Title:
Portable golf ball damage repair device
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A tool is provided for repairing or restoring the surface of a golf ball. A portable, hand-held, lightweight tool comprises one or more abrasive surfaces for repairing or lessening burs, gouges, scratches and other damage from the cover of a golf ball. The tool may be made from a pliable, deformable material, such as foam rubber, to conform to the curved surface of a golf ball. The tool may include a fastener so that the tool may be attached to a belt loop, golf bag, key chain, golf cart, or the like. In other exemplary embodiments, the tool may be an article of clothing or other golf equipment, such as a glove, towel, or golf club cover.



Inventors:
Hassfurther, Eric Jon (Dallas, TX, US)
Application Number:
12/221885
Publication Date:
02/11/2010
Filing Date:
08/07/2008
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
15/104.93, 15/105, 15/229.11, 451/523, 473/300
International Classes:
A63B57/00; A63B47/04
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MORGAN, EILEEN P
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Walder Intellectual, Property Law P. C. (17330 PRESTON ROAD, SUITE 100B, DALLAS, TX, 75252, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A portable tool for modifying a surface of a golf ball, the tool comprising: a three-dimensional core of material having at least one exterior surface; and at least one abrasive surface portion attached to the at least one exterior surface, wherein the at least one abrasive surface portion has a grade of granularity such that application of the at least one abrasive surface portion to an exterior surface of a golf ball modifies material of the exterior surface of the golf ball to lessen negative effects on dynamic properties caused by surface damage.

2. The portable tool of claim 1, wherein the at least one abrasive surface portion comprises: a first surface portion having a first grade of granularity such that the first surface portion is used to remove or lessen burs from a surface of the golf ball; a second surface portion having a second grade of granularity such that the second surface portion is used to smooth damage from the surface of the golf ball; a third surface portion having a third grade of granularity such that the third surface portion is used to buff the surface of the golf ball; and a fourth surface portion having a fourth grade of granularity such that the fourth surface portion is used to shine the surface of the golf ball.

3. The portable tool of claim 1, wherein the at least one abrasive surface portion is concave.

4. The portable tool of claim 3, wherein the at least one surface portion has a concavity that substantially matches a curvature of the exterior surface of the golf ball.

5. The portable tool of claim 1, wherein the three-dimensional core of material comprises a deformable material.

6. The portable tool of claim 5, wherein the deformable material is foam rubber.

7. The portable tool of claim 1, wherein the at least one abrasive surface portion comprises a plurality of abrasive surface portions that are labeled to indicate grade of granularity.

8. The portable tool of claim 1, further comprising: a fastener.

9. The portable tool of claim 1, further comprising: a towel attached to the three-dimensional deformable core of material.

10. A tool for modifying a surface of a golf ball, the tool comprising: a core of material having at least one exterior surface; at least one abrasive surface portion attached to the at least one exterior surface, wherein the at least one abrasive surface portion has a grade of granularity such that application of the at least one abrasive surface portion to the exterior surface of a golf ball modifies material of the exterior surface of the golf ball to lessen negative effects on dynamic properties of the golf ball caused by surface damage; and a backing, wherein the core of pliable material is affixed to the backing and wherein the backing slides into a mounting bracket.

11. The tool of claim 10, wherein the mounting bracket is affixed to a ball washer.

12. The tool of claim 10, wherein the mounting bracket is affixed to a golf cart.

13. The tool of claim 10, wherein the at least one abrasive surface portion comprises: a first surface portion having a first grade of granularity such that the first surface portion is used to remove or lessen burs from a surface of the golf ball; a second surface portion having a second grade of granularity such that the second surface portion is used to smooth damage from the surface of the golf ball; a third surface portion having a third grade of granularity such that the third surface portion is used to buff the surface of the golf ball; and a fourth surface portion having a fourth grade of granularity such that the fourth surface portion is used to shine the surface of the golf ball.

14. The tool of claim 10, wherein the at least one abrasive surface portion is concave.

15. The tool of claim 14, wherein the at least one surface portion has a concavity that substantially matches a curvature of the exterior surface of the golf ball.

