Title:
LOCKING CONCRETE INSERT
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A locking insert is described for use in a poured concrete structure. The locking insert includes a hollow elongated body, a longitudinal channel with two configured side edges and a channel floor, a paired gear nut and locking plate that interengages said configured side edges, an attachment bolt, and a method to prevent concrete from seeping into the locking insert. The embedment of the locking insert into a concrete structure provides a positive locking, positional and anti-slip method of attachment for a structural or secondary element. The locking insert allows for vertical positioning and locking of the paired gear nut and locking plate to ensure a proper connection with a structural or secondary element through an attachment bolt. The locking insert with an attached outwardly projecting element transfers the load associated with the structural or secondary element throughout the concrete structure to allow for a high strength connection.



Inventors:
Hohmann, Ronald P. (Hauppauge, NY, US)
Application Number:
12/258890
Publication Date:
04/29/2010
Filing Date:
10/27/2008
Assignee:
MITEK HOLDINGS, INC. (Wilmington, DE, US)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/223.13
International Classes:
E04B1/41
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
MASINICK, JONATHAN PETER
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
SENNIGER POWERS LLP (100 NORTH BROADWAY, 17TH FLOOR, ST LOUIS, MO, 63102, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A locking insert for embedment in one face of a poured concrete structure for attaching a structural or secondary element thereto, said locking insert comprising: an elongated body having a hollow interior and an exterior surface adapted, upon insertion into said concrete structure, to be substantially coplanar with said face thereof, a longitudinal channel in said exterior surface of said elongated body providing an opening into said interior thereof, said longitudinal channel further comprising: a channel floor disposed opposite said opening; two configured sides of the channel opening, said sides being parallel and coplanar the one with the other, and; a paired threaded gear nut and locking plate for disposition in said longitudinal channel and upon installation and rotation interengages with said configured sides of said longitudinal channel to secure said locking insert; whereby said locking insert provides a positional slip-free attachment site for said structural or secondary element.

2. A locking insert as described in claim 1, wherein said elongated body further contains at least one attachment opening in said channel floor, said attachment opening adapted for attachment to formwork through the use of an attachment member.

3. A locking insert as described in claim 2, wherein said attachment member is selected from a group consisting of nails, screws and bolts.

4. A locking insert as described in claim 1, wherein an outwardly projecting element extends from the exterior surface of the elongated body opposite the opening of the longitudinal channel, said outwardly projecting element adapted for insertion into the concrete structure to more fully transfer the load associated with said secondary or structural element.

5. A locking insert as described in claim 4, wherein said outwardly projecting element is in the shape of a bolt.

6. A locking insert as described in claim 4, wherein said outwardly projecting element is frustoconically shaped.

7. A locking insert as described in claim 1, wherein said elongated body, said paired threaded gear nut and locking plate, and said outwardly projecting element are constructed of material selected from a group consisting of galvanized steel, hot dip galvanized steel, stainless steel, cast malleable iron, and bright basic steel.

8. A locking insert as described in claim 7, wherein said elongated body is formed from a squared tube;

9. A locking insert as described in claim 1, wherein said paired threaded gear nut and locking plate includes a gear nut portion configured to interengage said longitudinal channel edges to position said paired gear nut and locking plate.

10. A locking insert as described in claim 1, wherein the locking plate portion of said paired threaded gear nut and locking plate has a horizontal width greater than the width of said longitudinal channel, to lock said paired gear nut and locking plate within said longitudinal channel when an attachment bolt connects said gear nut and locking plate with a secondary or structural connection.

11. A locking insert as described in claim 10, wherein said attachment bolt includes a bolt head attached to one end of said attachment bolt.

12. A locking insert as described in claim 10, wherein said attachment bolt is attached to said paired threaded gear nut and locking plate by welding.

13. A locking insert as described in claim 1, wherein said configured sides are shaped in a shark tooth manner.

14. A locking insert as described in claim 1, wherein said configured sides are shaped in an arcuate manner.

15. A locking insert as described in claim 1, wherein said elongated body has end plates adapted to restrict entry of concrete into said longitudinal channel.

16. A locking insert as described in claim 1, wherein said longitudinal channel contains a removable filler, adapted to restrict entry of concrete into said longitudinal channel, selected from a group consisting of foam, rubber or removable plastic.

17. A locking insert as described in claim 1, wherein a force emitting object is affixed to said locking plate portion, whereby when said locking plate portion is inserted into said longitudinal channel, said force emitting object engages said channel floor and said paired gear nut and locking plate against said configured side edges, thereby restricting movement.

