Title:
Motor Mount Assembly
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A motor mount assembly is provided for detachably attaching a motor to a watercraft. The motor mount assembly comprises a battery housing, a mounting flange, an adjustable support assembly, and a motor support shaft. The battery housing is disposed on and releasably secured to the watercraft. The battery housing accommodates a battery that powers the motor. The mounting flange is detachably attached to and extends outwardly from the battery housing. A first end of the adjustable support assembly detachably attaches to the mounting flange. The adjustable support assembly supports the motor support shaft. The motor support shaft is connected to a second end of the adjustable support assembly and is positioned substantially vertical to the adjustable support assembly. The motor is connected to the bottom end of the motor support shaft and is therefore detachably attached to the watercraft via the motor support shaft.



Inventors:
Burke, James Michael (Stony Brook, NY, US)
Application Number:
12/836579
Publication Date:
01/20/2011
Filing Date:
07/15/2010
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
440/53, 440/63
International Classes:
B63H20/08; B63H21/17
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
POLAY, ANDREW
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Ashok Tankha (36 Greenleigh Drive, Sewell, NJ, 08080, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A motor mount assembly for detachably attaching a motor to a watercraft, comprising: a battery housing disposed on and releasably secured to said watercraft, wherein said battery housing is configured to accommodate a battery that powers said motor; a mounting flange detachably attached to and extending outwardly from said battery housing within said watercraft; an adjustable support assembly mounted on said mounting flange, wherein a first end of said adjustable support assembly detachably attaches to said mounting flange, and wherein a second end of said adjustable support assembly supports a motor support shaft; and said motor support shaft connected to said second end of said adjustable support assembly and positioned substantially vertical to said adjustable support assembly, wherein a bottom end of said motor support shaft is connected to said motor; whereby said motor is detachably attached to said watercraft via said motor support shaft.

2. The motor mount assembly of claim 1, wherein said second end of said adjustable support assembly is configured to receive said motor support shaft.

3. The motor mount assembly of claim 2, further comprising an end cap configured to receive and secure said motor support shaft within a space defined between said second end of said adjustable support assembly and said end cap.

4. The motor mount assembly of claim 3, wherein said motor support shaft is pivotally connected within said space defined by said second end of said adjustable support assembly and said end cap for steering said watercraft.

5. The motor mount assembly of claim 3, wherein said motor support shaft is rigidly connected within said space defined by said second end of said adjustable support assembly and said end cap for non-steering of said watercraft.

6. The motor mount assembly of claim 3, further comprising a locking element for locking said motor support shaft within said space defined by said second end of said adjustable support assembly and said end cap for one of a pivotal connection and a rigid connection of said motor support shaft to said adjustable support assembly.

7. The motor mount assembly of claim 1, further comprising a steering system rigidly attached to a middle section of said motor support shaft, wherein said steering system comprises: a steering mount bracket with an end cap rigidly attached to said middle section of said motor support shaft, wherein said steering mount bracket and said end cap together define a space for receiving said middle section of said motor support shaft; a tie rod rigidly attached to said steering mount bracket, wherein said tie rod provides a lateral offset for applying a steering force by a user on said motor support shaft; and a steering handle hingedly connected to said tie rod, wherein a first end of said steering handle is hingedly connected to said tie rod, and a second end of said steering handle is disposed proximal to said user to enable said user to apply said steering force on said motor support shaft.

8. The motor mount assembly of claim 1, further comprising a casing for accommodating said motor, wherein said casing with said accommodated motor is connected to said bottom end of said motor support shaft.

9. The motor mount assembly of claim 1, further comprising clamping elements to releasably secure said battery housing to said watercraft.

10. The motor mount assembly of claim 1, wherein said mounting flange is a T-shaped frame detachably attached to said battery housing by a plurality of fastening elements.

11. The motor mount assembly of claim 1, wherein said first end of said adjustable support assembly is detachably attached to said mounting flange by a locking pin.

12. The motor mount assembly of claim 1, wherein said adjustable support assembly comprises a plurality of interconnected sliding members adjustable for varying lengths of said watercraft.

13. The motor mount assembly of claim 12, wherein each of said sliding members of said adjustable support assembly comprises a plurality of recesses for receiving one or more locking pins, wherein said one or more locking pins lock said sliding members to each other in a position based on length of said watercraft.

14. The motor mount assembly of claim 1, further comprising a footpad connected to said adjustable support assembly and positioned between said adjustable support assembly and said watercraft for supportively cushioning said adjustable support assembly on said watercraft.

