Title:
Wireless video game controller
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The wireless video game controller is a 1:1 scale realistic replica Air soft gun, of a weapon, such as a US military standard issue assault rifle or machine gun. An M16, M4, or other such realistic replica having realistically operational moving mechanical parts may function as a wireless video game controller when equipped with a wireless video game controller having switch placement that facilitates electrical and mechanical interaction between the switches and the operational moving mechanical parts of the gun replica. Moreover, joystick and pushbutton wireless game controls are disposed on portions of the gun that are ergonomically consistent with a gun user's stance and hand positioning when handling and firing the weapon. Programmable buttons are optionally provided and placement of the programmable buttons is consistent with the inventive game controller's ergonomic design.



Inventors:
Huebner, Richard D. (Orlando, FL, US)
Santoro, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL, US)
Hinchman, William H. (Orlando, FL, US)
Application Number:
12/588493
Publication Date:
04/21/2011
Filing Date:
10/16/2009
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F9/24
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
HOANG, BACH V
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Richard C. Litman (112 S. West Street, Alexandria, VA, 22314, US)
Claims:
We claim:

1. A wireless video game controller, comprising: a rifle replica having a central body, a trigger hand grip positioned below a rear section of said central body, a trigger extending down from the central body in front of the trigger hand grip, a stock extending rearward from the central body, a barrel extending forward from the central body and a barrel hand grip extending along the barrel, said rifle replica having substantially the same size, same weight, and moving mechanical parts as the rifle being replicated, said moving mechanical parts including a removable magazine, said trigger being squeezable, and a positionable safety mechanism; game control buttons disposed on said rifle replica; a controller disposed inside the rifle replica, the game control buttons being electrically connected to the controller, thereby transmitting configuration information of said game control buttons to the controller, the controller being in operable communication with a device playing a video game, thereby allowing a user of the controller to control at least one feature of the video game; a game control switch disposed on the rifle replica, the game control switch controlling actions of the video game via operable communication with the controller, the game control switch being positioned so that actuation of the game control switch occurs cooperatively with operation of at least one of said moving mechanical parts of the rifle replica; joystick game control devices disposed on the rifle replica, the joystick game control devices controlling actions of the video game via operable communication with the controller; a tilt switch disposed inside the rifle replica, the tilt switch being electrically connected to the controller, the tilt switch transmitting vertical pitch information of the rifle replica to the controller, the controller transmitting the vertical pitch information to the device running the video game, thereby enhancing play of the video game.

2. The wireless video game controller according to claim 1, wherein the joystick game control devices comprise a first joystick disposed on the trigger hand grip and a second joystick disposed on the barrel hand grip, both joysticks being easily accessible to a user's thumbs for control of some aspect of said video game when the user's hands are in a shooting position on the gun replica.

3. The wireless video game controller according to claim 1, wherein said tilt switch sends pitch down information to said wireless video game controller when the barrel of said rifle replica is pitched down a predetermined angle from a horizontal plane.

4. The wireless video game controller according to claim 1, wherein said tilt switch sends pitch up information to said wireless video game controller when the barrel of said rifle replica is pitched up a predetermined angle from a horizontal plane.

5. The wireless video game controller according to claim 1, wherein a predetermined number of said game control buttons are disposed longitudinally along said barrel grip thereby facilitating ease of access to said game control buttons when a shooter has proper hand placement on said gun replica for shooting said gun replica.

6. The wireless video game controller according to claim 1, further comprising a forward assist mechanism disposed on said gun replica, said forward assist mechanism functioning as a control switch electrically connected to said wireless video game controller.

7. The wireless video game controller according to claim 1, wherein said game control switch is a trigger switch that is actuated cooperatively with squeezing of said trigger.

8. The wireless video game controller according to claim 7, wherein a “magazine” game control switch is actuated cooperatively with placement of said removable magazine in said gun replica and is de-actuated cooperatively with removal of said removable magazine from said gun replica.

9. The wireless video game controller according to claim 7, further comprising an electrical interlock circuit wherein said “magazine” game control switch deactivates said trigger switch when said magazine is disengaged from said gun replica.

10. The wireless video game controller according to claim 1, wherein said game control switch is actuated cooperatively with a predetermined setting of said positionable safety mechanism.

11. The wireless video game controller according to claim 1, further comprising a sliding hammer disposed on said central body wherein said game control switch is actuated cooperatively with a predetermined sliding position of said sliding hammer.

