Title:
INFLATABLE PONG TABLE
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An inflatable pong table comprises a substantially hollow inflatable member. The inflatable member may be formed with an opposing pair of end recesses and having an intermediate recess interposed between the end recesses. The pong table may further comprise a pair of end inserts that are removably insertable within the end recesses. Each of the end inserts preferably includes a plurality of apertures formed therein. Each of the apertures may be sized and configured to receive the base of a beverage container. An intermediate insert is preferably configured to be removably insertable into the intermediate recess. The intermediate insert is preferably formed with a substantially hard and planar upper surface to facilitate bouncing of a ball thereagainst.



Inventors:
Boyd, Stephen (Murrieta, CA, US)
Foster, Donnie T. (Murrieta, CA, US)
Application Number:
12/025026
Publication Date:
08/06/2009
Filing Date:
02/02/2008
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B67/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
CHAMBERS, MICHAEL S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Novatech, IP Law (1001 Avenue Pico, Suite C500, San Clemente, CA, 92673, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. An inflatable pong table, comprising: a substantially hollow inflatable member having an opposing pair of end recesses and an intermediate recess interposed between the end recesses; a pair of end inserts disposed within the end recesses, each of the end inserts having at least one aperture formed therein; and an intermediate insert disposed within the intermediate recess.

2. The inflatable pong table of claim 1 wherein each of the end inserts has a plurality of apertures formed therein, each one of the apertures being sized and configured to receive a beverage container.

3. The inflatable pong table of claim 1 wherein the at least one aperture is triangularly shaped.

4. The inflatable pong table of claim 1 wherein the inflatable member is rectangularly shaped.

5. The inflatable pong table of claim 1 wherein the intermediate and end inserts are sized and configured to be removably insertable into respective ones of the intermediate and end recesses.

6. The inflatable pong table of claim 1 wherein the intermediate and end recesses are rectangularly shaped.

7. The inflatable pong table of claim 1 further comprising a valve assembly mounted to the inflatable member.

8. The inflatable pong table of claim 1 wherein: each of the intermediate and end recesses defines a recess depth; the recess depth being less than a thickness of the corresponding intermediate and end inserts that are insertable into the intermediate and end recesses.

9. The inflatable pong table of claim 1 wherein each of the intermediate and end inserts include substantially planar upper surfaces.

10. The inflatable pong table of claim 1 wherein the intermediate and end inserts are formed of acrylic material.

11. The inflatable pong table of claim 2 wherein: the plurality of apertures are formed within each one of the end inserts in a triangular arrangement; a pair of the apertures being disposed on opposing sides of a base of the triangular arrangement.

12. An inflatable pong table, comprising: a substantially hollow inflatable member having an opposing pair of end recesses and an intermediate recess interposed between the end recesses; a pair of end inserts disposed within the end recesses, each of the end inserts having at least one marking configured to designate placement of a beverage container; and an intermediate insert disposed within the intermediate recess.

13. The inflatable pong table of claim wherein the inflatable member is rectangularly shaped.

14. The inflatable pong table of claim wherein the intermediate and end inserts are sized and configured to be removably insertable into respective ones of the intermediate and end recesses.

15. The inflatable pong table of claim wherein the intermediate and end recesses are rectangularly shaped.

16. The inflatable pong table of claim further comprising a valve assembly mounted to the inflatable member.

17. The inflatable pong table of claim wherein: each of the intermediate and end recesses defines a recess depth; the recess depth being less than a thickness of the corresponding intermediate and end inserts that are insertable into the intermediate and end recesses.

18. The inflatable pong table of claim wherein each of the intermediate and end inserts include substantially planar upper surfaces.

19. The inflatable pong table of claim wherein the intermediate and end inserts are formed of acrylic material.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Not Applicable

STATEMENT RE: FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH/DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND

The present invention relates generally to games and, more particularly, to a pong table that is specifically adapted to be inflatable such that participants may play the game in a swimming pool or other body of water. Advantageously, the inflatable nature of the pong table allows for deflation to a reduced size for convenience in storage and transportability.

Water pong is an immensely popular game that is similar in some aspects to the traditional game of ping pong. The game of water pong entails the use of a relatively smooth and hard surface upon which a ball such as a ping pong ball may be bounced. In playing the game, participants at opposed ends of the table take turns throwing the ball lengthwise across the table in an attempt to bounce the ball off a central hard surface and into one of many containers or cups located at opposing table ends. Each of the cups may contain a desired beverage.

