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Title:
SCULPTURE BRICK
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A simulated brick panel is made by applying a first layer of mortar on a base panel, applying a second layer of mortar over the first mortar layer, and then cutting grooves in the second layer to expose the first layer of mortar to view. The first layer of mortar is chosen to have a color of mortar and the second layer of mortar is chosen to have a color of brick so that the grooves will effect a simulation of mortar lines between bricks. A tool especially adapted for cutting the grooves is also provided.


Inventors:
Newman, Robert L. (Mooresville, NC, US)
Application Number:
11/763418
Publication Date:
09/10/2009
Filing Date:
06/14/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/745.19, 52/747.1, 52/749.11
International Classes:
E04C2/04; E04B1/16; E04B1/32; E04F21/00
View Patent Images:
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Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Ronald, Hofer L. (122 LINDBERGH LANE, MOORESVILLE, NC, 28117, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A method for making a sculpture brick panel on a structural surface to simulate the appearance of a brick panel, comprising the steps of: (A) applying a first layer of mortar having a first color on the structural surface, said first color being selected to simulate mortar; (B) applying a second layer of mortar having a second color over said first layer of mortar, said second color being selected to simulate brick; and (C) selectively cutting grooves in said second layer to a depth sufficient to expose said first layer.

2. The method as in claim 1, wherein said base panel is masonry board.

3. The method as in claim 1, wherein said base panel is cement blocks.

4. The method as in claim 1, wherein said first layer of mortar is a gray color.

5. The method as in claim 1, wherein said second layer of mortar is a red color.

6. The method as in claim 1, wherein step D is carried out by hand manipulation of a hand-held cutting tool.

7. The method as in claim 1, wherein step D is carried out by cutting horizontal and vertical grooves.

8. The method as in claim 1, wherein step D is carried out by cutting diverging grooves to simulate an arch.

9. A method for making a panel on a structural surface to simulate the appearance of brick comprising the steps of: (A) applying a first layer of mortar having a first color on the structural surface, said first color being selected to simulate mortar; (B) applying a second layer of mortar having a second color over said first layer of mortar, said second color being selected to simulate brick; and (C) selectively hand cutting grooves in said second layer to a depth sufficient to expose said first layer.

10. A hand tool for cutting grooves in mortar to simulate mortar lines between brick, said tool having an elongated handle with an open slot at one end thereof and a blade having a width about equal to width of a mortar line, said blade being being secured in said slot with a forward end of said blade extending beyond the slot.

11. A panel simulating sculptured brick on a structural surface, the simulated brick panel comprising: (A) a first layer of mortar having a first color on the structural surface, said first color being selected to simulate mortar; (B) a second layer of mortar having a second color over said first layer of mortar, said second color being selected to simulate brick; and (C) a multiplicity of linear grooves in said second layer to a depth sufficient to expose said first layer; and (D) a multiplicity of non-linear grooves in said second layer to a depth insufficient to expose said second layer.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present Invention relates to simulated brick walls. More specifically, the present invention relates to a method for making a wall panel or surround which appears to be made of brick but is comprised of mortar and cart be made in situ.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

It is known to make simulated masonry walls by first coating a base pane structure with a base coat to simulate mortar and then coating the base coat with a finish coat layer. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 3,819,396 Jun. 25, 1974 to Yocum discloses a simulated masonry wall and a process for its making wherein simulated mortar joints are provided by simultaneously cutting each of several sets of grooves extending to, into or through the base layer with a plurality of knife members having their knife edges guided above the surface of the base panel structure. The Yocum patent also suggests that previously known processes for making simulated masonry panels were provided by cutting each groove individually by hand, grooves in each set being cut sequentially.

There remains a need, however, for an improved method for making a simulated brick, wall using a technique which allows for a variety of designs and which can be carried out by unskilled as well as skilled workers. There also remains a need for a straightforward process which can be carried out to make a simulated brick wall in less time than a brick veneer wall and at less cost. There also remains a need for an improved process for making a simulated brick wall which allows the artisan to control the size, shape, color, and design of every brick in the wall. And there remains a need for an improved method for making a simulated brick wall which method does not require structural modifications to existing walls or footings.

