Title:
FOLDABLE DUAL SHELF PRESENTATION SYSTEM
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A dual column presentation display system with optional integrated shelving, storage, headers, panels, table base and top, for use in displaying products, samples, premiums or the like made optimally from a single piece of paperboard which when folded and assembled forms a hinged dual column stand alone display system with multiple shelving trays in each column and wherein a separate center display header is nested between and attached to the dual columns.



Inventors:
Virvo, Alexander (Stamford, CT, US)
Application Number:
12/526528
Publication Date:
02/04/2010
Filing Date:
02/15/2008
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47F1/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
NOVOSAD, JENNIFER ELEANORE
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HOFFMAN WARNICK LLC (75 STATE STREET, 14TH FLOOR, ALBANY, NY, 12207, US)
Claims:
Wherefore I claim:

1. A dual column presentation display system for use in retail, sales, and promotional settings to display and offer for consumption products, premiums, samples, and advertising information comprising: a single sheet of paperboard approximately rectangular in shape having a plurality of scores, fold lines, die cuts, glue tabs, folding tabs, and slots; a parallel structure having a series of parallel panels spanning said sheet separated by similarly parallel panel fold lines; a first and second glue tab, each on an opposing first and second edge of said sheet, said edges aligned with said parallel structure; a glue joint strip aligned with said parallel structure and located approximately in a middle of said sheet; and a central hinge joint aligned with said parallel structure, co-located with said glue joint strip, and extending from a third edge of said sheet to an opposing fourth edge of said sheet, said third and forth edges essentially parallel to each other, and perpendicular to said parallel structure.

2. The dual column presentation display system of claim 1, further comprising a series of at least four panels located between said first glue tab edge and said hinge joint, ascending in number with a first panel adjacent to said first glue tab, a second panel adjacent to said first panel, a third panel adjacent to said second panel, and a fourth panel adjacent to said third panel and also adjacent to said hinge joint; said third panel contains a first integral rectangular shelf tray bounded by a first tray fold line and a first tray U-shaped score line, said first fold line and first U-shaped score line together forming said first rectangular shape; said first tray fold line essentially perpendicular to said panel fold lines; and a middle portion of said first U-shape score line having a first shelf locking tab appended to said first tray by a first locking tab fold line, and each one of a first tray side edge of said first U-shaped score line having a first folding side tab appended by a first side tab fold line.

3. The dual column presentation display system of claim 2, further comprising a first shelf tray locking slot cut into said first panel at a height equal to said first tray fold line; and said first shelf tray locking slot is parallel to said first shelf tray fold line.

4. The dual column presentation display system of claim 2, further comprising said third panel contains a second integral rectangular shelf tray bounded by a second tray fold line and a second U-shaped score line, said second fold line and second U-shaped score line together forming said second rectangular shape; and said second tray fold line essentially perpendicular to said panel fold lines; and a middle portion of said second U-shape score line having a second shelf locking tab appended to said second tray by a second locking tab fold line, and each one of a side edge of said second U-shaped score line having a second folding side tab appended by a second side tab fold line.

5. The dual column presentation display system of claim 4, further comprising a second shelf tray locking slot cut into said first panel at a height equal to said second tray fold line; and said second shelf tray locking slot is parallel to said second shelf tray fold line.

6. The dual column presentation display system of claim 2, further comprising a first bottom flap and first closing tab extending from said fourth edge of said first panel; a third bottom flap and third closing tab extending from said fourth edge of said third panel; a second inner flap extending from said fourth edge of said second panel; said second inner flap having a centrally located second slot for receiving said first and said third closing tabs; a fourth inner flap extending from said fourth edge of said fourth panel; said fourth inner flap having a centrally located fourth slot for receiving said first and said third closing tabs; and said centrally located second and fourth slots dimensioned so as to frictionally accommodate both said first and second closing tabs at the same time.

7. The dual column presentation display system of claim 2, further comprising a further series of at least four additional panels located between said second glue tab edge and said hinge joint, ascending in number with a fifth panel adjacent to said second glue tab, a sixth panel adjacent to said fifth panel, a seventh panel adjacent to said sixth panel, and an eighth panel adjacent to said seventh panel and also adjacent to said hinge joint; said seventh panel contains a third integral rectangular shelf tray bounded by a third tray fold line and a third tray U-shaped score line, said third fold line and third U-shaped score line together forming said third rectangular shape; said third tray fold line essentially perpendicular to said panel fold lines; and a middle portion of said third U-shape score line having a third shelf locking tab appended to said third tray by a third locking tab fold line, and each one of a third tray side edge of said third U-shaped score line having a third folding side tab appended by a third side tab fold line.