16. The tool of claim 10, wherein the three-dimensional core of material comprises a deformable material.

17. The tool of claim 16, wherein the deformable material is foam rubber.

18. The tool of claim 10, wherein the at least one abrasive surface portion comprises a plurality of abrasive surface portions that are labeled to indicate grade of granularity.

19. A ball washer, comprising: an exterior housing; an interior ball washing mechanism; a mounting bracket; a core of material having at least one exterior surface; at least one abrasive surface portion attached to the at least one exterior surface, wherein the at least one abrasive surface portion has a grade of granularity such that application of the at least one abrasive surface portion to the exterior surface of a golf ball modifies material of the exterior surface of the golf ball to lessen negative effects on dynamic properties of the golf ball caused by surface damage; and a backing, wherein the core of material is affixed to the backing and wherein the backing slides into the mounting bracket.

20. The ball washer of claim 19, wherein the at least one abrasive surface portion comprises: a first surface portion having a first grade of granularity such that the first surface portion is used to remove or lessen burs from a surface of the golf ball; a second surface portion having a second grade of granularity such that the second surface portion is used to smooth damage from the surface of the golf ball; a third surface portion having a third grade of granularity such that the third surface portion is used to buff the surface of the golf ball; and a fourth surface portion having a fourth grade of granularity such that the fourth surface portion is used to shine the surface of the golf ball.

21. The ball washer of claim 19, wherein the at least one abrasive surface portion is concave.

22. The ball washer of claim 21, wherein the at least one surface portion has a concavity that substantially matches a curvature of the exterior surface of the golf ball.

23. The ball washer of claim 19, wherein the core of material comprises a deformable material.

24. The ball washer of claim 23, wherein the deformable material is foam rubber.

25. The ball washer of claim 19, wherein the at least one abrasive surface portion comprises a plurality of abrasive surface portions that are labeled to indicate grade of granularity.

26. A golf club grip, comprising: a tactile cover that fits over a handle portion of a golf club on a first end of the golf club grip; a golf ball repair tool on a second end of the golf club grip, wherein the golf ball repair tool comprises an abrasive surface portion, wherein the abrasive surface portion has a grade of granularity such that application of the at least one abrasive surface portion to an exterior surface of a golf ball modifies material of the exterior surface of the golf ball to lessen negative effects on dynamic properties of the golf ball caused by surface damage.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present application relates generally to a tool for repairing or restoring the surface of a golf ball and more specifically to a portable, hand-held, lightweight tool for repairing surface damage on the cover of a golf ball.

2. Background of the Invention

The game of golf is a very popular sport. Professional, amateur, and casual players alike enjoy the challenges that golf presents. Unlike other sports, golf is an individual sport where a player combines several skills on each hole to try to lower his score. For example, in a given hole of golf, a player may attempt a long drive, pitch his way out of a sand trap, strategically place the ball on the green, read the layout of the green, and execute a putt with the proper angle and force to place the ball into the cup and finish the hole below par.

The drive in particular demands a great amount of attention from players. The drive itself can make or break a hole. The player attempts to hit the ball with enough distance and accuracy to make each following shot easier, and to ultimately reduce the number of strokes it takes to complete the hole. Players often visit driving ranges to perfect all the components of their swings to increase distance and accuracy during the drive.

A great amount of research and development goes into improving golf clubs and golf balls to achieve better results, particularly with respect to the drive. The golf club that is used to drive the ball off the tee, the driver, is considered by many players to be the most important club in the bag, and players often covet the latest and greatest driver on the market. In addition, the golf ball itself has seen an evolution starting with the original featherie ball, which was a leather pouch that was filled with goose feathers, stitched shut, dried, oiled, and painted white. The gutta-percha ball was made from the gum of the Malaysian Sapodilla tree, which was heated and molded into a sphere. A common golf ball consists of a rubber core with wound rubber thread and an enamel cover, although golf ball manufacturers are always attempting to improve the design.