15. The motor mount assembly of claim 1, wherein said accommodated battery is in electric communication with said motor connected to said motor support shaft for electrically powering said motor.

16. The motor mount assembly of claim 15, further comprising a control system in electric communication with said accommodated battery and said motor for controlling discharge of electrical power from said accommodated battery to said motor during operation of said motor, wherein said control system is disposed proximal to a user within said watercraft and enables said user to change speed and direction of rotation of said motor.

17. A method for detachably attaching a motor to a watercraft, comprising: providing a motor mount assembly comprising a battery housing, a mounting flange, an adjustable support assembly comprising a plurality of interconnected sliding members, and a motor support shaft; releasably securing said battery housing to said watercraft, wherein said battery housing is configured to accommodate a battery that powers said motor; detachably attaching said mounting flange to said battery housing, wherein said detachably attached mounting flange extends outwardly from said battery housing within said watercraft; detachably attaching a first end of said adjustable support assembly to said mounting flange, wherein said adjustable support assembly supports said motor support shaft; adjusting said sliding members of said adjustable support assembly and locking said sliding members in a position based on length of said watercraft; connecting said motor support shaft to a second end of said adjustable support assembly and positioning said motor support shaft substantially vertical to said adjustable support assembly; and connecting said motor to a bottom end of said motor support shaft.

18. The method of claim 17, further comprising receiving and securing said motor support shaft within a space defined by said second end of said adjustable support assembly and said end cap.

19. The method of claim 18, further comprising pivotally connecting said motor support shaft within said space defined by said second end of said adjustable support assembly and said end cap for steering said watercraft.

20. The method of claim 18, further comprising rigidly connecting said motor support shaft within said space defined by said second end of said adjustable support assembly and said end cap for non-steering of said watercraft.

21. The method of claim 17, wherein said motor mount assembly further comprises a steering system rigidly attached to a middle section of said motor support shaft, wherein said steering system enables a user to operatively change direction of said watercraft, wherein said steering system comprises: a steering mount bracket with an end cap rigidly attached to said middle section of said motor support shaft, wherein said steering mount bracket and said end cap together define a space for receiving said middle section of said motor support shaft; a tie rod rigidly attached to said steering mount bracket, wherein said tie rod provides a lateral offset for applying a steering force by said user on said motor support shaft; and a steering handle hingedly connected to said tie rod, wherein a first end of said steering handle is hingedly connected to said tie rod, and a second end of said steering handle is disposed proximal to said user to enable said user to apply said steering force on said motor support shaft.

22. The method of claim 17, further comprising electrically powering said motor by said accommodated battery in electric communication with said motor.

23. The method of claim 22, further comprising controlling discharge of electrical power from said accommodated battery to said motor during operation of said motor by a control system in electric communication with said accommodated battery and said motor.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of provisional patent application No. 61/225562 titled “Motor Mount Assembly”, filed on Jul. 15, 2009 in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

The specification of the above referenced application is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND

Conventional watercrafts are manually powered by paddlers using oars or other paddling devices. The paddlers generally get exhausted while manually paddling the watercrafts. Also, when a group of paddlers manually powers a watercraft by paddling, some of the paddlers are unable to keep up with the group because of exhaustion, age, physical conditions, etc. The paddlers may also be afraid to venture far into the sea or other water body, for fear of being too fatigued to return. Many others are unable to engage in this form of recreation due to physical disabilities.

To propel a watercraft using minimal effort, an electrically powered watercraft is required. In order to electrically power a watercraft with an electric motor with a steering facility and associated control components, there is a need for a mounting assembly that accommodates and firmly supports an electrical power source, the electric motor, the steering facility, and its associated components on the watercraft. Furthermore, there is a need for a mounting assembly that is stable, lightweight in construction, and easy to assemble on or attach to the watercraft.

Hence, there is a long felt but unresolved need for a detachable motor mount assembly that enables a user or paddler to attach an electrically powered motor to the watercraft and propel the watercraft using the electrically powered motor.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This summary is provided to introduce a selection of concepts in a simplified form that are further described in the detailed description of the invention. This summary is not intended to identify key or essential inventive concepts of the claimed subject matter, nor is it intended for determining the scope of the claimed subject matter.

The motor mount assembly disclosed herein addresses the above stated need for detachably attaching an electrically powered motor to a watercraft for propelling the watercraft. The motor mount assembly disclosed herein comprises a battery housing, a mounting flange, an adjustable support assembly, and a motor support shaft. The battery housing is disposed on and releasably secured to the watercraft. In an embodiment, the motor mount assembly further comprises clamping elements for releasably securing the battery housing to the watercraft. The battery housing is configured to accommodate a battery that powers the motor.

