 100 is generally cylindrical in shape, with a central internal axis 118 perpendicular to the diameter of any circular cross-section of the cylindrical shape.

In one embodiment, the glass body is configured with a base end (bottom of the bottle body). Opposite the base end is a top end (top of the bottle body) for receiving/connecting the lid. In yet another embodiment, the top end serves as both a receiving end and a dispensing end. The top end may be of varying width, or a width commensurate with the width of the cylindrical body of the bottle. See FIG. 1.

In yet another embodiment, bottle 100 may be of various sizes, heights, and widths.

One aspect of the invention is a safety coating 112 applied to a portion of the glass bottle 100. In one embodiment, the safety coating is applied to all or a portion of the glass body 102. In another embodiment, the safety coating is applied to all or a portion of the lid 116. See FIG. 2, which shows the safety coating on the exterior of the bottle surface. In one embodiment, the application of safety coating 112 provides a glass bottle 100 that is both shatter and impact resistant. In one embodiment, the safety coating 112 protects the consumer from being harmed by the shards of glass formed when a glass bottle shatters or breaks. In another embodiment, the safety coating 112 makes bottle 100 portable and easy to use without fear of creating and distributing shards of glass in areas that normally don't allow use of glass containers or areas where a consumer would be hesitant to bring glass.

In one embodiment, a single safety coat layer is applied to at least a portion of the bottle 100. In another embodiment, one or more safety coats can be applied in order to achieve a layering-effect of the safety coat, particularly in those areas prone to breakage on a bottle, such as the base and or the neck of the bottle.

Various companies produce products that enable coating of glass bottles. In one embodiment, the safety coating 112 comprises a plastisol material such as DB4682 CLEAR NON-PHTH as supplied by POLYONE CORPORATION, 8155 Cobb Center Drive, Kennesaw, Ga. 30152. While a plastisol material is described in one embodiment, it will be understood by one having ordinary skill in the art that other synthetic coating materials are available for use and would impart a coating on glass water bottle 100 to render glass water bottle 100 shatter resistant or impact resistant.

In one embodiment, the safety coating is compliant with federal regulations and sanctioned for contact with food.

The plastisols and polymers used in the safety coating may be tailored to a wide range of products and processes through methods known in the art. Such compounds are formulated over a wide range of hardness, temperature, flexibility, heat, tear and abrasion resistance characteristics in virtually any color and clear coating. It is envisioned that other material, whether presently in existence or to be developed at a later date, will be used in the safety-coating, provided it is sanctioned by the FDA under 21 CFR for contact with food.

In one embodiment, a safety coating 112 comprising a plastisol is applied by hot dip, cold dip, rotational molding or other coating processes as known in the art. In another embodiment, the plastisols are applied in a liquid state and curing takes place at temperatures between 350 and 400 degrees F., resulting in the deposit of a coating of solid plasticized polyvinyl on the item.

In one embodiment, the plastisol material is BPA-free. In another embodiment the plastisol material is phthalate-free. In yet another embodiment, the plastisol material is both BPA- and phthalate-free.

The clear plastisol/polymer coating 112 reduces potential breakage due to the fact that coated glassware has improved resistance to breakage and shattering. The plastisol coating gives glass water bottle 100 added strength, slip resistance and impact absorption qualities.

In one embodiment, the glass bottle 100 is essentially clear and colorless and is coated in a plastisol material that is also essentially clear and colorless, thereby allowing the user to see the stored liquid at all times. This visibility also facilitates easy input and removal of items from within the interior of bottle 100, as the user of the glass water bottle 100 is able to view the item in question from outside bottle 100 and manipulate it appropriately.

In another embodiment, one or both of bottle 100 or safety coating 112 is colored or tinted to provide a colored or tinted safety-coated glass bottle 100.

The safety-coated glass bottle 100 is of various shapes and sizes. In one embodiment, the safety-coated glass bottle 100 is of a size compatible with a standard automobile cup holder.

Turning now in more detail to the figures, FIG. 1 shows an exploded view of one embodiment of the invention comprising at least three parts operably connected to provide a shatter-resistant glass bottle for storing liquids. The closed construct operably comprises body 102, lid 116, and safety-coating 112.

Body 102 operably comprises base 104, cylindrical wall 124, and top end 120. As depicted in FIG. 1, in one embodiment, top end 120 is configured with complementary, mated threads or grooves 110b for reversible engagement with lid 116. In another embodiment, top end 120 also serves as a receiving end. In yet another embodiment, top end 120 serves as a dispensing end.

In one embodiment, lid 116 operably comprises connecting end 106, neck 122, and dispensing end 108. As depicted in FIG. 1, in one embodiment, dispensing end 108 is configured with complementary, mated threads or grooves 120 for reversible engagement with cap 114 which is configured with complementary, mated threads or grooves.