The cover of the current golf ball has rows of dimples, which affect certain aerodynamic forces. When in flight, a sphere experiences two types of drag. The first type is the obvious drag due to friction, which only accounts for a small part of the drag experienced by a golf ball in flight. The majority of the drag comes from the separation of the flow behind the ball. This drag is known as pressure drag due to separation. The dimples achieve a fairly constant drag, even when the speed of the golf ball increases. Dimples also cause a pressure differential between the top and bottom of a back-spinning ball, which causes lift.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In one illustrative embodiment, a portable tool for modifying a surface of a golf ball comprises a three-dimensional core of material having at least one exterior surface and at least one abrasive surface portion attached to the at least one exterior surface. The at least one abrasive surface portion has a grade of granularity such that application of the at least one abrasive surface portion to an exterior surface of a golf ball modifies material of the exterior surface of the golf ball to lessen negative effects on dynamic properties caused by surface damage.

In another illustrative embodiment, a tool for modifying a surface of a golf ball comprises a core of material having at least one exterior surface and at least one abrasive surface portion attached to the at least one exterior surface. The at least one abrasive surface portion has a grade of granularity such that application of the at least one abrasive surface portion to the exterior surface of a golf ball modifies material of the exterior surface of the golf ball to lessen negative effects on dynamic properties of the golf ball caused by surface damage. The tool further comprises a backing. The core of pliable material is affixed to the backing, and the backing slides into a mounting bracket.

In another illustrative embodiment, a ball washer comprises an exterior housing, an interior ball washing mechanism, a mounting bracket, a core of material having at least one exterior surface, and at least one abrasive surface portion attached to the at least one exterior surface. The at least one abrasive surface portion has a grade of granularity such that application of the at least one abrasive surface portion to the exterior surface of a golf ball modifies material of the exterior surface of the golf ball to lessen negative effects on dynamic properties of the golf ball caused by surface damage. The ball washer further comprises a backing. The core of material is affixed to the backing, and the backing slides into the mounting bracket.

In yet another illustrative embodiment, a golf club grip comprises a tactile cover that fits over a handle portion of a golf club on a first end of the golf club grip and a golf ball repair tool on a second end of the golf club grip. The golf ball repair tool comprises an abrasive surface portion. The abrasive surface portion has a grade of granularity such that application of the at least one abrasive surface portion to an exterior surface of a golf ball modifies material of the exterior surface of the golf ball to lessen negative effects on dynamic properties of the golf ball caused by surface damage.

These and other features and advantages of the present invention will be described in, or will become apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art in view of, the following detailed description of the exemplary embodiments of the present invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention, as well as a preferred mode of use and further objectives and advantages thereof, will best be understood by reference to the following detailed description of illustrative embodiments when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a three-dimensional cross-sectional view illustrating the composition of a golf ball with which aspects of the illustrative embodiments may be implemented;

FIG. 2 illustrates a damaged surface of a golf ball with which aspects of the illustrative embodiments may be implemented;

FIG. 3 depicts a portable hand-held tool for repairing the surface of a ball in accordance with an illustrative embodiment;

FIGS. 4A and 4B show views of a portable hand-held golf ball surface repair tool with concave surfaces in accordance with an illustrative embodiment;

FIGS. 5A and 5B depict embodiments comprising a hand towel comprising a tool for repairing the surface of a ball in accordance with an illustrative embodiment;

FIG. 6 depicts a golf club cover comprising a tool for repairing the surface of a ball in accordance with an illustrative embodiment;

FIG. 7 depicts a ball washer having a tool for repairing the surface of a ball in accordance with an illustrative embodiment;

FIGS. 8A and 8B show views of a golf ball surface repair tool with concave surfaces in accordance with an illustrative embodiment;

FIG. 9 depicts a golf cart in which the illustrative embodiments may be implemented; and