18. A locking insert as described in claim 17, wherein said force emitting object is a spring.

19. A locking insert for embedment in one face of a poured concrete structure for attaching a structural or secondary element thereto, said locking insert comprising: an elongated body having a hollow interior and an exterior surface adapted, upon insertion into said concrete structure, to be substantially coplanar with said face thereof, a longitudinal channel in said exterior surface of said elongated body providing an opening into said hollow interior thereof, said longitudinal channel further comprising: a channel floor disposed opposite said opening; two configured sides of the channel opening, said sides being parallel and coplanar the one with the other; and, a paired threaded gear nut and locking plate for disposition in said longitudinal channel which, upon installation and engagement, interengages with said configured sides of said longitudinal channel to secure said locking insert; whereby said locking insert provides a positional slip-free attachment site for said structural or secondary element.

20. A locking insert as described in claim 19, wherein said elongated body further contains at least one attachment opening in said channel floor, said attachment opening adapted for attachment to formwork through the use of an attachment member.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a locking concrete insert for use in a poured concrete structure. More particularly, this invention relates to a positive locking concrete insert that provides a heavy-duty, positional, and anti-slip mechanism to connect with another structural or secondary element.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART

Concrete inserts are utilized in poured concrete structures to connect structural or secondary elements thereto. In the past, a widely accepted concrete insert employed an askew headed bolt set in an elongated chamber. Although useful in allowing vertical repositioning of the connecting bolt, the prior insert failed to lock the bolt in a given vertical position. In some instances, the lack of positive locking in the prior art devices resulted in structural slippage and failure.

The use of poured concrete structures in the field of construction known as tilt-up concrete construction is one of the fastest growing building technologies in North America, with at least 10,000 structures using this technology being built every year. Tilt-up construction has been in existence for more than a century and today constitutes more than 15% of industrial buildings. Additional construction using poured-in-place concrete slabs, ceilings and walls add to this large percentage.

This popularity is the result of the favorable inherent characteristics of concrete which include strength, durability, permeability and wear resistance. These characteristics provide completed structures with all the energy efficiency, structural strength, high thermal mass, fire resistance and durability associated with concrete. Concrete construction is also environmentally friendly because the structure is cast onsite, minimizing transportation costs, and the high thermal mass of concrete provides excellent insulation. Another benefit of concrete construction is the speed of construction. While the panels are under formation, the remaining building systems are readily integrated into the overall structures. This results in shorter overall construction times. All of these benefits are recognized by builders in all areas of construction from relatively simple single-level office buildings to the current construction of the world's tallest building, the Burj Dubai, which is constructed of reinforced concrete.

Poured concrete tilt-up structures are created horizontally in large slabs using a form made of a material such as wood. The form is coated with a lubricant to prevent the poured concrete from adhering to the form. The form molds the concrete structure, providing the shape and size, as well as the openings for doorways and windows.

Poured concrete construction often requires concrete structures to support other structural or secondary elements. Such support is provided through concrete inserts embedded in the concrete structure. The concrete inserts are positioned after the form is constructed, by attaching the base of the insert into the form, typically through a nail, screw or similar instrument, in a manner that positions the outer face of the insert in a coplanar fashion with the surface of the concrete. The remainder of the insert is embedded within the concrete structure. After the form is completed, concrete is poured into the form and allowed to cure. Once the concrete is cured, the form is removed, leaving the concrete insert embedded within the concrete wall and open for connection with a structural or secondary element. According to the Concrete Reinforcing Steel Institute, “formwork and its associated labor is the largest single cost segment of the concrete structural frame—generally more than 50%.”

The use of positive-locking concrete inserts embedded within the concrete structure also provides for greater safety for the craftsman. There is no welding or cutting required and there are no dangerous projections on the surface of the outer panel.

Prior art concrete inserts typically comprise an elongated metal unit with a longitudinal opening that is capable of receiving a nut and bolt set to secure brackets, angle beams or other modes of attachment. The prior insert generally contains some extended portion set within the concrete panel to transfer the attached load through the nut and bolt into a large volume of concrete, thereby providing maximum support. During the pouring of the concrete panel, the longitudinal opening of the insert is filled with foam, rubber, plastic or other removable substance to ensure that the longitudinal opening thereof remains concrete free and ready to accept the nut and bolt set.