8. The dual column presentation display system of claim 7, further comprising a third shelf tray locking slot cut into said fifth panel at a height equal to said third tray fold line; and said third shelf tray locking slot is parallel to said third shelf tray fold line.

9. The dual column presentation display system of claim 7, further comprising said seventh panel contains a fourth integral rectangular shelf tray bounded by a fourth tray fold line and a fourth tray U-shaped score line, said fourth fold line and fourth U-shaped score line together forming said fourth rectangular shape; said fourth tray fold line essentially perpendicular to said panel fold lines; and a middle portion of said fourth U-shape score line having a fourth shelf locking tab appended to said fourth tray by a fourth locking tab fold line, and each one of a fourth tray side edge of said fourth U-shaped score line having a fourth folding side tab appended by a fourth side tab fold line.

10. The dual column presentation display system of claim 9, further comprising a fourth shelf tray locking slot cut into said fifth panel at a height equal to said fourth tray fold line; and said fourth shelf tray locking slot is parallel to said fourth shelf tray fold line.

11. A dual column presentation display system for use in retail, sales, and promotional settings to display and offer for consumption products, premiums, samples, and advertising information comprising: a plurality of hollow columns fabricated from a flexible material such as paperboard or plastic; each of said columns having a longitudinal axis and each said column joined to a common hinge joint, said joint being parallel to said longitudinal axes and further being external to each said column; and each said column able to rotate about said joint to the extent allowed by other said columns.

12. The dual column presentation display system of claim 11, further comprising said columns are vertically oriented in their intended display space; and at least one of said columns has a first horizontal tray for displaying said products.

13. The dual column presentation display system of claim 12, further comprising a panel of similar length as said columns and having a pair of upper extension arms and a pair of lower extension arms; each of said arms having a flap and locking tab; a pair of said columns each having an upper slot and a lower slot, each of said upper slots adapted to receive one of said upper extension flaps and locking tabs; each of said lower slots adapted to receive one of said lower extension flaps and locking tabs; said panel removably mounted between said pair of columns by means of said combination of flaps, tabs and slots whereby said front panel is fixably displayed between said pair of columns.

14. The dual column presentation display system of claim 13, further comprising an upper panel of shorter length than said columns and having a pair of upper extension arms and a lower extension tab; each of said arms having a flap and locking tab; a pair of said columns each having an upper slot for receiving said flaps and tabs; a base skirt having attachment means for attaching to a lower portion of said pair of columns, said skirt projecting out laterally from said columns and providing support for a table top; said top having a surface slot for receiving said panel lower extension tab; wherein said upper panel fixedly locates said column pair spatially and said table top provides a surface for product demonstrations.

15. The dual column presentation display system of claim 13, further comprising at least one slot in said panel for receiving, holding and displaying of flat printed material such as brochures or magazines.

16. The dual column presentation display system of claim 12, further comprising each display consists of a modular series of pairs of columns, each said column having a rectangular cross-section, and each said pair hingedly aligned so that said product trays are facing in the same lateral direction, said pairs cooperatively arranged in a scalable manner to occupy a display space.

17. The dual column presentation display system of claim 12, further comprising said first horizontal tray having a front panel handedly mounted on a front edge of said first horizontal tray and said front panel angled forward into a display space for dispensing products and samples.

18. A dual column presentation display system for use in retail, sales, and promotional settings to display and offer for consumption products, premiums, samples, and advertising information comprising a pair of rectangular columns hingedly attached, each column open on one surface only; each having a pair of horizontal trays located vertically from each other; said columns rotated into a desired position and further fixed by a display panel rigidly mounted between the pair of columns.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of a provisional patent application, titled “Foldable Dual Shelf Presentation System”, Application No.: 60/901,481, and filed in the United States Patent and Trademark Office on Feb. 15, 2007.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not applicable

REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING, A TABLE, OR A COMPUTER PROGRAM LISTING COMPACT DISC APPENDIX

Not applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to the need for a simple foldable, easily customizable, single unit temporary shelf display structure for use at in-store sampling, demonstrations and at various event venues, in addition to a structure that has features that makes it an ideal display to present products at retail. What is needed is a simple to set up, single unit presentation system that has all the necessary functionality built-in. The system needs to be a standard structure where the addition of separate attachments will create additional benefits for the demonstrator, presenter or marketer. Further, it is important that this presentation system has a more appealing look and feel than a traditional shelf displays and/or shelf and demo table combinations. In the field of sampling and in-store demonstrations and the structures one typically finds are not very exciting to look at. A typical demo unit is front facing and includes a folding table with table skirt, and maybe an easel back sign. And if a traditional shelf display is not used, the product may simply be dispensed from its original shipping carton, or placed on the table top for view.