Accordingly, the present invention provides an improved method, for making a simulated brick wall which method is straightforward, easily carried out, requires no structural modifications of existing walls and allows a great deal of flexibility or control of size, shape, color and design. Further understanding of these and other advantages of the present invention will be had from the following disclosure taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an elevational view of a preferred embodiment of a sculpture brick panel of the present invention illustrated as a window surround;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view, broken away, taken along line 2-2 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view, broken away, illustrating a step of the method of the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view, broken away, illustrating another step of the method of the present invention;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view, broken away, illustrating a further step of the method of the present invention:

FIG. 6 is a side elevation showing a preferred embodiment of a tool of the present invention for use in carrying out the method of the invention;

FIG. 7 is a plan view of the tool of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is an elevational view, broken away, of an alternative preferred embodiment of a sculpture brick panel of the present invention illustrating simulation of antique brick; and

FIG. 9 is an plan view of an alternative embodiment of a tool of the present invention.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A method for making a panel which simulates the appearance of brick, comprises the steps of:

    • (A) providing a base panel;
    • (B) applying a first layer of mortar having a first color on a surface of the base panel, said first color being selected to simulate mortar;
    • (C) applying a second layer of mortar having a second color over said first layer of mortar, said second color being selected to simulate brick; and
    • (D) selectively cutting grooves in said second layer to a depth sufficient to expose said first layer.

One embodiment of the present invention comprises a sculpture brick panel having the above-mentioned first and second layers of mortar and wherein the second layer has linear grooves therein simulating brick mortar lines and further has irregular grooves cut partially therein to simulate cracks in bricks. The present invention further comprises a tool for creating the cracks and/or grooves in the second layer of mortar.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention involves a method of making a panel which simulates a panel, made of brick or a panel having a brick veneer thereon. The present invention involves use of a first mortar having a color simulating mortar and a second mortar having a color simulating brick. Generally speaking, the method of this invention comprises the steps of first providing a base panel or other surface structure to which a layer of mortar can be applied, applying a first coating of the first mortar on the panel, applying a second coating of the second mortar over the first mortar, and then cutting grooves through the second coating of mortar to expose the first coating of mortar to thereby simulate mortar lines.

The base panel can be a masonry board such as Dura-Rock or Hardi-board nailed or otherwise secured to studs or other wall support, structure. Of course, any panel or structure having a surface suitable to support, a layer of mortar may be used in the present invention. For example, the base panel can be a cement block wall or a poured cement wall or the like.

The first mortar can be any conventional mortar material, for example, type S mortar, and can be gray or any color desired by the artisan to simulate mortar. Suitable mortar materials are well known in the art.

The second mortar also can be any conventional mortar material and can be red or any color desired by the artisan to simulate brick. The mortar material can be the same as that used as the first mortar material except is of a color to simulate brick.

Now referring to FIG. 1, a preferred embodiment of a sculpture brick panel of the present invention is shown and indicated generally by the numeral 10. Sculpture brick panel 10 has a plurality of simulated bricks 12 which are separated by simulated mortar lines 14. As illustrated in FIG. 1, sculptured brick panel 10 is shown as a window surround for window 16. Sculpture brick panel 10 is illustrated with two vertically extending side sections 18 and 20 and an arched section 22. Arched section 22 comprises a plurality of simulated bricks 24 which appear to have been cut in a manner to form a key stone structure.

As best shown in FIG. 2, sculpture brick panel 10 is provided on conventional 2×4 studs 28 and comprises a base panel 26 of masonry board attached to studs 28, first mortar layer 30 and second mortar layer 32, Grooves 34 are cut through second mortar layer 32 and preferably into first layer 30 as illustrated in FIG. 2 so that one viewing sculpture brick panel 10 from the left in FIG. 2 will see first mortar layer 30 through grooves 34. The appearance of sculpture brick panel 10 is thus that of a panel of bricks with mortar between the bricks.

