Title:
Practice putter with pointed striking surface
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A practice putter comprised of a shaft and a putter head attached to the shaft. The putter head is comprised of a first substantially V-shaped assembly and a second substantially V-shaped assembly.



Inventors:
Pontius, Peter Y. (Waterloo, NY, US)
Application Number:
12/378031
Publication Date:
09/10/2009
Filing Date:
02/10/2009
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/254, 473/340
International Classes:
A63B69/36; A63B53/04
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
PASSANITI, SEBASTIANO
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HOWARD J. GREENWALD P.C. (Post Office Box 25885, ROCHESTER, NY, 14625, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A practice putter comprised of a shaft and a putter head attached to said shaft, wherein said putter head is comprised of a first substantially V-shaped assembly and a second substantially V-shaped assembly.

2. The practice putter as recited in claim 1, wherein said putter head is comprised of a front side and a back side.

3. The practice putter as recited in claim 2, wherein said first substantially V-shaped assembly extends outwardly from said front side.

4. The practice putter as recited in claim 3, wherein said second substantially V-shaped assembly extends outwardly from said back side.

5. The practice putter as recited in claim 4, wherein said putter head is comprised of a top surface.

6. The practice putter as recited in claim 5, wherein said top surface is comprised of an alignment line.

7. The practice putter as recited in claim 6, wherein said first substantially V-shaped assembly is comprised of a first flat surface.

8. The practice putter as recited in claim 7, wherein said second substantially V-shaped assembly is comprised of a second flat surface.

9. The practice putter as recited in claim 8, wherein said alignment line extends from said first flat surface to said second flat surface.

10. The practice putter as recited in claim 9, wherein a first wing and a second wing extend outwardly from said front side.

11. The practice putter as recited in claim 20, wherein a third wing and a fourth wing extend outwardly from said back side.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED PATENT APPLICATION

This application claims priority based upon provisional patent application 61/068,160, filed on Mar. 5, 2008

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

A practice putter comprised of a head with a striking surface that is pointed.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Practice golf putter heads are known to those skilled in the art. Thus, e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 3,384,376 discloses a practice putter head that has striking pin. U.S. Pat. 3,021,141 discloses a putter head comprised of a U-shaped device. U.S. Pat. No. 3,194,564 a practice putter head comprised of a pair of pins within which the golf ball is to be disposed prior to putting.

None of the prior art devices is entirely satisfactory. It is an object of this invention to provide an improved practice golf putter comprised of a putter head that will facilitate more accurate putting.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In accordance with this invention, there is provided a practice putter comprised of a shaft and a putter head attached to said shaft, wherein said putter head comprised of two striking surfaces, each of which comprises a substantially V-shaped assembly.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention will be described by reference to the specification, the claims, and the following drawings, in which like numerals refer to like elements, and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a partial perspective view of one preferred embodiment of applicant's practice putter;

FIG. 2 is a front view of the putter of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a side view of the putter of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a top view of the putter of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 5 is a bottom view of the putter of FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

It is one of the objectives of this invention to provide a practice putter head which will enable the practicer to establish the position in which the practice putter head should be held to hit the ball along the desired path to the golf hole.

It is another objective of the invention to provide a practice putter head which will, due to its V shaped pointed striking surface, provide immediate feedback as to whether the V shaped point striking surface struck the ball in the middle of the golf ball and if the practice putter head remained at the desired angle from set up, to pull back stroke, through hitting the ball, and throughout the follow through. If it is not done properly, the ball will immediately move in the direction of the side of the V shaped point that is wrongly struck. As in all learning, immediate feedback is imperative; and this practice putter head provides such immediate feedback as to allow the practicer to make necessary adjustments right away.

It is yet another objective of this invention to provide, through the V shaped striking point, a means of determining a portion of the path along which the golf ball is intended to follow in order to roll into the golf hole.

Yet another objective of the invention is to provide the player with a means of developing what is known as “muscle memory”, meaning with consistent and successful practice, the muscles in the arms, wrists, and hands will “remember” the feeling of the appropriate pull back stroke, striking position of the putter, and the follow through stroke.