There are a multitude of existing options for temporary displays that hold products, foods, beverages, books, magazines, novelties and many other items for in-store presentations and or sampling. The competition for customer's attention is fierce and there is more and more pressure on marketers to produce more attractive, more efficient and more effective displays. Marketers are challenged with the need to create displays that are easy to set up, meet stringent size constraints set by retailers, are efficient to produce, and most importantly are effective at accomplishing the task.

Some companies can afford to continuously create one-of-a-kind display constructions that achieve a marketers creative display objectives, however, our highly competitive environment presents a growing need for a standardized, flexible display structure that achieves the marketer's objectives of being attractive, having plenty of “selling” space on a display, without having to think up a complete new structure each time a display needs to be designed. Such a display solution would need to be simple to set up and easily customizable.

2. Description of the Prior Art

The traditional standard presentation system has a shelf display with folding table base. The most basic display is made with a single tray that is designed to hold the product, and the header is attached on top of the display. The table is a separate structure, and can be provided by the store, or event venue. A separate sign and a printed table cloth may be added to accommodate selling messages. Although all the necessary parts to create a presentation are there, the end result may not have a very cohesive look, especially since there is no control as to the size table that will be made available to the demonstrator. From store to store the presentation may have a different look and feel.

The traditional standard shelf display with a shopping cart table is slightly better than the structure described above. Using a shopping cart as a table creates a more consistent look as shopping carts are often the same size. Using this option, the shopping cart is covered by a tabletop to which a poster for ‘selling messages’ is affixed.

Another display presentation configuration is the pop-up standard shelf display with a separate table. Sometimes a shelf display ships flat and is assembled by the demonstrator or store clerk. A separate table may also be shipped to complete the presentation, or the store may provide one. Although usually easy to set up, the demonstrator still needs to manage two separate items: the table; and the shelf unit. This adds complexity to making certain the presentation is consistent. Store managers may request that the table be separated from the shelf so as not to constrict traffic. And, unfortunately, decisions like these may be good for the store but may prove damaging to the presentation.

One of the major concerns when evaluating traditional displays, is that the most basic display is made with a single tray that is designed to hold the product with a header attached on top of the display. The product in this display faces forward. This display although functional, is not exciting to look at. Once the tray display is set up, the header is slipped on to the top of the tray to complete the display. The complaint that many marketers have with this display is that, all too often, the header either is never put on the display or, the header is taken off well before the display has completed its work. This happens because the header is at the top of the display and is not permanently attached, so if it is blocking other products, and/or other signage in the store in the store, the header is often taken down by store clerks, shoppers and sometimes, even by competitors.

A slightly better approach than the structure described above, is a permanent header. This design uses glue, or a tab mechanism to permanently attach the header to the top of the tray. Once the tray display is set up, the header is folded back and the wings slip in top the top of the tray. This design eliminates the header from being easily removed. However it can still be made ineffective by slipping out the wings and having the header fall forward covering the display and eliminating the selling message from the shoppers view.

Another approach is the traditional standard shelf display with a header attached to a perimeter of the tray. This basic single tray display is also designed to hold the product facing forward, and the header that is attached to the tray usually extends past the top and a least to one side of the display and at times it will extend on both the right and left side of the display. This simple display structure certainly does a reasonable job of showcasing the product, but is also not very exciting to look at, as it is one step above a shipping carton. In fact it often is a shipping carton put on a base. The header “hangs-out” from the sides of the display, interfering with the limited space in the shopping aisles.

Another improvement to the above display presentation systems is a dual shelf display with a header display between the shelves where the entire display system is made from one single piece of paperboard. This dual shelf display with a large header in the middle is the structure that best addresses the need to have a large selling space on the display that cannot be easily removed. This structure has two product trays on either side of a center graphics panel. In this structure, each of the trays are connected to the center panel by a crease. Unfortunately, this structure, in addition to the product trays, requires a separate base to prop up the display. This display is designed to make the product face forward, and in the end looks like other basic single tray displays with the one difference that the graphics are in the center of the display.

A further embodiment of the above dual shelf display system is the display described above, except that, instead of being made from a single piece of paperboard, the two product trays and the center graphics panel are manufactured as separate elements and thereafter connected by tabs or other fastening means. This display also has the product being displayed face forward, and requires a separate base to complete the display.

