Title:
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR A BOARD GAME
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A board game uses a board (1) which is marked with centre (2) middle (3) and outer (4) playing circuits and player tokens (107, 108, 109, 111, 112, 113) which move on the board (1). The game ends when a player's token (107, 111) lands on an End of Game square (6, 7) and that player also holds an End of Game card which has been obtained by the player's token (107, 111) landing on a square that is marked with a star (12, 13, 14, 16). Player tokens (108, 112) moving on the middle circuit (3) may land on mystery (17, 18, 19, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25), Score (34, 36, 37, 38, 39, 41, 42, 43, 44, 46, 47, 48), and Question squares (27, 28, 29, 31, 32 and 33). Player tokens (109, 113) moving on the outer circuit (4) may land on mystery (57, 58, 59, 61), decision (62, 63, 64, 66) and Question squares (67, 68, 69 and 71). Player tokens may also land on six squares (49, 51, 52, 53, 54, 56) which are marked with the words “Miss a Turn”. These six squares (49, 51, 52, 53, 54, 56) are located at points where the middle circuit (3) coincides with the centre circuit (2) or the outer circuit (4).



Inventors:
Jacklin, Karl Martin (Victoria, AU)
Application Number:
12/513251
Publication Date:
04/15/2010
Filing Date:
11/01/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
273/243, 273/288, 273/242
International Classes:
A63F3/00
View Patent Images:
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20020089121Rotating maze board gameJuly, 2002Bjornson
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Primary Examiner:
MENDIRATTA, VISHU K
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ORRICK, HERRINGTON & SUTCLIFFE LLP (IP PROSECUTION DEPARTMENT 2050 Main Street, Suite 1100, IRVINE, CA, 92614, US)
Claims:
1. A board game comprising a substrate which has a playing surface, the playing surface being adapted for the movement of a plurality of player tokens on it; and having markings on it, the markings comprising a plurality of playing circuits, the playing circuits comprising at least a first, second and third playing circuit, each playing circuit: being divided into a set of playing positions, such that player tokens may be placed on each playing position; intersecting each other playing circuit at a plurality of intersecting positions so that a playing position at each of the plurality of intersecting positions is common to at least two of the plurality of playing circuits; and adapted to provide a playing path which defines the play of at least one player token associated with said playing circuit.

2. A board game as claimed in claim 1 wherein the play defined by the playing path corresponds to one or more predefined game functions of the player token associated with said playing circuit.

3. A board game as claimed in claim 2 wherein the predefined game functions are unique to each respective playing circuit.

4. A board game as claimed in claim 1 wherein each player token is confined to movement only on its respective playing path.

5. (canceled)

6. (canceled)

7. (canceled)

8. A board game as claimed in claim 1, in which the playing positions of the first playing circuit comprise: at least one playing position which bears indicia that it is a starting position for player tokens; at least two playing positions each of which bears indicia that to the effect that the landing of a player token on it contributes to ending a game

9. A board game as claimed in claim 8, in which the playing positions of the first playing circuit further comprise: at least two playing positions each of which bears indicia to the effect that the landing of a player token on it results in the awarding to that player of a token which contributes to the ending of a game.

10. A board game as claimed in claim 1, in which the playing positions of the second playing circuit comprise: at least two playing positions, each of which bears indicia that it is a starting position for player tokens; a plurality of playing positions, each of which bears indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to draw a card on which is a question to be answered; a plurality of playing positions, each of which bears indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to draw a “mystery” card; and a plurality of playing positions, each of which bears indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to increment a score.

11. (canceled)

12. A board game as claimed in claim 1, in which the playing positions of the third playing circuit comprise: at least two playing positions, each of which bears indicia that it is a starting position for player tokens; a plurality of playing positions, each of which bears indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to draw a card which requires the player to make a decision relevant to the playing of the game; a plurality of playing positions, each of which bears indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to draw a “mystery” card; and a plurality of playing positions, each of which bears indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to draw a card on which is a question to be answered.

13. (canceled)

14. (canceled)

15. (canceled)

16. A board game as claimed in claim 1, further comprising markings that indicate where: mystery cards; decision cards; question cards; or penalty cards are to be placed on the board.

17. (canceled)

18. (canceled)

19. (canceled)

20. (canceled)

21. A method of playing a board game on a substrate which has a playing surface, the playing surface: being adapted for the movement of a plurality of player tokens on it; and having markings on it, the markings comprising a plurality of playing circuits, the playing circuits comprising at least a first, second and third playing circuit, each playing circuit: being divided into a set of playing positions, such that player tokens may be placed on each playing position; and intersecting each other playing circuit at a plurality of intersecting positions so that a playing position at each of the plurality of intersecting positions is common to at least two of the plurality of playing circuits; and, adapted to provide a playing path which defines the play of at least one player token associated with said playing circuit, the method of playing the game comprising: at least two players placing at least one of the plurality of player tokens on each of the playing circuits.

22. A method of playing a board game as claimed in claim 21, further comprising each player moving player tokens on each of the plurality of playing circuits in accordance with pre-defined rules of the board game such that: the play defined by the playing path corresponds to one or more predefined game functions of the player token associated with said playing circuit wherein the predefined game functions are unique for each respective playing circuit, and: each player token is confined to movement only on its respective playing path.

23. (canceled)

24. (canceled)

25. A method of playing a board game as claimed in claim 21, in which the playing positions of the first playing circuit comprise: at least one playing position which bears indicia that it is a starting position for player tokens; at least two playing positions each of which bears indicia that to the effect that the landing of a player token on it contributes to ending a game; the method of playing the board game further comprising ending the game subsequent to a player token of a player landing on a playing position which bears indicia to the effect that the landing of a player token on it contributes to ending a game.

26. (canceled)

27. A method of playing a board game as claimed claim 21, in which the playing positions of the second playing circuit comprise: at least two “start” playing positions, each of which bears indicia that it is a starting position for player tokens; a plurality of “question” playing positions, each of which bears indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to draw a card on which is a question to be answered; a plurality of “mystery” playing positions, each of which bears indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to draw a “mystery” card; and a plurality of “score” playing positions, each of which bears indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to increment a score the method of playing the board game further comprising each player: placing at least one player token on each “start” playing position; drawing a “question” card when a token of the player lands on a “question” playing position; drawing a “mystery” card when a token of the player lands on a “mystery” playing position; and incrementing their score by a pre-determined amount when a token of the player lands on a “score” playing position.

28. (canceled)

29. A method of playing a board game as claimed in claim 21, in which the playing positions of the third playing circuit comprise: at least two “start” playing positions, each of which bears indicia that it is a starting position for player tokens; a plurality of “decision” playing positions, each of which bears indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to draw a card which requires the player to make a decision relevant to the playing of the game; a plurality of “mystery” playing positions, each of which bears indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to draw a “mystery” card; and a plurality of “question” playing positions, each of which bears indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to draw a card on which is a question to be answered the method of playing the board game further comprising each player; placing at least one player token on each “start” playing position; drawing a “decision” card when a token of the player lands on a “decision” playing position; drawing a “mystery” card when a token of the player lands on a “mystery” playing position; and drawing a “question” card when a token of the player lands on a “question” playing position.

30. (canceled)

31. A method of playing a board game as claimed in claim 21, in which when a player token lands on any of the playing positions that are intersecting positions on both the third playing circuit; and either of the first playing circuit and the second playing circuit, then a penalty is imposed on the player in accordance with the rules of the game.

32. (canceled)

33. (canceled)

34. A method of playing a board game comprising a plurality of playing paths, the method comprising the steps of: advancing player tokens along the plurality of playing paths where each player token is dedicated to one of the respective playing paths; providing for interaction between the advancement of at least two player tokens at a plurality of intersecting positions common to at least two playing paths; determining the advancement and interaction of player tokens in accordance with predetermined game functions corresponding to the respective playing paths.

35. A method as claimed in claim 34 wherein the predetermined game functions comprise one or a combination of: a subject framework of a field of knowledge; at least one characterization from an action, fantasy or drama story; characterizing elements of an action, fantasy or drama story.

36. Apparatus for a board game comprising: a substrate with a playing surface having a plurality of playing paths: random number generation means for advancing player tokens along the plurality of playing paths where each player token is dedicated to one of the respective playing paths; the playing paths adapted to provide for interaction between the advancement of at least two player tokens at a plurality of intersecting positions common to at least two playing paths; a set of rules for determining the advancement and interaction of player tokens in accordance with predetermined game functions corresponding to the respective playing paths.

37. Apparatus as claimed in claim 36 wherein the predetermined game functions comprise one or a combination of: a subject framework of a field of knowledge; at least one characterization from an action, fantasy or drama story; characterizing elements of an action, fantasy or drama story.

38. Apparatus adapted to conduct a board game, said apparatus comprising: a processor configured to operate in accordance with a predetermined instruction set, said apparatus, in conjunction with said instruction set, being adapted for use in one or a combination of: playing the game of claim 1;

39. A computer program product comprising: a computer usable medium having computer readable program code and computer readable system code embodied on said medium for conducting a board game within a data processing system, said computer program product comprising: computer readable code within said computer usable medium for one or a combination of: displaying game information; playing the game of claim 1;

40. (canceled)

41. (canceled)

42. Apparatus adapted to conduct a board game, said apparatus comprising: A processor configured to operate in accordance with a predetermined instruction set, said apparatus, in conjunction with said instruction set, being adapted for use in one or a combination of: performing the method as claimed in claim 21.