While FIG. 1 depicts a bottle 100 with a lid comprising a dispensing end (shown as 108 in FIG. 1), it should be understood that other configurations are envisioned and intended. In one particular embodiment, the lid 116 is configured as the cap, therefore absent the neck and dispensing end. In one embodiment, the lid 116 has a surface configured with threaded grooves and an opposite surface that is relatively flat and planar, absent the neck and cap. (This arrangement is not shown in FIG. 1) In this particular configuration, the threaded end 110b of the body 102 comprises the dispensing end 108, with the resulting configuration providing a wide-mouth dispensing/receiving end of glass body 102. Thus, the lid 116 operable connects to the body 102 via the threaded connecting end 106 and in the absence of the neck and dispensing end, the lid 116 of this particular arrangement functions as the cap 114.

In one embodiment, the dispensing end 108 of the bottle is configured as part of lid 116; in another embodiment, dispensing end 108 is configured as part of the glass body 102.

In one embodiment, depicted in FIG. 1, the safety-coating 112 covers a portion of body 102. FIG. 2 depicts a top-down cross-sectional view of safety-coating 112 applied to the exterior of body 102.

When in closed form, the construct provides a sealed, shatter-resistant glass bottle for storing liquids. The stored liquids may then be accessed by several means. In embodiments comprising cap 114 capable of reversible engagement, disengagement of cap 114 from lid 116, provides access for dispensing stored liquids via the opening of dispensing end 108. Additionally, stored liquids may dispensed by disengaging connecting end 106 from top end 120. In the embodiment depicted in FIG. 1, such reversible engagement is provided by the mated threads or grooves 110a and 110b. FIG. 3 depicts an additional embodiment in which stored liquids may be dispensed via lid 116 adapted to accommodate straw 402 through opening 400. In another embodiment not depicted in the figures, liquids may be dispensed via cap 114 adapted to accommodate straw 402.

The detachable nature of the component parts of the invention also provides multiple avenues for adding stored liquids to the shatter-resistant bottle. When the invention is in closed form, stored liquids may be added by disengaging cap 114 from dispensing end 108 and pouring the liquid to be stored through the opening of dispensing end 108. Additionally, stored liquids may be added to the closed form of the invention by disengaging lid 116 from body 102 and pouring the liquid through the opening of top end 120. The wider opening of top end 120 allows for not only liquids to be stored, but also for items or materials which the user wishes to add to the stored liquid.

Lid 116 has a connecting end 106 configured with grooves or threads 110a which provide reversible engagement of complementary threads or grooves 110b on body 102. Connecting end 106 has two surfaces: an interior surface which is proximal to central internal axis 118 and an exterior surface which is distal to central internal axis 118.

Lid 116 also has neck 122 which extends from connecting end 106 and terminates in dispensing end 108. Neck 122 has two surfaces: an interior surface proximal to central internal axis 118 and an exterior surface distal to central internal axis 118. Dispensing end 108 has two surfaces: an interior surface proximal to central axis 118 and an exterior surface distal to central internal axis 118.

The interior surfaces of connecting end 106 and neck 122 are adjacent to and continuous with one another. The interior surfaces of neck 122 and dispensing end 108 of are adjacent to and continuous with one another. The exterior surfaces of connecting end 106 and neck 122 are adjacent to and continuous with one another. The exterior surfaces of neck 122 and dispensing end 108 are adjacent to and continuous with one another. The exterior surfaces of connecting end 106, neck 122, and dispensing end 108 form a lid handling area.

In one embodiment, dispensing end 108 is configured with threads or grooves 120 mated for reversible engagement of dispensing end 108 with cap 114 outfitted with complementary threads or grooves. In one embodiment, dispensing end 108 has a smooth opening allowing a consumer to drink directly from bottle 100.

Body 102 has a flat or concave base 104, to allow for resting bottle 100 on planar surfaces. Body 102 also has a cylindrical wall 124 extending upwards from base 104 to top end 120. Top end 120 and cylindrical wall 124 of body 102 each have two surfaces: an interior surface proximal to central internal axis 118 and an exterior surface distal to central internal axis 118. Base 104 has two surfaces: an interior surface adjacent to and continuous with the interior surface of cylindrical wall 124 of body 102 and an exterior surface adjacent to and continuous with the exterior surface of cylindrical wall 124 of body 102. The interior surface of top end 120 is adjacent to and continuous with the interior surface of body 102; the exterior surface of top end 120 is adjacent to and continuous with the exterior surface of body 102. The area bounded at the bottom by the interior surface of the base 104 and at the sides by the interior surfaces of the cylindrical wall 124 and top end 120 forms a reservoir for storing liquids or drinks. The exterior surfaces of base 104, cylindrical wall 124, and top end 120 form a body handling area.

