Title:
Strategy War Game
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A strategy war game is disclosed. In a particular embodiment, a game board is covered by sixty-four squares forming a checkered pattern. Each game piece of a first set of game pieces is adapted to subsequently move only within a first set of squares representing land. Each game piece of a second set of game pieces is adapted to subsequently move only within a second set of squares representing water. Each game piece of a third set of game pieces is adapted to subsequently move within a third set of squares representing air. The strategy war game further includes a point system, wherein a first player is given a predetermined number of points for capturing a game piece during a turn by moving a game piece of the first player to a square occupied by the game piece of the second player.



Inventors:
Miller, Paul (Gotha, FL, US)
Application Number:
12/411332
Publication Date:
10/01/2009
Filing Date:
03/25/2009
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F3/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MENDIRATTA, VISHU K
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Matthew G. McKinney (Allen, Dyer, Doppelt & Gilchrist, P.A. 255 South Orange Avenue Suite 1401, Orlando, FL, 32801, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A strategy war game comprising: a game board, wherein a surface of the game board covered by sixty-four squares forming a checkered pattern; a first characteristic assigned to a first set of squares of the checkered pattern, wherein the first set of squares includes fifteen contiguous squares on each opposing end of the game board; a first set of game pieces assigned a first starting position and each game piece of the first set of game pieces adapted to subsequently move only within the first set of squares; a second characteristic assigned to a second set of squares of the checkered pattern, wherein the second set of squares includes thirty-four squares that are not part of the first set of squares; a second set of game pieces assigned a second starting position and each game piece of the second set of game pieces adapted to subsequently move only within the second set of squares; a third characteristic assigned to a third set of squares of the checkered pattern, wherein the third set of squares includes the first set and second set of squares; a third set of game pieces assigned a third starting position and each game piece of the third set of game pieces adapted to subsequently move within the third set of squares; and a point system, wherein a first player is given a predetermined number of points for capturing a game piece during a turn by moving a game piece of the first player to a square occupied by the game piece of the second player.

2. The strategy war game of claim 1, wherein the first characteristic of the first set of squares represents land areas.

3. The strategy war game of claim 2, wherein the second characteristic of the second set of squares represents sea areas.

4. The strategy war game of claim 3, wherein the third characteristic of the third set of squares represents air areas.

5. The strategy war game of claim 4, wherein the first set of game pieces includes tank game pieces movable to one square or two squares from its occupied position in one of a forward left, forward right, backward left, or backward right, unobstructed direction.

6. The strategy war game of claim 5, wherein the second set of game pieces includes submarine game pieces movable to one square or two squares from its occupied position in one of a left, right, forward left, forward right, backward left, or backward right, direction.

7. The strategy war game of claim 6, wherein the second set of game pieces further includes destroyer game pieces movable to one square from its occupied position in one of a forward, backward, left, right, forward left, forward right, backward left or backward right, unobstructed direction.

8. The strategy war game of claim 7, wherein the third set of game pieces includes helicopter game pieces movable to two squares from its occupied position in any direction.

9. The strategy war game of claim 8, wherein the third set of game pieces includes fighter game pieces movable to either one, two or three squares from its occupied position in one of a forward, backward, left or right, unobstructed direction, or movable to one or two squares from its occupied position in one of a forward left, forward right, backward left or backward right, unobstructed direction.

10. The strategy war game of claim 9, wherein the third set of game pieces includes bomber game pieces movable to either one, two or three squares from its occupied position in one of a forward, backward, left or right, direction, or movable to one or two squares from its occupied position in one of a forward left, forward right, backward left or backward right, direction.

11. The strategy war game of claim 10, wherein the third set of game pieces includes amphibian game pieces movable to one square from its occupied position in one of a forward, forward left, or forward right, direction.

12. The strategy war game of claim 11, wherein the first set of game pieces includes a king amphibian game piece movable to one or two squares from its occupied position in one of a forward, backward, left, right, forward left, forward right, backward left or backward right, direction, when the amphibian game piece reaches the opposing end of the game board.

13. The strategy war game of claim 12, wherein the first set of game pieces includes a commander game piece movable to one square from its occupied position in one of a forward, backward, left, right, forward left, forward right, backward left or backward right, direction.