Of course if money is no object, any number of temporary custom shelf displays may be created to meet any marketer's specific objective. Often new custom displays require clever design structures that are specifically designed to showcase a particular product, and will not lend themselves easily to work for other products. In this category there are no standards, as everything is custom, so there are no efficiencies in design or in production.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Against the foregoing background, it is the primary object of the present invention to provide a foldable temporary display comprised of a single structure that forms two columns that are attached by a foldable means and a separate and large, inter-locking display header that, when connected between the columns, creates an attractive display with a substantially “open” look. The “locked-in” header keeps the display in such a fixed position.

It is the object of the invention, to provide a display where the two columns may be formed to feature shelves to hold product, forming a dual shelf structure.

It is also the object of the invention, to provide a display where the two columns may be formed without shelves forming an interesting dual column shape for additional space for signage.

It further the object of the invention, to provide a display where the one or both columns may be formed with a drop down door as in a dump bin dispenser, where the dual columns store the products and or samples being dispensed.

It is yet another object of the invention, to provide a display where the columns may be different from each other, where one may contain shelves while the other is a dump bin.

It is yet another object of the invention to provide a display with an “open” look and feel with a wide viewing angle. Varied viewing angles may be achieved by rotating the shelf columns of the dual shelf structure to the desired angle from each other and locking them in place with the placement of the center panel that is attached to each of the columns. One such ideal and inviting viewing angle is approximately 270 degrees. This creates a convex feel to the front of the display with the two columns facing away from each other with the center panel facing forward.

It is another object of the invention, to provide a display where the bottom portion of the dual shelf structure may be extended so that it forms its own base to the display, and does not need a separate base. A shorter version makes a great tabletop display.

It is another object of the invention to add a table skirt and a table top for use of the display as a demo table and shelf unit in one. This demo table structure makes it ideal for use in product sampling and in product demos.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a display that will accept a rear graphics panel to create a finished look on the back of the display.

It is another object of the present invention to have the dual shelf structure be made from a single piece of flexible material, such as paperboard, plastic, or other known flexible materials used in making temporary displays.

It is yet another object of the present invention to offer significant space for advertising, promotional or informational messaging on the center display header that is nested between the shelves when the display is set up.

It is but another object of the present invention to create pockets in the center or rear panel so that they may be used to showcase product samples.

It is but another object of the present invention to make the center display header interchangeable, allowing marketers to easily switch-out creative messages. They may reuse the same dual shelf structure with a different center display header. One such example is where a company may want to create sampling events around several different products. All that they would need to do is create a new center display header for each sampling event while using the exact same dual shelf structure. This approach would be both cost effective and easy to execute.

It is yet still another object of the invention to provide a display that is considered easy to assemble at store level. The two part (dual shelf and center panel billboard) system takes only a few minutes to assemble.

It is still another object of the invention to use the display in such a configuration where the dual shelves of one unit are on opposite sides so that multiple display units of the dual shelf structure may be placed side-by-side to create a modular scalable display. The individual dual shelf structures may be attached to each other by glue, tape, lock tabs or any other well known fastening means, or by a separate friction fit tray structures at the base, and or a friction fit interlocking header.

It is another object of the invention, to provide a display that has a substantially flat profile prior to assembly to allow for efficient storage and efficient shipping.

It is yet still another object of the present invention, to provide a display that allows for the shelves to be assembled and filled with product, then shipped pre-packed for quick store assembly.

It is yet another object of the invention to provide a display that uses a dual shelf structure which may be used to accommodate a single shelf, multiple shelves, or if preferred, no shelves at all. The structure that normally holds shelves may be constructed to feature hooks for hanging product, drop down doors to create a dump bins, or with no openings at all, where the shelf columns may provide additional space for messaging.

It is yet another object of the invention to provide a display structure that works as a floor display, and if constructed at a smaller size may be used as a tabletop or counter display.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The foregoing and still other objects and advantages of the present invention will be more apparent from the detailed explanation of the preferred embodiments of the invention in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of the floor display dual shelf construction containing two shelf towers.

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the display header.

FIG. 2A is a plan view of the table base

FIG. 2B is a plan view of the table top.

FIG. 3 is an alternate front display header

FIG. 3A is a plan view of the rear display panel.

FIG. 3B is a plan view of an alternate tabletop.

FIG. 3C is plan view of an alternate table base

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the Dual Shelf construction showing slits.

FIG. 4A is a plan view of an alternate rear panel.

FIG. 4B is a plan view of a front panel skirt.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view where the left side of dual shelf structure is folded over and attached.