FIGS. 10A and 10B illustrate a golf club grip with a golf ball repair tool in accordance with an illustrative embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The illustrative embodiments provide a tool for repairing or restoring the surface of the material of a damaged golf ball. A portable, hand-held, lightweight tool comprises one or more abrasive surfaces for repairing surface damage on the cover of a golf ball. The cover of a golf ball is the hard coating on the outside of a golf ball. As used herein, the term “surface” refers to the outside surface of the material of the cover of the golf ball. The tool is configured to repair, remove, or lessen material damage to the surface of the golf ball by application of one or more of the abrasive surfaces. As used herein, the term “application” refers to manipulation of an abrasive surface while in contact with the surface of a damaged golf ball or manipulation of the golf ball while in contact with an abrasive surface. The tool may be made from a pliable material, such as foam rubber, to conform to the curved surface of a golf ball. The tool may include a fastener so that the tool may be attached to a belt loop, golf bag, key chain, golf cart, or the like. In other exemplary embodiments, the tool may be an article of clothing or other golf equipment, such as a glove, towel, golf club cover, golf ball washer, or the like.

The illustrative embodiments may be utilized with many different types of sports balls or other projectile objects. In order to provide a context for the description of the specific elements and functionality of the illustrative embodiments, FIGS. 1 and 2 are provided hereafter as exemplary golf balls with which exemplary aspects of the illustrative embodiments may be implemented. While the description following FIGS. 1 and 2 will focus primarily on a particular golf ball implementation, this is only exemplary and is not intended to state or imply any limitation with regard to the features of the present invention. To the contrary, the illustrative embodiments are intended to be applicable to any projectile the flight of which may be affected by imperfections in the surface of the projectile.

FIG. 1 is a three-dimensional cross-sectional view illustrating the composition of a golf ball with which aspects of the illustrative embodiments may be implemented. Golf ball 100 comprises a rubber core 102, which is surrounded by rubber winding 104. The outer surface of golf ball 100 is made up of a urethane cover 106. In the depicted example, urethane cover 106 has a smooth, dimpled surface. The surface of urethane cover 106 affects certain aerodynamic forces on golf ball 100. While golf ball 100 is shown with a rubber winding 104, many golf ball designs may differ. For example, many golf balls available today do not use a rubber winding.

FIG. 2 illustrates a damaged surface of a golf ball with which aspects of the illustrative embodiments may be implemented. Golf ball 200 has a smooth urethane cover surface. The surface of golf ball 200 comprises dimples, such as dimples 202. In the depicted example, golf ball 200 has a damaged portion 204, which may be a bur, gouge, or scratch, for example.

During play, a golf ball may come into contact with several objects or surfaces. For instance, a game of golf is typically initiated by striking (driving) the ball from a wooden or plastic tee. The ball may bounce and come to rest on a fairway, the rough (areas of long grass), a sand trap (areas of sand that are usually around the green), the green (areas of short grass around the cup), and the cup. The ball also comes into contact with the clubs themselves. In addition, the ball may strike other objects, such as trees, golf carts, cement or gravel cart paths, and so forth.

As a result of the abuse a typical golf ball endures, the surface of the ball may suffer surface damage, such as burs, gouges, scratches, etc. The term “surface damage,” as used herein, refers to any such damage to the material surface of the ball that may affect the aerodynamics and rolling dynamics of the ball, including, but not limited to, gouges and scratches. Because the cover surface of the golf ball is specifically designed for long, accurate flight, maintaining the integrity of the surface of the golf ball is very important. Many pro shops and driving ranges collect damaged balls and send them to be resurfaced using complicated and expensive machinery. However, during the course of the game, the only solution for damage to the surface of the ball is to replace it with a new one.

In accordance with an illustrative embodiment, a tool is provided for substantially repairing or restoring the surface of a golf ball. That is, the tool modifies the material surface of the ball to reduce the effects of surface damage and to lessen the negative effects on aerodynamics, rolling dynamics, or other dynamic properties caused by surface damage. In one exemplary embodiment, the tool is portable, hand-held, and lightweight so that it may be carried on the golf course to allow the player to modify the surface of the ball on the fly rather than relying on an expensive, cumbersome machine. The tool may comprise one or more abrasive surfaces for reducing the effects of surface damage on the material of the cover of a golf ball.