The mounting flange is detachably attached to the battery housing within the watercraft and enables mounting of the adjustable support assembly on the mounting flange. The mounting flange extends outwardly from the battery housing within the watercraft. In an embodiment, the mounting flange is a T-shaped frame detachably attached to the battery housing by multiple fastening elements.

A first end of the adjustable support assembly is detachably attached to the mounting flange, for example, by a locking pin. A second end of the adjustable support assembly supports the motor support shaft. In an embodiment, the adjustable support assembly comprises multiple interconnected sliding members adjustable for varying lengths of the watercraft. Each of the sliding members of the adjustable support assembly comprises multiple recesses for receiving one or more locking pins. The locking pins lock the sliding members to each other in a position based on length of the watercraft. In an embodiment, the motor mount assembly further comprises a footpad connected to the adjustable support assembly and positioned between the adjustable support assembly and the watercraft for supportively cushioning the adjustable support assembly on the watercraft.

The motor support shaft is connected to the second end of the adjustable support assembly and positioned substantially vertical to the adjustable support assembly. The second end of the adjustable support assembly is configured to receive the motor support shaft. The motor mount assembly further comprises an end cap configured to receive and secure the motor support shaft within a space defined between the second end of the adjustable support assembly and the end cap. In an embodiment, the motor mount assembly further comprises a locking element for locking the motor support shaft within the space defined by the second end of the adjustable support assembly and the end cap for a pivotal connection or a rigid connection of the motor support shaft to the adjustable support assembly. In an embodiment, the motor support shaft is pivotally connected to the adjustable support assembly for steering the watercraft. In another embodiment, the motor support shaft is rigidly connected to the adjustable support assembly for non-steering of the watercraft.

The motor is connected to the bottom end of the motor support shaft. The motor is, for example, a permanent magnet direct current motor. In an embodiment, the motor mount assembly further comprises a casing for accommodating the motor. The casing with the accommodated motor is connected to the bottom end of the motor support shaft. The motor is therefore detachably attached to the watercraft via the motor support shaft.

In another embodiment, the motor mount assembly further comprises a steering system rigidly attached to a middle section of the motor support shaft. The steering system comprises a steering mount bracket with an end cap, a tie rod, and a steering handle. The steering mount bracket with the end cap is rigidly attached to the middle section of the motor support shaft. The steering mount bracket and the end cap together define a space for receiving the middle section of the motor support shaft. The tie rod is rigidly attached to the steering mount bracket and provides a lateral offset for applying a steering force by a user on the motor support shaft. The steering handle is hingedly connected to the tie rod. A first end of the steering handle is hingedly connected to the tie rod. A second end of the steering handle is disposed proximal to the user to enable the user to apply the steering force on the motor support shaft.

In the motor mount assembly disclosed herein, the battery accommodated in the battery housing is in electric communication with the motor connected to the motor support shaft for electrically powering the motor. In another embodiment, the motor mount assembly further comprises a control system disposed proximal to the user within the watercraft. The control system is in electric communication with the accommodated battery and the motor for controlling discharge of the electrical power from the accommodated battery to the motor during operation of the motor. The control system enables the user to change speed and direction of rotation of the motor.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The foregoing summary, as well as the following detailed description of the invention, is better understood when read in conjunction with the appended drawings. For the purpose of illustrating the invention, exemplary constructions of the invention are shown in the drawings. However, the invention is not limited to the specific components and methods disclosed herein.

FIG. 1 exemplarily illustrates a perspective view of a motor mount assembly for detachably attaching a motor to a watercraft.

FIG. 2 exemplarily illustrates a battery housing of the motor mount assembly releasably secured to the watercraft.

FIG. 3 exemplarily illustrates an exploded view of the motor mount assembly with a steering system.

FIG. 4 exemplarily illustrates a top exploded view of a steering embodiment of the motor mount assembly.

FIG. 5 exemplarily illustrates a top view of a steering system of the motor mount assembly.

FIG. 6 exemplarily illustrates a side view of a non-steering embodiment of the motor mount assembly on a watercraft.

FIGS. 7-8 exemplarily illustrate exploded views of a non-steering embodiment of the motor mount assembly.

FIG. 9 illustrates a method for detachably attaching a motor to a watercraft.

FIG. 10 exemplarily illustrates a control system of the motor mount assembly in electric communication with a battery and a motor.