As exact insert alignment seldom occurs, vertical adjustability of the nut and bolt set is desirable for proper mating of the support members. Longitudinal movement within the concrete insert is essential because once the insert is embedded in the concrete structure, the insert itself is generally immovable. Although longitudinal movement is achieved through the use of the elongated channel and bolt, the nut and bolt connection could loosen and jeopardize the alignment of the structures, which could cause failure.

In preparing for this application the below-mentioned patents have become known to the inventors hereof.

PatentInventorIssue Date
7,213,376Pulkkanen, et. al.May 8, 2007
5,729,951FrohlichMar. 24, 1998
5,625,993KellyMay 6, 1997
4,469,466HotzSep. 4, 1984
4,235,560SchimmelNov. 25, 1980
4,073,329HalaFeb. 14, 1978
4,021,991HotzMay 10, 1977
4,009,549HalaMar. 1, 1977
1,933,536AwbreyNov. 7, 1933
1,854,277SchatzApr. 19, 1932

Exemplary of the development of the concrete insert into the current state of the prior art, in a patent to Arthur J. Schatz, U.S. Pat. No. 1,854,277 issued Apr. 19, 1932, entitled “Eccentric Washer For Angle Supports,” an adjustable washer used to allow vertical movement of an angle support is taught. Schatz's patent works with a bolt that is embedded in a concrete structure rather than a bolt that is housed within an embedded insert. Further development in S. C. Awbrey, U.S. Pat. No. 1,933,536 issued Nov. 7, 1933, entitled “Concrete Insert,” provides for a housed modified bolt that helps to restrict vertical movement and a modified nut for use in ceiling inserts.

More recently, R. Hotz in U.S. Pat. No. 4,021,991 issued May 10, 1977, entitled “Fastening Device,” describes a tapered nut that wedges into shelf angles to prevent slippage and teaches the use of external forces to prevent slippage. Further, a modified transition bolt used to clamp together abutting side rails of a pair of edge-to-edge concrete wall panels, is taught by V. Schimmel in U.S. Pat. No. 4,235,560 issued Nov. 25, 1980.

Other methods of attaching and locking structures to anchoring structures are described in the prior art in patents such as D. Kelly in U.S. Pat. No. 5,625,993 issued May 6, 1997, entitled “Concrete Structure Having Load Transferring Insert and Method For Making Same,” which discloses a load transferring V-shaped nut and longitudinal bolt that restricts rotation within the insert, and K. Frohlich in U.S. Pat. No. 5,729,951 issued Mar. 24, 1998, entitled “Anchoring Device for the Construction Industry,” which provides attachment of anchors to an anchor rail by means of plastic deformation of the anchor rail and/or the anchor.

Other concrete inserts have improved positioning capability. Exemplary of this is J. Pulkkanen in U.S. Pat. No. 7,213,376 issued May 8, 2007, entitled “Bracket for Supporting Structural Element to Support Structure,” which teaches a moveable bracket part to allow two-dimensional connection movement.

The development of a positional, anti-slip mechanism to connect with another structural or secondary element is an area of importance that needs to be more fully addressed. The present assignees, Hohmann & Barnard, Inc., (“H&B”), having many years and vast experience in the masonry and fastening fields have received patents in related fields including A. Hala in U.S. Pat. 4,009,549 issued Mar. 1, 1977, entitled, “Stone Structural Securement System and Method,” which taught a method of interconnection between the structural frame of an edifice and the exterior masonry panels. Additionally, in 1978, A. Hala of H&B, received another U.S. Pat. No. 4,073,329 issued Feb. 14, 1978, for an invention entitled, “Wedge Shaped Lock Washer Construction and Assembly.” Hala's patent taught an adjustable washer and fastening system that uses an interlocking wedging engagement system to lock the adjoining members in place. H&B's devices have received widespread usage in the industry. However, none of these devices are designed to provide a complete locking high-load concrete insert that will withstand large scale forces. Further, none of these devices provide the versatility of use of the present invention.

The present invention has varied applications that include, but are not limited to, the following typical uses: providing a brick relief angle at a concrete beam; providing a brick relief angle at a concrete slab on a corrugated metal deck with a pour-stop; providing a brick relief angle at a precast concrete lintel; casting into the underside of a concrete slab to accept partition wall restraint angles; welding to the underside of a steel beam to accept a partition wall restraint angle; welding to the web of a spandrel beam to accept a masonry wall restraint anchor; casting into the underside of a concrete slab to accept pipes, ductwork, etc.; providing a gravity or tieback insert in precast panels; casting into radial concrete to accept handrails; embedding into a fully grouted concrete masonry unit wall to accept deadload or lateral anchors for stone, or precast veneers; and casting into concrete walls to accept stone anchors.