The beverage containers or cups at each end of the table may be arranged in a triangular or pyramid shape. Participants attempt to bounce the ball into one of the cups after which the participants at the opposing end of the table are required to drink the contents of the cup into which the ball has landed. The empty cup is then removed from the table and the opposing team takes its turn in attempting to bounce the ball in the opposite direction toward the opposite end of the table. The game is won by the participants who are the first to cause the opposing team to drink the contents of all of the cups located at the opposing team's end of the table. Variations on the game may include the participants attempting to toss the ping pong ball directly into the opponent's cups. However, if the ball is bounced off the table instead of tossed into the cups, the opposing team is allowed to block the bouncing ball to prevent the ball from landing in a cup.

Further options in playing the game include requiring the opposing team to consume the contents of three cups if two balls are successfully tossed into the same cup. A further option in playing the game includes allowing a participant at each end of the table to rearrange the cups as they desire in order to increase the difficulty for the opposing team to bounce or toss ping pong balls into the cups at their end. Once all the cups are removed from one end of the table, the losing team may be provided with one additional attempt to land a ball into a cup at the opposing team's end. An overtime round may be included in the game if both teams successfully cause the opposing team to drink and eliminate all cups from their respective ends.

The prior art includes various games which entail the use of a ping pong ball on a hardened surface. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 3,858,877 issued to Lundstrom discloses an invertible floating game board for use in a swimming pool. The game board comprises a table that is specifically adapted to float on a body of water and includes a removable barrier or net over which the ping pong ball is bounced. In this regard, the invertible game board disclosed in the Lundstrom reference essentially entails a floatable ping pong table that may be anchored in position in a swimming pool by the use of weights on opposing sides of the ping pong table. Ropes or lines extending downwardly from the ping pong table at the midpoint help to anchor the pool table in position. One drawback associated with the game board of Lundstrom is that the game board is essentially a rigid or hardened surface which occupies a relatively large volume making transportability and storage of the game board difficult and inconvenient.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,976,434 issued to Roig et al. discloses a floating amphibious game table that is adapted for use on a body of water. The game table includes a base member having multiple openings on the upper surface into which beverage containers may be disposed. The lower surface of the game table is adapted to receive a plurality of legs which facilitate floatation of the game table on a body of water such as a swimming pool. In addition, the legs are sufficiently rigid to support the table out of water such as on a hardened surface. One drawback associated with the game table of the Roig reference is similar to the above-mentioned drawback associated with the generally rigid table of the Lundstrom reference. The game table of Roig is generally rigid and non-collapsible such that transportability and storage is also inconvenient.

U.S. Patent Publication No. 2004/0188942 filed by Trokan discloses a beer pong game system comprises colored beer pong balls having printed messages. In playing the game, participants toss the pong balls across the length of the table. Upon landing a ball into one of the cups at the opposing end, the participants at that end must drink the contents of the beverage and discard the cup. The printed messages on the ping pong balls, or alternatively, color coding of each of the balls adds a degree of complexity to the game in that the participants must perform the acts printed on the ping pong ball and/or as provided by the color coding of the ping pong ball. Similar to the above-mentioned drawbacks associated with the Lundstrom and the Roig references, the game system disclosed in the Trokan reference possesses the undesirable deficiency of the table being substantially rigid and non-collapsible such that storage and transportability is inconvenient.

The prior art also includes additional references which disclose game tables adapted for playing the game of pong. However, each of the references possesses the above-described drawbacks associated with a substantially rigid table that is relatively large, heavy and bulky. Unfortunately, the rigid nature of the prior art tables renders the table difficult and inconvenient to transport and store.

As can be seen, there exists a need in the art for a pong table that is adapted to be played in a variety of environments and which may be conveniently transported and stored without the undesirable drawbacks associated with bulky, large and heavy tables of the prior art.

BRIEF SUMMARY

The present invention specifically addresses the above-described needs associated with pong tables of the prior art. More particularly, in one aspect, the present invention is a pong table that is specifically adapted to be inflatable such that the table may be easily stored and transported between locations where the game of pong is played. The pong table comprises a substantially hollow and inflatable member which may have a generally rectangular shape although various other shapes and configurations are contemplated. The inflatable member may include an opposing pair of end recesses formed on opposing ends of the inflatable pong table on an upper side thereof. In addition, the inflatable member preferably includes an intermediate recess that is disposed midway between the end recesses and is also located on the upper side of the inflatable member.