43. A computer program product comprising: a computer usable medium having computer readable program code and computer readable system code embodied on said medium for conducting a board game within a data processing system, said computer program product comprising: computer readable code within said computer usable medium for one or a combination of: displaying game information; performing the method steps as claimed in claim 21.

Description:

RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority to Australian Provisional Patent Application No. 2006906084 in the name of G.A.T.E.Ways Publications Pty Ltd, which was filed on 1 Nov. 2006, entitled “A Board Game” and, Australian Provisional Patent Application No. 2006906085 in the name of G.A.T.E.Ways Publications Pty Ltd, which was filed on 2 Nov. 2006, also entitled “A Board Game” and Australian Provisional Patent Application No. 2007905175 in the name of G.A.T.E.Ways Publications Pty Ltd, which was filed on 21 Sep. 2007, also entitled “A Board Game” and the specifications thereof are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety and for all purposes.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to games in which players move tokens around a playing path on a playing board. Such games are commonly known as “board games”. In one form, the present invention relates to board games in which the playing and/or participation thereof, may be facilitated by electronic means, however, it should be appreciated that the present invention is not limited to that use, only.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The discussion throughout this specification comes about due to the realisation of the inventor and/or the identification of certain related art problems by the inventor.

Most board games have a single playing path. Some board games have multiple playing paths. Most board games incorporate the element of chance by having a random number generator such as a dice. Some games such as Snakes and Ladders base the game wholly on chance, while others such as Monopoly include varying degrees of decision-making.

By way of example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,584,484 (Kenvyn) discloses a board game apparatus including a board with a number of intersecting endless playing paths each with marked spaces. A playing piece is associated with each player for moving around the board. To facilitate movement around the board cards are used to determine tasks for completion and directions to be followed. Tokens are associated with the tasks and are used for recording successful completion of tasks by players. The board game apparatus of Kenvyn is used as a tool to direct players to desired information sources, for example one or more dictionaries of different levels of detail or language such that players may test and/or increase their knowledge. It is noted that in the game disclosed by Kenvyn the multiple intersecting pathways merely provide a number of alternative routes for a playing piece. In effect, this provides a single convoluted path comprising sections of the multiple pathways that can be taken by a single playing piece representing a single player where each playing piece has the potential to be at any position on any pathway on the board at some point in the game. Accordingly, the function of the game board of Kenvyn is considered comparable to Snakes and Ladders where the snakes and the ladders of the board move a playing piece from one point along a given pathway section to another point on another pathway section such that a playing piece may be located at any space on the board at some point in the game.

Other board games, which include either intersecting or alternate pathways for playing pieces in which any one of the paths may be followed by a player's pieces are found in U.S. Pat. No. 5,704,611 (Pierce) and U.S. Pat. No. 5,092,606 (Miller).

U.S. Pat. No 5,607,160 (Stevens at al) identifies a problem in a number of prior art games that facilitate movement of playing pieces around a board by players either answering questions, drawing or, acting out a word or object but do not combine any or all three of the skills involved in questions, drawing and acting. The solution provided by Stevens et al provides three intersecting pathways for the playing piece of an individual or team to traverse and wherein the playing piece must complete all pathways and carry out all the prescribed tasks to complete the game. The prescribed tasks to be completed are a combination of activities including answering questions, drawing and acting.

U.S. Pat. No 6,332,613 (Reese) discloses apparatus for playing a game comprising a board and a plurality of playing pieces (or shards) for placement on the board for tracking progress of the game. The board is demarcated into a number of playing areas and each playing area is subdivided into abutting playing spaces. Some of the playing areas partially overlap such that the playing areas have at least some playing spaces in common. The playing pieces of a side are shards matching the playing spaces on the playing area corresponding to the side. The object of the game is to be the first side to place all their shards over their respective playing area and then to subsequently place a ring on a central space of the board in order to win the game. Point's rounds are conducted for the purpose of accumulating points, which allow a side to place their shards, one shard for each point, on playing spaces of their respective playing area. The gaining of points for placing shards and the ability to place the ring on the board is achieved by way of identifying a “Ringer” from subgroups of a topic or subject category represented on word cards, where a “Ringer” is a contrived word that Is a deceptive representation of being a member of the particular subgroup. Sides are sequentially paired in the course of a round such that each side alternately “fingers”, that is, takes the role of trying to identify the “Ringer” of the word card selected by the “hander”, that is, the other side holding the given word card to be “fingered”. The topics for each word card are arranged in order of increasing difficulty, that is, topics probably known to a player, topics possibly known to a player and, topics probably not known to a player. Accordingly, varying point scores according to the degree of difficulty may be awarded to the “fingerer” if they correctly identify the “Ringer”, whereas if they do not correctly identify the “Ringer” a point score is awarded to the “hander” instead and, the point score of the “hander” may be indirectly proportional to the score that could have gone to the other side. The board game that Reese discloses is directed at merely testing players' knowledge of categorized items for perceived recognizability of a given item as being a member of a set falling within a given category.

Published UK Patent Application No 2,149,675 (Clingman et al) discloses a board game that, like chess, involves strategy rather than chance. The game apparatus of Clingman et al includes a playing surface having a number of intersecting sinuous paths and primary and secondary playing pieces. Each path is defined between two longitudinal lines and is divided transversely to the longitudinal lines into a series of “zones” extending along the path longitudinally between a start and finish zone. Also, along each longitudinal line distinctive “positions” are provided at the junctions of adjacent zones. The primary piece of each player is initially positioned at the start of its respective path on the playing surface in its start zone and is moved stepwise along the path, ie from zone to zone, to the finish at the other end of that path. Each player also has a set of secondary pieces which are placed initially on certain predetermined ones of the positions and are movable stepwise to other positions along the longitudinal lines. An opponent's secondary pieces may be dispersed (or captured) by bringing an opposing secondary piece into an adjacent position. The game is won either when one player manages to advance his/her primary piece to the finish at the other end of his/her path, or when he/she captures his/her opponent's primary piece by surrounding his/her opponent's primary piece in a zone in which the first player has one of his secondary pieces at each of the positions that make up the four corners of that zone. Whilst the primary playing piece of each player is confined to a single path on its ‘quest’, the secondary playing pieces are free to move along any playing path and while doing so they maintain the allotted purpose or function. Clingman et al is considered to extend a game such as chess by introducing two categories of playing pieces, one such playing piece has as its function to move to the ultimate destination playing zone and end the game whilst the other category of playing piece may be used to attack and dispose of playing pieces of the opposition whether they be of one category or the other such that the game is also ended if the disposed of playing piece of the opponent is its primary piece.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,267,375 (Bernstein et al) identifies a problem with known life choice and career games in that they do not address the myriad of career and family choices available to girls and young women. Bernstein et al provides a solution in a game that provides choices for life pursuits to persons featuring a game board having a central start space for all players and a number of life paths, each of which has spaces marked successively over the length of the path with indicia representing instructions to a player landing a game piece on the given space. A first set of paths extends radially away from or about the start space. A second set of “choice” paths is provided, each of which has spaces marked with indicia relating to a life pursuit, and an entry space and a finish space at opposite ends of the “choice” path. The entry and finish spaces of the “choice” paths are contiguous with corresponding spaces of one of the first set of paths from which a player can choose to move their playing piece into the entry space of the given choice path. Accordingly, a given player may have their playing piece travel from a start space common to the playing piece of each player along any one of the first and second set of paths laid out on the board.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,394,454 (Etherington, Jr at al) discloses a board game for players to move their plural game pieces from respective start spaces to respective finishing spaces along a first path and a second path having a plurality of connector paths in between. The first path encompasses the second path such that the first path is a perimeter path and the second path is an interior path. Both first and second paths and the connector paths are divided into path spaces. A plurality of start spaces are located adjacent the first path. A plurality of end paths are respectively connected to the first path. Cards are drawn by players for indicating movement of the players' sets of playing pieces around the paths and the game is won by the player that moves their set of game pieces to the end of the respective end path. The game of Etherington Jr et al is considered to be a variation on the well known game of Ludo™ in which one of the variations is that progress of the playing pieces around the board is determined by means of the directions given on the drawn cards and not dice.

Any discussion of documents, devices, acts or knowledge in this specification is included to explain the context of the invention. It should not be taken as an admission that any of the material forms a part of the prior art base or the common general knowledge in the relevant art in Australia or elsewhere on or before the priority date of the disclosure and claims herein.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

An object of the present invention is to alleviate at least one disadvantage associated with the related art.

In contrast with the related art, in one aspect the present invention provides a board game comprising a playing surface, the playing surface being adapted for the movement of a plurality of player tokens on it; and having markings on it, the markings comprising a plurality of playing circuits, the playing circuits comprising at least a first, second and third playing circuit, each playing circuit:

being divided into a set of playing positions, such that player tokens may be placed on any playing position;

intersecting each other playing circuit at a plurality of intersecting positions so that a playing position at each of the plurality of intersecting positions is common to at least two of the plurality of playing circuits; and

adapted to provide a playing path which defines the play of at least one player token associated with said playing circuit.

In a preferred embodiment, the play defined by the playing path corresponds to one or more predefined game functions of the player token associated with said playing circuit. The predefined game functions may be unique for each respective playing circuit and, preferably each player token is confined to movement only, on its respective playing path.