14. The strategy war game of claim 13, the point system to determine a winner of the strategy war game, further comprising: one point given for capturing an amphibian game piece; two points given for capturing a tank game piece; three points for capturing a submarine game piece; three points for capturing a destroyer game piece; four points for capturing a helicopter; four points for capturing a fighter; five points for capturing a bomber game piece; and seven points for capturing a commander game piece; wherein the player with a larger sum of points when the commander is captured or a predetermined time frame expires is the winner of the game.

15. The strategy war game of claim 14, wherein the amphibian game piece represented by a model amphibious vehicle, the tank game piece represented by a model tank, the submarine game piece represented by a model submarine, the destroyer game piece represented by a model destroyer, the helicopter game piece represented by a model helicopter, the fighter game piece represented by a model fighter, the bomber game piece represented by a model bomber, and the commander game piece represented by a model personnel carrier.

16. The strategy war game of claim 15, further including a timer to determine an expiration of a predetermined time limit for a turn of each player.

17. The strategy war game of claim 16, wherein each player is provided one commander game piece,

18. The strategy war game of claim 17, wherein each player is provided two fighter game pieces and one bomber game piece.

19. The strategy war game of claim 18, wherein each player is provided two tank game pieces and two submarine game pieces.

20. The strategy war game of claim 19, wherein each player is provided two helicopter game pieces, four amphibian game pieces and one destoyer game piece.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/039,364 filed Mar. 25, 2009. The disclosure of the provisional application is incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD

The present disclosure is generally related to games and game boards, and more specifically to a strategy war game.

BACKGROUND

Strategy games serve to entertain the players by challenging the skill of each player to anticipate the moves of the opposing player. Strategy game designs may include boards with a variety of different configurations. The game pieces are assigned attributes that control how a particular piece may be moved throughout the game. The attributes of a game piece may also change. A shortcoming of the prior art strategy games is that the games may be too easy to master or provide limited moves so that the game provides little challenge to the players. For example, Checkers is a relatively simplistic strategy game that skilled players may not find interesting enough to play since the time to master the game is relatively short.

Another example of a strategy game is Chess. Although Chess provides more game pieces and more complicated moves than Checkers, Chess uses outdated game pieces and may be too complicated for casual players. Accordingly, what is needed is a strategy war game that corresponds to authentic real-life abilities of current military hardware and that is neither too simplistic nor complicated for players.

SUMMARY

In a particular embodiment, a strategy war game is disclosed. The strategy war game includes a game board covered by sixty-four squares forming a checkered pattern. A first characteristic is assigned to a first set of squares of the checkered pattern. The first set of squares includes fifteen contiguous squares on each opposing end of the game board and a first set of game pieces are assigned a first starting position. Each game piece of the first set of game pieces is adapted to subsequently move only within the first set of squares. A second characteristic is assigned to a second set of squares of the checkered pattern. The second set of squares includes thirty-four squares that are not part of the first set of squares. A second set of game pieces is assigned a second starting position and each game piece of the second set of game pieces is adapted to subsequently move only within the second set of squares. A third characteristic is assigned to a third set of squares of the checkered pattern. The third set of squares includes the first set and second set of squares. A third set of game pieces is assigned a third starting position and each game piece of the third set of game pieces is adapted to subsequently move within the third set of squares. The strategy war game further includes a point system, wherein a first player is given a predetermined number of points for capturing a game piece during a turn by moving a game piece of the first player to a square occupied by the game piece of the second player.

One particular advantage provided by embodiments of the strategy war game is the ability to simulate modern warfare between two players. In addition, the strategy war game encourages the players to improvise strategy in any number of ways as described by the rules as explained herein.

For example, game pieces that are assigned the ability to move through the air on the game board are represented by either a model helicopter, fighter or bomber game piece. Game pieces that are assigned the ability to move through the water on the game board are represented by either a model submarine or destroyer game piece. Further, game pieces that are assigned the ability to move on land and water on the game board are represented by a model amphibious vehicle game piece, referred to as an amphibian.