FIG. 6A is a top view of dual shelf structure, with the glue flaps folded inwardly and the towers rotated away from each other.

FIG. 6B is a top view of dual shelf structure with the glue flaps folded inwardly and the towers rotated adjacent to each other.

FIG. 6C is a top view of dual shelf structure, with the glue flaps folded outwardly and the towers rotated away from each other.

FIG. 6D is a top view of dual shelf structure, with the glue flaps folded outwardly and the towers rotated towards each other.

FIG. 6E is a top view of a multi-unit dual shelf display structure

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a partially folded dual shelf structure shown in an upside down position.

FIG. 7A is a front perspective view of the dual shelf structure.

FIG. 7B is a front perspective view of the front display header.

FIG. 7C is a top planar view of the dual shelf structure with the front display header attached.

FIG. 8 is a perspective rear view of a fully assembled dual shelf structure.

FIG. 9 is a perspective front view of the fully assembled dual shelf structure with the front display header partially attached on the right side, and not yet attached at the top and bottom of the left side.

FIG. 10 is a perspective side view of the of the rear panel in position to be attached to the left rear of the display.

FIG. 11 is a perspective front view of the fully assembled dual shelf display with a full front header attached to right and left shelf towers. Also shown is a shelf structure inserted into the center panel to display small items.

FIG. 12 is a front perspective view of the dual shelf structure with the table skirt placed in position prior to being locked into lower shelves of right and left towers.

FIG. 13 is a front perspective view of FIG. 12 with the table skirt locked into bottom shelves of right and left shelf towers, and with the tabletop placed over table base and attached to dual shelf tower.

FIG. 14 is a front perspective view of FIG. 13 with the display header attached to right shelf tower, and ready to be attached to left shelf tower.

FIG. 15 has been intentionally omitted.

FIG. 16 is a front perspective view of the fully assembled dual shelf structure with attached table of FIG. 14.

FIG. 17 has been intentionally omitted.

FIG. 18 is a front perspective view of the dual shelf structure where the right and left shelf towers are rotated to a front facing position, and a front bottom header is in position to lock into the dual shelf structure of FIG. 20.

FIG. 19 has been intentionally omitted.

FIG. 20 is a perspective front view of the front facing dual shelf structure of FIG. 19.

FIG. 21 is a perspective front view of the assembled dual shelf structure with large attached table of FIG. 3.

FIG. 22 is a front perspective view of the dual shelf structure where the shelf structure is not rotated to form an angle to the shelves. This configuration is used when multiple dual shelf structures are assembled in the same display unit to create a dual sided display of FIG. 6E.

FIG. 23 has been intentionally omitted.

FIG. 24 is a perspective front view tabletop model of the display of FIG. 11 with a center panel that is designed to accept an image or a photo.

FIG. 25 is a perspective rear view of the display of FIG. 11 where the rear panel is designed with three shelves that display magazines, samples or other products.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

To the accomplishments of the foregoing objects and advantages the present invention in brief summary comprises a display with a dual shelf structure connected to the center billboard panel by means of a tab structure, glue, tape, hook and loop or other well know fastening means.

In the preferred embodiment, a display structure is formed from two parts, first a dual tower shelf structure formed from a single flat piece of paperboard 100 of FIG. 1, and secondly, a flat center panel billboard 250 of FIG. 3. The dual tower shelf structure 100 is comprised of two shelf columns or towers, 118 and 119 (see FIG. 7A) which are formed by folding paperboard 100 on folds 10 and 114 and gluing the rear surface of tabs 116 and 117 to the rear surfaces of panels 104 and 105 respectively as shown in FIG. 5. When tabs 116 and 117 are glued then dual shelf structure of FIG. 7A may be formed. Panels 105, 106, 107 and 108 (FIG. 1) will form column 118 (FIG. 7A) while panels 101, 102, 103 and 104 (FIG. 1) will form column 119 (FIG. 7A).

Column 118 is formed by folding and locking bottom flaps 136 and 138 into inner flaps 135 and 137, and column 119 is formed by folding and locking bottom flaps 231 and 233 into inner flaps 232 and 234. Additional structure to the columns 118, 119 is provided by locking respective shelf tab 123 of shelves 122, 140, 139 and 141 into respective receiving slots 127. When assembled, each column is formed separately but is attached to the other by means of a flexible joint 112 as shown in FIG. 7A & 7C. Once the structure is formed, one shelf column 118 may be rotated by means of flexible joint 112 towards (or away from) the other column 119. The center display header 250 of FIG. 7B is attached, by inserting tuck tabs 257 and 262 (FIG. 7B) into the corresponding openings 129 and 130 (FIG. 1) in dual shelf structure 100, nesting the center display panel 267 of display header 250 between the two shelf columns 119 and 118.