In another aspect a preferred embodiment of the present invention provides a method of playing a game using a board game as disclosed herein, comprising, for each player:

placing player tokens on each “start” position on each playing circuit;

throwing a dice;

the player who has thrown the highest score of the dice taking the first turn of play;

on each succeeding throw of the dice, the player who threw the dice moving one player token through the number of playing positions indicted by the throw of the dice.

In yet another aspect, a preferred embodiment of the present invention provides a method of playing a game using a board game as disclosed herein with particular reference to

the drawings; and

the rules of the game that are set out in at least one of the Annexures to this specification.

In still another aspect, a preferred embodiment of the present invention provides apparatus adapted to conduct a board game, said apparatus comprising:

processor means adapted to operate in accordance with a predetermined instruction set,

said apparatus, in conjunction with said instruction set, being adapted to perform at least one or more of the method steps as disclosed herein.

In a further aspect, a preferred embodiment of the present invention provides a computer program product comprising:

a computer usable medium having computer readable program code and computer readable system code embodied on said medium for conducting a board game within a data processing system, said computer program product comprising:

computer readable code within said computer usable medium for one or more of:

displaying game information and;

playing the game of the board game as disclosed herein.

In another aspect, a preferred embodiment of the present invention provides a method of playing a board game on a substrate which has a playing surface, the playing surface:

being adapted for the movement of a plurality of player tokens on it; and

having markings on it, the markings comprising a plurality of playing circuits, the playing circuits comprising at least a first, second and third playing circuit, each playing circuit:

being divided into a set of playing positions, such that player tokens may be placed on each playing position; and

intersecting each other playing circuit at a plurality of intersecting positions so that a playing position at each of the plurality of intersecting positions is common to at least two of the plurality of playing circuits; and,

adapted to provide a playing path which defines the play of at least one player token associated with said playing circuit,

the method of playing the game comprising:

at least two players placing at least one of the plurality of player tokens on each of the playing circuits.

In yet a further aspect, a preferred embodiment provides a method of playing a board game comprising a plurality of playing paths, the method comprising the steps of:

advancing player tokens along the plurality of playing paths where each player token is dedicated to one of the respective playing paths;

providing for interaction between the advancement of at least two player tokens at a plurality of intersecting positions common to at least two playing paths;

determining the advancement and interaction of player tokens in accordance with predetermined game functions corresponding to the respective playing paths.

In still another aspect, a preferred embodiment provides apparatus for a board game comprising:

a substrate with a playing surface having a plurality of playing paths:

random number generation means for advancing player tokens along the plurality of playing paths where each player token is dedicated to one of the respective playing paths;

the playing paths adapted to provide for interaction between the advancement of at least two player tokens at a plurality of intersecting positions common to at least two playing paths;

a set of rules for determining the advancement and interaction of player tokens in accordance with predetermined game functions corresponding to the respective playing paths.

In these embodiments, the predetermined game functions may comprise one or a combination of:

a subject framework of a field of knowledge;

at least one characterization from an action, fantasy or drama story;

characterizing elements of an action, fantasy or drama story.

Other aspects and preferred aspects are disclosed in the specification and/or defined in the appended claims, forming a part of the description of the invention.

As noted above, the play of a player token which is defined by a playing circuit's playing path may correspond to one or more predefined game functions of the player token. In preferred embodiments, such predefined game functions may advantageously relate to any number of characterizations, which may be modeled on one or more aspects of the entire human body of knowledge and pursuits, for example, the sciences and engineering, learning, literature, the arts, cultural manifestations and productions. Accordingly, embodiments of the present invention may comprise fantasy/super hero scenarios such as, for example, “Superman™,” “Batman™” and “Spiderman™”. Embodiments of the present game are adaptable to a wide range of such action, fantasy or drama themes, most particularly where one can identify a central character (eg a hero), the circumstances of forces supporting the central character (eg hero), and other protagonists in the central character's (eg hero's) story (eg the hero's enemies). A preferred embodiment of the present game provides for interaction between these three elements of an action, fantasy or drama theme, in a combination of competing factors enjoyed by most children. Further embodiments of the game can be presented with no underlying story, being played but merely within a subject framework, the action cards all relating to the same field of knowledge, for example, mathematics, science, history, geography, paleontology, etc. Accordingly, the game tests the knowledge and skill of the players within a competitive framework.

Furthermore, preferred embodiments of the game are readily adaptable to any number of characterizations found in popular media and literature involving narrative themes, particularly those comprising Odyssean themes such as for example, J. R. R. Tolkien's “The Lord of the Rings”™ trilogy and “The Hobbit”™, Douglas Adam's “The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy”™, the BBC's “Dr Who”™ series, Emily Rodda's “Deltora Quest”™ series and J K Rowling's “Harry Potter”™ series. Other fantasy and high fantasy adaptations may comprise George Lucas's “Star Wars”™ epics and Gene Roddenbury's “Star Trek”™ television series.

The nature of the preferred embodiment of the present game is such that it may be played between two individual players, between an individual player and a team of players, or between two teams of players. Accordingly, throughout this specification, including the claims, the term “player” is used to include both an individual player and a team of players. Further the term “player tokens” refers to playing pieces that represent or indicate one or more functional aspects of a player.

It is preferred that the board game further comprises a plurality of player tokens, each of which player tokens is adapted for movement on a respective playing circuit.

It is preferred that movement of player tokens on a playing circuit is determined at least in part by random number generation.

It is preferred that there are six player tokens divided into two sets of three player tokens.

It is preferred that the playing positions of the first playing circuit comprise one or more of:

at least one playing position which bears indicia that it Is a starting position for player tokens;

at least two playing positions each of which bears indicia to the effect that the landing of a player token on it contributes to ending a game

It is preferred that the playing positions of the first playing circuit further comprise:

at least two playing positions each of which bears indicia to the effect that the landing of a player token on it results in the awarding to that player of a token which contributes to the ending of a game.

It is preferred that the playing positions of the second playing circuit comprise one or more of:

at least two playing positions, each of which bears indicia that it is a starting position for player tokens;

a plurality of playing positions, each of which bears indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to draw a card on which is a question to be answered;

a plurality of playing positions, each of which bears indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to draw a “mystery” card; and

a plurality of playing positions, each of which bears indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to increment a score.

It is preferred that each of the playing positions that are intersecting positions on both the first and second playing circuits bear indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to have an extra turn of play.

It is preferred that the playing positions of the third playing circuit comprise one or more of:

at least two playing positions, each of which bears indicia that it is a starting position for player tokens;

a plurality of playing positions, each of which bears indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to draw a card which requires the player to make a decision relevant to the playing of the game;

a plurality of playing positions, each of which bears indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to draw a “mystery” card; and

a plurality of playing positions, each of which bears indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to draw a card on which is a question to be answered.

It is preferred that each “mystery” card bears indicia that a player has either received a reward or a penalty relative to playing the game.

It is preferred that each of the playing positions that are intersecting positions on both

the third playing circuit; and

either of the first playing circuit and the second playing circuit,

bear indicia that a player whose token lands on it is to miss a turn of play.

It is preferred that the playing surface further comprises markings that indicate directions in which playing tokens may be moved.

It is preferred that the board game further comprises markings that indicate where:

mystery cards;

decision cards;

question cards; or

penalty cards

are to be placed on the board.

Rules for playing the game according to the presently-described preferred embodiment are set out in Annex 1 to this specification. Alternately with reference to Annex 2 to this specification, a detailed version of a preferred embodiment relates to the present board game being adapted to the game of Quidditch™ as known from the Harry Potter™ stories.

It will be appreciated from the following description of preferred embodiments that players have to decide which of their tokens to move after each throw of the dice based on an assessment of which move they believe offers them the greatest advantage. The game is therefore not only one of chance, but also of strategy and competitive skill. It also provides for the testing of the player's knowledge, the subject matter of which may be derived from a variety of study areas, some examples of which have been noted hereinabove.

It is unlike other board games that have a designated start and finish position on the board. In the presently described game the players can seek to prolong the game until they are in a winning position. In preferred embodiments, three discrete pathways are provided where the player tokens on each pathway are restricted to moving only along their respective playing circuit and each respective player token has its own unique functions and objectives. Further, plural random number generating means, such as dice, may be incorporated such that the movement of each player token corresponding to it own respective playing path is controlled by its respective random number generating means at each turn. For example, with three discrete playing paths it is preferred that three separate random number generating means such as three dice are activated and moving all three of a player's tokens in correspondence to each respective random number generating means. A further advantage is provided in preferred embodiments where particular game control cards may be provided to increase the complexity of the game, such as for example the use of question cards which allow for questions that may be more intellectually demanding and take longer to answer than other questions but these question cards do not hold up the game whilst they are answered. There is also an advantage offered in preferred embodiments where decision making cards are provided to give greater control over the direction and development of the game as it is played out.

In further embodiments, the present invention may comprise the use of computer implemented apparatus as described herein to perform the board game functions and/or facilitate the function of displaying game information, for example, the score of players, the operation of cards in electronic form and progress of play in general.