FIGS. 11A-11C exemplarily illustrate steering movement of the watercraft using the steering system of the motor mount assembly.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 exemplarily illustrates a perspective view of a motor mount assembly 100 for detachably attaching a motor 117 to a watercraft 101. As used herein, the “watercraft” is a water surface transportation vessel, for example, a canoe, a kayak, a boat, etc. used for transporting materials or persons over water. The motor mount assembly 100 disclosed herein comprises a battery housing 102, a mounting flange 106, an adjustable support assembly 108, and a motor support shaft 116. The battery housing 102 is disposed on and is releasably secured to the watercraft 101. The battery housing 102 is configured to accommodate a battery 103 that powers the motor 117. The mounting flange 106 is detachably attached to the battery housing 102 within the watercraft 101 and enables mounting of the adjustable support assembly 108 to the mounting flange 106. The mounting flange 106 extends outwardly from the battery housing 102 within the watercraft 101. A first end 108a of the adjustable support assembly 108 detachably attaches to the mounting flange 106, for example, by a locking pin 109a. A second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 supports the motor support shaft 116. The motor support shaft 116 is connected to the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 and is positioned substantially vertical to the adjustable support assembly 108.

A bottom end 116b of the motor support shaft 116 is connected to the motor 117. The motor 117 is an electric trolling motor. The motor 117 is, for example, a permanent magnet direct current motor. In an embodiment, the motor mount assembly 100 disclosed herein further comprises a casing 118 for accommodating the motor 117. The casing 118 with the accommodated motor 117 is connected to the bottom end 116b of the motor support shaft 116. The motor 117 is therefore detachably attached to the watercraft 101 by the motor mount assembly 100. A propeller 128 is connected to the motor 117 for propelling the watercraft 101. The electrically powered motor 117 drives the propeller 128 for propelling the watercraft 101.

The adjustable support assembly 108 is, for example, made of a thermoplastic polymer. In an embodiment, the adjustable support assembly 108 comprises multiple interconnected sliding members 110a and 110b adjustable for varying lengths of the watercraft 101. The sliding members 110a and 110b are adjusted and locked in a position based on the length of the watercraft 101. Each of the sliding members 110a and 110b of the adjustable support assembly 108 comprises multiple recesses 111 for receiving one or more locking pins 109b. The locking pins 109b lock the sliding members 110a and 110b to each other in a position based on the length of the watercraft 101.

In another embodiment, the motor mount assembly 100 disclosed herein further comprises a steering system 119 rigidly attached to a middle section 116a of the motor support shaft 116. The steering system 119 comprising a steering mount bracket 120 with an end cap 121, a tie rod 123, and a steering handle 125 is disclosed in the detailed description of FIG. 5.

In the motor mount assembly 100 disclosed herein, the battery 103 accommodated in the battery housing 102 is in electric communication with the motor 117 connected to the motor support shaft 116, for electrically powering the motor 117. In an embodiment, the motor mount assembly 100 disclosed herein further comprises a control system 126 in electric communication with the accommodated battery 103 and the motor 117 via, for example, wires 127 for controlling discharge of electrical power from the accommodated battery 103 to the motor 117 during operation of the motor 117. The control system 126 is disposed proximal to the user within the watercraft 101 and enables the user to change speed and direction of rotation of the motor 117. The control system 126 is, for example, a portable handheld device. The handheld control system 126 enables the user to maneuver the motor 117 remotely. In an embodiment, the control system 126 may also be foot operated by the user. The motor mount assembly 100 disclosed herein is removable from the watercraft 101 for easy transport and storage.

FIG. 2 exemplarily illustrates a battery housing 102 of the motor mount assembly 100 releasably secured to the watercraft 101. In an embodiment, the motor mount assembly 100 disclosed herein further comprises multiple clamping elements 104 to releasably secure the battery housing 102 to the watercraft 101 in an enclosure 202 predesigned on the watercraft 101. The predesigned enclosure 202 in the watercraft 101 accommodates the battery housing 102. In an embodiment, the clamping elements 104 are, for example, tension springs that are extendible under tension. Opposing ends 104a and 104b of each of the clamping elements 104 comprise, for example, hooks 105 that are used to releasably secure the battery housing 102 to the watercraft 101. The battery housing 102 comprises prefabricated recesses 102a for receiving the hooks 105 on one of the opposing ends 104a of the clamping elements 104. Each of the hooks 105 on the other opposing ends 104b of the clamping elements 104 may be inserted into protruding recesses 101a on the watercraft 101 for detachably attaching the battery housing 102 to the watercraft 101. The clamping elements 104 are directed to detachably attach the battery housing 102 to the watercraft 101 as exemplarily illustrated by the arrow 201 in FIG. 2. In an example, four clamping elements 104 may be provided for four corners of a square shaped battery housing 102 to releasably secure the battery housing 102 to the watercraft 101. These clamping elements 104 may extend under tension and secure the battery housing 102 to the watercraft 101. When the battery housing 102 needs to be released from the watercraft 101, the user removes the hooks 105 of each of the clamping elements 104 from the corresponding protruding recesses 101a of the watercraft 101 and from the corresponding prefabricated recesses 102a on the battery housing 102, and releases the battery housing 102 from the watercraft 101.