Now referring to FIGS. 3 to 5, the method of the present invention will be described. The initial step of the present invention involves provision of a panel suitable as a base panel for the first layer of mortar. Thus, as is illustrated in the embodiment shown in FIG. 3, an initial step of the present invention is to apply base panel 26 of masonry board to studs 28 (only one stud 28 being shown in the Figure). The masonry board may be any suitable base panel such as ¼″ Dura-Rock masonry board. The next step of the present invention is to apply first mortar layer 30 over panel 26 as is illustrated in FIG. 4. Layer 30 is preferably chosen to have a color suitable for mortar such as gray and can be any suitable thickness such as ¼″ thickness. Mortar layer 30 can be allowed to set or dry before second mortar layer 32 is applied over it in the next step. Thus, as illustrated in FIG. 5, second mortar layer 32 is applied over first mortar layer 30. Second mortar layer 32 may be applied over first mortar layer 30 before or after first mortar layer 30 has hardened. Second mortar layer 32 should be selected to have the color of brick it is desired to simulate and can be of any desired thickness for example ¼′ thickness has been found to be suitable. Finally, and preferably before second mortar layer 32 has set up or hardened, grooves are cut through second mortar layer 32 to selectively expose first mortar layer 30 to simulate mortar lines. Generally speaking, it will be preferable to measure and cut the horizontal grooves first and then cut the vertical lines between the horizontal lines to thereby simulate the ends of bricks.

It will be appreciated that the present invention can be practiced with hand tools. A plastering trowel for applying mortar and cutting tool for cutting grooves may be all of the tools required for some installations. Of course, a screwdriver or hammer for securing the base panel to a supporting structure, a tape measure for measuring location of the grooves and a circular saw for cutting the base panel may also be used. Also a soft brush for texturing the second mortar layer may be desired to enhance the simulated brick appearance of the second layer.

A preferred hand tool of the invention for cutting grooves through mortar layer 32 is illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7 and indicated generally by the numeral 40. Tool 40 has an elongated handle 42 which is sized to fit comfortably in the hand of the user. Handle 42 can be made of polymeric material, wood, metal or any other suitable material and has a slot 44 in a forward end thereof which is adapted to receive a wide blade 46 which can also be made of any suitable material such as metal, for example steel, or a polymeric material. Blade 46 is held in place in handle 42 by fasteners 48 which can be bolts and nuts as shown in FIG. 7. The forward face 50 of Blade 46 is of a width to correspond to the desired width of a mortar line in the final sculpture brick panel. Blade 46 has a hollow interior 52 to facilitate removal of mortar material during its use.

Now referring to FIG. 8, an alternative sculpture brick panel of the present invention is shown and indicated generally by the numeral 100. Sculpture brick panel 100 has grooves 134 which are analogous to grooves 34 of panel 10 and is generally made in a manner analogous to panel 10 with a first mortar layer 130 and a second mortar layer 132. Sculpture brick panel 100 also has grooves 101 and 103 in mortar layer 132 to simulate cracks in bricks. Thus grooves 101 are cut to a shallow depth not entirely through layer 132 which grooves 103 are cut to a depth to extend through layer 132 to expose layer 130 to view. One advantage of the method of the present invention is that grooves can be cut into the second mortar layer on a straight line to simulate mortar between bricks or can be cut in an irregular line and to different depths to simulate cracks in the brick such as might be found in antique brick walls.

Now referring to FIG. 9, an alternative embodiment of a tool for use herein is disclosed and indicated generally by the numeral 200. Tool 200 is generally analogous to tool 40 but has a blade 202 with a forward width 204 which blade 202 is molded into handle 206 or alternatively blade 202 is made or molded as a one-piece construction of polymeric plastic or metal with handle 206.

While a preferred embodiment of the present invention has been disclosed and illustrated as a window surround, it will be appreciated that the present invention is suitable for use wherever a simulated brick panel is desired and offers a great deal of design flexibility. For example, the present invention can be used to provide a simulated brick panel having brick in a herringbone pattern or any other pattern. It is an advantage of the present invention that such alternative patterns can be made much more easily with the present invention than with conventional brick. Also, the present invention may be used indoors for example to simulate brick on a feature wall or a wainscote in a dining room, or a brick back-splash in a kitchen or a fireplace. The invention may be used outdoors for example to reface a home in brick or cover the foundation block in brick. These and other uses of the present invention are contemplated to be within the scope of this invention which is intended to be limited only by the following claims.