Further scope of applicability of embodiments of the present invention will become apparent from the detailed description given hereinafter. However, it should be understood that the detailed description and specific examples, while indicating preferred embodiments of the invention, are given by way of illustration only, since various changes and modifications within the spirit and scope of the disclosure herein will become apparent to those skilled in the art from this detailed description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Further disclosure, objects, advantages and aspects of preferred and other embodiments of the present application may be better understood by those skilled in the relevant art by reference to the following description of embodiments taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, which are given by way of illustration only, and thus are not limitative of the disclosure herein, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a playing board showing a playing surface according to one preferred embodiment;

FIG. 2 illustrates a sample of game cards suitable for use in conjunction with the board of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 illustrates an arrangement for scoring that is suitable for use in conjunction with the board of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 4 and 5 illustrate player tokens suitable for use in conjunction with the board of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 illustrates an electronic display for facilitating play of the game in accordance with another preferred embodiment;

FIG. 7 illustrates an electronic display for facilitating play of the game in accordance with a further preferred embodiment.

FIG. 8 illustrates a portion of the playing board of FIG. 1 during an Initial play of a game according to one embodiment of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

A board game in accordance with the embodiment of FIG. 1 is played between two players. In other embodiments it is envisaged that more than two players may be involved. For example, in one embodiment adapted for the Harry Potter™ story, it is envisaged that up to four players representing each of the four Hogwarts houses may be involved.

A playing board 1 according to the presently-described embodiment of the invention has three playing circuits:

A first circuit 2 which is positioned generally in the centre of the playing surface and is coloured yellow in a preferred embodiment of the playing board of FIG. 1;

A second circuit 3 which is positioned generally to be centered around the middle of the playing surface and is coloured green in a preferred embodiment of the playing board of FIG. 1; and

A third circuit 4 which positioned to provide a generally outer path with respect to the playing surface and is coloured brown in a preferred embodiment of the playing board of FIG. 1.

Each of the circuits 2, 3 and 4 has multiple points of intersection with each of the other circuits.

Considering the first generally centered circuit 2, it is in the form of a column of squares. The end squares 6 and 7 which appear as the upper and lower squares of the centre circuit 2 are both marked as “End of Game” squares. Proximate the end of game squares 6 and 7, the centre circuit 2 intersects the second middle circuit 3 so as to have squares 8 and 9 (which are coloured blue or pink in preferred embodiments of the board of FIG. 1) in common. These squares 8 and 9 are marked as “Extra Turn” squares. The central square 11 of the centre circuit 2 is bordered partly in red and partly in blue to designate its use for respective “red” and “blue” players and is marked as the “Start” square. The central circuit 2 also has two squares 12 and 13 that are Marked with blue stars and two squares 14 and 16 that are marked with red squares. The blue markings are for indicating the squares' use to the advantage of the blue player and to the disadvantage of the red player as described below. Correspondingly, the red markings are for indicating the squares' use to the advantage of the red player and to the disadvantage of the blue player. It is noted that the chosen markings for any playing squares of the board whether they be on any one of the playing circuits may be varied yet remain distinctive of their function as described herein and these variations would be within the knowledge and discretion of the person skilled in the art without departing from the scope of the present embodiment.

Considering the middle circuit 3, in the example of FIG. 1 it is in the form of an approximately hour-glass shaped closed circuit of squares. The middle circuit 3 has:

eight squares 17, 18, 19, 21, 22, 23, 24 and 25 which are marked with the symbol “?”;

six squares 27, 28, 29, 31, 32 and 33 which are marked with the letter “Q”;

twelve squares 34, 36, 37, 38, 39 41, 42, 43, 44, 46, 47 and 48 which are marked with the word “Score”;

six squares 49, 51, 52, 53, 54 and 56 which are marked with the letter “P”. These six squares 49, 51, 52, 53, 54 and 56 occur at points where the middle circuit 3 coincides with the centre circuit 2 or the outer circuit 4.

Proximate to the “Start” square 11 of the centre circuit 2, the middle circuit 3 also has two squares 57 and 58, each of which is marked with the word “Start”. The square 57 has a red border to indicate use by the red player and the square 58 has a blue border to indicate its use by the blue player.

Considering the outer circuit 4, in the example of FIG. 1, it is in the form of the periphery of a rectangle. The outer circuit 4 has:

four squares 57, 58, 59 and 61 which are marked with the symbol “?”;

four squares 62, 63, 64 and 66 which are marked with the letter “D”;

four squares 67, 68, 69 and 71 which are marked with the letter “Q”.

The outer circuit 4 also two squares 72 and 73, each of which is marked with the word “Start”. The square 72 has a blue border and the square 73 has a red border. Again, the blue border indicates use by the blue player and the red border indicates use buy the red player.

The actual number of squares may vary within the scope of the presently described embodiments and this may be recognised by the person skilled in the art and adapted as for example according to how game players react to the number of squares they are presented with.

The board 1 is marked:

on the right-hand side of the board with a blue-coloured rectangle 74 which is marked with the word “BLUE”. Proximate to the rectangle 74, the board 1 has two blue-bordered arrows 76 and 77, each of which points in the same direction; and

on the left-hand side of the board with a red-coloured rectangle 78 which is marked with the word “RED”. Proximate to the rectangle 78, the board 1 has two red-bordered arrows 79 and 81 each of which points in the same direction and in the same direction as do the arrows 76 and 77.

The board 1 is additionally marked with:

a square 78a which has a red border and which is marked with a red star symbol;

a square 79a which has a blue border and which is marked with a blue star symbol;

a rectangle 81a which is light purple in colour and which is marked with a “?” symbol;

a rectangle 82 which is pink in colour and which is marked with the letter “D”;

a rectangle 83 which is light blue in colour and which is marked with the letter “Q”; and

a rectangle 84 which is marked with a four-lobed symbol.

FIG. 2 illustrates examples of a set of game cards suitable for use in conjunction with the board of FIG. 1. This figure shows:

four cards 84, 86, 87 and 88, each of which is marked with a “?” symbol and with an instruction;

four cards 89, 91, 92 and 93, each of which is marked with the letter “D” and with a statement;

four cards 94, 96, 97 and 98, each of which is marked with the letter “P” and with a statement; and

four cards 99, 101, 102 and 103, each of which is marked with:

the letter “Q”, a question, and the answer to that question.

FIG. 3 illustrates an arrangement for scoring that is suitable for use in conjunction with the board of FIG. 1. The arrangement of FIG. 3 is printed on a sheet of material such as stiff paper or cardboard. It has a card 104 which has blue markings and a card 107 which has red markings. It is also marked with thirty digits within individual rectangular outlines for each card 104 and 107 which are indicated generally at 106. Alternatively, scoring devices comprising rotating discs may be employed. Such devices may comprise two numbered discs situated inside an envelope with two cutouts to enable viewing of the displayed number as a score indicator. Two further cut outs within the envelope may be provided to enable players to rotate the discs to alter scores accordingly.

FIGS. 4 and 5 illustrate player tokens suitable for use in conjunction with the board of FIG. 1.

The player tokens 107, 108 and 109 of FIG. 4 each have a red border and are marked with the letter “R” to indicate use by the red player. The body of the token 107 is coloured yellow, the body of the token 108 is coloured green and the body of the token 108 is coloured brown each indicating use for the token on the yellow, green and brown playing circuits, respectively.

The player tokens 111, 112 and 113 of FIG. 5 each have a blue border and are marked with the letter “B” to indicate use by the blue player. The body of the token 111 is coloured yellow, the body of the token 112 is coloured green and the body of the token 113 is coloured brown each indicating use for the token on the yellow, green and brown playing circuits, respectively.

As noted above with respect to the markings for each individual playing square, it is noted that the markings and colour schemes for each of the playing paths/circuits, the player tokens and other markings in relation to the board game for indicating use by a particular player may be varied yet remain distinctive of their function as described herein and these variations would be within the knowledge and discretion of the person skilled in the art without departing from the scope of the present embodiments described herein.

Playing the game requires a minimum of two players, for example as noted with respect to the accompanying drawings, the red player and the blue player. The winning player (team) will be the one with the higher number of points at the end of the game.

In playing the game according to the embodiment described in relation to FIGS. 1 to 5:

the cards which are marked with the symbol “?” in FIG. 2 are described as “mystery” cards;

the cards which are marked with the letter “D” in FIG. 2 are described as “decision” cards;

the cards which are marked with the letter “Q” in FIG. 2 are described as “question” cards;

the cards which are marked with the letter “P” in FIG. 2 are described as “penalty” cards;

the tokens 107, 108 and 109 are used by a player who is described as the “red player”; and

the tokens 111, 112 and 113 are used by a player who is described as the “blue” player.

At the beginning of play, each pack of mystery, decision, question and penalty cards is separately shuffled and then placed face down on rectangle 81a, 82, 83 and 84 respectively. Considering the “blue” player, that player's:

yellow token 107 is placed on “Start” square 11 of the centre circuit 2;

green token 108 is placed on “Start” square 58 of middle circuit 3; and

brown token 109 is placed on “Start” square 72 of outer circuit 4.

Considering the “red” player, that player's:

yellow token 111 is placed on “Start” square 11 of the centre circuit 2;

green token 112 is placed on “Start” square 57 of middle circuit 3; and

brown token 113 is placed on “Start” square 73 of the outer circuit 4.

Each player then throws a dice and the player who throws the highest number on the dice has the first move in the game. Other mechanisms for deciding which player has the first move may be utilised as would be recognised by the person skilled in the art. Movements of the tokens are determined by the score on a standard dice, which is thrown alternately by each player, unless the sequence is varied by instructions on cards that are called up when tokens land on specifically designated squares on the board.