The battery 103 accommodated in the battery housing 102 is, for example, a lightweight rechargeable battery that enables selective utilization of power for maneuvering of the watercraft 101. The battery 103 is, for example, a sealed lead-acid (SLA) battery or any other portable power source. The battery 103 easily fits inside the battery housing 102, produces low noise or no noise during operation of the watercraft 101, and is environment friendly as no air polluting by-products are released during the operation of the watercraft 101.

FIG. 3 exemplarily illustrates an exploded view of the motor mount assembly 100 with a steering system 119. In the exploded view illustrated in FIG. 3, the motor mount assembly 100 disclosed herein comprises the mounting flange 106, the adjustable support assembly 108, the motor support shaft 116, and the steering system 119. In an embodiment, the mounting flange 106 is a T-shaped frame detachably attached to the battery housing 102 by multiple fastening elements 107. The mounting flange 106 extends outwardly from the battery housing 102 as exemplarily illustrated in FIG. 1. The fastening elements 107 are, for example, threaded bolts 107c and nuts 107b that enable the user to fasten the mounting flange 106 to the battery housing 102. In order to fasten the mounting flange 106 to the battery housing 102, the user inserts the bolts 107c and nuts 107b into the abutting mounting flange 106 and the battery housing 102 and rotates the bolts 107c against the corresponding nuts 107b.

In an embodiment, the first end 108a of the adjustable support assembly 108 is detachably attached to the mounting flange 106 by a locking pin 109a. The direction of detachably attaching the first end 108a of the adjustable support assembly 108 to the mounting flange 106 is exemplarily illustrated by the arrow 301. In an embodiment, the adjustable support assembly 108 comprises multiple interconnected sliding members 110a and 110b adjustable for varying lengths of the watercraft 101 as exemplarily illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 3. Each of the sliding members 110a and 110b of the adjustable support assembly 108 is configured to slide into one another in directions as exemplarily illustrated by the arrows 302. In an embodiment, the interconnected sliding members 110a and 110b are arranged in a telescopic arrangement and extended for varying lengths of the watercraft 101. The sliding members 110a and 110b are, for example, of a square cross section, a rectangular cross section, a circular cross section, an oval cross section, etc. Each of the sliding members 110a and 110b comprises multiple recesses 111 for receiving one or more locking pins 109b. The locking pins 109b lock the sliding members 110a and 110b to each other in a position based on length of the watercraft 101. In this embodiment, the motor mount assembly 100 disclosed herein further comprises a footpad 112 connected to the adjustable support assembly 108 and positioned between the adjustable support assembly 108 and the watercraft 101 for supportively cushioning the adjustable support assembly 108 on the watercraft 101. The footpad 112 is, for example, of a rubber cup shape. Furthermore, a fastening element 107d, for example, a wing nut may be used to secure the footpad 112 to the adjustable support assembly 108. The footpad 112 provides stability to the adjustable support assembly 108 and restricts movement of the adjustable support assembly 108 during the operation of the watercraft 101.

In an embodiment, the motor mount assembly 100 further comprises an end cap 113 configured to receive and secure the motor support shaft 116 within a space 114 between the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 and the end cap 113. In this embodiment, the motor mount assembly 100 further comprises a locking element 115 for locking the motor support shaft 116 within the space 114 defined by the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 and the end cap 113 for a pivotal connection or a rigid connection of the motor support shaft 116 to the adjustable support assembly 108. In an embodiment as exemplarily illustrated in FIG. 3, the motor support shaft 116 is pivotally connected to the adjustable support assembly 108 for steering the watercraft 101. The locking element 115 is inserted into the end cap 121 and the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 in a direction as exemplarily illustrated by the arrow 304 in FIG. 3 for pivotal connection of the motor support shaft 116. In another embodiment as exemplarily illustrated in FIGS. 6-8, the motor support shaft 116 is rigidly connected to the adjustable support assembly 108 within the space 114 defined between the U-shaped second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 and the end cap 113 for non-steering of the watercraft 101. In the “non-steering” mode of operation, the rigid connection of the motor support shaft 116 to the adjustable support assembly 108 restricts steering of the watercraft 101 by restricting movement of the motor support shaft 116 within the space 114 defined between the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 and the end cap 113.