Other aspects, advantages, and features of the present disclosure will become apparent after review of the entire application, including the following sections: Brief Description of the Drawings, Detailed Description, and the Claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a plan view of the game board illustrating the areas representing land, air and sea, and the game pieces representative directional movements;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the game board illustrating the game pieces in the starting position;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a diagram illustrating the allowed movements of an amphibian game piece from its starting position;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of a diagram illustrating the allowed movements of an amphibian game piece moved from its starting position;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of a diagram illustrating the allowed movements of a king amphibian game piece from its starting position;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of a diagram illustrating the allowed movements of a king amphibian game piece moved from its starting position;

FIG. 7 is a plan view of a diagram illustrating the allowed movements of a tank game piece from its starting position;

FIG. 8 is a plan view of a diagram illustrating the allowed movements of a tank game piece moved from its starting position;

FIG. 9 is a plan view of a diagram illustrating the allowed movements of a submarine game piece from its starting position;

FIG. 10 is a plan view of a diagram illustrating the allowed movements of a submarine game piece moved from its starting position;

FIG. 11 is a plan view of a diagram illustrating the allowed movements of a destroyer game piece from its starting position;

FIG. 12 is a plan view of a diagram illustrating the allowed movements of a destroyer game piece moved from its starting position;

FIG. 13 is a plan view of a diagram illustrating the allowed movements of a helicopter game piece from its starting position;

FIG. 14 is a plan view of a diagram illustrating the allowed movements of a helicopter game piece moved from its starting position;

FIG. 15 is a plan view of a diagram illustrating the allowed movements of a fighter game piece from its starting position;

FIG. 16 is a plan view of a diagram illustrating the allowed movements of a fighter game piece moved from its starting position;

FIG. 17 is a plan view of a diagram illustrating the allowed movements of a bomber game piece from its starting position;

FIG. 18 is a plan view of a diagram illustrating the allowed movements of a bomber game piece moved from its starting position;

FIG. 19 is a plan view of a diagram illustrating the allowed movements of a Commander-in-Chief game piece from its starting position; and

FIG. 20 is a plan view of a diagram illustrating the allowed movements of a Commander-in-Chief game piece moved from its starting position.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The strategy war game is played by two opposing and warring armed forces represented by specially designed game pieces placed on a square board 10 comprised of sixty four alternating dark squares 15 and light colored squares 20 arranged in eight lines 25, 30 of eight squares each. The square board 10 is set up for play orientated in a diamond shape so that a dark color square 35 is always positioned at the top and bottom of the board 10, as the single square in the first row closest to each player's seated position. Progressing toward the center of the board, the second row 60 per side contains two light color squares 20. The third row 62 per side contains three dark color squares 15 and so on and so forth.

All sixty four squares on the board are given their own alphanumeric name ranging from “A1” to “H8” as defined on the game board by the intersection of a letter and a number assigned to each line. Collectively, this nomenclature is used as a system for notating the placements and movements of the game pieces in the game. For proper set up, the single square in the first row at the bottom of the board must be square “A1.” Due to this unique set up of the tradition checkered board 10, a brief explanation of the game pieces' directional movements is necessary. Orthogonal player moves (Forward, Backward, Left and Right) are moves that connect dark to dark and light colored squares to each other across their single mating point; whereas diagonal player moves (Forward Left, Forward Right, Backward Left and Backward Right) are moves that connect dark and light colored squares to each other across their mating borderline.

To summarize, the game pieces' directional movements can be described in relation to each player's seated position via any one of the following eight independent directions: Forward 41, Forward Left 45, Forward Right 46, Left 43, Right 44, Backward 42, Backward Left 47 or Backward Right 48.

Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 2, the battlefields of the game are, “Through the Air,” “On Land” and “In the Sea” (Air, Land and Sea). The fifteen squares 50 per side that are occupied by each player's game pieces at the start of the game (thirty total) represent the Land areas of the board 10. The thirty four remaining squares 40 that are unoccupied squares at the start of the game represent the Sea areas of the board 10. While each square uniquely represents either a land area or a sea area of the board, every square (Land or Sea) simultaneously represents an Air battlefield of the board. The eight specially designed game pieces (thirty total) are set up from left to right on the board 10 per side as follows: First row 35—Commander-In-Chief (C); Second row 60—Fighter (F), Fighter (F); Third row 62—Tank (T), Bomber (B), Tank (T); Fourth row 64—Submarine (S), Helicopter (H), Helicopter (H), Submarine (S); Fifth row 66—Amphibian (A), Amphibian (A), Destroyer (D), Amphibian (A), Amphibian (A). The two opposing armed forces are distinguishable by color, one dark and one light. The starting position of the Commander of the light colored armed forces is always square “A1.” The game pieces are mounted on either platform bases (if they compete on Land or in the Sea) or on aerial platform bases (if they compete through the Air); Commanders, Bombers and Destroyers are distinguished as leaders of their respective divisions within the armed forces by adding a second platform base underneath them. Once the board is set up, each player must assume their position as Commander-In-Chief of one of the two armed forces prepared to command the services of their fifteen game pieces towards victory.