Each of the intermediate and end recesses is adapted to receive a corresponding intermediate insert and corresponding pair of end inserts. The end inserts may each include a single aperture or a plurality of apertures or openings formed therewithin. Each of the apertures may be sized and configured to receive at least one beverage container such as a cup. The end inserts may alternatively each include a single large aperture formed in a triangular or pyramid shape suitable to accommodate a plurality of cups. The end inserts may optionally include markings such as lines or symbols or patterns rather than apertures as a means to designate a placement or arrangement of the cups.

In one aspect, the intermediate and end recesses are preferably fabricated from a polymeric material such as plastic and, more preferably, acrylic material. In addition, each of the intermediate and end inserts may preferably be fabricated with a generally planar and hardened upper surface. Particularly, the intermediate insert is preferably fabricated to have a generally hardened and planar upper surface for facilitating bouncing of a ping pong ball thereagainst such that the ball will bounce in a predictable direction and manner.

Regardless of their outer geometry, the inserts may be fabricated to be buoyant such as by including a hollow interior portion in order to facilitate floating thereof should the insert be displaced from the pong table. In addition, it is also contemplated that the inserts may be fabricated as generally solid or homogenous bodies that are generally non-buoyant and may further have a generally constant thickness. Preferable materials for fabricating the inserts include any suitable polymeric material such as acrylic, polyester, polyethylene or any other suitable metallic and/or non-metallic material or various combinations thereof.

As discussed above, in one aspect, each of the apertures is preferably sized and configured to receive a beverage container such as the base of a cup. The apertures may extend partially and/or completely through a thickness of the end inserts. Each set of apertures on each end insert is preferably formed in a pyramid or triangular shape. In one aspect, the end insert may include ten apertures and may have a further opposing pair of apertures formed near corners of the base of the pyramid or triangle in the end insert. In another aspect, the end insert may include a single aperture of a triangular or pyramid shape although the end insert may be formed with an aperture in any number, shape, size and configuration.

The inflatable member itself may be constructed with opposing end walls and opposing side walls which interconnect an upper side of the inflatable member to a lower side. The upper and lower sides as well as the end and side walls are preferably formed of a flexible polymeric material such as vinyl, rubber or any other material that is suitable for repeated inflation and deflation cycles. In this regard, the material for forming the inflatable member is preferably resistant to cracking which could cause leakage over time. The inflatable member may include at least one valve or valve assembly by which the inflatable member may be inflated and deflated. The valve or valve assembly is adapted to allow insertion of gas such as air by means of any suitable inflation source such as a common bicycle air pump or any other suitable means.

In addition, the valve may comprise a simple, sealable valve member which is manually open and closable and which allows for manual inflation and deflation. In one embodiment, the inflatable member may be sized to be approximately 8 ft. in length, 3 ft. in width and having a height of approximately 3 inches when fully inflated. However, the inflatable member may be sized and configured such that when inflated, the pong table assumes a variety of sizes and shapes. Furthermore, it is contemplated that the pong table may be configured for receiving additional inserts other than the intermediate and end inserts mentioned above.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

These and other features of the present invention will become more apparent upon reference of the drawings wherein like numerals refer to like parts therethroughout and in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an inflatable pong table having an opposing pair of end recesses and a center or intermediate recess for receiving corresponding end inserts and an intermediate insert;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the inflatable pong table illustrated in FIG. 1 and further illustrating a geometric configuration thereof in one embodiment;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along lines 100-100 of the pong table of FIG. 2 and further illustrating the mounting of the intermediate and end inserts in respective ones of the intermediate and end recesses;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of the pong table taken along lines 102-102 of FIG. 2 and further illustrating the border portion which defines the recess; and

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken along lines 104-104 of FIG. 2 and further illustrating the end insert having a plurality of apertures formed therein for receiving beverage containers.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Referring now to the drawings wherein the showings are for purposes of illustrating preferred embodiments of the invention only and not for purposes of limiting the same, FIG. 1 is a perspective illustration of a pong table 2 which is specifically adapted to be inflatable such that the pong table 2 may be easily stored or transported between locations where the game is played. More specifically, the pong table 2 comprises a substantially hollow but inflatable member 4 having a plurality of recesses 10, 12 adapted to receive a corresponding number of inserts 6, 8. Even further, the inflatable member 4 may include an opposing pair of end recesses 10 and an intermediate recess 12 that may be interposed such as midway between the end recesses 10 although the intermediate recess 12 may be located at any spacing between the end recesses 10.