When the center panel 250 is attached to both columns 118, 119 in the preferred embodiment, the dual shelf structure is locked in a fixed position, offering approximately a 270 degree angle of view.

Referring to the drawings and, in particular to FIG. 1 thereof the dual shelf structure 100 with center display header 250 of the present invention is provided and referred to generally by the sheet of paperboard 100 of FIG. 1 that is die cut and scored in such a way that it may be folded to form a display structure with two shelf columns 118 and 119 connected by fold 112 as shown in FIG. 7A. It is the intent of the inventor, to make the display minimally from one sheet of paperboard. The inventor anticipates that in certain instances, two or more sheets of paperboard may be joined to create a similar structure, instances where a single large sheet of paperboard is not easily available, or the job may not fit the machinery needed to create the display. It is further the intent of the inventor to make this structure from any suitable paperboard, plastic, or any other material that is flexible and easy to work with using conventional converting equipment.

In the preferred embodiment the right side (FIG. 1, everything right of fold 112) and the left side (FIG. 1, everything left of fold 112) of the paperboard 100 are folded and glued on tabs 116 and 117 forming the right and left containers 119 and 118 of the display. FIG. 5 is a perspective view where the left portion of the display is rotated and folded on score 114 where tab 117 is attached to the rear of panel 105, however it should be noted that any other suitable means of attachment may be used including but not limited to tuck flaps, tape, staples, snaps or other well known fastening means. The right side is folded on score 110 and attached to the rear of panel 104. It should be noted that FIG. 5 is the backside view of FIG. 1 and therefore the ‘left’ and ‘right’ sides are reversed.

FIG. 6C shows the preferred embodiment where tabs 116 and 117 are glued on opposite sides of fold 112 and separated by a space 400 (FIG. 6D) for ease of gluing and assembly. It should be noted that that there are several tab configurations that may be desired in order to control the amount of space 400 that exists between the right and left shelf columns 119 and 118. As is shown in FIG. 6B, tabs 116 &117 are folded into the columns 118 &119, and conversely in FIG. 6C the tabs 116 &117 are folded away from the columns 118 &119. This is one way to vary the space 400 between the columns.

In certain applications it may be desired to remove fold 112 (FIG. 6B and FIG. 6D) and/or have tabs 116 and 117 glued on top of one another (not shown). This is a very desirable tab configuration in those instances where the marketer or manufacturer would like to maximize the space necessary to hold product and minimize the space 400 between the columns 119 and 118. Another way in which that same space may be minimized is by folding tabs 116 and 117 inwardly and gluing the tabs in such a way that the outside of tabs 116 and 117 are adjacent to the inside of paperboard 100, resulting in the tabs 116 and 117 appearing inside of the shelf column structures 118 and 119 (FIG. 6A and FIG. 6B). This way the folds 120 and 121 (FIG. 6A) may be brought closer to almost touch, only to be slightly separated by fold 112. In this instance where there is no fold 112, a fold may be created by rotating one of the shelf structures 119 or 119 from the other causing a fold to occur in paperboard 100 in the space between folds 120 and 121.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view where both shelf columns 119 and 118 are partially assembled, and the dual shelf structure is resting in an upside down position for ease of set up. Assembly of bottom flaps 231, 232, 233, 234 and 135, 136, 137 and 138 are helpful in making the shelf columns square, and similar flaps may optionally appear at the top of the dual shelf structure (not shown). The inventor contemplates that these bottom flaps are not necessary for the functionality of the display if the shelf panels 122, 140, 139 and 141 are engaged. To engage shelf 122, while the unit is in the upside down position, fold shelf Support panels 124 and 125 inwardly inside shelf column and push shelf 122 towards the rear of shelf column 118, so that shelf lock 123 may be engaged with shelf receiving slot 127. Then repeat same procedure to engage shelves 140, 141 and 139 into their corresponding shelf receiving slots 127. FIG. 11 shows the assembled shelves 139 and 141 locked into panel 108 and shelves 122 and 140 locked into panel 101. The square or rectangular structure for the individual columns 119 and 118 is urged by the engagement of shelf panels 122, 140, 139 and 141, and further when shelf flaps 123 are engaged with the shelf receiving slots 127. It is the intent of the inventor to permit more shelves if desired, even if the additional shelves are constructed as separate structures (not shown). This the rectangular or square configuration may also be formed by top and/or bottom flaps as previously discussed, or the structure may be given by introducing an altogether separate structure (not shown) such as a box or insert, made from the same or different material that will fill out the space within the panels comprising shelf columns 119 and 118. This structure may also be given by the product that is placed into the display, such as stacked boxes or other displayable products. The height, width and depth of the shelves may be altered by increasing or decreasing the size of the blank paperboard being used to form dual shelf structure 100, and or by altering the distances between the scores in such a way that the shelf columns 119 and 118 would be formed with narrower or wider profiles, as necessary to best display the products. The height of the cavity within the shelf structures may also be adjusted by vertically re-positioning the shelf assembly, which includes the shelf, shelf tab and its corresponding receiving slot at the rear of the shelf column. By moving the shelf assembly up or down you can achieve different cavity heights, so long as there is sufficient paperboard to make the shelf and the corresponding receiving shelf slot 127. There are limitations as to how short a cavity may be as shelf 122 must be long enough so that shelf tab 123 must be able to be cut from paperboard 100 and able to reach shelf receiving slot 127 and slide over tab 126 of FIG. 8 and be folded down to lock into shelf receiving slot 127. It should also be noted that the distance between shelves should be sufficient to allow the free movement of product in and out of shelf columns 119 and 118.