Accordingly, while several distinct devices were developed to assist in constructing a concrete structure, the current state of the art does not fulfill the need for a positional, anti-slip mechanism to connect with another structural or secondary element. As described hereinbelow, the present invention employs a specialized locking system that allows positional movement of the nut, while maintaining a high-strength, anti-slip locked connection.

SUMMARY

The present invention is composed of a solid material such as steel or cast malleable iron formed into a squared tube. The squared tube is altered to provide a longitudinal channel in the device, which provides access to the hollow elongated body. Additional elements such as end plates and outward projections can also be affixed.

During construction, when formwork is used, the rear portion of the base of the device is constructed with an attachment opening to receive a nail, screw or other attachment instrument for use in connecting the device to the formwork in a manner that positions the base of the device in a coplanar fashion with the surface of the concrete. The elongated body can be constructed with end plates or can be filled with a removable protective insert to restrict concrete from entering the longitudinal channel. Once the locking insert is attached to the formwork, concrete is poured into the structure and the locking insert is set in concrete. After the concrete is set, any protective insert is removed and the longitudinal channel is exposed. Further, this versatile device can be welded to the underside of a steel beam to accept partition wall restraint angles or welded to the web of a spandrel beam to accept masonry wall restraint anchors.

The longitudinal channel contains a frictional gripping cutout along the two configured sides that inversely matches and interengages the frictional gripping cutout of the interengaging portion of the gear nut. When the gear nut is paired with a locking plate, it is inserted into the longitudinal channel either, through the longitudinal channel, through a port, or by rotational movement, and can be vertically positioned to the predetermined location and set into place. Pairing of the gear nut and locking plate occurs either through welding the gear nut to the locking plate, machining the gear nut and locking plate, or manually affixing the gear nut and locking plate through the use of an attachment bolt. An attachment bolt is inserted through the paired gear nut and locking plate to provide a means for connecting to a secondary or structural connection. Additionally, an attachment bolt can be formed with the single two-part gear nut and locking plate to provide a single complete means for connecting to a secondary or structural connection. Gear nut positioning assistance is provided through a locating spring that is affixed to the locking plate. Such locating spring pushes against the channel floor and longitudinal channel, thereby holding the paired gear nut and locking plate in place until it can be secured, by an attachment bolt, to a secondary or structural connection.

In general terms, a locking insert device for a poured concrete structure is disclosed hereby, which insert includes a hollow elongated body with an opening in one face thereof forming a longitudinal channel along the body and attaching hardware to mount a structural element. The opening has configured side edges and the attaching hardware is a novel paired gear nut and locking plate that interengages the configured side edges and accepts an attachment bolt. Upon installation, the locating spring, affixed to the locking plate, secures the gear nut and locking plate in the longitudinal channel at the desired location until the secondary or structural connection is secured through an attachment bolt. A means is provided to prevent wet concrete from seeping into the locking insert. The locking insert is constructed of galvanized steel, hot dip galvanized steel, stainless steel, cast malleable iron, or bright basic steel. The interengagement of the locking insert with the novel hardware provides anti-slip attachment and positive locking and positioning for a structural or secondary element onto a concrete structure.

The locking insert allows for vertical positioning and locking of the gear nut and locking plate to ensure a proper connection with a structural or secondary element through an attachment bolt. Further, the locking insert with an attached outwardly projecting element transfers the load associated with the structural or secondary element throughout the concrete structure to allow for a high strength connection.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In the following drawings, the same parts in the various views are afforded the same reference designators.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a first embodiment of this invention showing a locking insert with a hollow elongated body with end plates and outwardly projecting elements attached to the elongated body embedded in a poured concrete structure, with the paired gear nut and locking plate and attachment bolt set within the longitudinal channel;

FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view of FIG. 1 taken along a plane bisecting the concrete insert showing the paired gear nut and locking plate and locating spring interengaged with the configured side edges;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a rotating paired gear nut and locking plate;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an arcuate paired gear nut and locking plate;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of an alternate design paired gear nut and locking plate;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of an alternate design paired gear nut and locking plate;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a second embodiment of this invention, similar to FIG. 1, but employing a longitudinal channel with a port.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In the embodiments described hereinbelow, the locking insert employs an innovative design that combines the strength and design of the paired gear nut and locking plate, the longitudinal channel and the elongated body. The result of such design produces a locking insert wherein the paired gear nut and locking plate interengages the channel sides, providing a positional, positive locking connection when secured to a secondary or structural connection through an attachment bolt.