The fastening elements 107a used for rigidly attaching a steering mount bracket 120 with an end cap 121 of the steering system 119 to the middle section 116a of the motor support shaft 116 are inserted into the end cap 121 and the steering mount bracket 120 in a direction as exemplarily illustrated by the arrow 303 in FIG. 3.

FIG. 4 exemplarily illustrates a top exploded view of a steering embodiment of the motor mount assembly 100. The steering embodiment of the motor mount assembly 100 is implemented when a user wishes to steer the watercraft 101 during operation. In the steering embodiment, a steering system 119, as disclosed in the detailed description of FIG. 1 and FIG. 3, is provided and the motor mount assembly 100 is configured for pivotal connection of the motor support shaft 116 within the space 114 defined between the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 and the end cap 113. The end cap 113 encloses the motor support shaft 116 within the space 114 defined by the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 and the end cap 113. The user inserts the motor support shaft 116 into the space 114 as exemplarily illustrated in FIG. 3, utilizes the end cap 113 to enclose the motor support shaft 116, and inserts a locking element 115 through the end cap 113 and the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 to secure the motor support shaft 116 and allow the pivotal connection of the motor support shaft 116 with respect to the adjustable support assembly 108.

FIG. 5 exemplarily illustrates a top view of a steering system 119 of the motor mount assembly 100. The steering system 119, as disclosed in the detailed description of FIG. 1, comprises a steering mount bracket 120 with an end cap 121, a tie rod 123, and a steering handle 125. The steering mount bracket 120 with the end cap 121 is rigidly attached to the middle section 116a of the motor support shaft 116 by the fastening elements 107a, for example, bolts. The fastening elements 107a are inserted into the end cap 121 and the steering mount bracket 120 in a direction as exemplarily illustrated by the arrow 303 in FIG. 3 and FIG. 5 for rigid attachment of the end cap 121 and the steering mount bracket 120 to the middle section 116a of the motor support shaft 116. The steering mount bracket 120 and the end cap 121 together define a space 122 for receiving the middle section 116a of the motor support shaft 116 as exemplarily illustrated in FIG. 3. The tie rod 123 is rigidly attached to the steering mount bracket 120 and provides a lateral offset for applying a steering force by the user on the motor support shaft 116. A first end 125a of the steering handle 125 is hingedly connected to the tie rod 123, for example, by a hinge 124. A second end 125b of the steering handle 125 is disposed proximal to the user and enables the user to apply the steering force on the motor support shaft 116. When the user applies a steering force on the motor support shaft 116 using the steering handle 125, the tie rod 123 transfers the steering force from the steering handle 125 to the steering mount bracket 120 via the hinge 124. The steering mount bracket 120 rotates along with the motor support shaft 116 due to the rigid connection between the steering mount bracket 120 and the motor support shaft 116. This rotation of the motor support shaft 116 rotates the motor 117 connected at the bottom end 116b of the motor support shaft 116. Thus, a steering force applied by the user on the steering handle 125 causes rotation of the motor 117 along with the motor support shaft 116.

FIG. 6 exemplarily illustrates a side view of a non-steering embodiment of the motor mount assembly 100 on a watercraft 101. The non-steering embodiment of the motor mount assembly 100 is implemented when a user does not wish to steer the watercraft 101 during operation. In this embodiment, the steering system 119 exemplarily illustrated in FIG. 1, FIG. 3, and FIG. 5, is not connected to the motor support shaft 116 of the motor mount assembly 100. In the non-steering embodiment, the motor support shaft 116 is rigidly connected to the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 using the end cap 113.

As exemplarily illustrated in FIG. 6, the control system 126 is disposed proximal to the user within the watercraft 101 and enables the user to change speed and direction of rotation of the motor 117. The control system 126 is in electric communication with the battery 103 and the motor 117 via wires 127 or insulated electric cables. The wires 127 are supported by the motor support shaft 116 and then run alongside the adjustable support assembly 108 towards the user.

FIGS. 7-8 exemplarily illustrate exploded views of a non-steering embodiment of the motor mount assembly 100. In the non-steering embodiment, the motor support shaft 116 is rigidly connected to the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 using the end cap 113. In this embodiment, the user inserts the motor support shaft 116 at the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 and encloses the motor support shaft 116 using the end cap 113 for rigidly connecting the motor support shaft 116 within the space 114 defined by the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 and the end cap 113. The user uses the locking elements 115, for example, bolts to rigidly connect the motor support shaft 116 to the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108. The bolts are longitudinally threaded into the abutting end cap 113 and the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 in a direction as exemplarily illustrated by the arrow 701 in FIGS. 7-8.