FIG. 3 depicts a portable hand-held tool for repairing the surface of a ball in accordance with an illustrative embodiment. Tool 300 has a rectangular block shape with six sides. At least one of the sides has one or more abrasive surfaces. For instance, in the example depicted in FIG. 3, the top surface of tool 300 has three abrasive surfaces 302, 304, and 306. Surface 302 may have a coarse grade of granularity, or grit; surface 304 may have a medium grade of granularity; and, surface 306 may have a fine grade of granularity. Thus, for example, surface 302 may have a coarseness of 80-200 grit to repair, remove, or lessen large burs, surface 304 may have a coarseness of 200-800 grit to smooth scratches, and surface 306 may have a coarseness of 800-1600 grit to polish the surface of the golf ball. Tool 300 may have additional surfaces, such as surfaces 308, 310. In one exemplary embodiment, the granularity of the surfaces 302-310 may be color coded, numbered, or labeled.

In another exemplary embodiment, tool 300 may have a fastener 312. Using fastener 312, a player may attach tool 300 to a belt loop, a golf bag, a golf cart, or the like. Alternatively, tool 300 may be small and portable enough to keep in the player's pocket or on a keychain.

Tool 300 may be made of a pliable core material, such as foam rubber. Surfaces 302-310 may be paper or fabric surfaces that are applied to the outside surface of the core of tool 300 with adhesive, for example. In an alternative embodiment, an abrasive may be applied to the outside surface of the core of the tool 300 using a spray or the like. Thus, when the player rubs the golf ball into a surface, such as surface 302, for example, the shape of tool 300 conforms to the curvature of the ball, allowing more surface-to-surface contact. Rubbing the golf ball against an abrasive surface of tool 300 effectively modifies the surface of the golf ball at the initial point of contact as well as surrounding areas to repair, remove, or lessen the damaged portion with little effort. With the surface of the golf ball thus modified or repaired—that is, with the negative effects on dynamic properties of the ball effectively limited—the player may continue use of the ball without any significant effect on the flight of the ball.

While tool 300 is depicted as a rectangular block, tool 300 may take a variety of different forms depending upon the implementation. For example, tool 300 may be a cube, pyramid, cylinder, tetrahedron, or the like.

FIGS. 4A and 4B show views of a portable hand-held golf ball surface repair tool with concave surfaces in accordance with an illustrative embodiment. More particularly, FIG. 4A is a three-dimensional view of a portable hand-held tool for modifying the surface of a golf ball in accordance with an illustrative embodiment. Tool 400 has a square block shape with six sides. In the example depicted in FIG. 4A, each side of tool 400 has a concave abrasive surface. For example, surface 402 may have a coarse grade of granularity (e.g., 80-200 grit); surface 404 may have a medium grade of granularity (e.g., 200-800 grit); and, surface 406 may have a fine grade of granularity (e.g., 800-1600 grit). Thus, for example, surface 402 may be used to repair, remove, or lessen large burs, surface 404 may be used to smooth scratches, and surface 406 may be used to polish the surface of the golf ball.

FIG. 4B is a side cross-sectional view of the portable hand-held tool for repairing the surface of a golf ball in accordance with the illustrative embodiment. Tool 400 has concave surfaces 402 and 406 in this view. Surfaces 402 and 406 substantially match the curvature of golf ball 410. Thus, when golf ball 410 comes into contact with surface 402, for example, the surface-to-surface contact is increased. Tool 400 may also be made of a pliable, deformable material, such as foam rubber, with flexible abrasive surfaces, such as paper or fabric, being affixed to the outer surface of tool 400, to increase surface-to-surface contact.

In other embodiments, the portable tool may also take the form of an article, such as clothing or other items used on the golf course. For example, the tool may be incorporated into a glove, shirt, pants, hat, visor, or the like. The tool may also be incorporated into a golf bag, golf cart, golf club, etc.

FIGS. 5A and 5B depict example hand towels comprising a tool for repairing the surface of a ball in accordance with an illustrative embodiment. As shown in FIG. 5A, hand towel 500 has two abrasive surfaces 502 and 504 in the depicted example. However, depending upon the implementation, hand towel 500 may have more or fewer abrasive surfaces without departing from the spirit and scope of the illustrative embodiments. Surface 502 may have a coarse grade of granularity, and surface 504 may have a fine grade of granularity. Thus, for example, surface 502 may be used to repair, remove, or lessen large burs, and surface 504 may be used to polish the surface of the golf ball. In one exemplary embodiment, the granularity of the surfaces 502 and 504 may be color coded, numbered, or labeled.

