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Title:
Illuminated Filing Device
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A handheld device for performing motorized filing with illumination of the filed surface at the point of contact is disclosed. The device is comprised of a translucent file attached to a shaft that contains a light-emitting diode disposed to transilluminate the file. The device also contains a motor to rotate said shaft and file as well as a power source. The device will provide more effective and efficient trimming of the nails of an infant, filing and shaping of the nails of an adult, and sanding, filing, or polishing of other surfaces.


Inventors:
Keene, Adam Barnett (New York, NY, US)
Application Number:
12/168877
Publication Date:
01/07/2010
Filing Date:
07/07/2008
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
132/73.5, 132/76.4, 362/119, 362/253
International Classes:
A45D29/14
View Patent Images:
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Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Adam, Keene (317 East 3rd Street #14, New York, NY, 10009, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A device for providing illuminated filing, trimming, polishing, or sanding comprising: a) a translucent abrasive surface of predetermined size, shape, and composition attached to a shaft in which is embedded a light-emitting diode that is disposed to pass light through said abrasive surface b) a handheld element that contains a motor that provides rotation to said abrasive surface and shaft and also transmits electrical power both to said motor and to said light-emitting diode whereby said device will provide illumination at the point of contact between said abrasive surface and the object to be filed, trimmed, polished, or sanded.

2. The device in claim 1 specifically designed to trim the nails of an infant as wherein: a) said abrasive surface is a round disc with a fine abrading surface, b) said motor is of low torque and, c) said power source is comprised of batteries contained within said handheld unit.

3. The device in claim 1 specifically designed to file or shape the nails of an adult wherein: a) said abrasive surface is a file with a predetermined shape and composition depending whether the nail is to be trimmed or shaped, b) said motor is of moderate torque and, c) said power source is either batteries or an electrical cord contained within the handheld unit.

4. The device in claim 1 specifically designed to file, sand, or polish a work surface wherein: a) said abrasive surface is a file with a predetermined shape and composition depending on the task being performed and the material being worked upon, b) said motor is of moderate or high torque and, c) said power source is either batteries or an electrical cord contained within the handheld unit.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Not applicable.

FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH

Not applicable.

SEQUENCE LISTING OR PROGRAM

Not applicable.

BACKGROUND

1. Field of Invention

This invention relates to motorized filing devices, specifically to an improved means of providing illumination of the surface to be filed.

2. Prior Art

When attached to a motor that provides rotation, abrasive surfaces are useful for a number of applications. In construction, such surfaces are used for sanding, trimming, and polishing wood, metal, rock, and other materials. In personal grooming, motorized files are used for smoothing, shaping, and trimming adult fingernails and toenails. These motorized files are too powerful for the delicate fingers and toes of infants.

The trimming of infant fingernails is frequently problematic for parents, since the use of manual nail clippers is difficult and can lead to troublesome lacerations of the fingers. Manual nail files are recommended by pediatricians to avoid this problem, but are time-consuming and ineffective. As a result, many parents do not trim their infants' nails properly, which is problematic since fingernail scratches are the most common cause of eye injuries in children.

There have been attempts to develop motorized files that are safe and effective for the fingernails of infants. An example of such a device is described in Fingernail Trimmer Having Rotationally Abrasive Oscillating Surface issued as U.S. Pat. No. 7,188,628 in the name of Lawrence G. Shubert (Mar. 3, 2007). This patent generally relates to a motorized nail trimmer for infants with an undefined shock absorbing material. Such a material is unnecessary since the soft fingernails of infants allow for effective trimming with a very low torque motor that will not cause damage to the skin. In addition, this device lacks a mechanism for providing illumination to the fingernail surface. Illumination is all-important when attempting to trim the fast-moving fingernails of an infant to ensure that the file is applied to the nail rather than the skin. Illumination that is effective and does not disturb a sleeping infant would be particularly desirable since it is much easier to trim the nails of an infant while he or she is asleep.

In the field of animal grooming, the Illumi Nail™ pet nail grinder from Master Grooming Tools™ provides a motorized rotational abrasive surface with external light-emitting diodes for illumination. However, the device does not integrate the light-emitting diode within the abrading surface, so that illumination at the point of contact between the abrading surface and the nail can be blocked by shadows and is not ideal. In the field of construction, handheld devices to which abrasive bits may be attached which have integrated lighting have been developed such as U.S. Pat. No. 7,296,905 in the name of Mark Etter (Nov. 20, 2007). Again, the light source of such devices may not be ideal since it is not integrated within the functioning bit. In the field of dentistry, handheld drilling and grinding devices have been developed which with integrated lighting such as U.S. Pat. No. 4,561,845 in the name of Moshe Meller (Dec. 31, 1985). However, the illumination supplied by such devices may be less than ideal since the light source is not integrated within the working bit and may be blocked by shadows or objects.