In poured concrete construction, shown in the embodiments hereof, this locking insert provides a paired gear nut and locking plate for use in attaching a structural or secondary element through an attachment bolt. Further, the insert vertically locks the structural or secondary element in place and prevents pullout from the elongated body. The outwardly projecting element supports the attached load by transferring and spreading such load throughout the concrete mass containing the locking insert, providing a high strength support system. Recent advancements in concrete building construction, and its related gains in popularity, demand such an easy to use, high strength, positional and anti-slip locking connection to provide proper, efficient and safe construction.

In a related sense, prior art concrete inserts provide a method of attaching and positioning structural and secondary elements. Although useful in providing a method of attachment with the ability to reposition the attachment point, the prior art fails to completely prevent slippage and to fully lock the connection. In some instances, such shortcomings of the prior art resulted in structural slippage and failure. Further, the prior art lacks the versatility associated with the novel design and versatility of this invention.

To address the two concerns, namely, positioning and preventing bolt slippage and pullout, the inventor's innovative locking insert employs a novel and unique paired gear nut and locking plate that interengages with the longitudinal channel. The first concern is addressed by the gear nut portion of the paired gear nut and locking plate that interengages the configured edges of the longitudinal channel in the elongated body. The gear nut portion fits within the configured edges of the longitudinal channel to allow vertical positioning. The latter concern is addressed by the design of the locking plate portion of the paired gear nut and locking plate which, when set within the longitudinal channel and secured against a structural or secondary connection with an attachment bolt, fully locks the paired gear nut and locking plate within the heavy-duty, high strength elongated body.

In the detailed description, the elongated body and the paired gear nut and locking plate are constructed of carbon steel or cast malleable iron.

Referring now to FIGS. 1 through 3, the first embodiment of a locking insert of this invention set within a poured concrete structure is shown and is referred to generally by the numeral 20. In this embodiment, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, a hollow elongated body 22 is shown having a longitudinal channel 24 in the front face of the locking insert and end plates 26 and 28 on each end of the elongated body. The longitudinal channel 24 contains a channel floor 30 and parallel coplanar configured sides 32 and 34. The configured sides 32 and 34 are formed in a shark tooth manner 42 to interengage the paired gear nut and locking plate 38. No port is required because the paired gear nut and locking plate 38 (as shown in FIG. 3) is inserted through the longitudinal channel 24 with the locking plate portion 41 of the paired gear nut and locking plate 38 parallel to the configured sides 32 and 34, rotated 90 degrees and pulled into the longitudinal channel 24 opening until the shark toothed gear nut portion 43 of the paired gear nut and locking plate 38 is engaged with the configured sides 32 and 34.

The shark toothed paired gear nut and locking plate 38 engages the configured sides 32 and 34 of the longitudinal channel 24, providing an anti-slip method of attachment. The paired gear nut and locking plate 38 works in conjunction with a locating spring 39 to set the paired gear nut and locking plate 38 in place prior to attachment to a secondary or structural connection through an attachment bolt 44. As shown in FIG. 2, when the locating spring 39 is pressed against the channel floor 30 and the paired gear nut and locking plate 38, the locating spring 39 sets the paired gear nut and locking plate 38 within the longitudinal channel 24 and against the configured sides 32 and 34. The paired gear nut and locking plate 38 is set by the locating spring 39 until it can be secured within the longitudinal channel 24 by an attachment bolt 44 to a secondary or structural connection.

Further, to allow attachment load transfer throughout the concrete structure 40, the elongated body contains bolt head shaped outwardly projecting elements 50, 52 and 54 that are secured deep within the concrete structure 40 as shown in FIG. 1. The shape of the outwardly projecting elements 50, 52 and 54 can take the form of an array of attachments, including a frustoconical shape or any other design that assists in transferring the attachment load throughout the concrete member 40. The best mode of placement of the outwardly projecting elements 50, 52 and 54 is one outwardly projecting element for every six inches of elongated body 22, however, lessening or adding other outwardly projecting elements 50, 52 and 54 is allowable. The locking insert 20 can be attached to formwork through an attachment opening (not shown) in the channel floor 30. The attachment opening provides a method of attachment using nails, screws or the like to secure the locking insert 20 against the formwork. An alternative design provides another method of attachment (not shown) through the use of flange members that project outwardly from the front face of the elongated body 22.