A player whose turn it is to throw the dice may move any one (but preferably only one) of that player's tokens the number of spaces corresponding to the score on the dice. In a preferred embodiment, a score on the dice cannot be apportioned between the player's tokens. However, in other embodiments this may be allowed. As noted herein, it is also preferred for this embodiment having three playing paths that more than one dice be used. For example, three dice may be used to indicate movement on each of the three respective paths and all three tokens of the player having their turn will be moved in that turn according to the values indicated by the respective dice. Each of the three dice may be colour coded to correspond to their respective playing path.

Players keep an accurate running total of the points they score during the game. Deliberate misrepresentation of this score may result in the immediate loss of the game. A player may ask for, and then be provided with, the opponent's total score at any time during the game.

Both the yellow token 107 of the red player and the yellow token 111 of the blue player will move up and down the centre (yellow) path 2. However the first move on this path from the starting position will be away from the player's End of Game square. That is, UP for the red token 107 away from End of Game Square 7 and DOWN for the blue token 111 away from End of Game Square 6.

The green token 108 of the red player on the middle (green) path 3 and the brown token 109 of the red player on the outer (brown) path 4 moves in the clockwise direction around the board. The green token 112 of the blue player on middle (green) path 3 and the brown token 113 of the blue player on the outer (brown) path 4 moves in the anticlockwise direction around the board. In alternative embodiments this directional movement May be reversed but it is required, in preferred embodiments that players move in generally opposite direction around these playing circuits.

The landing of a player's token on either of the (light blue) Extra Turn squares 8 and 9 gains an extra turn only if that player's Green and Yellow tokens occupy the square together.

Landing on any of the Penalty (P) squares 49, 51, 52, 53, 54 and 56 which is already occupied by either the player's own token, or the opponent's token, requires that the player take a card from the top of the Penalty card pack.

If the tokens of the two opposing players occupy the same square on any other occasion during the game, each of the players may role the dice and the higher scorer will add 10 points to his/her total.

Landing on a Question (Q) square 27, 28, 29, 31, 32, 33, 67, 68, 69 or 71 requires that a question card be taken from the top of the stack of question cards at 83 and that the player answer the question stated on the card. There is no penalty for an incorrect answer; however the player gains 10 points for a correct answer. In the case where a player consists of a team of individuals, those individuals are permitted to share the decision-making and pool their knowledge to answer questions as they arise. It is preferred that a time limit be applied when answering questions. In an alternative embodiment, players may be permitted to consult various immediately available information resources in order to discover the answers to such questions, but this preferably may necessitate a reduced time limit.

Landing on a Mystery (?) square 17, 18, 19, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 57, 58, 59 or 61 requires that the player take a card from the top of the Mystery card pack at 81. The outcome will either be a reward or a penalty depending on the luck of the draw (eg. “Miss a Turn”, “Add 10 points to your total score”, etc.). If the implementation of a Mystery card results in an additional reward or penalty, then the player must accept that outcome.

Landing on a Decision (D) square 62, 63, 64 or 66 requires that the player take a card from the top of the Decision card pack at 82. The card will offer two options. These options will convey a varying probability between two levels of penalty or two levels of reward. For example, a card may offer a player the choice to either miss a turn, or throw the dice and accept an alternative outcome, which will generally either increase the severity of the penalty, or cancel it altogether. Scoring an even number on the dice may mean missing no turns, whilst throwing an odd number may result in two missed turns instead of one. Similarly, the card may offer two alternative reward options where the player chooses one or the other of these options.

Landing on a Penalty (P) square on the board means that the player must draw a Penalty card from the pack. This card will apply a significantly greater penalty than might be expected from a Mystery (?) or Decision (D) card.

A token on the middle circuit 3 scores points as it moves about that circuit. There are specifically designated 10-point “Score” squares 34, 36, 37, 38, 39 41, 42, 43, 44, 46, 47 and 48. A player whose token lands on one of these squares adds ten points to their score, unless an opposition player's token occupies such a square, in which case the score may not count.

Some of the Mystery cards also add points to or subtract points from a player's total score.

A token on the outer circuit 4 also offers the opportunity to draw Mystery, Decision and Question cards, but it also offers an opportunity to inflict a significantly greater penalty on an opponent. If say, a token on the outer circuit 4 and a token on one of the middle circuit 3 or the centre circuit 2 occupies the same (intersecting) square, the player whose token is on the middle circuit 3 or the centre circuit 2, must draw a Penalty card.

Should the tokens of the two players simultaneously occupy the same square on any other part of the board within the same circuit, the players must throw the dice. The player who throws the highest number on the dice will receive, for example, 10 points.

The game is concluded by:

a player who holds their “End of Game” card landing on the appropriate “End of Game” square; or

a player drawing a Mystery card that arbitrarily concludes the game; or

a player drawing a Mystery card that offers to that player an opportunity to conclude the game.

The End of Game Square for the blue player is square 7 and the End of Game square for the red player is square 6. A player must throw the exact score on the dice in order to occupy either one of the two End of Game squares. A score in excess of the number required merely brings about a change in the direction of the token.

A player obtains an End of Game card by landing on a star on the centre circuit 2 that is of their colour. These are stars 12 and 13 for the blue player and 14 and 16 for the red player. A player who holds their End of Game card forfeits that card by landing on a star that is the colour of their opponent.

The player who ends the game receives one hundred and fifty bonus points.

It is quite possible for a player to end the game but still lose it. A player's objective is to avoid ending the game until that player has sufficient points to win it. This may even mean forcing opponents to end the game against their wishes. For example, a player may draw a Mystery card which permits that player to move an opponent's token back three spaces. This could mean moving the token on the centre circuit to the opponent's End of Game square when the opponent is holding his/her appropriate End of Game cards.

It is unlikely that any two games will be played out in the same way, as there are so many variables that can come into play and strategies that can be invoked. A game may be played out to the end, and may therefore take a long period to complete. Alternatively, a time limit may be set at the commencement of the game, at the end of which the player with the greater number of points is the winner.

By way of alternatives to what has been described herein, the following may be provided in other embodiments.

Instead of each player throwing the dice and determining which of his/her player tokens to move (ie. one on each circuit), there may be provided three differently coloured dice, which determine the movement of the respective player's tokens on each circuit in the same play phase. For example, in one embodiment, the player places the three dice in a “throwing cup,” shakes it, and tips the dice onto the playing surface. The score on each dice determines the number of spaces moved on the respective circuit.

With respect to alternate rules of play, if in a single throw, the player scores the same number of each dice, then the player may receive a 50 point bonus. If in a single throw, the sum of the scores on the three dice add to 7, the player may lose 10 points.

As another alternative, playing spaces that affect an opponent may be incorporated such that, if a player's brown Tokens 109 or 113 (located on the outer pathway) comes to rest on a square designated by, for example, the letter “B” whilst an opponent's green Token 108 or 112 is on a “Score” square, the opponent's score for that square may be disallowed.

With respect to alternative question play, a “Mega Question” may be employed such that, if a player draws a “Mega Question” card, all players have the opportunity to bid to answer the question. The bid is based on the number of points a player is prepared to lose as a result of an incorrect answer. This number of points may also determine the number of points gained for a correct answer. In contrast to specifically timing questions as noted above, the question does not have to be answered immediately (ie. within the same play phase). The maximum time provided to answer such questions may be approximately five minutes and is measured by the game's timing device (eg. an hour glass or electronic timer). The game may advantageously continue in the interim. It is envisaged that the “Mega Question” option may be applied to one or more of the existing game card categories, eg. “?”, “D”, “P”, or “Q” or added as another category in its own right.

In the context of an embodiment of the present game being adapted for mathematics, a “Mega Question” in a generalised form of the game could comprise a mathematics question, such as for example, the following:

Jack and Mary plan to attend a six o'clock session at the local cinema. Jack's watch is ten minutes fast, but he thinks that its five minutes slow. Mary's watch is ten minutes slow, but she thinks that its ten minutes fast. Both live ten minutes from the cinema. Jack likes to arrive just as the session is starting, but Mary likes to be five minutes early. What time does each person arrive at the cinema?

Alternate Mystery cards may be provided to enhance play. In one embodiment, amongst the Mystery Cards there may be several that refer to special cards. For example, in reference to an embodiment that is adapted to the Harry Potter™ series, “Magic Spell” cards can be provided amongst the Mystery Cards. No matter which player draws one of these particular Mystery Cards, ALL players are involved in the process. One of the players takes the top card from the Magic Spell deck and reads it aloud. The card will describe an unforeseen event in the game that can only be corrected by using a magic spell. Each player has three minutes to devise such a spell. At the end of this period each player will read his solution to the other players who will then award a score based on the marking criteria listed on the reverse of the Magic Spell card and the accompanying book of spells. An example of a Magic Spell Card and its scoring criteria follow:

“Magic Spell” Problem No. 1:

One of your “chasers” has the opportunity to score a vital goal in the match. However just as she prepares to shoot, her movements suddenly slow down so much that one of the opposition beaters is able to direct a “bludger” straight at her, whilst at the same time two opposition chasers move in to steal the “quaffle”. You scan the crowd and notice Severus Snape acting very suspiciously. You're sure that he has cast some sort of spell on your chaser. You must find a way of counteracting the situation. What is your solution?

If you make up your own spell (or combination of spells), you will score 10 points for each of its functions (as long as they are plausible of course). If you refer to spells mentioned in the Harry Potter stories, you will score 10 points for each one you correctly describe, and an additional 10 points for using its correct name.

You will be required to read your solution to the other players who will adjudicate on your score.