In an alternative embodiment shown in FIG. 5B, hand towel 510 comprises a tool portion 512 and a towel portion 514. Tool portion 512 may have a square block shape. In the example depicted in FIG. 5B, one side of tool portion 512 has three concave abrasive surfaces. For example, surface 522 may have a coarse grade of granularity (e.g., 80-180 grit); surface 524 may have a medium grade of granularity (e.g., 180-320 grit); and, surface 526 may have a fine grade of granularity (e.g., 320-800 grit). Thus, for example, surface 522 may be used to repair, remove, or lessen large burs, surface 524 may be used to smooth a scratch, and surface 526 may be used to smooth the surface of the golf ball. The player may first wipe the golf ball with towel portion 514, and then rub the surface of the ball against the abrasive surfaces 522-526 of tool portion 512, in order from coarse to medium to fine to very fine, for example.

FIG. 6 depicts a golf club cover comprising a tool for repairing the surface of a ball in accordance with an illustrative embodiment. Golf club cover 600 includes a zipper 604, which opens to allow cover 600 to be slipped over golf club 602. Golf club cover 600 has three abrasive surfaces 612, 614, and 616. Surface 612 may have a coarse grade of granularity (e.g., 80-200 grit); surface 614 may have a medium grade of granularity (e.g., 200-800 grit); and, surface 616 may have a fine grade of granularity (e.g., 800-1600 grit). Thus, for example, surface 612 may be used to repair, remove, or lessen large burs, surface 614 may be used to smooth a scratch, and surface 616 may be used to polish the surface of the golf ball. In one exemplary embodiment, the granularity of the surfaces 612-616 may be color coded, numbered, or labeled.

FIG. 7 depicts a ball washer having a tool for repairing the surface of a ball in accordance with an illustrative embodiment. Ball washer 700 may be stationed at various locations on a golf course, such as at each tee. Ball washer 700 typically has a cleaning fluid and a mechanism for washing the ball inside. A player may open ball washer 700, place the ball in the opening, and clean dirt and debris from the outside of the ball. Thus, a player may use ball washer 700 to improve the appearance of the outside surface of a golf ball. Ball washer 700 may also have a towel attached to allow the player to dry the outside surface of the ball.

In accordance with an illustrative embodiment, ball washer 700 has golf ball repair tool 702 mounted thereon or incorporated within. Golf ball repair tool 702 may have a plurality of abrasive surfaces, such as surface 704, thereon to modify the surface of the golf ball to limit the negative effects on aerodynamics, rolling dynamics, or other dynamic properties caused by surface damage. Each abrasive surface, such as surface 704, may be concave to match the curvature of a golf ball.

Tool 702 may be made of a pliable, deformable material, such as foam rubber. Surface 704, for example, may be a paper or fabric surface that is applied to the outside surface of tool 702 with adhesive, for example. Thus, when the player rubs the golf ball into surface 704, for example, the shape of tool 702 conforms to the curvature of the ball, allowing more surface-to-surface contact.

FIGS. 8A and 8B show views of a golf ball surface repair tool with concave surfaces in accordance with an illustrative embodiment. More particularly, FIG. 8A is a three-dimensional view of a tool for modifying the surface of a golf ball, such as tool 702 in FIG. 7, in accordance with an illustrative embodiment. Tool 810 has a square block shape. In the example depicted in FIG. 8A, one side of tool 810 has four concave abrasive surfaces. For example, surface 812 may have a coarse grade of granularity (e.g., 80-180 grit); surface 814 may have a medium grade of granularity (e.g., 180-320 grit); surface 816 may have a fine grade of granularity (e.g., 320-800 grit); and, surface 818 may have a very fine grade of granularity (e.g., 800-1600 grit). Thus, for example, surface 812 may be used to repair, remove, or lessen large burs, surface 814 may be used to smooth a scratch, surface 816 may be used to smooth the surface of the golf ball, and surface 818 may be used to polish the surface of the golf ball to a shine. The player may first wash the golf ball in a golf ball washer, such as washer 700 in FIG. 7, and then rub the surface of the ball against the abrasive surfaces 812-818 of tool 810, in order from coarse to medium to fine to very fine, for example.

