Title:
Firelog Pan
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A light weight, reusable, disposable, and relatively inexpensive pan that can be placed in a fireplace. One embodiment of the firelog pan includes a base, risers in the base that permit airflow under a firelog placed on the risers (thus helping the firelog to burn properely), and sidewalls that retain ash from a firelog burned in the firelog pan. The pan preferably is made of a lightweight heat resistant material. The pan preferably can be re-used several times before being discarded. The pan preferably is relatively inexpensive, so the pan can be replaced when desired.



Inventors:
Malone, Clancy (Plain City, OH, US)
Application Number:
12/165711
Publication Date:
11/19/2009
Filing Date:
07/01/2008
Assignee:
Mel Marrone
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F23J1/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
PRICE, CARL D
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
BUTZER & CHEN LAW, LLC (870 HIGH STREET, SUITE 104, WORTHINGTON, OH, 43085, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A firelog pan, comprising: a base; risers in the base that permit airflow under a firelog placed on the risers; and sidewalls that retain ash from a firelog burned in the firelog pan; wherein the firelog pan comprises a lightweight heat resistant material.

2. A firelog pan as in claim 1, wherein the material comprises p-coated aluminum.

3. A firelog pan as in claim 1, wherein the firelog pan is reusable.

4. A firelog pan as in claim 1, wherein the firelog pan is disposable.

5. A firelog pan as in claim 1, wherein the firelog pan is eighteen and one half inches long, eight and one half inches wide, and two inches deep.

6. A firelog pan as in claim 1, wherein the risers together can support at least six pounds weight without significant deformation.

7. A firelog pan as in claim 1, wherein the risers in the firelog pan are hollow such that risers from other firelog pans can fit at least partially within those risers, whereby the firelog pan is stackable with the other firelog pans for compact storage, display, and packaging.

8. A method of burning a firelog in a firelog pan, comprising: placing the firelog in the firelog pan, with the firelog pan including a base, risers in the base that permit airflow under a firelog placed on the risers, and sidewalls that retain ash from a firelog burned in the firelog pan, with the firelog pan comprising a lightweight heat resistant material; burning the firelog in the firelog pan; allowing the firelog pan to cool; and dumping ash from the firelog out of the firelog pan.

9. A method as in claim 8, wherein the material comprises p-coated aluminum.

10. A method as in claim 8, further comprising reusing the firelog pan to burn another firelog.

11. A method as in claim 8, further comprising disposing of the firelog pan.

12. A method of storing firelog pans, comprising: gathering plural firelog pans, each firelog pan comprising a base, risers in the base that permit airflow under a firelog placed on the risers, and sidewalls that retain ash from a firelog burned in the firelog pan, with the firelog pan comprising a lightweight heat resistant material, and with the risers in the firelog pan being hollow; and stacking the firelog pans with risers of lower firelog pans at least partially fitting into risers of one or more higher firelog pans.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/052,874 filed May 13, 2008, in the name of the same inventor.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

This invention relates to a firelog pan that permits easy cleanup of ashes from a firelog.

2. Description of the Related Art

Manufactured firelogs are log-shaped products that can be burned in a traditional fireplace instead of wood logs. Firelogs are typically made from a wax-like substance impregnated with flammable materials and/or chemicals. One leading manufacturer of firelogs is Duraflame, Inc.

Firelogs tend to burn hotter, longer, and cleaner than wood logs. Nonetheless, firelogs do generate significant ash when burnt, and this ash can be bothersome to clean up.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The invention addresses the foregoing with a light weight, reusable, disposable, and relatively inexpensive pan that can be placed in a fireplace. A firelog can be placed directly in the pan and lit. The pan is designed so that the firelog should burn completely. The pan also captures ash from the firelog. Once the firelog has burnt and the ash has cooled, the ash can be cleaned up by simply removing the pan and dumping out the ash.

The pan preferably can be re-used several times before being discarded. The pan preferably is relatively inexpensive, so the pan can be replaced when desired.