FIG. 9 illustrates a method for detachably attaching a motor 117 to a watercraft 101. A motor mount assembly 100 comprising a battery housing 102, a mounting flange 106, an adjustable support assembly 108 comprising multiple interconnected sliding members 110a and 110b, and a motor support shaft 116 as disclosed in the detailed description of FIGS. 1-8, is provided 901. The battery housing 102 is releasably secured 902 to the watercraft 101. The battery housing 102 is configured to accommodate a battery 103 that powers the motor 117. The mounting flange 106 is detachably attached 903 to the battery housing 102. The detachably attached mounting flange 106 extends outwardly from the battery housing 102 within the watercraft 101. A first end 108a of the adjustable support assembly 108 is detachably attached 904 to the mounting flange 106 to support the motor support shaft 116. The sliding members 110a and 110b of the adjustable support assembly 108 are adjusted and locked 905 in a position based on length of the watercraft 101. The motor support shaft 116 is connected 906 to the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 and positioned substantially vertical to the adjustable support assembly 108. The motor 117 is connected 907 to a bottom end 116b of the motor support shaft 116.

Consider an example where a user wishes to detachably attach a motor 117 to a watercraft 101, for example, a kayak, for electrically powering the watercraft 101. The user disposes the battery housing 102 of the motor mount assembly 100 disclosed herein at a suitable position on the watercraft 101 taking into account various parameters, for example, the centre of gravity, balance of loads, etc. of weight locations in the watercraft 101. The weight of the battery 103 aids in securing the battery housing 102 and counter balances the weight of the motor 117. The user may position the battery housing 102 within, for example, a predesigned enclosure 202 as exemplarily illustrated in FIG. 2, of the watercraft 101 for accommodating the battery housing 102. The user releasably secures the battery housing 102 to the watercraft 101 using the clamping elements 104, for example, tension springs. Each of the clamping elements 104 comprises hooks 105 on opposing ends 104a and 104b. The user inserts the opposing hooks 105 of each of the clamping elements 104 into one of the protruding recesses 101a on the watercraft 101 and a proximal one of the prefabricated recesses 102a on the battery housing 102. These clamping elements 104 extend under a tension or a tensile force and secure the battery housing 102 to the watercraft 101.

The user detachably attaches the mounting flange 106, for example, the T-shaped frame to the releasably secured battery housing 102 using multiple fastening elements 107, for example, threaded bolts 107c and nuts 107b. The user mounts the adjustable support assembly 108 on the mounting flange 106 in a direction as exemplarily illustrated by the arrow 301 in FIG. 3. The user adjusts the adjustable support assembly 108 comprising, for example, two sliding members 110a and 110b by sliding one of the sliding members 110a or 110b within another sliding member 110b or 110a in directions as exemplarily illustrated by the arrows 302 in FIG. 3. The user adjusts the adjustable support assembly 108 based on a length of the watercraft 101. The length of the adjustable support assembly 108 is adjustable, for example, between about 12 inches and about 52 inches. The user locks each of the sliding members 110a and 110b of the adjustable support assembly 108 in a position using the locking pins 109b. The user inserts the locking pins 109b into the matching recesses 111 of the sliding members 110a and 110b to lock the sliding members 110a and 110b. The motor mount assembly 100 is mounted on the watercraft 101 with a sit inside configuration or the watercraft 101 with a sit-on-top configuration. In the sit inside configuration, the user sits on a depression in the watercraft 101 whereas in a sit-on-top configuration the user sits on the surface of the watercraft 101. The user may sit on a seat (not shown) provided in the watercraft 101 that allows the user to sit on top or sit inside the watercraft 101.

In the steering mode of operation, the user may wish to steer the watercraft 101 using the steering system 119. For this mode of operation, the user pivotally connects the motor support shaft 116 to the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 and encloses the motor support shaft 116 using the end cap 113. The user inserts the motor support shaft 116 within the space 114 defined between the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 and the end cap 113 and inserts a locking element 115 through the end cap 113 to allow the pivotal connection of the motor support shaft 116 within the space 114 defined by the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 and the end cap 113. The locking element 115 is, for example, inserted through the end cap 113 and the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 in a direction as exemplarily illustrated by the arrow 304 in FIGS. 3-4. The motor mount assembly 100 for the steering mode of operation is exemplarily illustrated in FIG. 1 and FIG. 3.