The pong table 2 includes a pair of end inserts 6 that are disposable within the pair of end recesses 10. Similarly, the intermediate recess 12 is adapted to receive an intermediate insert 8. Each of the end inserts 6 may have a plurality of apertures 14 formed therein with each of the apertures 14 preferably being sized and configured to receive a beverage container. Each of the end inserts 6 may alternatively have a single aperture 14 being sized and configured in a pyramid or triangular shape or in any other size, shape and configuration. Advantageously, the pong table 2 is adapted to be inflatable to enhance storage and transportability. As shown in FIG. 2, inflation and deflation of the pong table 2 is facilitated by at least one valve assembly 16.

In a further embodiment, as shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, it is contemplated that the pong table 2 may include two or more interior compartments 46 which are fluidly separated from one another. In this regard, each of the interior compartments 46 preferably includes its own valve assembly 16 such that each interior compartment 46 may be separately inflated and deflated by means of its valve assembly 16. The valve assembly 16 as illustrated in FIG. 2 may be adapted to allow insertion of gas such as air by means of any suitable inflation source.

For example, it is contemplated that the valve assembly 16 may be adapted to engage an end fitting on a hose or a common bicycle air pump as is well known in the art. In an alternative embodiment, the valve assembly 16 may simply comprise a sealable valve member which is manually open and closable and which allows for inflation by manual means such as by a person blowing air into the valve assembly. For pong tables having such manual valve members, the same may be deflated by simply removing the valve member to allow gas such as air to escape.

FIG. 2 shows the inflatable pong table 2 in plan view wherein the inflatable member 4 is illustrated as rectangularly-shaped. In a preferred embodiment, the inflatable member 4 may be sized and configured to be approximately 8 ft long, 3 ft wide, and with a height of approximately 3 inches when fully inflated. However, it is appreciated that the inflated pong table 2 may be sized and configured in any shape, size and configuration when inflated. Furthermore, it is contemplated that the pong table 2 may be configured for receiving additional inserts other than the intermediate 8 and end inserts 6, mentioned above which are conventionally utilized in playing the game of pong.

Referring still to FIG. 2, inflatable member 4 can be seen as having the opposing pair of end recesses 10, each of which is shown as being rectangularly-shaped although the same may be provided in any shape, size and configuration. Furthermore, shown in FIG. 2 is the intermediate insert 8 disposed within the intermediate recess 12. The intermediate recess 12 is generally equally spaced between the end recesses 10 in the preferred embodiment although the recesses 10, 12 may be spaced in any arrangement.

Referring to FIGS. 2 and 3, the inflatable member 4 itself has an upper side 18, a lower side 20, a pair of end walls 22 and a pair of opposing side walls 24. As can be seen in FIG. 2, the upper side 18 includes the intermediate recess 12 and end recesses 10 which are bordered on the lateral sides by a border portion 26. A pair of separator portions 28 may optionally be included to divide the intermediate recess 12 from the end recesses 10. As can be seen in FIG. 3, the separator portions 28 as well as the border portions 26 each may include upper surfaces 30, 32 which are preferably disposed slightly above the upper surfaces 34, 36 of the intermediate 8 and end inserts 6.

More specifically, each of the intermediate 12 and end recesses 10 defines a recess depth. Preferably, the recess depth is preferably less than a thickness of a corresponding intermediate 8 and end inserts 6. However, it should be noted that the relative heights of the border portion 26, separator portion 28 and upper surface 30, 32 may vary relative to one another. For example, it is contemplated that the upper side 18 (i.e., border portion 32 and separator portion 30) are sized to be at a height that is equal to or slightly less (such as ½ inch) than the height of the upper surfaces 34, 36 of the inserts 6, 8.

FIG. 4 depicts a cross-sectional view of the pong table 2 illustrating a pair of opposing recess edges 38 and a recess floor 40 which collectively define the end recess 10. Likewise, the intermediate recess 12 includes the same recess edges 38 and recess floor 40. Each of the intermediate 12 and end recesses 10 are preferably fabricated such that at least the upper surfaces 42 of the recess floors 40 are generally hardened. Furthermore, each of the intermediate 12 and end recesses 10 preferably has a planar upper surface 42 although non-planar surfaces are contemplated. However, the planar arrangement of the upper surface 42 is more preferable for the intermediate insert 8 to allow bouncing of a ping pong ball or other object or article thereagainst such that the ball bounces in a predictable direction and manner. In this regard, the inserts 6, 8 themselves may each be fabricated so as to be hollow in order to facilitate floating or buoyancy thereof should the pong table 2 be displaced during enthusiastic playing of the game.