One embodiment of the firelog pan includes a base, risers in the base that permit airflow under a firelog placed on the risers (thus helping the firelog to burn properely), and sidewalls that retain ash from a firelog burned in the firelog pan. The pan comprises a lightweight heat resistant material.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIGS. 1 and 2 show top and cross-sectional views of an embodiment of a firelog pan.

FIG. 3 shows firelog pans stacked together using the cross-sectional view of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 shows a perspective view of an embodiment of a firelog pan.

FIG. 5 shows the firelog pan of FIG. 4 in use.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/052,874 filed May 13, 2008, in the name of the same inventor is hereby incorporated by reference as if fully set forth herein.

Briefly, a light weight, reusable, disposable, and relatively inexpensive firelog pan according to the invention can be placed in a fireplace, a firelog can be placed directly in the pan, and the firelog can be lit. The pan is designed so that the firelog should burn completely. The pan also captures ash from the firelog. Once the firelog has burnt and the ash has cooled, the ash can be cleaned up by simply removing the pan and dumping out the ash.

The pan preferably can be re-used several times before being discarded. The pan preferably is relatively inexpensive, so the pan can be replaced when desired.

In more detail, FIG. 1 shows a top view of an embodiment of firelog pan 1, and FIG. 2 shows a cross-sectional view of pan 1 along line II-II in FIG. 1. As shown in these figures, firelog pan 1 includes base 2, plural risers 3 in the base that permit airflow under a firelog placed on the risers (thus helping the firelog to burn properely), and sidewalls 4 that retain ash from a firelog burned in the firelog pan.

Firelog pan 1 preferably includes three risers 3. A different number of risers can be used. The risers together preferably can support at least six pounds of weight without significant deformation. This limitation helps with reusability. However, the invention is not limited to a design with such risers.

The risers in the firelog pan preferably are hollow such that risers from other firelog pans can fit at least partially within those risers, as illustrated in FIG. 3. This arrangement helps with stacking firelog pans for compact storage, display, and packaging. Again, the invention is not limited to this design.

Firelog pan 1 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 preferably is about 18.5 inches long, 8.5 inches wide, and 2 inches deep, with ¾ inch high risers. The outside risers preferably are separated by about 11 inches. The incorporated provisional application includes further details of dimension that can be used. These dimensions (including the one specified above) have been found to be suitable to fit into most fireplaces, to support most firelogs, to provide good airflow under a firelogs when it is burnt in the firelog pan, and to permit good viewing of a firelog as it burns. While these dimensions have been found to work well, other dimensions can be used if so desired.

Firelog pan 1 preferably is made of a lightweight heat resistant material. In a preferred embodiment, the pan is made from 0.005 gauge 3003 alloy aluminum with a p-coat such as a monoglycerides-stearic acid mixture. This coating facilitates texturing and forming. An MSDS sheet for a suitable material is included in the incorporated provisional application. The invention is not limited to these materials.

P-coated alloy aluminum tends to have an “aluminum foil” like look and tends to be somewhat “crinkly” and deformable. Thus, firelog pans made of this general type of material tend not to be formed exactly as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, but rather to have a more rounded and slightly irregular appearance. FIG. 4 attempts to show this type of appearance in a perspective view. The incorporated provisional application includes actual images of such a firelog pan. The invention is not limited to this type of appearance.

FIG. 5 shows the firelog pan of FIG. 4 in use. Manufactured firelog 6 is shown burning in firelog pan 1, preferably in a fireplace. The pan can be used in other settings, for example outdoors, although this is not recommended unless appropriate safety precautions have been taken. In addition, natural logs also can be burned in the pan. Ash 7 is shown collecting in the bottom of the firelog pan. After the log has burnt and the pan has cooled, the ash easily can be dumped out of the firelog pan as illustrated by the curved arrows in FIG. 5.

The invention is in no way limited to the specifics of any particular embodiments and examples disclosed herein. For example, the terms “preferably,” “preferred embodiment,” “one embodiment,” and the like denote features that are preferable but not essential to include in embodiments of the invention. Many other variations are possible which remain within the content, scope and spirit of the invention, and these variations would become clear to those skilled in the art after perusal of this application.