SUMMARY

In accordance with one specific embodiment, the device consists of a battery-powered low-torque motor that rotates a translucent file for trimming an infant's nails. The file has a battery-powered light-emitting diode embedded in its supporting shaft that allows for direct illumination of the infant's finger and fingernail.

In accordance with an alternate specific embodiment, the device consists of a cord-powered moderate torque motor with a translucent file and embedded light-emitting diode for manicuring the finger or toenails of an adult.

In accordance with an alternative specific embodiment, the device consists of a cord-powered hand drill with a high torque motor and a bit that has an embedded light-emitting diode and a translucent file for detailed sanding, filing, or polishing of surfaces such as wood, rock, or metal.

DRAWINGS

Figures

FIG. 1A shows the device as a motorized pediatric nail trimmer in accordance with one embodiment.

FIG. 1B shows the device as a motorized adult nail filer in accordance with another embodiment.

FIG. 1C shows the device as a motorized filer or sander to be used on wood, metal, or other surfaces in accordance with another embodiment.

FIG. 2A shows a detail of the abrasive surface, shaft and commutator with an embedded light-emitting diode and resistor in accordance with one embodiment.

FIGS. 2B and 2C show different possible shapes of the abrasive surface in accordance with alternative embodiments.

FIG. 3 shows a detail of the abrasive surface and shaft with commutator, electrical brushing with housing, and motor.

FIGS. 4A and 4D show various views of the electrical brushing with housing.

FIG. 5 shows an alternative view of the abrasive surface with commutator, electrical brushing with housing and motor when attached.

FIG. 6 is an electrical diagram of the device in accordance with one embodiment.

REFERENCE NUMERALS

10Aabrasive surface, disc shape10Babrasive surface, conical
shape
10Cabrasive surface, dome shape12shaft
14commutator16resistor
18light-emitting diode20Adevice body, pediatric
nail trimmer
20Bdevice body, adult nail filer20Cdevice body, motorized
sander
22Aswitch, pediatric nail trimmer22Bswitch, adult nail filer
22Cswitch, motorized sander24electrical cord
30electrical brushing32brushing housing
34motor shaft35hole
36motor38battery
40electrical wire42switch, internal component

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Preferred Embodiment

One embodiment of the device as a pediatric nail trimmer is illustrated in FIG. 1A. The device consists of a disc-shaped fine abrasive surface 10A which is attached to an opaque shaft 12 and inserted into the device body 20A that has an on-off switch 22A attached. In the preferred embodiment abrasive surface 10A is a fine reusable abrasive surface made of transparent glass and is permanently attached to shaft 12 but may be made of transparent plastic or other material and may be detachable from shaft 12 for replacement. The abrasive surface 10A is one centimeter in diameter but may have alternative sizes and shapes as in FIG. 2B part 10B and FIG. 2C part 10C. Shaft 12 is made of opaque plastic in the preferred embodiment but may be made of metal or other material. Device body 20A is made of plastic in the preferred embodiment but may be made of metal or other material.

A detail of the file-light assembly is illustrated in FIG. 2A. It consists of abrasive surface 10A attached to shaft 12 and electrical commutator 14. Within shaft 12 is embedded resistor 16 and light-emitting diode 18 which are electrically connected to commutator 14 as shown. In the preferred embodiment 18 is a 3 millimeter white light-emitting diode and resistor 16 is 0.1 ohms but different colors, sizes, and resistances may be used.

FIG. 3 shows a detail of the abrasive surface 10A and shaft 12 with commutator 14 juxtaposed with electrical brushing 30, brushing housing 32 and motor 36. In the preferred embodiment the motor 36 is the FA-130RA from Mabuchi Motors of Japan which has a speed of 6150 revolutions per minute and a torque of 0.55 millinewton meters when operating under 3 volts. However other small low-torque motors could be used. In the preferred embodiment commutator 14 is inserted into the hole 35 such that it makes contact with electrical brushing 30 and is attached to motor shaft 34. In the preferred embodiment brushing 30 has two arms but it may have a single arm to transmit electricity from the battery 38 to the light-emitting diode 18 as well. Electrical power is transmitted from the battery to the brushing via electrical wires 40.