Yet another objective of this invention is to provide a practice putter that is simple in design, economical to produce, effective for both indoor and outdoor practice, equally effective for any age/sex golfer, equally effective for both right and left handed golfers, and pleasing to the eye.

There have been many putting training aids on the market. None have focused almost entirely on developing “muscle memory” in the hands, wrists, and arms without the assistance of some type of rail system used to guide the putter. One of the primary reasons golfers miss putts is that in the midst of pulling the putter head back in preparation for the fore stroke, the putter face turns and does not remain straight, causing the ball to roll in a direction different than intended when the golfer initially lined up the putt. The V shaped point used as the striking surface of the practice putter head invention serves as a visual aid in assuring the putter point continues to point in the desired direction during back stroke, fore stroke, and follow through. It also serves as an immediate source of feedback. If the putter head face does not remain straight during back stroke, fore stroke, and follow through, the point of the V will not strike the ball in the center and the ball will immediately roll in the direction the putter head's V shaped point was pointing upon impact. The golfer will know exactly what corrective action must be taken to correct the error in their putting stroke.

FIG. 1 is a partial perspective view of a practice putter 10 comprised of a shaft 17 connected to a putter head 20. As will be apparent, the shaft 17 is not drawn to scale and is substantially longer than indicated in the Figure.

In the embodiment depicted in FIG. 1, the shaft is attached to a grip 16. This grip 16 can be made of rubber, leather, neoprene, or any other standard golf putter grip material. The size of the grip can be standard golf club grip size, oversized for people who prefer a larger grip feel in their hands. The shape of this grip can be round, or flat on the front of the grip where the golfer normally places his/her thumbs. The length of the grip is approximately 10 inches (in one embodiment), but it can be other lengths.

Referring again to FIG. 1, the putter head 20 may be any shape that putter heads conventionally have, including rectangular, square, half-moon, blade, and other shapes. In general, the putter heads conventionally have a front side and back side. Putter head 20 has such a front side 19 (corresponding to its “right side”), and a back side 21 (corresponding to its “left side”).

Extending from front side 19 is a first substantially V-shaped assembly 23. Extending from back side 21 is a second substantially V-shaped assembly 25. These V-shaped assemblies provide the striking surfaces used in applicant's practice putter; and they will be described in greater detail elsewhere in this specification.

Referring again to FIG. 1, also extending from front side 19 are wings 27 and 29. Extending from back side 21 are wings 31 and 33. Such wings 27, 29, 31, and 33 may be the same or different. In one embodiment, they have substantially the same weight, substantially the same size, and substantially the same shape. Without wishing to be bound by any particular theory, applicant believes that these wings provide a balanced feel to his practice putter.

Referring again to FIG. 1, the putter shaft 17 is preferably cylindrical in shape and can vary in length from the standard putter shaft length to any length desired by the golfer. The standard diameter of the shaft is preferably 0.370 inches, but can be larger or smaller. The shaft can be made of steel, graphite, aluminum, wood, fiberglass, or any combination of materials. The shaft can be “stepless”, “double bend”, “straight” or other variations of the above mentioned types. The shaft 17 is present to assist the golfer in moving the practice putter head in the desired direction and with the desired speed as to propel the golf ball in the direction of the golf hole. In the embodiment depicted, the shaft 17 is preferably anchored into the putter head 20 by being affixed into a pre-placed hole (not shown) on the top surface of the practice putter head 20. The material used to affix the shaft 17 into the hole (not shown) can be any type of glue, epoxy, or other bonding material.

The practice putter head 20 can be made of metal, wood, fiberglass, or any combination of materials desired.

Referring again to FIG. 1, and in the preferred embodiment depicted, the top surface 14 of putter head 20 is comprised of an alignment line 13 that preferably extends from the first substantially V-shaped assembly 23 to the second substantially V-shaped assembly 25, and also from striking surface 35 to striking surface 37. The alignment line 13 is preferably a slot 13 that is cut into the surface 14 to a depth of from about 0.02 to about 0.20 inches. The alignment line 13 assists the golfer in aligning the putter head 20 with the golf ball (not shown).