12. The wireless video game controller according to claim 1, further comprising a reload mechanism having a button disposed on said gun replica, said reload mechanism releasing said magazine when said button is depressed, said game control switch being actuated cooperatively with depressing of said reload mechanism button.

13. The wireless video game controller according to claim 1, wherein said game control switch is actuated cooperatively with placement of a user's shoulder against the stock of said gun replica.

14. The wireless video game controller according to claim 1, wherein a first of said game control buttons is connected to a first digital, directional input of said wireless video game controller, a second of said game control buttons is connected to a second digital, directional input of said wireless video game controller, a third of said game control buttons is connected to a third digital, directional input of said wireless video game controller, and a fourth of said game control buttons is connected to a fourth digital, directional input of said wireless video game controller.

15. The wireless video game controller according to claim 14, wherein a fifth of said game control buttons is connected to a left trigger input of said wireless video game controller, and a sixth of said game control buttons is connected to a right trigger input of said wireless video game controller.

16. The wireless video game controller according to claim 15, wherein a seventh of said game control buttons is connected to a left joystick click input of said wireless video game controller, and an eighth of said game control buttons is connected to a right joystick click input of said wireless video game controller.

17. The wireless video game controller according to claim 16, wherein a ninth of said game control buttons is connected to an alternate left trigger input of said wireless video game controller, and a tenth of said game control buttons is connected to an alternate right trigger input of said wireless video game controller.

18. The wireless video game controller according to claim 1, wherein a predetermined number of said game control buttons are disposed on the central body proximate the trigger thereby facilitating ease of access to said game control buttons when a shooter has proper hand placement on said gun replica for shooting said gun replica.

19. The wireless video game controller according to claim 1, wherein a predetermined number of said game control buttons are disposed on the stock thereby facilitating ease of access to said game control buttons when a shooter has proper hand placement on said gun replica for shooting said gun replica.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to electronic game apparatus, and more specifically to a wireless video game controller having game controls that are electromechanically connected to operational mechanical parts of a simulated rifle.

2. Description of the Related Art

Video games playable on computers have become a very popular means of entertainment and are now generally played on controller devices held by two hands. The typical two-handed controller is generally shaped like an oversized computer mouse having a plurality of controls. This arrangement may be acceptable for a variety of video games. However, it is not very realistic for First Person Shooter (FPS) games in which a shooter is placed in a virtual environment with targets to shoot at. While the traditional mouse-shaped controller devices have become ubiquitous, they tend to take away from the realism of FPS video games, leaving FPS game participants yearning for another type of control device.

Thus, a wireless video game controller solving the aforementioned problems is desired.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The wireless video game controller is preferably a 1:1 scale Air soft gun that is a realistic replica of a weapon, e.g., a US military standard issue assault rifle or machine gun. For example, an M16, M4, or other such realistic replica having realistically operational moving mechanical parts may function as a wireless video game controller when equipped with a wireless video game controller having switch placement that facilitates electrical and mechanical interaction between the switches and the operational mechanical moving parts of the gun replica.

Moreover, joystick and pushbutton wireless game controls are disposed on portions of the gun that are ergonomically consistent with a gun user's stance and hand positioning when handling and firing the weapon. Programmable buttons are optionally provided, and placement of the programmable buttons is consistent with the game controller's ergonomic design.

These and other features of the present invention will become readily apparent upon further review of the following specification and drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a right side view of a wireless video game controller according to the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a left side view of a wireless video game controller according to the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a partial side view of a wireless video game controller according to the present invention, showing an enlarged view of the stock of the rifle replica.

FIG. 4 is a partial side view of the wireless video game controller according to the present invention, showing an enlarged view of the grip and barrel.

FIG. 5 is a partial right side view of the wireless video game controller according to the present invention, showing an enlarged view of the trigger area.

FIG. 6 is a partial side view of the wireless video game controller according to the present invention, partially broken away to show details thereof.

FIG. 7 is a partial left side view of the wireless video game controller according to the present invention, showing further details of the trigger area.

FIGS. 8 and 9 are partial left side views of the wireless video game controller according to the present invention, showing operation of the bolt or slide hammer action.

FIG. 10 is a top perspective view of a typical wireless video game controller of the prior art.

FIG. 11 is a partial side view of the wireless video game controller according to the present invention, shown with the trigger area broken away to show internal details thereof.

FIG. 12 is a partial side view of the wireless video game controller according to the present invention, shown partially broken away to show details of the internal mechanism.