However, it is also contemplated that each of the inserts 6,8 may be fabricated as a generally solid material of constant thickness. Preferable materials for fabricating the inserts include any suitable polymeric material such as acrylic, polyester, polyethylene, or any other metallic and/or non-metallic material or combination thereof. FIG. 5 depicts a sectional view of one of the end inserts 6 illustrating a plurality of apertures or openings 14 formed therein. As mentioned above, each of the apertures 14 is preferably sized and configured to receive the base of a beverage container such as a cup, can, bottle or other object. As shown in FIG. 5, the apertures 14 may be formed as extending partially into a thickness of the end 6 and intermediate inserts 8. However, it is also contemplated that in a further embodiment, the apertures 14 may extend through an entire length of the insert 6, 8.

Referring briefly to FIG. 1, one of the end inserts 6 is disposed in spaced arrangement from the corresponding end recess 10. As can be seen, the plurality of apertures 14 is illustrated as being formed in a pyramid or triangular shape including ten apertures 14 with a further opposing pair of apertures 14 formed near corners of the end insert 6. In this regard, it should be noted that the end insert 6 may be formed with any number of apertures 14 in any shape or configuration. Specifically, the end insert 6 may be formed to have anywhere from six to seventeen apertures 14 although any number may be provided. Furthermore, the geometric arrangement of the apertures 14 may be provided in any form other than the triangular or pyramid shape.

In addition, markings, symbols, patterns or other geometric features may be substituted for the apertures 14 to designate the placement of the cups. Such geometric features may be integrally molded into the inserts during the formation process such as during molding. In addition, such geometric features may be applied on any surface (e.g., upper and/or lower surfaces) of the inserts 6, 8. Even further, the geometric features designating preferred placement of the cups may be provided on the recess floors 40. In such an arrangement, the inserts may be formed as clear acrylic members such that the geometric features are visible through the inserts 6, 8.

As previously mentioned, each of the apertures 14 is preferably sized and configured to receive the base of a beverage container or cup. In this regard, the apertures 14 may be sized and configured to hold any commercially available container such as a 12-ounce paper or plastic drinking cup. However, the apertures 14 may be sized and configured to hold various sizes and configurations of beverage containers such as cans, glasses, cups and any other suitable container or object. Preferably, the apertures 14 are configured such that when the beverage container is placed thereinto, the base of the beverage container is laterally stabilized to prevent tipping of the beverage container during playing of the game. However, the opening of the aperture 14 is preferably such that the beverage container may be easily inserted and removed therefrom at the appropriate time during playing of the game. In addition, aperture 14 may be sized and configured to hold multiple beverage containers in a triangular or pyramid shape.

Referring briefly to FIGS. 3 and 4, the intermediate insert 8 is disposed within the intermediate recess 12. Each of the intermediate 8 and end inserts 6 is preferably rectangularly-shaped and preferably sized and configured to be removably insertable into the corresponding intermediate 12 and end recesses 10. As was earlier mentioned, the intermediate insert 8 preferably has a hardened planar upper surface 34 in order to facilitate bouncing of the ping pong ball thereagainst. The intermediate 8 and end inserts 6 may further include optional openings or other formations to facilitate removal and insertion (i.e., placement) of the inserts 6, 8 into the respective recesses 10, 12. For example, each of the inserts 6,8 may include an opposing pair of finger holds formed along opposing edges or corners of the insert 6, 8. In a further embodiment, each of the inserts 6, 8 may include a slight depression along opposing edges of the inserts 6, 8 to facilitate insertion of fingers or hand between the recess edges 38 or the insert 6, 8 for grasping of the insert 6, 8.

Referring to FIGS. 1-5, the construction of the inflatable member 4 may include opposing end walls 22 and side walls 24 interconnecting the upper side 18 to the lower side 20. The lower side 20 may be formed as a substantially planar panel member and may be formed of any suitable material. Likewise, the upper side 18 is formed to include the end recesses 10 and intermediate recess 12 and therefore may be pre-fabricated into the polymeric material. However, it is contemplated that the end recesses 10 and intermediate recess 12 may be formed using panel components which may be interconnected to one another such as using adhesive bonding or thermal sealing. Likewise, the upper side 18 may be joined to the lower side 20 by means of a perimeter seam. Such perimeter seam may be formed as a protruding inwardly or protruding outwardly seam.

