Title:
Two hang grip
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A grip for attachment to a handle of a striking instrument swung with both of a user's hands for striking an object, one hand being a leading hand for leading the instrument toward the object and the other hand being a following hand. The grip comprises a leading portion adapted for receiving the grip of the user's leading hand and defining a first coefficient of friction between the leading portion of said grip and the user's leading hand; and a following portion adapted for receiving the grip of the user's following hand and defining a second coefficient of friction between the following portion of said grip and the user's following hand; the second coefficient of friction being lower than the first coefficient of friction.



Inventors:
Chen, Sam H. (San Diego, CA, US)
Bishop, William H. (Solana Beach, CA, US)
Application Number:
12/380833
Publication Date:
07/02/2009
Filing Date:
03/04/2009
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/300, 473/568
International Classes:
A63B53/14
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
GRAHAM, MARK S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Palomar Patent (3490 Mission Mesa Way, San Diego, CA, 92120-1573, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A grip for attachment to a handle of a striking instrument swung with both of a user's hands for striking an object, one hand being a leading hand for leading the instrument toward the object and the other hand being a following hand; the handle having a distal end connected to a striking portion of the instrument and a proximal end; said grip comprising: a leading portion adapted for receiving the grip of the user's leading hand and defining a first coefficient of friction between the leading portion of said grip and the user's leading hand; and a following portion adapted for receiving the grip of the user's following hand and defining a second coefficient of friction between the following portion of said grip and the user's following hand; the second coefficient of friction being lower than the first coefficient of friction.

2. The grip of claim 1 wherein: said leading portion of said grip is proximal said following portion.

3. The grip of claim 1 wherein: said grip comprises: a single wrap of grip material comprising: a section of leading material; and a section of following material.

4. The grip of claim 1 wherein: said grip comprises: an elongate tape comprising: a first end of leading material; and a second end of following material.

5. The grip of claim 1 wherein: said grip comprises: a elongate sleeve of resilient material; and wherein said leading portion includes a covering of leading material on a portion of said sleeve for receiving the grip of the user's leading hand; and said following portion includes: a covering of following material on a portion of said sleeve for receiving the grip of the user's following hand.

6. A grip for attachment to a handle of a striking instrument swung with both of a user's hands for striking an object, one hand being a leading hand for leading the instrument toward the object and the other hand being a following hand; the palms of the user's facing in opposite directions; the handle having a distal end connected to a striking portion of the instrument and a proximal end; said grip comprising: a leading portion adapted for receiving the grip of the user's leading hand and defining a first coefficient of friction between the leading portion of said grip and the user's leading hand; and a following portion adapted for receiving the grip of the user's following hand and defining a second coefficient of friction between the following portion of said grip and the user's following hand; the second coefficient of friction being lower than the first coefficient of friction.

7. The grip of claim 6 wherein: said leading portion of said grip is proximal said following portion.

8. The grip of claim 6 wherein: said grip comprises: a single wrap of grip material comprising: a section of leading material; and a section of following material.

9. The grip of claim 6 wherein: said grip comprises: an elongate tape comprising: a first end of leading material; and a second end of following material.

10. The grip of claim 6 wherein: said grip comprises: a elongate sleeve of resilient material; and wherein said leading portion includes a covering of leading material on a portion of said sleeve for receiving the grip of the user's leading hand; and said following portion includes: a covering of following material on a portion of said sleeve for receiving the grip of the user's following hand.

11. A striking instrument swung with both of a user's hands for striking an object, one hand being a leading hand for leading the instrument toward the object and the other hand being a following hand for following the instrument toward the object; said instrument including: a striking portion for striking the object; a handle including: a distal end connected to said striking portion; and a proximal end; and a grip attached to said proximal end of said handle including: a leading portion adapted for receiving the grip of the user's leading hand and defining a first coefficient of friction between the leading portion of said grip and the user's leading hand; and a following portion adapted for receiving the grip of the user's following hand and defining a second coefficient of friction between the following portion of said grip and the user's following hand; the second coefficient of friction being lower than the first coefficient of friction.

12. The striking instrument of claim 11 wherein: said leading portion of said grip is proximal said following portion.

13. The striking instrument of claim 11 wherein: said grip comprises: a single wrap of grip material comprising: a section of leading material; and a section of following material.

14. The striking instrument of claim 11 wherein: said grip comprises: an elongate tape comprising: a first end of leading material; and a second end of following material.

15. The striking instrument of claim 11 wherein: said grip comprises: a elongate sleeve of resilient material; and wherein said leading portion includes a covering of leading material on a portion of said sleeve for receiving the grip of the user's leading hand; and said following portion includes: a covering of following material on a portion of said sleeve for receiving the grip of the user's following hand.

16. The striking instrument of claim 11 wherein the instrument is swung with the palms of the user's hands facing in opposite directions.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates in general to hand grips, and more particularly to an improved grip for attachment to a handle of a striking instrument swung with both of a user's hands for striking an object, such as a bat or golf club.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The invention is a grip for attachment to a handle of a striking instrument, such as a baseball bat or golf club, that is swung with both of a user's hands for striking an object, such as a ball, wherein one of the user's hands is a pulling or leading hand for pulling or leading the instrument toward the object and the other hand is a pushing or following hand. The handle has a distal end connected to a striking portion of the instrument and a proximal end. The grip comprises a leading portion adapted for receiving the grip of the user's leading hand and defining a first coefficient of friction between the leading portion of the grip and the user's leading hand; and a following portion adapted for receiving the grip of the user's following hand and defining a second coefficient of friction between the following portion of said grip and the user's following hand; the second coefficient of friction being lower than the first coefficient of friction.