FIG. 13 is a partial top view in section of the wireless video game controller according to the present invention, showing details of the clip release switch.

FIG. 14 is a block diagram of a control circuit for a wireless video game controller according to the present invention.

Similar reference characters denote corresponding features consistently throughout the attached drawings.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the wireless video game controller 10 is preferably a 1:1 scale model Air soft gun that is a realistic replica of a weapon, e.g., a US military standard issue assault rifle or machine gun. For example, a replica of an M16, M4, or the like may function as a housing for the wireless video game controller 10. The wireless video game controller 10, as exemplified in FIGS. 1-9 and 11-14, adapts many of the mechanically interactive functions of a Model M16 gun to serve as a variety of function controls normally available on a conventional wireless video game controller, thereby enabling a user to control many aspects of a video game by manipulating moving mechanical parts of the gun replica. For example, trigger portion 1400 has a realistic trigger 33 that is electromechanically connected to a trigger switch 136. Remaining wireless game function controls are integrated into the gun body 14 so that the gun performs as a full functioning wireless video game controller.

The wireless video game controller 10 is particularly well suited for use by a player of a first person “shooter” (FPS) type video game. In such video games, the player typically is presented with a first person view of an environment in the video game and is asked to aim and shoot various targets. The user is commonly provided with a crosshair or other target designation, typically, in the center of the display. The point of view of the user in the game typically moves left, right, up, down, etc., based on the input from a computer mouse, keyboard, prior art XBOX controller 1302 (shown in FIG. 10), or the like, to allow the user to aim at various targets in the video game.

Targeting or aiming is typically accomplished by positioning the crosshair at the desired position, generally using a peripheral control device, e.g., computer mouse, keyboard, directional pad, and the like, to change the point of view of the user in the video game or otherwise position the crosshair on the display in the video game. Shooting the target is typically accomplished by pressing a dedicated shoot button. The dedicated shoot button has in the past typically been a mouse button or a key on the keyboard. Similarly, joysticks may also be used to change the point of view of the user in the game and shooting is typically accomplished by pressing shoot button, generally on the top of the joystick or on a base of the joystick.

For FPS applications, the wireless video game controller 10 provides a more realistic interaction with the video game, since the device is shaped like a firearm and has intuitive access to the control buttons, joysticks, and the like, in order to quickly change the point of view of the user, quickly change weapon configuration, and quickly fire the weapon. While the wireless video game controller 10 is particularly well suited for use in FPS video games, the wireless video game controller 10 may be operable with any video game, as well. In addition, the wireless video game controller 10 is preferably compatible with video game systems, such as all versions of the XBOX-360® (XBOX is a registered trademark of Microsoft, Inc.), all versions of the SONY PLAYSTATION® (PLAYSTATION is a registered trademark of Sony Computer Entertainment, Inc.), and all versions of similar present and future computer gaming systems. Moreover, the wireless video game controller 10 may be utilized with other computer simulations and virtual reality systems, such as those commonly used by law enforcement and military agencies as training aids.

The wireless video game controller 10 is shaped as a firearm, preferably as a military-style assault rifle. With reference to FIGS. 1, 2, and 4, it is readily apparent that the exemplary gun replica 14 is made from a modified M16 model-Wells Air Soft Gun, although it is contemplated that a gun replica controller as described herein could be manufactured at the outset with the controller switches and processors built in.

The wireless video game controller 10 includes a handgrip 20 positioned below a rear section of a central body 22. A trigger 33 extends down from the central body 22 in front of the handgrip 20. A barrel 26 extends forward from the central body 22. A clamshell grip 25 may envelope the barrel, extending coaxially with the barrel 26 in front of the central body 22. The wireless video game controller 10 includes a stock 29, which can be used to steady the wireless video game controller 10 against the user's shoulder. This increases stability of the wireless video game controller 10, the same as in an actual rifle. The controller 10 has substantially the same size, same weight, and same external mechanical features as the rifle being replicated, e.g., the M-16, the M-4, or the like. Functioning external mechanical features include a removable clip 21, a squeezable trigger 33, and a retractably extendable lever (slide hammer 35). Game control buttons are disposed on the rifle replica.