Commander-In-Chief is a strategy war game for two players. To begin play, one player selects the dark and one player selects the light colored armed forces to be in command of throughout the game. Each player places their fifteen game pieces on the game board 10 in their starting positions as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. When ready, the players take alternating turns moving their game pieces one by one about the board to either an unoccupied square or to opponent occupied square and in the latter case, capturing opponent's game piece from that square as only one game piece may occupy any given square at any single moment in time. Once a game piece is captured, it is permanently removed from the game. Game pieces can only move along straight, unobstructed paths, unless stated otherwise. The game pieces that can go under or go over can jump other game pieces. Jumping game pieces does not result in their capture. Only one game piece may be moved on a single turn and the dark colored game pieces always play first. The players must move on their turn. Play evolves, turn by turn, from the beginning of the war through the game's eventual completion with each player analyzing the current battlefield situation, adjusting their game plan accordingly and executing commands (movements of the game pieces) in a collective effort to achieve the game's objective. A one minute sand timer is included for play requiring time limits (per move—one minute and per game X minutes as predetermined by both players).

To record point totals for scoring purposes, each player adds together the values for all the game pieces they have captured per the following point ranking system:

Amphibian—(1 point), Tank—(2 points), Submarine—(3 points), Destroyer—(3 points), Helicopter—(4 points), Fighter—(4 points), Bomber—(5 points), Commander-In-Chief —(7 points).

A one minute sand timer is included for play requiring time limits (per move—one minute and per game—x minutes (or turns) as arbitrarily agreed to per game by the players). From the beginning of or at any point during the game, the players can use the sand timer as a tool to enforce the per move and/or per game time limits.

Referring now to FIGS. 3-20, the “O” indicates the possible squares to which a particular game piece can move according to the rules of the game. For example, Amphibians compete “On Land” and “In the Sea” portion of the board 10. Amphibians can move one square in any one of three forward directions: Forward 41, Forward Left 45 or Forward Right 46 as shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. Amphibians are unique in that if they reach their opponent's first row 35 on the opposite side of the game board 10, they become King Amphibian (KA). King Amphibians are distinguished from amphibians by adding a second Platform Base under them. If an Amphibian becomes a King Amphibian, its mobility changes.

Referring now to FIGS. 5 and 6, King Amphibians only compete “On Land” portion of the board 10. King Amphibians can move one or two squares in any direction: Forward, Backward, Left, Right, Forward Left, Forward Right, Backward Left or Backward Right. King Amphibians are restricted to movement on their opponent's “Land” portion of the board 10.

Referring now to FIGS. 7 and 8, Tanks compete “On Land” portion of the board 10. Tanks can move one or two squares in any of four directions along a straight path: Forward Left, Forward Right, Backward Left or Backward Right. Tanks are restricted to movement on their own land area of the board 10.

Referring now to FIGS. 9 and 10, Submarines compete “In the Sea” portion of the board 10. Submarines can move one or two squares in any one of six directions along a straight path: Left, Right, Forward Left, Forward Right, Backward Left or Backward Right. Submarines have a restriction on their first move of the game. Their first move of the game must be one square Forward. Submarines are submersible warships that can “Go Under” (or around) other game pieces during a two square move and thus, not be blocked by other game pieces that would otherwise obstruct the completion of a two square move.

Referring now to FIGS. 11 and 12, Destroyers compete “In the Sea” portion of the board 10. Destroyers, also known as commanders of the sea, can move one square in any direction: Forward, Backward, Left, Right, Forward Left, Forward Right, Backward Left or Backward Right. Destroyers also have a restriction on their first move of the game. These armored warships' first move of the game must be one square in any one of three forward directions: Forward, Forward Left or Forward Right.