In another embodiment, the seam may be formed as an overlapping seam which may be bonded using adhesive and/or any suitable means including mechanical and/or heat bonding. In addition, the inflatable member 4 may be formed in a seamless configuration. The inflatable member 4 may be formed with generally straight longitudinal and lateral sides (i.e., side walls 24 and end walls 22). However, as was earlier mentioned, the inflatable member 4 may be provided in any alternative shape and/or configuration other than a rectangular shape having the straight sides illustrated in the figures. Each of the end walls 22 and side walls 24 is illustrated in the figures as being generally straight or slightly bulbous. However, depending upon the formation of the interconnection of the upper 18 and lower sides 20 and inclusion of a perimeter seam, the end walls 22 and side walls 24 may form alternative configurations.

In a further embodiment, the inflatable member 4 may be sub-divided into at least two interior compartments 46 which may be fluidly separated from one another. Each of the interior compartments 46 may be fluidly connected to a valve assembly 16 mounted to an exterior portion of the inflatable member 4. However, two or more of the interior compartments 46 may fluidly connect to a single valve assembly 16. In this regard, it is contemplated that in order to maintain the generally planar shape of the upper 18 and lower sides 20, reinforcing or internal webbing 44 may be strategically located within the inflatable member 4.

The internal webbing 44 may be disposed in any orientation such as in a vertical orientation extending between opposing end walls 22. Likewise, the vertical webbing 44 may extend between opposing side walls 24. Furthermore, the inflatable member 4 may include a combination of internal webbing 44 that criss-crosses one another in varying angles in order to maintain the generally planar shape thereof. In one embodiment, internal webbing 44 may be inserted to maintain a generally planar shape of the recess floor 40 of each of the intermediate 12 and end recesses 10. In this regard, such planar shape of the recess floor 40 may facilitate stable mounting of the corresponding inserts 6, 8 thereinto in order to prevent rocking or tipping motion of the insert 6, 8 on an otherwise protruding recess floor 40.

The inflatable member 4 may further include a valve assembly 16 located in any suitable location. For example, FIG. 2 illustrates a single valve assembly 16 located adjacent to a corner of the inflatable member 4. However, it should be noted that the valve assembly 16 may be positioned on the lower side 20 of the inflatable member 4 or any other suitable location that does not interfere with playing of the game. Also optionally included with the inflatable member 4 may be at least one and, more preferably, a plurality of anchor members such as eye hooks 48 mountable to the inflatable member 4 and configured to allow for anchoring against lateral or sideways movement. As shown in FIG. 2, the eye hooks may be located as one on each corner to stabilize the inflatable member 4 against movement such as may be desired during play. In addition, the eye hooks 48 may allow the inflatable member 4 to be hung or suspended when not in use or in order to allow the inflatable member 4 to dry after use. Although shown as being provided on each corner of the inflatable member 4, the eye hooks may be provided in any location and in any quantity. In addition, the size, shape and overall configuration of the eye hooks 48 may be varied to configurations other than that which is illustrated and described above.

The inflatable member 4 may be fabricated from flexible material, such as vinyl, rubber or any other polymeric material, suitable for repeated inflation and deflation cycles of the inflatable member 4 without cracking over time that could otherwise cause leakage of the inflatable member 4. Furthermore, it is contemplated that the inflatable member 4 is fabricated with material that, when inflated, maintains a substantially rigid or semi-rigid shape to facilitate a generally planar overall configuration of the inflatable member 4.

Other materials that may be used include sealed fabric material. In addition, the construction of the inflatable member 4 may comprise a plurality of generally rigid sections such as the sections used for formation of the recess floors 40. In such an arrangement, it is contemplated that such rigid portions are interconnected by relatively flexible vinyl and/or other polymeric material in order to facilitate deflation and compaction of the pong table 2 to a relatively small size to facilitate transportability and storage.

The above description is given by way of example, and not limitation. Given the above disclosure, one skilled in the art could devise variations that are within the scope and spirit of the invention disclosed herein. Further, the various features of the embodiments disclosed herein can be used alone, or in varying combinations with each other and are not intended to be limited to the specific combination described herein. Thus, the scope of the claims is not to be limited by the illustrated embodiments.