FIGS. 4A and 4B show additional views of the brushing housing and brushing in the preferred embodiment.

FIG. 5 illustrates an additional view of the abrasive surface 10A and shaft 12 with commutator 14 when in contact with brushing 30 and attached to motor shaft 34 via hole 35 in brushing housing 32.

FIG. 6 is an electrical diagram showing power being transmitted via battery 38 to the internal component of the on-off switch 42 and then to both motor 36 and brushing 30. In accordance with one preferred embodiment this battery is 3 volts.

Operation—Preferred Embodiment

The pediatric nail trimmer shown as the preferred embodiment is operated by holding the device in one's hand and turning on switch 22A which will cause the abrasive surface 10A to rotate and also illuminate said abrasive surface via light-emitting diode 18. The device is then pointed towards the infant's fingernail as shown in FIG. 1A, illuminating the nail to be trimmed. Abrasive surface 10A is then applied to the infant's nail briefly for the trimming process.

Internally, the turning on of switch 22A closes internal switch 42 which then transmits electricity from battery 38 both to motor 36 and to brushing 30. Electrical energy is transmitted to the light-emitting diode 18 from the brushing 30 via the commutator 14. This internal operation is illustrated in FIG. 6.

Detailed Description—Alternative Embodiments

One alternative embodiment of the device as an adult nail filer is shown in FIG. 1B. This embodiment is different in that abrasive surface 10A may be rougher and the motor may be of higher torque. Also, it may be powered by an electrical cord 24 rather than by a battery. Otherwise the basic assembly of the file, shaft, light-emitting diode, commutator, and brushing, and motor are the same as shown in FIGS. 2-6.

Another alternative embodiment of the device as a motorized sander, filer, or polisher is shown in FIG. 1B. This embodiment is different in that the abrasive surface 10A may be rougher, the motor may be of high torque, and the device may be powered by an electrical cord or rechargeable battery. Otherwise the basic assembly of the file, shaft, light-emitting diode, commutator, and brushing, and motor are the same as shown in FIGS. 2-6.

ADVANTAGES

From the description above, a number of advantages of some embodiments of my illuminated filing device become evident:

a) The pediatric nail trimmer will allow for more efficient trimming of an infant's nails since it will directly illuminate the point of contact between the nails and the abrasive surface.

b) The pediatric nail trimmer will allow for more convenient trimming of an infant's nails since the work surface can be illuminated without waking a sleeping infant.

c) The pediatric nail trimmer will prevent injury to the infant's skin during trimming since direct illumination of the work surface will limit contact time and help to ensure that the abrasive surface is applied to the nail rather than the finger.

d) The pediatric nail trimmer will prevent injury to the infant's skin since it recognizes that the thin nails of infants can be trimmed with a very low torque motor which will stop when excessive pressure is applied.

e) The pediatric nail trimmer will prevent nail clipper-related lacerations of the infant's fingers which are troublesome to parents and prevent them from trimming their infant's nails regularly.

f) The adult nail filer will allow for easier and more precise trimming and shaping of an adult's nails since it will provide direct illumination at the work surface.

g) The motorized sander, filer, or polisher will allow for more precise work in many applications and on many different materials since it will provide direct illumination at the work surface.

CONCLUSION

Accordingly, the reader will see that the illuminated filing devices of the various embodiments can be used to file, trim, sand, or polish surfaces in a precise and convenient manner by providing illumination directly at the point of contact between the abrasive surface and the work surface.

Although the description above contains many specificities, these should not be construed as limiting the scope of the embodiment but as merely providing illustrations of some of the presently preferred embodiments. Many other possibilities are possible, for example:

    • a) Electricity could be transmitted to the light-emitting diode by a single brush and metal connector rather than the double brush and commutator technique described.
    • b) Multiple light-emitting diodes could be embedded into the file and shaft in order to increase the illuminating power.
    • c) The size, shape, material and roughness of the abrasive surface could be altered to make it suitable for use as a surgical or dental file.
    • d) The size and shape of the body of the device could be altered and air and water ducts could be added to the device to make it suitable as a surgical or dental file.
    • e) The motor could provide variable rather than fixed speed, torque, and rotational direction for additional applications.
    • f) The light-emitting diode and motor could have separate power sources.

Thus, the scope of the embodiment should be determined by the appended claims and their legal equivalents, rather than by the examples given.