An XBOX-360, Sony Playstation, or other suitable wireless video game controller is disposed inside the rifle replica. For example, as shown by comparison of the block diagram of FIG. 14 with FIG. 10 depicting prior art XBOX 360 controller 1302, it is readily understood that the function controls of an XBOX 360 controller 1302, such as legacy guide button G, legacy left joystick LS, legacy directional pad DP, and legacy right joystick RS, are mapped to switches, buttons, and joystick controls in the wireless video game controller 10. As shown in FIGS. 1-3, the switches, buttons and joystick controls are disposed on exterior and interior portions of air gun M-16 replica 14. As part of the M16 replica modification, wireless controller microprocessor 12 is disposed on a circuit board C inside the M-16 rifle replica 14.

The game control buttons are electrically connected to the circuit board C of the wireless video game controller 10 and transmit their configuration information to the processor 12 of the wireless video game controller 10. The wireless video game controller 10 wirelessly communicates via wireless link W with a device, e.g., PC, XBOX, PS2, or the like, playing a video game, thereby allowing a user of the wireless video game controller 10 to control at least one feature of the video game.

Tilt switches 120 and 140 are disposed inside the rifle replica, the tilt switches being electrically connected to the wireless video game controller 12 and transmitting vertical pitch information of the rifle replica to the wireless video game controller 12, which in turn communicates the vertical pitch information to the XBOX or other device running the video game. Thus, the information from tilt switches 120 and 140 enhances play of the video game without the use of expensive gyroscopic sensors on the wireless video game controller 10.

Referring to FIG. 11 and the partial detail of FIG. 12, it is seen that the wireless video game controller 10 has a right analog joystick 134 disposed on the handgrip 20 of the gun. Referring to FIG. 6, it is seen that a left analog joystick 142 is disposed on front clamshell grip 25 of the gun. As shown in FIG. 2, at least one breakout pushbutton switch 182 is disposed on the gun 14 to support joystick click functionality. Also included, as shown in FIGS. 1, 2, 4, and 11, are slide pull switch 118 engageable by the slide pull 35, fourth barrel button 106, forward assist knob switch 116, and camper button 112 which map to XBOX digital pad directional switches D1, D2, D3, and D4, respectively. Button 112 is mounted on the right side of central body 22 above the trigger 33 to provide easy access for grenade launching in most FPS games. Button 110 mounted on central body 22 is routed to the RB input of controller 12. The buttons connect to circuit board C.

Moreover, barrel switches 100, 102, and 104 are disposed on the clamshell 25 and connect to LB, A, and B inputs of controller 12, respectively. Placement of the barrel switches 100, 102, and 104 is longitudinal along the clamshell 25 and facilitates ease of access when a shooter has proper hand placement on the gun. As shown in FIGS. 3 and 10, buttons 126, 128, 129, and 130 are mounted on the left-hand side of stock 29 for easy and convenient access when a shooter is holding the gun in a proper stance. Buttons 126, 128, 129, and 130 connect to START, GUIDE, CONNECT, and BACK inputs of controller 12, respectively. The START, GUIDE, CONNECT, and BACK inputs correspond to control buttons on legacy controller 1302. The GUIDE button on legacy controller 1302 is central circular button G. Placing the control button functions on the stock 29 enable the user to play the game and effortlessly control the controller 12 without letting go of the gun replica controller 10.

Preferably two rumble packs 44 are disposed inside the device 10. All of the buttons are strategically located throughout the Model M16 controller 10 to allow full control and easy access. Buttons and switches, including those interacting with moving parts on the M-16 replica are connected to the controller circuit board C via wiring routed inside the gun 14. The connection of buttons and switches on various parts of the gun 14 to the wireless controller microprocessor 12 enables the wireless video game controller 10 to play CALL OF DUTY video games, as well as other type of games. For example, an M-16 is in the FPS game, COD4, and many other First Person Shooter (FPS) video games, thus use of the control device 10 advantageously adds to the virtual reality of the game. It is contemplated herein that the gun replica wireless video game controller 10 can provide button and switch interfaces connectable to any game controller platform such as, but not limited to, XBOX 360, PC, PS3, and the like.

The wireless video game controller's tilt switches 120, 140 connect to the controller processor 12 to provide a player with real time tilt tracking that associates vertical tilt (up or down) of the air gun wireless video game controller 10 with vertical tilt of a virtual gun within the video game, thereby creating the effect of bringing the player closer to a virtual reality immersion in the game.