Scoring Criteria:

1. Immobilise Professor Snape using either a Petrificus Totalus spell or a Stupify spell

2. Cast a Finite Incantatem spell that counteracts the effects of Professor Snape's spell

3. Take over control of your chaser's body movements using the Mobilocorpus spell. This allows you to move your chaser out of the path of the bludger, avoid the opposition chasers, and score the goal.

4. Use the Wingardium Leviosa spell to either move your chaser out of harm's way, or deflect your opponent's bludger from its intended destination.

5. Take 5 points off if you suggest the Protego spell as you would not be in a suitable position to reflect Professor Snape's spell back on himself.

6. If you suggest the use of any one of the following three spells—the Imperius Curse, the Cruciatus Curse or the Avadra Kedavra Curse, take 10 points off for each one as the Ministry of Magic has declared them illegal.

Another example of an alternate Mystery Card in a special case may relate to a category like Super Challenge cards. Such Super Challenge cards may pose questions that serve a similar function to the Magic Spell card used for the Harry Potter™ example. One such Super Challenge question may be a task that has no specific or correct answer but which requires knowledge, skill and imagination in order for player/players to come up with a plausible response/solution as in the following example scenarios.

Super Challenge Question—Example 1

You are lost in dense bushland and as evening approaches the temperature falls to near freezing point. When you fail to return to camp by nightfall, a search party will be organised, but it may not set out until first light, and even then, the search area is likely to be large. It may be hours or even days before you are located. Your survival will depend on your common sense and wit, the suitability of the bush walking clothes you are wearing, and a few personal items such as your wristwatch, a compass, two muesli bars, a multi-function knife, and a water bottle containing about half a litre of water. What action do you take?

Take 5 points for each of the following factors you mention in your response.

1. The need to keep warm over night in the freezing conditions (eg. perhaps by digging a hole to protect you from the wind and covering yourself with suitable foliage to maintain body heat)

2. Avoiding straying too far from your current position

3. Determining some way of alerting aerial searchers to your position without putting yourself at risk

4. Rationing your meagre supply food and water, and seeing whether it can be supplemented from your surrounding environment.

Super Challenge Question—Example 2

You set up a lemonade stand in your street as a fundraiser for the local youth club. At the end of the first week your profits are less than anticipated. What might you do to improve your situation?

Take 5 points for each of the following factors you mention in your response.

1. Advertising within the neighbourhood

2. Sourcing cheaper raw materials to achieve an increased profit margin

3. Increasing the price of a glass of lemonade as long as this achieves an increased total profit

4. Operating only on days when the weather is appropriate (warm, sunny, etc.). This minimises waste.

5. Offering some incentives—everybody likes a bargain

Super Challenge Question—Example 3

You plan to walk from Town A to Town B. The direct route, a distance of 14km, will take you entirely through rugged bush country. However, there is a large square clearing with a side length of 7 km situated as in the diagram below. The square clearing has two diagonals, one of which starts at C and is perpendicular to the direct route from A to B, at a point 7 kms from both towns.

It is considered that time will be saved if you travel on a route similar to the one shown above passing through P and Q, where the section PQ is parallel to the direct route. Your average travel speed in the bushland is 1 km/hr and your average travel speed through the clearing is 5 km/hr. Let the perpendicular distance between AB and PQ be x. Find and describe the route for which your traveling time will be least.

Take 5 points for each of the following factors you mention in your response.

1. Finding an expression for the total time taken to travel from A to B as a function of x when you take any route of the type shown in the diagram.

2. Choose several values for x and calculate the total time taken to travel from A to B for each of these values of x.

3. Determining a relationship between time and distance and making comparisons using different values for speed.

4. Determining a relationship between time and speed and making comparisons using different values for distance.

5. Use of Pythagoras' Theorem.

6. Producing graphs to illustrate trial and error determinations.

7. Use of calculus and differentiation to determine minima.

In the above mathematical example, numerous other criteria may be utilised to test the skill and knowledge of players as would be recognised by the person skilled in the art.

While the present invention has been described with reference to a few specific embodiments, the description is illustrative of the invention and is not to be construed as limiting the invention. Various modifications may occur to those skilled in the art without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims. For example, a person skilled in the art will recognise that embodiments of the invention described herein may be implemented using one or more computers. Accordingly, as an alternative to game cards, dice, and pencil and paper scoring, an electric device or devices may be used to handles these functions. In that case, the method steps disclosed herein may be embodied as instructions that comprise a computer program. The program may be stored on computer-readable media, such as floppy disks, optical discs (eg compact discs), or fixed disks (such as hard drives and the like), and may be resident in memory, such as, for example random access memory (RAM), read-only memory (ROM), firmware, or flash RAM memory. The program as software may then be executed on a computer or microprocessor device to implement the method. The program or portions of its execution, may also be distributed over multiple computers or servers in a network having a topology corresponding to one or a combination of: a small area such as in a LAN (Local Area Network); a large campus or city area such as in a MAN (Metropolitan Area Network) or; a wide geographical area such as in a WAN (Wide Area Network).

It should be noted that where the terms “server”, “secure server” or similar terms are used herein, a communication device is described that may be used in a communication system, unless the context otherwise requires, and should not be construed to limit the present invention to any particular communication device type. Thus, a communication device may comprise, without limitation, a bridge, router, bridge-router (router), switch, node, or other communication device, which may or may not be secure.

It should also be noted that where a flowchart, set of rules or their equivalent is used herein to demonstrate various aspects of the invention, it should not be construed to limit the present invention to any particular logic flow or logic implementation. The described logic may be partitioned into different logic blocks (e.g., programs, modules, functions, or subroutines) without changing the overall results or otherwise departing from the true scope of the invention. Often, logic elements may be added, modified, omitted, performed in a different order, or implemented using different logic constructs (e.g., logic gates, looping primitives, conditional logic, and other logic constructs) without changing the overall results or otherwise departing from the true scope of the invention.

Various embodiments of the invention may be embodied in many different forms, comprising computer program logic for use with a processor (e.g., a microprocessor, microcontroller, digital signal processor, or general purpose computer), programmable logic for use with a programmable logic device (e.g., a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) or other PLO), discrete components, integrated circuitry (e.g., an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC)), or any other means comprising any combination thereof. In an exemplary embodiment of the present invention, predominantly all of the communication between users and the server is implemented as a set of computer program instructions that is converted into a computer executable form, stored as such in a computer readable medium, and executed by a microprocessor under the control of an operating system.

Computer program logic implementing all or part of the functionality where described herein may be embodied in various forms, comprising a source code form, a computer executable form, and various intermediate forms (e.g., forms generated by an assembler, compiler, linker, or locator). Source code may comprise a series of computer program instructions implemented in any of various programming languages (e.g., an object code, an assembly language, or a high-level language such as Fortran, C, C++, JAVA, or HTML) for use with various operating systems or operating environments. The source code may define and use various data structures and communication messages. The source code may be in a computer executable form (e.g., via an interpreter), or the source code may be converted (e.g., via a translator, assembler, or compiler) into a computer executable form.

The computer program may be fixed in any form (e.g., source code form, computer executable form, or an intermediate form) either permanently or transitorily in a tangible storage medium, such as a semiconductor memory device (e.g, a RAM, ROM, PROM, EEPROM, or Flash-Programmable RAM), a magnetic memory device (e.g., a diskette or fixed disk), an optical memory device (e.g., a CD-ROM or DVD-ROM), a PC card (e.g., PCMCIA card), or other memory device. The computer program may be fixed in any form in a signal that is transmittable to a computer using any of various communication technologies, including, but in no way limited to, analog technologies, digital technologies, optical technologies, wireless technologies (e.g., Bluetooth), networking technologies, and inter-networking technologies. The computer program may be distributed in any form as a removable storage medium with accompanying printed or electronic documentation (e.g., shrink wrapped software), preloaded with a computer system (e.g., on system ROM or fixed disk), or distributed from a server or electronic bulletin board over the communication system (e.g., the Internet or World Wide Web).

Hardware logic (comprising programmable logic for use with a programmable logic device) implementing all or part of the functionality where described herein may be designed using traditional manual methods, or may be designed, captured, simulated, or documented electronically using various tools, such as Computer Aided Design (CAD), a hardware description language (e.g., VHDL or AHDL), or a PLD programming language (e.g., PALASM, ABEL, or CUPL).

Programmable logic may be fixed either permanently or transitorily in a tangible storage medium, such as a semiconductor memory device (e.g., a RAM, ROM, PROM, EEPROM, or Flash-Programmable RAM), a magnetic memory device (e.g., a diskette or fixed disk), an optical memory device (e.g., a CD-ROM or DVD-ROM), or other memory device. The programmable logic may be fixed in a signal that is transmittable to a computer using any of various communication technologies, including, but in no way limited to, analog technologies, digital technologies, optical technologies, wireless technologies (e.g., Bluetooth), networking technologies, and internetworking technologies. The programmable logic may be distributed as a removable storage medium with accompanying printed or electronic documentation (e.g., shrink wrapped software), preloaded with a computer system (e.g., on system ROM or fixed disk), or distributed from a server or electronic bulletin board over the communication system (e.g., the Internet or World Wide Web).

With the above in mind, as an example, the present invention may be suitable for use with a computer network implementation of a board game, which may further be played individually by one player (red or blue) against a central micro-controller functioning as the other player (blue or red).