An embodiment of top end 120 is configured with grooves or threads 110b mated for reversible engagement of complementary threads or grooves 110a of connecting end 106. The use of such mated and complementary threaded reversible engagement means allows for a consumer to “open” bottle 100 by disengaging threads 110a and 110b. After threads 110a and 110b have been disengaged, lid 116 is removed from body 102, providing a wide opening through which to access the reservoir. In this way, a consumer easily accesses the reservoir and adds or removes liquids or objects including, but not limited to, ice cubes, tea bags, and slices of fruit.

In one embodiment, top end 120 is wide-mouthed. In one embodiment, the width of connecting end 106 of lid 116 is commensurate in width with top end 120. In one embodiment, the circumference of connecting end 106 of lid 116 is substantially similar to the circumference of base 104 of body 102. In one embodiment, the width of the opening of top end 120 is commensurate in scope with the average width of the body 102 of glass bottle 100. In another embodiment, the width of the opening is a width smaller than the average width of the body 102 of the glass bottle 100.

In one embodiment, top end 120 is configured to be reversibly engaged to connecting end 106 by means other than mated and complementary threads and grooves. In one embodiment, dispensing end 108 is configured to be reversible engaged to cap 114 by means other than mated and complementary threads and grooves.

In one embodiment, the reversible engagement of top end 120 and connecting end 106 provides for a water-tight seal. In one embodiment, the reversible engagement of dispensing end 108 and cap 114 provides for a water-tight seal.

In one embodiment, safety coating 112 is applied to at least one portion of the exterior surface of bottle 100. In one embodiment, safety coating 112 is applied to at least one portion of the body handling area. In another embodiment, safety coating 112 is applied to at least one portion of the lid handling area. In one embodiment, the safety coating 112 will cover the entire outside surface of glass bottle 100, including a portion of base 104 and a portion of any threaded or grooved portions of the glass bottle 100, such as top end 120 or connecting end 106. In another embodiment, safety coating 112 will cover a portion of the exterior surface of glass bottle 100, without covering any threaded portions of bottle 100. In yet another embodiment, safety coating 112 will cover at least a portion of the interior of glass bottle 100.

In one embodiment cap 114 has a flip top opening.

In one embodiment, lid 116 is configured with an opening 400 for integrated plastic straw 402 for use in drinking stored liquids from body 102. See FIG. 3

In one embodiment, cap 114 is configured with an opening to accept integrated plastic straw 402 for use in drinking stored liquids from the body 102.

In another embodiment, lid 116 is a snap-on lid that secures to the body 102.

In one embodiment, lid 116 further comprises a lid handle 404. In one embodiment, lid handle 404 is permanently affixed to lid 116. See FIG. 4. In another embodiment, lid handle 404 is removably affixed to lid 116. In one embodiment, lid handle 404 is made of a rigid material. In another embodiment, lid handle 404 is made of a flexible material.

In another embodiment, bottle 100 is configured with a body handle. The body handle consists of handle piece and carrying band. The carrying band of body handle is applied to body 102 prior to engagement of lid 116 with body 102. The handle piece of body handle then extends above lid 116. The handle piece is made of any one of a number of materials, whether flexible or rigid, as deemed appropriate.

In one embodiment, bottle 100 is configured with a removable side handle. Removable side handle is attached to body 102 via levers which, when pressed towards body 102 engage a strap encircling body 102.

In another embodiment, bottle 100 is configured with a removable shoulder strap for hands free transport of the glass bottle 100.

In another embodiment, bottle 100 is configured with a removable sleeve. In one embodiment the sleeve is a rubberized or other textured material that aids with gripping bottle 100. In another embodiment, the sleeve reversibly attaches to bottle 100 by Velcro or other releasable attachment means.

In one embodiment, the safety-coated glass water bottle 100 is configured to filter liquids deposited in reservoir of body 102. In one embodiment of the filtration system, lid 116 of safety-coated glass bottle 100 is configured with a filtration mechanism comprising a flip-open lid, passageway, and chamber containing carbon-exchange resin allowing for filtration of tap water, thereby providing filtered water for drinking. In one embodiment, lid 116 is configured with the filtration mechanism for use with bottle 100 when lid 116 is secured to the body 102.

In one embodiment, dispensing end 108 is configured as a pour spout opening. Pour spout opening of dispensing end 108 has an oblong shape and pouring end allowing for easier pouring of stored liquids into separate containers including, but not limited to, glasses or cups.

In one embodiment, the safety-coated glass bottle 100 is dishwasher safe.

In one embodiment bottle 100 is used for any type of beverage; water, apple juice (acidic), or any type of carbonated liquid.

In another embodiment, bottle 100 is heat and cold resistant.

The above described embodiments are to be considered in all respects only as exemplary and not restrictive. The scope of the invention is, therefore, indicated by the subjoined claims rather than by the foregoing description. All changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are to be embraced within their scope.





 
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