The wireless video game controller 10 is a fully operational FPS Machine Gun controller that replaces prior art controller 1302. For example, the right joystick 134 is disposed on the left side of the rear handgrip 20, adjacent to trigger 33 so that when a shooter's trigger finger is on the trigger, the shooter can use his/her thumb to manipulate the joystick control 134. The left joystick 142 is disposed on a midsection of the left side of clamshell grip 25 so that when a shooter's weapon support hand is holding the clamshell grip 25 with arm extended, the shooter can use his/her thumb to manipulate the joystick control 142. Additionally, video game control function buttons, and switches, being disposed on the inventive rifle wireless video game controller 10 allow a user full control over his/her virtual character, thereby eliminating the necessity of playing the FPS games with traditional controller 1302.

The gun trigger 33 has realistic mechanical action, and due to connection and placement of micro trigger switch 136 for contact with the trigger 33 when the trigger 33 is pulled the video game weapon, fires in real time, thereby synchronizing trigger pulling action of the user to his/her virtual character in the game. Micro trigger switch 136 is disposed inside the replica 14 and sits behind the trigger mechanism in a manner that allows the contacts of switch 136 to close responsive to movement of the trigger mechanisms when the trigger 33 is squeezed. The micro trigger switch 136 sends its status to controller 12 on circuit board C, the controller 12 wirelessly communicating the switch status information to the head unit playing the video game.

Additionally, there is a realistic, functioning safety 52 disposed on the gun 14. The safety 52 is mechanically connected to safety switch 132, which is positioned inside the gun to contact cam portion 1100 of the safety mechanism 52 thereby closing when the safety lever is positioned in the safe mode. The safety switch 132 has wiring which is routed to the controller board C for processing by processor 12. Flipping the working safety lever 52 to—SAFETY ON—changes a player's weapon in the game. The player cannot fire the new virtual weapon until the SAFETY is turned OFF. The functionality of the working safety lever 52 simulates putting away a real firearm in that when the safety is on, the weapon will not fire. As shown in FIGS. 10 and 14, the safety switch 132 simulates activating the “Y” button on prior art controller 1302, yet advantageously, as shown in FIG. 2, the functionality of safety switch 132 being implemented by mechanical lever 52 on the gun provides easy access by the shooter without the shooter changing shooting positioning of the shooter's hands. Moreover, when the safety is switched to ON, the trigger mechanism will not work and thus will not send a fire command to the controller 12.

The wireless video game controller 10 has a reload mechanism 38 including a reload button that, when pressed, causes the spring-loaded ammunition clip 21 to fall out. The reload functionality includes submicro switch 108, which is mounted close to a bar on reload mechanism 38, thereby allowing switch 108 to be closed by a perpendicularly extending tang portion of the reload button mechanism 38 when the reload button is pushed. The reload bar, an elongate, perpendicularly extending portion of the reload mechanism, holds the clip in place, and when it is displaced, the model clip physically falls out. When the clip 21 is in place, it makes contact with a “trigger bridge” micro detect switch 138 wired to the micro trigger switch 136 that is connected internally to the gun replica's trigger 33. This enables the trigger switch 136 to make electrical contact with the controller circuit board when the model clip is in and not make the electrical contact when the model clip is out, thus providing a realistic reload system.

The reload mechanism 38 includes a tang that closes reload micro switch 108, thereby sending a signal to processor 12 that disables trigger firing until the clip mechanism 38 is released after a clip is put back in. When the clip is out, the trigger mechanism (internal micro trigger switch 136) cannot send a fire command to the microcontroller 12 until the clip has been pushed back in and locked in place by a reload bar portion of clip release mechanism 38, thereby finishing the RELOAD process. Micro switch 138 is internally disposed adjacent to the clip in order to provide an interlock feature requiring the clip to be placed back into the weapon 14 to enable firing by trigger 33. It should be understood that during this reloading process for the player, the virtual character in the game is doing the same type of reloading motion.

An Aim Down Site (A.D.S.) micro switch 124 is positioned externally on the end of stock 29. When the user's shoulder depresses the associated micro switch 124 via physical upper body contact with the stock end of the Model M16 Controller 10, the resultant closed switch contact status is sent to the controller 12 on circuit board C. Switch 124 is mapped to the Left Trigger function of the wireless controller 12. This provides a realistic sight A.D.S. system that requires the player to make physical upper body contact with the weapon replica 10 in Standard Military form for shooting. This feature is easily used in “sniper mode” in which the user holds his/her virtual breath via depressing joystick click button 182, while maintaining upper body contact with the weapon replica 10, i.e., the user's actions mirror the virtual character's action in the game.