As a further example, one embodiment of the present invention may comprise the use of such computer implemented apparatus as described above to perform the board game functions and/or facilitate the function of displaying game information, for example, the score of players, the operation of cards in electronic form and progress of play in general.

With regard to such electronic implementation of the game in one embodiment the following should be noted with reference to FIGS. 6 and 7, which illustrate an electronic display of the relevant functions that players would be exposed to in the course of play for players distinguished by colour (eg red player, yellow player, orange player, blue player) and also by number (player 1, player 2, player 3, player 4), respectively.

An electronic device suitable for facilitating play of the game refers to a standalone hand held computational/storage device much like a television remote controller in appearance or, alternately, a computer software program that when downloaded into computer memory, simulates this device using the computer video display unit, computer memory, and the computer keyboard and mouse. In either event, the device comprises:

1) A suitably sized backlit LCD screen 114 as in FIGS. 6 and 7 to display information keyed into and read from the device during a game, as well as to allow access to option menus. Menu options may comprise saving and retrieving games, downloading data, etc.

2) A small in-built speaker for sound effects (not shown).

3) A numeric keypad 116 as in FIGS. 6 and 7 allowing players to key in scores and penalties as they occur. The keypad may comprise some preset function keys to speed up the process. Some example preset function may be double 117, halve 118, add multiples 119 and subtract multiples 121, etc. Many of these functions, if not all, would be recognised by the person skilled in the art.

4) Additional keys allowing access to other information stored in memory such as RAM, for example, by way of text query entry area 122. Example information may be, rules, saved games, action card details, etc. Input/output device functions like those of an electronic mouse may be utilised to invoke some or all of these functions, eg use of ‘right click’ when placing a cursor over the relevant portion of the display. Also there should be the capacity to bring “end of game cards”, for example, the “golden snitch” into and out of play.

5) An ON/OFF switch and a RESET button

6) Multiple memories (eg RAM) accessed from the keypad 116 to store player scores, details of saved games, action and question cards, rules, and recording whether end of game cards (eg the golden snitch) are in or out of play. Again, input/output device functions may be utilised to invoke this access.

7) An I/O port (eg. USB) through which rules, questions and mega questions, mystery cards, decision cards, penalty cards, and super challenge cards can be download from an external source (eg. computer disc or Internet).

8) A random generator 124 which would take the place of dice, as well as randomise the order of the action cards, etc. In FIGS. 6 and 7 the random generator may be invoked by clicking on the image 124 of the dice as shown.

9) An on-screen timing device 126 (clock) activated and operated by keypad buttons, and automatically invoked during some activities (eg. Mega Questions and Super Challenges). FIGS. 6 and 7 show such a timing device 126 in the large area display for each player at the top of the display.

10) Battery compartment, for example, in a hand held embodiment of the game device.

It will be appreciated by persons skilled in the art that numerous variations and/or modifications may be made to the invention as shown in the specific embodiments without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention as broadly described. The present embodiments as described herein are, therefore, to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive. This application is therefore intended to cover any variations uses or adaptations of the invention following in general, the principles of the invention and comprising such departures from the present disclosure as come within known or customary practice within the art to which the invention pertains and as may be applied to the essential features hereinbefore set forth.

As the present invention may be embodied in several forms without departing from the spirit of the essential characteristics of the invention, it should be understood that the above described embodiments are not to limit the present invention unless otherwise specified, but rather should be construed broadly within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims. Various modifications and equivalent arrangements are intended to be included within the spirit and scope of the invention as described hereinabove. Therefore, the specific embodiments are to be understood to be illustrative of the many ways in which the principles of the present invention may be practiced. In the description hereinabove and claims hereinbelow, means-plus-function clauses are intended to cover structures as performing the defined function and not only structural equivalents, but also equivalent structures. For example, although a nail and a screw may not be structural equivalents in that a nail employs a cylindrical surface to secure wooden parts together, whereas a screw employs a helical surface to secure wooden parts together, in the environment of fastening wooden parts, a nail and a screw are equivalent structures.

“Comprises/comprising” when used in this specification is taken to specify the presence of stated features, integers, steps or components but does not preclude the presence or addition of one or more other features, integers, steps, components or groups thereof. Thus, unless the context clearly requires otherwise, throughout the description and the claims, the words ‘comprise’, ‘comprising’, and the like are to be construed in an inclusive sense as opposed to an exclusive or exhaustive sense; that is to say, in the sense of “including, but not limited to”.

Annex 1—The Board Game Rules—Example 1

  • 1. The Board Game consists of three intersecting paths (or circuits):

Path 1 (the yellow path) on which Token 1 is located

Path 2 (the green path) on which Token 2 is located

Path 3 (the brown path) on which Token 3 is located

  • 2. The game requires a minimum of two players (the red player and the blue player). For example, it can be played by four small teams whose members share the decision-making and pool their knowledge to answer questions as they arise.
  • 3. The winning player (team) will be the one with the higher number of points at the end of the game.
  • 4. Players should keep an accurate running total of the points they score during the game. Deliberate misrepresentation of this score will result in the immediate loss of the game. A player may ask for (and be provided with) his/her opponent's total score at any time during the game.
  • 5. The game will end when Token 1 is in play and a player who is currently in possession of his/her End of Game card, is first to occupy the appropriate End of Game square on Path 1. Being first to achieve this outcome adds 150 points to the player's total score. The game may also end when a player draws an End of Game Mystery (?) card.
    Note: It is quite possible to end the game but still lose It. Therefore, the objective is to avoid ending the game until one has sufficient points to win it.
  • 6. All players (teams) will have 3 tokens (one for each path).
  • 7. Each token begins the game on one of the three specified starting positions.
  • 8. Both players will throw the dice (one dice or three dice) to see who gets the first move of the game (higher score starts). The dice may comprise traditional dice to be rolled on a surface whether or not a “throwing cup” is used or, an electronic version displayed on a screen.
  • 9. A player whose turn it is to throw the dice, may move any one (but only one) of his/her tokens the number of spaces corresponding to the score on the dice. For three dice, the player places the three dice in the “throwing cup,” shakes it, and tips the dice onto the playing surface. The score on each dice determines the number of spaces moved on the respective circuit. Note: A score on the dice cannot be apportioned between tokens.
  • 10. If there are two players (eg. The Red and the Blue), Red's tokens on the Brown and Blue paths must move in a clockwise direction around the board. Blue's tokens on the Brown and blue paths must move in an anticlockwise direction. If there are three players, two will move their tokens in a clockwise direction and one in an anticlockwise direction. Four players will mean that the tokens of two players will move in a clockwise direction, and two in an anticlockwise. And so on for more than four players. This increases the likelihood that the tokens of opposing players will occupy the same squares, a desirable element of a competitive game.
  • 11. Both red and blue tokens will move up and down the Yellow path, however the first move on this path from the starting position will be away from the player's End of Game square. (ie. UP for the red token, and DOWN for the blue token).
  • 12. A player must make the exact score in order to occupy either one of the two End of Game squares. A score in excess of the number required merely brings about a change in the direction of the token. In the case of three dice, the player must make the exact score on the respective dice corresponding to the Yellow path.
  • 13. Landing on the End of Game square does not conclude the game unless the player also holds the appropriate End of Game card. A player obtains the card by landing on their End of Game square. For example, a red player obtains the card by landing on either of the two Red Star squares. However, should the player subsequently land on an opposition player's End of Game square, the card is forfeited. For example, if a Red player lands on a Blue Star square, their card is forfeited. Similarly, the blue player must hold the Blue star card to be in a position to end the game. Landing on a Red Star square forfeits the card.
  • 14. Landing on either of the (pink) Extra Turn squares, gains an extra turn only if the player's Blue and Yellow tokens occupy the square together.
  • 15. Landing on any of the Penalty (P) squares already occupied by either the player's own token, or his/her opponent's token, requires that the player take a card from the top of the Penalty card pack.
  • 16. If the tokens of the two opposing players occupy the same square on any other occasion during the game, each of the players will role the dice, and the higher scorer will add 10 points to his/her total.
  • 17. Each time a player lands on a Score square, ten points is added to the player's total.
  • 18. Landing on a Question (Q) square requires that the player answer the question stated on the card. There is no penalty for an incorrect answer, however the player gains 10 points for a correct answer.
  • 19. Landing on a Mystery (?) square requires that the player take a card from the top of the Mystery card pack. The outcome will either be a reward or a penalty depending on the luck of the draw (eg. “Miss a Turn”, “Add 10 points to your total score”, etc.). If the implementation of a Mystery card results in an additional reward or penalty, then the player must accept that outcome.
  • 20. Landing on a Decision (D) square requires that the player take a card from the top of the Decision card pack. The card will offer two options. The player must choose one or the other of these options.
  • 21. The Question, Mystery, Decision and Penalty cards must be shuffled before the start of each game. After drawing a card, it must always be returned to the bottom of the pack.
  • 22. Each pack of cards contains a card requiring the pack to be shuffled. It should be the bottom card in each pack at the start of the game. If it comes to the top of the pack during the game, it should be removed, the pack shuffled, and then placed once more at the bottom.

Annex 2—The Board Game Rules—Example 2

The objective of this embodiment of the board game is to encapsulate the general elements of a fantasy game played within a fun-filled, challenge of chance and wit. It can be played by up to 4 players (or 4 teams of players). However, it is again noted that the present game does have a more general application making it adaptable to a wide range of “action/fantasy” scenarios, most particularly where you can identify a hero, the forces supporting the hero, and the hero's enemies. The game provides for interaction between these three elements.