It is also the intent of the inventor to offer this display without shelves such as when there is a need to use the display as a gravity feed, where the shelf would be an obstruction. In this embodiment the columns would be shelf-free and a continuous column which would allow product to flow freely down the length of the column only to have an opening at the bottom of the column from which the product would be easily dispensed (not shown). It is further the intent of the inventor to allow the marketer to decide whether shelf columns 119 and 118 should be substantially the same size or substantially different in size (not shown), or if the number of shelves in shelf column 118 should equal the number of shelves in shelf column 119 or if the number of shelves should be different and non symmetrical in size (not shown). It is further the intent of the inventor to allow to increase or decrease the length of shelves 122, 139, 141 and 140 and to move up or down shelf receiving slot 127 in such a way as to create special angles in the positioning of the shelf so as to cause the products being displayed to lean forward or backward as desired by the marketer. It is the intent of the inventor to offer an alternate version of the shelf columns being formed (not shown) where shelf flaps are not used but an alternate method to create a square or rectangular structure for shelf columns 118 and 119.

It is further the intent of the inventor to have a more secure locking mechanism in instances where the product is heavy, where the shelf tab 123 would have an opening at the score through which a flap taken from the rear of the display would lock the shelf in position (not shown). It is important to note that the inventor anticipates that with today's sophisticated die cut and gluing machines it is possible to attach the shelves to their respective backer panels during the manufacturing process with glue or adhesive, eliminating the need for shelf slots. FIG. 8 is a rear view of the same display showing how the shelf lock 123 engages with shelf slot 127 by folding over tab 126. In the instance where the shelves may be attached automatically the slots 127 and tabs 126 would not be visible from the rear view of the display of FIG. 8.

The attachment of the center panel 250 is shown in the top view of FIG. 7C where display header extension 251 is shown with tab 257 and flap 258 (see also FIG. 7B). Flap 258 is rotated downwards on fold 266 so that it is adjacent to tab 257, in this configuration tab 257 easily slips into slot 129. Once the tab 257 slips through slot 129, flap 258 is rotated upwards to lock display header extension 251 to shelf column 119. This same process is used to lock in display header extensions 253, 254 and 252 shown in FIG. 7B to their corresponding slots 143, 142 and 130 (see also FIG. 1). In this configuration, center panel 267 is nested between columns 119 and 118 making it an inviting display with plenty of space for messaging. It may be desired to make the display approachable from the rear as well as the front of the display. In this case the marketer may choose to add a graphic panel to the rear portion of the display. To do so, rear panel 500 of FIG. 3A is attached to the rear of dual shelf structure 100 as shown in FIG. 10. FIG. 8 shows rear slots 131, 132, 334 and 335 designed to accept rear graphic panel flaps 508, 504, 507 and 506 respectively. To minimize any raw edges of the paperboard optional flaps 502 and 503 were added to rear panel 100. They get folded inwardly and will be adjacent to column panels 108 and 101 respectively once panel 500 is tabbed into the dual shelf structure.