The steering system 119 is then rigidly attached on the middle section 116a of the motor support shaft 116. The user rigidly attaches the steering mount bracket 120 with the end cap 121 to the middle section 116a of the motor support shaft 116. The user inserts the fastening elements 107a into the end cap 121 and the steering mount bracket 120 in a direction as exemplarily illustrated by the arrow 303 in FIG. 3 for rigidly attaching the steering mount bracket 120 with the end cap 121 to the middle section 116a of the motor support shaft 116. The user then rigidly attaches the tie rod 123 to the steering mount bracket 120. The user then connects the steering handle 125 to the tie rod 123 via the hinge 124. The steering handle 125 is extendible to a length as desired by the user in order to conveniently operate the steering system 119 and change the direction of movement of the watercraft 101.

In the non-steering mode of operation, the user may wish to not steer the watercraft 101. For this mode of operation, the motor support shaft 116 is rigidly connected within the space 114 defined by the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 and the end cap 113. The user inserts the motor support shaft 116 within the space 114 defined by the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108 and the end cap 113 and inserts locking elements 115, for example, two bolts through the end cap 113 to rigidly connect the motor support shaft 116 to the second end 108b of the adjustable support assembly 108. The direction of insertion of the locking elements 115 through the end cap 113 is exemplarily illustrated by the arrow 701 in FIGS. 7-8. The motor mount assembly 100 for the non-steering mode of operation is exemplarily illustrated in FIGS. 6-8.

The inserted, pivotally or rigidly attached, motor support shaft 116 now detachably attaches the motor 117 or the casing 118 of the motor 117 to the watercraft 101. The motor 117 is electrically powered by the battery 103, for example, a 12-volt battery, accommodated in the battery housing 102. Furthermore, the user utilizes the control system 126 to control the transfer of electrical power from the battery 103 to the motor 117.

FIG. 10 exemplarily illustrates a control system 126 of the motor mount assembly 100 in electric communication with a battery 103 and a motor 117. The control system 126 may be clipped onto a life vest of the user. The control system 126 is in electric communication with the battery 103 and the motor 117 via the wires 127. The wires 127 are supported by the motor support shaft 116 and then run alongside the adjustable support assembly 108 towards the user. The control system 126 allows the user to change the direction of rotation of the motor 117, for example, in a clockwise direction or a counter clockwise direction, based on a desired direction of movement of the watercraft 101, for example, forward or reverse direction. The user also utilizes the control system 126 to change speed of rotation of the motor 117.

FIGS. 11A-11C exemplarily illustrate steering movement of the watercraft 101 using the steering system 119 of the motor mount assembly 100. The motor mount assembly 100 as illustrated in the top views of FIGS. 11A-11C is mounted at the stern of the watercraft 101. The motor mount assembly 100 may also be mounted at the bow of the watercraft 101.

As exemplarily illustrated in FIG. 11A, the steering handle 125 of the steering system 119 is in a mean position, that is, the steering handle 125 is neither pushed away or pulled towards the user. This mean position of the steering handle 125 keeps the motor 117 in line with the longitudinal axis 129 of the watercraft 101.

As exemplarily illustrated in FIG. 11B, the steering handle 125 of the steering system 119 is shown pulled towards the user. The steering handle 125 in this position is disposed proximal to the user. This pulled position rotates the motor 117 towards the left of the watercraft 101. Thus, the rotation of the motor 117 towards the left of the watercraft 101 causes the watercraft 101 to be steered in the rightward direction, that is, the watercraft 101 is steered to the right of the longitudinal axis 129.

As exemplarily illustrated in FIG. 11C, the steering handle 125 of the steering system 119 is shown pushed away from the user. The steering handle 125 in this position is disposed farther away from the user. This pushed position rotates the motor 117 towards the right of the watercraft 101. Thus, the rotation of the motor 117 towards the right of the watercraft 101 causes the watercraft 101 to be steered in the leftward direction, that is, the watercraft 101 is steered to the left of the longitudinal axis 129.

The foregoing examples have been provided merely for the purpose of explanation and are in no way to be construed as limiting of the present invention disclosed herein. While the invention has been described with reference to various embodiments, it is understood that the words, which have been used herein, are words of description and illustration, rather than words of limitation. Further, although the invention has been described herein with reference to particular means, materials and embodiments, the invention is not intended to be limited to the particulars disclosed herein; rather, the invention extends to all functionally equivalent structures, methods and uses, such as are within the scope of the appended claims. Those skilled in the art, having the benefit of the teachings of this specification, may effect numerous modifications thereto and changes may be made without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention in its aspects.





 
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