There are four types of player.

  • “Player Type 1” whose responsibility it is to score goals by getting a large object through targets at the end of the playing field.
  • “Player Type 2” whose job it is to harass the opposition players by interfering at intersection points, as well as to protect their teammates from the opposition Type 2 players.
  • “Player Type 3” who by attaining the elusive End of Game element (eg ‘end of game’ card etc) scores, for example, 150 points and brings the game to an end.
  • “Player Type 4” whose task it is to defend the opposition goal much like a ‘keeper’.

The game's playing surface comprises three pathways, each representing one of the first three main types of player—the Type 1 players (blue path), the Type 2 players (brown path), and the Type 3 player (yellow path). The playing surface is based on that of FIG. 1.

The Type 2 player path intersects the other two pathways at which locations penalties apply whenever any opposition tokens occupy the same squares at the same time.

The Type 1 players score points, the Type 2 players provide interference, and the Type 3 player tries to end the game with the most points.

  • This board game comprises both luck and skill (the roll of the dice, the random selection of various types of control cards, and the chance to end the game at an appropriate moment).
  • It also requires knowledge of the predetermined subject matter, story/stories or characterizations that may be selected to be reflected in the game functions of the playing paths, an ability to solve problems requiring reasoning skills, and a preparedness to make risky outcome influencing decisions. It is unlikely that any two games will ever follow exactly the same pattern.

Winning

  • The primary objective is to score points—more points than the opposition, and then bring the game to an end.
  • Generally, the game can only end when the one of the player's Type 3 player token lands on one of only two end of game squares, AND the end of game element is IN play, AND that player holds the appropriate end of game card. These three conditions will, as a result of randomly selected control cards, be independently and regularly made active or inactive during the course of a game.

As shown in Image 2, below, the game uses three differently coloured dice, coordinated to the colours of each of the three pathways, to determine the movements of each of the player's three tokens on the three different pathways.

A player's token may land on a mystery square (?) which requires him/her to draw a mystery card prescribing some specific action OR

A decision square (D) which requires a choice between at least two courses of action OR

A question square (Q) which requires a response before being able to roll the dice again OR

A penalty square (P) which applies one of a number of different penalties (as one would expect if, for example, hit by a bludger in a Harry Potter™ version of the game) OR

A Type 2 Player Square (B)—Explanation Below

Scoring squares only occur on the Type 1 player circuit. However, if a player's Type 1 player token is on a Score square at the same time that an opponent's Type 2 player token occupies the Type 2 player square, that player's, score is forfeited (it's akin to being hit or interfered with at the moment before attempting to score). A score may also be thwarted by the Keeper (ie Type 4 player).

Examples of Games Card are shown in FIG. 2. Some of the preferred features of this game include:

The “Mega Question”

When a “Mega Question” arises the players bid for the question by indicating how many points they are prepared to lose if they answer incorrectly. This number equates to the points they will gain if they are correct. The answer time is approximately five minutes, during which the game continues. Mega questions call on reasoning ability rather than just knowledge.

The “Magic Spell” and “Contextual Conundrum” Tasks

The game stops for approximately three minutes whilst ALL players attempt to find a way to counteract a mischievous “Magic Spell” threatening some aspect of the game, or explain a quote or scene description. All players assess each response according to an accompanying set of scoring criteria.

The “Unpredictable Spell”

At any roll of the dice a player can select the “Unpredictable Spell” option.

Preferably, there is a one in five chance of scoring 50 points, but a four in five chance of losing 20 points. This merely introduces another random element for the desperate player. It's usually a last ditch effort to get back into the game.

Some of the Rules that Make the Game Interesting and Fun

The game is played with three dice each of which controls the movements of one of a player's three tokens. The order in which the three tokens are moved is determined by the players, requiring them to think strategically. If a token lands on an action square, the action is completed before any other moves in the same play phase. So that for example, the game might be won by the movement of the Type 3 player token, before either of the other two pieces are moved.

When a player's Type 1 player token lands on a “Score” square, the player must roll the three dice and add the results. If the score adds to 7, then this represents a save by the keeper and the score does not count. Preferably, the chance of a keeper save is 15 in 216 (about a 7% chance of success).

If a player's Type 2 player Token comes to rest on a square designated by the letter “B” whilst an opponent's Type 1 player Token is on a “Score” square, the opponent's score for that square shall be disallowed.

If in a single throw, the player scores the same number on each dice, he/she gets a 10 point bonus (less than 3% chance).

If in a single throw, the sum of the scores on the three dice add to 7, the player loses 10 points (about a 7% chance).

Landing on any of the Penalty (P) squares already occupied by either the player's own token, or his/her opponent's token, requires that the player take a card from the top of the Penalty card pack. If the tokens of opposing players occupy the same square on any other occasion during the game, each of the players will role the dice, and the highest scorer will add 10 points to his/her total.

The first move from the starting position at the commencement of the game (or when a player's tokens have been sent back to the start) will be in the direction (up or down) of the player's End of Game card. If there are only two players, all tokens will begin the game by moving in opposite directions.

Alternatively, the game could be played using an electronic scorer, eliminating the need for cards and dice, just a board and tokens. An example electronic score mechanism display in FIGS. 6 and 7.

The electronic device of FIGS. 6 and 7 obviates the need for pencil and paper scoring, the need to have cards (as these could be stored in the device), and the need for dice (as the device could include a random generator). It also allows players to save the game and resume at a later time. Most importantly however it achieves the desirable objective of social interaction gained when sitting around a game board, with a more efficient method of scoring. Whilst it is envisaged that the present invention can be embodied in a totally computerised version providing the potential for realistic animated graphics, it may also tend to be isolating and somewhat antisocial.

The scoring device could be a multi-function dedicated hand-held electronic calculator or a computer program held on a CD/DVD able to be loaded on a desktop or laptop computer (Windows™/Macintosh™) placed adjacent to the game board.

Playing the Board Game

In a two-player game the board is set up as shown below in FIG. 8. Each player has three tokens, one for each pathway. At the commencement of the game the tokens move in the directions shown by the arrows. The players roll the dice to see who will start the game.

Movement of the tokens is determined by the scores on three dice colour-matched to the pathways to which they relate. After rolling the dice, the first player determines the order in which he will move his three tokens.

In this example, the first player wins the right to begin the game, rolls the dice and achieves the following result—

Namely, “4”, “2” and “5” for the yellow, blue and brown dice, respectively. He may elect to move his Type 3 player token first, and since he lands on his End of Game card, turns it face up to indicate that it is now in play.

He then moves his Type 1 player token two spaces to a Score square. He throws the three dice again, and as long as they don't add to 7, he is able to keep the 10 points.

Finally, he moves his Type 2 player token five spaces and lands on a Decision (D) square. By moving it last, he ensures that the results of the previous two moves are not negated. Had he moved it first, the Decision Card may have adversely impacted on either or both of the other two tokens.

He picks up a Decision Card from the top of the deck. It states “Go ahead TWO spaces OR Throw the dice and go ahead that number of spaces.”

It will be advantageous to throw the dice again as in this situation there is a one in three chance of an additional score.

Examples of other Decision Cards Comprise:

He chooses to roll the dice again, scores a two and lands on a Mystery square (?).

Mystery Cards can Takes Two Forms:

1. A simple reward or penalty, such as in Image 9 and 10, below:

2. A “Magic Spell” or “Contextual Conundrum” activity

When a player draws a “Magic Spell” or “Contextual Conundrum” card (see example below), the game ceases and all players become involved.

Each player must prepare a response to the task in the THREE minutes allocated for the activity, and then read it aloud to the other players who will give it a score out of fifty. In some instances, criteria are provided to help with the marking.

Examples of Magic Spell/Contextual Conundrum cards are shown below in Image 12:

A response to a drawn Mystery card of completes the first player's turn.

Now it's the second player's turn . . .

She rolls the dice and gets

Namely, “2”, “3” and “3” for the yellow, blue and brown dice, respectively. She chooses to move the Type 3 player token first, then the Type 1 player token. It has landed on a Question (Q) square. This requires that she correctly answer a question for 10 points. There is NO penalty for a wrong answer.

Questions Take a Variety of Formats:

1. The “General Knowledge” question.

These range in difficulty based on the knowledge that may be required of the subject matter or story being characterized.

2. Puzzles

This may comprise deciphering an anagram.

3. Logic questions.

These may present a series of statements that have an underlying pattern or relationship to be determined by the player, ie Mr X is to Mrs Y as Master W is to . . . whom? OR

Which is the odd one out in this collection of spells and why?

a) Alohomora

b) Colloportus

c) Locomotor Mortis

d) Petrificus Totalus

e) Tarantellegra

Randomly spread through this range of questions is the “Mega Questions”

Although drawn by one player, all players may bid for the right to answer a Mega Question. A bid is the number of points for a correct answer, and conversely, the number of points deducted for a wrong answer.

The Mega Question is generally more difficult and so the successful bidder has five minutes to think of the answer. During this time the game continues.

The last of the three tokens to be moved during this play phase is the Type 2 player token. It comes to rest on a Penalty square, however as the square is otherwise unoccupied, no penalty applies.

The game will end when the End of game element is in play and a player who is currently in possession of his/her End of Game card, is first to occupy the appropriate ‘End of Game’ square on the “Type 3 player” pathway. Ending the game earns the player a 150 point bonus.

The winning player is the one with the most points.





 
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