It is further the intent of the inventor to provide such a degree of flexibility in the display construction to accommodate a variety of design requests within the scope of this display. One such configuration is a single unit presentation display shelf structure and attached table of FIG. 16, made up from a medley of four interlocking separate parts shown in FIG. 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 2A and FIG. 2B-including: dual tray structure 100; table skirt 300; tabletop 400 and modified display header 250 of FIG. 2. FIG. 12 is a perspective view of the assembled dual shelf structure 100 with the table skirt 300 folded on score 306 and in position to lock table skirt flaps 301 and 302 into shelf slots 144 and 145 respectively. To further secure the table skirt at the bottom of the table skirt are tabs 305 and 304 which are inserted in dual shelf structure slots 143 and 142 respectfully in the same manner as the tab insertions previously shown in FIG. 7B and FIG. 7C. FIG. 13 shows table skirt 300 locked into dual shelf structure 100 and with tabletop 400 resting on top of table skirt 303 and locked into slots 126 of dual shelf structure 100. To complete the presentation system, FIG. 2 shows a modified display header 250 of FIG. 3 that is locked into dual shelf structure using tabs 257 and 262 in the same manner as previously shown in FIG. 7B and FIG. 7C. To stabilize the header, FIG. 14 shows optional tab 203 being inserted into tabletop slit 401. FIG. 14 also shows display header tab 259 and flap 258 prior to being folded and being locked into slot 129. It is further the intent of the inventor to attach taller, shorter, wider and narrower tables than which are shown in FIG. 21. FIG. 21 is a perspective view of assembled table base 350 and assembled table top 450 from FIG. 3C and FIG. 3B which shows a different style table that has a rectangular orientation and may be extended as far as necessary to support the product being displayed. This structure is also made with a table skirt 350 and a tabletop 450, however in this instance instead of having the table lock directly into the dual shelf structure, the tabletop and the table skirt may lock into the display header 250. Tabletop 450 of FIG. 3B is conventionally folded to form a rectangular tabletop, where panel 451 locks into receiving slit 265 on modified panel 250 of FIG. 3. Flaps 351, 353, 354 and 352 lock into slots 367, 368, 270 and 269 respectfully. It is contemplated by the inventor, that additional support may be included within the rectangular shelf structure that will help hold heavy objects that may be too heavy for the current structure to hold up. This structure may be formed from any number of suitable substrates designed specifically to hold up heavy weight.

It is further the intent of the inventor to create a structure in such a way that the paperboard 100 may be constructed in such a way that fold 112 is eliminated and panels 104 and 105 become a single panel as shown in the perspective view of FIG. 22 and top view FIG. 6D. Panels 103 and 106 are facing in opposite directions, so that when multiple units are attached that they form a display that may be shopped from opposite sides of the display as shown in FIG. 6E. With this orientation, the combined panels 104 and 105 form a single panel 601 with a large space for informational or promotional messaging. It is important to note that the dual shelf structure may be rotated 180 degrees so that panel 601 is facing outwardly on both sides of the multi-unit display as shown in FIG. 6E. It is the intent of the inventor to build flexibility into the size of the shelves and the height of the shelves that may be used. For example, if length 601 is fixed then the length of 106 and 103 may be varied from dual shelf structure to dual shelf structure, as long as the complete shelf structure stays within the base tray 500 of FIG. 6E. FIG. 6E is an example of the same sized, multiple units held together with a friction fit base 500 and may optionally have a similar friction fit header. The inventor also contemplates that the multi-unit displays may also be held together with tape, glue, rivets, hook and loop and other well known fastening means. FIG. 18 and FIG. 20 are the same structure of FIG. 22 with the exception that the dual shelf structure is folded on fold 112 so that panels 103 and 106 are in a front facing orientation. This embodiment offers some unique advantages contemplated by the inventor including the ability to vary the height 602 (see FIGS. 20 & 22) of the shelf within the constraints imposed by the length of the available shelf to lock into the rear panels as previously discussed. FIG. 18 shows the front base panel 380 of FIG. 4B in position to lock flaps 381 and 382 into shelf slits 144 and 145 respectfully, and for further support tabs 383 and 384 would lock into slots 143 and 142 respectfully. FIG 4A shows a plan view of the rear cover 550 of FIG. 18.

It is important to note that the various combinations of tabs and corresponding slots may be varied to the needs of the marketer without compromising the display, FIG. 24 is a dual shelf structure display forming a table top unit. This unit also contemplates a slip-in header 150 in the center display header. FIG. 25 shows a modified rear panel 500 of FIG. 10 designed to hold three magazine facings 151, 152 and 153. The inventor also contemplates that the shelf tower may take on different shapes than the square and rectangular ones discussed above. The tower cross-sectional shapes may include but not be limited to various geometric shapes such as a circle, ellipse, triangle or various types of polygons. These alternate structures will enhance the over all look of the dual structure display.