The feature of being able to switch to special kits, e.g., grenade launcher, Claymores, Rockets, and the like, is a D1 function on legacy X-BOX game controller 1302. The Model M16 wireless controller 10 has the same feature using the retractably extendable slide hammer 35, which is wired to switch 118 for D1 functionality. As shown in FIG. 11, the switch 118 is attached inside the replica weapon 10 in close proximity to planar elongate sliding internal portion of the extendable slide hammer 35 so that the switch closes when the slide hammer 35 is extended and mechanically contacts the switch 118. Wiring of switch 118 is routed to circuit board C to provide connection D1 to the processor 12, the D1 connection being equivalent to the left directional pad on prior art XBOX controller 1302. Pulling back on the slide hammer 35 allows the user to switch to special kits in the FPS game being played. Slide hammer internal micro detect switch 118 is placed behind and under the slide hammer 35 so that when the slide hammer 35 is physically pulled the slide hammer 35 makes contact internally with the slide hammer micro detect switch 118 which sends contact information to the controller circuit board C for processing by processor 12.

By tilting the wireless video game controller 10 thirty or more degrees down from the horizontal, an internal micro tilt switch 140 disposed in stock 29 (shown in FIG. 3) closes its switch contacts and transmits the tilt status information to the controller circuit board C, the processor 12 interpreting that as a left joystick click wherein a Sprint-mode allows and realistically resembles the virtual character's sprinting movements.

Similarly, a second internal tilt switch 120 is disposed inside a front portion of the central body 22 so that its electrical contacts close when the gun controller device 10 is leaned at a 30° or more angle above the horizontal. The contact information is sent to the controller circuit board C wherein the processor 12 interprets that as a Right Stick Click signal, which allows a Tilt/Lunge Barrel or Stock, Forward or Back, MELEE operation in the game. Positioning of the weapon replica 10 at the raised angle resembles the virtual character's movement (e.g., COD5 Bayonet Attack).

As shown in FIG. 2, a New Camper Mode of the inventive controller unit 10 has strategic “prone” and “breath” buttons 180, 184 placed on portion of the rifle barrel 26 proximate the central body 22, which, when optionally connected to X and B controller inputs allow snipers to access “prone” and “breath” features of the video game while still using the right analog joystick 134 to change the point of view of the user in the game thereby allowing the unit 10 to be easily held with a comfortable grip while maintaining full functional control over the video game. The micro tact switches 180 and 184 are disposed inside an upper portion of the gun body 22 and connect to the controller board C thereby sending contact information to controller 12. It is contemplated that the camper mode buttons may optionally be connected to programmable inputs when such inputs are available in a controller such as, e.g., controller 12.

As shown in FIG. 12, a vibrating rumbler 144 is disposed in the base of the handle 20 in proximity with right analog joystick 134. Another vibrating rumbler 144 is disposed in the clamshell 25 surrounding the barrel 26, in proximity with the left analog joystick 142. The rumblers 144 provide the feel of “Fire Power” and “Realistic Kick” at both handling points of gun replica 14.

Placement of the wireless controller circuit board C, buttons, and switches retains the original realistic appearance of the model machine gun 14. Moreover, all control device wiring is internally placed with in the Model M16 Controller 10 to further enhance the realistic look and feel of the gun 14.

Placement of right joystick 134 on the hand grip 20 and left joystick 142 on the clamshell grip 25 allows for a normal virtual character look system that functions in the same left hand-right hand manner as the “look” system in a legacy controller 1302. However the control placement of the inventive device 10 differs from control placement on the legacy controller in that the inventive control placement is ergonomic with respect to a rifle user's stance and hand positioning.

Additionally, as shown in FIG. 1, a flashlight 190 or laser targeting device 192 may be provided as options that attach under the gun barrel 26. Flashlight 190 and/or laser pointer 192 may be wired to the controller 12 in such a manner as to energize when a D2 switch closure is detected, which in many FPS games provides virtual night vision and targeting. Moreover a microphone may be mounted on the gun and may be wired to transmit audio when connect button 129 is pressed.

The wireless video game controller 10, being a replica of an actual firearm, is very realistic. However, it does not shoot projectiles of any kind, and therefore it is equipped with a red safety tip at the end of barrel 26.

It is to be understood that the present invention is not limited to the embodiment described above, but encompasses any and all embodiments within the scope of the following claims.