The substantially V-shaped assemblies 23 and 25 can provide different striking surfaces 35 and 37. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1, striking surfaces 35 and 37 are substantially flat. In another embodiment, not shown, striking surfaces 35 and 37 are arcaute. In another embodiment, not shown, striking surfaces 35 and 37 present sharp V-shaped points. The term “substantially V-shaped assembly” is meant to comprehend each of these (and other) assemblies with each of these (and other) striking surfaces. Similarly, the term “pointed” refers to striking surfaces that may be flat, arcuate, or sharply V-shaped.

Referring again to FIG. 1, it will be apparent that practice putter 10 can advantageously be used by both right-handed and left-handed golfers. Whether a golfer using the putter is left or right handed, the surfaces 35 and 37 are substantially the same. The alignment line 13 extends from one striking surface 35 to another striking surface 37 to assist in aligning either of such striking surfaces with a golf ball. The triangular designs 12 on each corner of the head 20 are used to assist with direction. In one embodiment, the length 39 of the putter head 20 is about 4 inches.

FIG. 2 is a front view of the putter 10. FIG. 3 is a side view of such putter 10.

FIG. 5 is a bottom view of putter head 20 that, in the embodiment depicted, is a small hallowed out oval 24 that is there only to lessen the weight of the putter head 20. It serves no other purpose and can be present or not.

Best Mode for Using the Practice Putter 10

The golfer will hold the grip 16 of the shaft 17 and align the sweet spot point (35 or 37) and the center line 13 so that the sweet spot is perpendicular to the golfer's line of sight and lined up with the center of a golf ball. The direction the golfer wishes to hit the golf ball is an extension of the center line indicator 13 passing through the sweet spots 35 and 37, through the center of the ball and directly in line with the intended target The golfer lines the practice putt up by bringing the practice putter head to rest with the sweet spot butted up to the center of the golf ball with an imaginary line extending from the actual center line indicator 13 through the sweet spot, through the golf ball continuing along the desired path and ending in the center of the golf hole. Once the golfer has lined up the practice putter head 20, he/she proceeds with a back stroke, whereby the putter is pulled in a backward motion straight back away from the golf ball. The goal is for the practice putter head 20 to be pulled back as straight as possible, keeping the practice putter sweet spot maintaining the imaginary line during this backstroke, keeping the practice putter head 20 as straight and steady as possible. The golfer would then commence a forward stroke, again attempting to maintain the imaginary line to the golf hole as the sweet spot of the putter strikes the golf ball in the exact center of said ball and pushing the golf ball in the intended direction in order for the golf ball to complete its roll into the hole. While such a stroke is desired, there are numerous errors a golfer can make resulting in a miss hit golf ball and a missed putt. This practice putter head 20 will give immediate feedback as to what error was made during the putting stroke by the direction the golf ball rather than straight to the intended target, the golf hole. Using the sweet spot on the front of the practice putter head during subsequent practice strokes, the golfer can not only correct the mistake, but also build what is known as “muscle memory”, so that the muscles in the hands, wrists, and arms will automatically repeat the desired back swing and the follow through of the putt.

This practice putter head 20 invention can be used by anyone of golf age; man, woman, or child. It can be used on an outside practice green, inside a house, hotel room, or anywhere a useable surface is present. It is useful inside during extended periods of inclement weather to perfect the putting stroke. It can be used with equal ease by left or right handed golfers.

It is contemplated that initially, this invention will be utilized with short practice putts, say 2 feet or less, until the golfer begins to develop the “muscle memory” to draw the practice putter head 20 straight back and straight through every time, which is the ultimate goal of the invention. As the golfer becomes more proficient with the invention, it is assumed that he/she will move incrementally farther from the target as to gain confidence with longer, more difficult putts.

While particular aspects of the invention (practice putter 20) must be illustrated to respect its ultimate purpose, modifications may be made as long as they fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.