Tool 810 is affixed to a backing 822, which may be secured within a mounting bracket 824. FIG. 8A shows only a portion of mounting bracket 824. Backing 822 may slide into mounting bracket 824 and be secured by screw 826. Thus, when the abrasive surfaces wear out or the material of tool 810 begins to deteriorate from weather effects, for instance, the tool may be replaced by sliding tool 810 out and sliding a new tool 810 into bracket 824.

FIG. 8B is a side cross-sectional view of the tool for repairing the surface of a golf ball in accordance with the illustrative embodiment. Tool 810 has concave surfaces 812-818 in this view. Tool 810 is affixed to backing 822, which slides into mounting bracket 824. Surfaces 812-818 may substantially match the curvature of a golf ball (not shown). Thus, when a golf ball comes into contact with surface 812, for example, the surface-to-surface contact is increased. Tool 810 may also be made of a pliable material, such as foam rubber, with flexible abrasive surfaces, such as paper or fabric, being affixed to the outer surface of tool 810, to increase surface-to-surface contact.

The golf ball repair tool may be mounted to other objects, such as a golf bag or golf cart, for example. FIG. 9 depicts a golf cart in which the illustrative embodiments may be implemented. Golf cart 900 includes console 902 to which a golf ball repair tool, such as tool 810 in FIGS. 8A and 8B, may be mounted. Console 902 may be a dashboard of golf cart 900, for example. Thus, whenever a player notices that the golf ball has suffered surface damage that may affect the dynamic properties of the ball, the player may bring the ball to golf cart 900 and modify the material surface of the ball to lessen the negative effects on aerodynamics of the golf ball.

FIGS. 10A and 10B illustrate a golf club grip with a golf ball repair tool in accordance with an illustrative embodiment. With reference to FIG. 10A, golf club grip 1000 is placed over the handle end of a golf club. Golf club grip 1000 has a leather or rubber surface that helps to improve the player's grip on the club. In accordance with an illustrative embodiment, golf club grip 1000 includes golf ball repair tool 1002 on the end of grip 1000. Golf ball repair tool 1002 has concave surface 1004, which is made of an abrasive material.

FIG. 10B shows a cross sectional view of the tool for repairing the surface of a golf ball in accordance with the illustrative embodiment. Golf club tool 1002 has concave surface 1004, which is either made of an abrasive material or has an abrasive material attached thereto. Thus, whenever a player notices that the golf ball has suffered material surface damage that may affect the aerodynamics, rolling dynamics, or other dynamic properties of the ball, the player may rub the ball against surface 1004 modify the surface of the ball to lessen the negative effects on dynamic properties of the golf ball. Within a set of golf clubs, different clubs may have various golf club grips 1000 with different repair tools 1002, each with a concave, abrasive surface 1004 of a different granularity.

Thus, the illustrative embodiments provide a tool for modifying the material of the surface of a golf ball to limit the negative effects on aerodynamics, rolling dynamics, and other dynamic properties caused by material surface damage. A portable, hand-held, lightweight tool comprises one or more abrasive surfaces for removing or lessening material damage from the cover of a golf ball. The tool may be made from a pliable, deformable material, such as foam rubber, to conform to the curved surface of a golf ball. The tool may include a fastener so that the tool may be attached to a belt loop, golf bag, key chain, golf cart, or the like. In other exemplary embodiments, the tool may be an article of clothing or other golf equipment, such as a glove, towel, hat, visor, or golf club cover.

The description of the present invention has been presented for purposes of illustration and description, and is not intended to be exhaustive or limited to the invention in the form disclosed. Many modifications and variations will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art. The embodiment was chosen and described in order to best explain the principles of the invention, the practical application, and to enable others of ordinary skill in the art to understand the invention for various embodiments with various modifications as are suited to the particular use contemplated.





 
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