Referring now to FIGS. 13 and 14, Helicopters compete “Through the Air” portion of the board 10. While Helicopter's are unique in that they are not restricted to movement only along a straight path via any one of the eight independent direction (forward, backward, left, right, forward left, forward right, backward left or backward right), they must move a distance of exactly two squares away from their initial position. Helicopters can move to any one of sixteen potential squares that are at a two square radial distance away from their previous position. Helicopters can “Go Over” (or around) other game pieces during a two square move and thus, not be blocked by other game pieces that would otherwise obstruct the completion of a two square move.

Referring now to FIGS. 15-18, Fighters and Bombers compete “Through the Air” portion of the board 10. Both Fighters and Bombers are stealth warplanes that move in exactly the same manner, with one exception. Fighters and Bombers can move either one, two or three squares in any one of four directions along a straight path: Forward, Backward, Left, Right, Forward Left, Forward Right, Backward Left or Backward Right. However, there is an exception in that only Bombers can “Go Over” (or around) other game pieces during a multiple square move and thus, not be blocked by other game pieces that would otherwise obstruct the completion of a multiple square move. Accordingly, Fighters can be blocked from completing a multiple square move if other game pieces obstruct their movement.

Referring now to FIGS. 19 and 20, Commanders compete “On Land” portion of the board 10. Commanders can move one square in any direction: Forward, Backward, Left, Right, Forward Left, Forward Right, Backward Left or Backward Right. Commanders are restricted to movement on their own Land area portion of the board 10.

Any game that ends in a tie or where no one player can win is called a draw, neither a win nor a loss for either side. Also, if the players choose not to continue a game for any reason, they may agree to call it a draw.

As shown in FIG. 21, the shapes of the game pieces correspond to their identities under the rules of the game. For example, as shown in FIG. 21, the Submarine game piece is represented by a scale model submarine, the Fighter by a scale model fighter, etc. so that the identity of the game piece is easily recognized.

The particular embodiments disclosed above and in the drawings are illustrative only, as the invention may be modified and practiced in different but equivalent manners apparent to those skilled in the art having the benefit of the teachings herein. Furthermore, no limitations are intended to the details of construction or design herein shown. It is therefore evident that the particular embodiments disclosed above may be altered or modified and all such variations are considered within the scope and spirit of the invention.

The illustrations of the embodiments described herein are intended to provide a general understanding of the structure of the various embodiments. The illustrations are not intended to serve as a complete description of all of the elements and features of apparatus and systems that utilize the structures or methods described herein. Many other embodiments may be apparent to those of skill in the art upon reviewing the disclosure. Other embodiments may be utilized and derived from the disclosure, such that structural and logical substitutions and changes may be made without departing from the scope of the disclosure. Accordingly, the disclosure and the figures are to be regarded as illustrative rather than restrictive.

One or more embodiments of the disclosure may be referred to herein, individually and/or collectively, by the term “invention” merely for convenience and without intending to voluntarily limit the scope of this application to any particular invention or inventive concept. Moreover, although specific embodiments have been illustrated and described herein, it should be appreciated that any subsequent arrangement designed to achieve the same or similar purpose may be substituted for the specific embodiments shown. This disclosure is intended to cover any and all subsequent adaptations or variations of various embodiments. Combinations of the above embodiments, and other embodiments not specifically described herein, will be apparent to those of skill in the art upon reviewing the description.

The Abstract of the Disclosure is provided to comply with 37 C.F.R. §1.52(b) and is submitted with the understanding that it will not be used to interpret or limit the scope or meaning of the claims. In addition, in the foregoing Detailed Description, various features may be grouped together or described in a single embodiment for the purpose of streamlining the disclosure. This disclosure is not to be interpreted as reflecting an intention that the claimed embodiments require more features than are expressly recited in each claim. Rather, as the following claims reflect, inventive subject matter may be directed to less than all of the features of any of the disclosed embodiments. Thus, the following claims are incorporated into the Detailed Description, with each claim standing on its own as defining separately claimed subject matter.

The above-disclosed subject matter is to be considered illustrative, and not restrictive, and the appended claims are intended to cover all such modifications, enhancements, and other embodiments, which fall within the true spirit and scope of the present invention. Thus, to the maximum extent allowed by law, the scope of the present invention is to be determined by the broadest permissible interpretation of the following claims and their equivalents, and shall not be restricted or limited by the foregoing detailed description.