The description that follows is of a second embodiment of the locking insert. For ease of comprehension, where similar parts are used reference designators “100”, units higher are employed. Thus, the outwardly projecting elements 150, 152 and 154 of the second embodiment are analogous to the outwardly projecting elements 50, 52 and 54 of the first embodiment.

Referring now to FIGS. 4 to 7, the second embodiment of a locking insert of this invention consists of a hollow elongated body 122 having a longitudinal channel 124 in the front face of the locking insert and end plates 126 and 128 on each end of the elongated body. The longitudinal channel 124 contains a channel floor and parallel coplanar configured sides 132 and 134, and a port 136. The port 136 can be located at any position, but the best mode of manufacture is to locate the port at one end of the longitudinal channel 124. The configured sides 132 and 134 are formed in a shark tooth manner 142 to interengage the nut and the chosen paired gear nut and locking plate assemblies 160 and 170, as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. The paired gear nut and locking plate of the first embodiment 41 as shown in FIG. 3. is also matched to the longitudinal channel 124 of this second embodiment.

The paired gear nut and locking plates for use with the locking insert 122 can take numerous forms, but the best mode of practice would be to either form the paired gear nut and locking plate 160 as a single piece or as two separate pieces 170. The paired gear nut and locking plate 160, as shown in FIG. 5, consists of an interengaging shark toothed gear nut portion 162 to interengage with the configured sides 132 and 134, a locking plate 164 and a locating spring (not shown). The paired gear nut and locking plate 170, as shown in FIG. 6, consists of an interengaging shark toothed gear nut portion 172 to interengage with the configured sides 132 and 134, a separate locking plate portion 174 and a locating spring (not shown). Although, no port is required because both paired gear nut and locking plates 160 and 170 can be inserted through the longitudinal channel 124 and adjusted into the proper location, a port is added to ease insertion into the longitudinal channel 124. Once the front portion of the paired gear nut and locking plate 162 and 172 is engaged with the longitudinal channel 124, the locating spring is set against the channel floor and the locking plate portion 164 and 174 thereby holding the paired gear nut and locking plate in place until the secondary or structural connection is set with an attachment bolt. This action, completes the anti-slip locking action.

An alternative longitudinal channel design, employing configured side edges containing an arcuate locking design (not shown), will similarly interengage an alternative arcuate paired gear nut and locking plate 180 as shown in FIG. 4. The arcuate paired gear nut and locking plate 180 consists of three parts, an interengaging arcuate gear nut portion 182, a locking plate 184, either welded to the gear nut portion or placed as a separate element, and a locating spring(not shown). The arcuate gear nut portion 182 engages the configured sides of the interengaging arcuate longitudinal channel, thereby locking the arcuate paired gear nut and locking plate 180 and providing an anti-slip method of attachment, when secured against a secondary or structural connection with an attachment bolt. The locking plate 184 works in conjunction with the locating spring. When the locating spring is pressed against the channel floor and the locking plate 184, the arcuate paired gear nut and locking plate 180 is set within the longitudinal channel and against the configured sides, awaiting the secondary or structural connection and attachment bolt that completes the anti-slip locking action.

Further, to allow attachment load transfer throughout the concrete structure, the elongated body contains bolt head shaped outwardly projecting elements 150 and 152 that are secured deep within the concrete structure. Outwardly projecting elements 150 and 152 can take the form of an array of attachments, including a frustoconical shape or any other design that assists in transferring the attachment load throughout the concrete member. The best mode of placement of the outwardly projecting elements 150 and 152 is one member for every six inches of elongated body 122, however, lessening or adding other outwardly projecting elements 150 and 152 is allowable.

The locking insert can be attached to formwork through an attachment opening (not shown) in the channel floor. The attachment opening provides a method of attachment using nails, screws or the like to secure the elongated body 122 against the formwork. An alternative design provides another method of attachment (not shown) through the use of flange members that project outwardly from the front of the elongated body 122.

An alternative elongated body design (not shown) is produced without end plates 126 and 128. In an effort to lower costs, the elongated body is filled with a removable insert consisting of foam, plastic or rubber. The removable insert is placed in the longitudinal channel prior to the pouring of the concrete, to inhibit the wet concrete from seeping into the longitudinal channel during the curing process. Once the concrete is cured, the removable insert is lifted from the longitudinal channel to allow insertion of a paired gear nut and locking plate into the longitudinal channel. Because many varying and different embodiments may be made within the scope of the inventive concept herein taught and because many modifications may be made in the embodiments herein detailed in accordance with the descriptive requirement of the law, it is to be understood that the details herein are to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.