Other features and many attendant advantages of the invention will become more apparent upon a reading of the following detailed description together with the drawings wherein like reference numerals refer to like parts throughout.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a partial top plan view of a first exemplary embodiment of the grip according to the invention in the form of a single wrap applied to a bat.

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the grip of FIG. 1 sketched for cutting from a larger piece of grip material.

FIG. 3 is sectional view of the grip material taken on line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a partial top plan view of a second exemplary embodiment of the grip according to the invention in the form of a tape being applied to the handle of a bat.

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of a portion of the grip tape of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is sectional view of the grip tape taken on line 6-6 of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a partial perspective view of a third exemplary embodiment of the grip of the invention on the handle of a golf club.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged cross sectional view of the grip of FIG. 7.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

With reference now to the drawings, and more particularly to FIG. 1 thereof, there is shown a partial top plan view of a first exemplary embodiment 10A of the grip 10 according to the invention in the form of a single wrap applied to the handle 90 of a striking instrument 80, such a baseball bat 80A.

Although many other uses of the grip tape 10 of the invention will become apparent to persons exposed to the invention, the invention was originally conceived to improve performance of an instrument 80 swung with both of a user's hands 70 for striking an object, such that, during the course of the swing, one hand 70 releases or partially releases so as to not further inhibit the swing or such as to not prevent natural follow-through of the swing.

Bat 80A includes a proximal or inner end 81 including a handle 90 and a distal or outer end 88 including a barrel or striking portion 89, shown partially cut away, for hitting an object. Inner end 81 includes a handle 90 having a distal end 92 connected to striking portion 89 and a proximal end 94 that is generally free and may terminate at a knob 95. Handle 90 may be uniform in shape throughout it length or may change, such as by being tapered, such as, as shown, by tapering slightly proceeding away from knob 95.

FIG. 1 shows a typical grip on baseball bat 80A by a right handed batter. The batter's left or leading hand 70F grips handle 90 near proximal end 94 and the batter's right or following hand 70S grips handle 90 distal leading hand 70F and typically abutting leading hand 70F. Bat 80A is swung in the direction of the batter's leading hand 70F to strike the ball such that during swinging the batter's left arm 69F and left hand 70F pulls bat 80A toward the ball and the batter's right arm 69S and right hand 70S pushes bat 80A toward the ball. Throughout the swing, the batter's leading hand 70F must maintain a tight grip on 80A to first accelerate bat 80A to hit the ball, then while the ball is struck, and then to hold onto the bat during follow through. Thus, it is important that the leading hand 70F have a very firm grip on bat 80A. However, the batter's following hand 70S pushes bat 80A such that bat 80A naturally rests on following hand 70S. Therefore, following hand 70S may use a lighter grip than the left hand 70F. Importantly also, at some location during the swing, the batter's right arm 69S and right hand 69S impede the natural movement of bat 80A such that it is desirable that right hand 70S smoothly releases its grip from bat 80A. With a left handed batter, the left and right hands would be switched. Also, a few persons bat “goofy handed”, i.e. where the leading hand 70F is the distal hand. Grip 10 of the invention facilitates the desired grip and release.

FIG. 1 shows grip 10A attached to handle 90 of bat 80A. Grip 10A includes a leading portion 20 having a length adapted for receiving the grip of the user's leading hand 70F and defining a first coefficient of friction between leading portion 20 of grip 10A and leading hand 70F, and a following portion 30 adapted for receiving the grip of the user's following hand 70S and defining a second coefficient of friction between following portion 30 of grip 10A and following hand 70S; the second coefficient of friction being lower than the first coefficient of friction. The palms of the user's hands 70 are opposed in that the palm of leading hand 70F is facing rearward and the palm of following hand 70S is facing forward.

The relative coefficients of friction of leading portion 20 and following portion 30 can be the result of material or texture or both. Sand paper could be used to produce a high coefficient of friction. Some polyurethanes with a tacky surface or with ridges, bumps or dimples 44 produce a high coefficient of friction. For a low coefficient of friction, some smooth thermoplastic material, such as used in cellophane or packing tape, may be used.

Looking further at FIGS. 2 and 3, FIG. 2 shows a top plan view of the grip 10A of FIG. 1 sketched for cutting from a larger piece of grip material 50 comprising a portion of leading material 20A for application to handle 90, and FIG. 3 is a sectional view of an exemplary embodiment of grip material 50 taken on line 3-3 of FIG. 2. Single wrap grip 10A may be cut from a larger piece of grip material 50. Grip material 50 includes a dividing line 51 dividing leading material 20A from following material 30A.

As best seen in FIG. 3, leading material 20A and following material 30A may be bonded by means well known in the art to an underlisting 59. Various underlistings, such as felt, are well known in the art. Underlisting 59 is used to provide elasticity, strength, cushioning, or shock resistance to material 50. Alternately, underlisting 59 could be used under just one material 20A or 30A or no underlisting 59 need be used. Leading material 20A is held adjacent following material 30A along dividing line 51 such as attachment by any suitable means well known in the field or by both being bonded to underlisting 59.

To draw the pattern of grip 10A on grip material 50, the user measures down from dividing line 51 the length of the desired leading portion 20 to establish inner end line 52. If the batter grips higher on handle 90 than shown, then the length of leading portion 20 may be longer with its maximum length determined by being able to fit on handle 90.

The user then measures up from dividing line 51 the desired length of following portion 30 to establish outer end line 53. This length may be longer than the width of the user's following hand 70S.

To draw the side lines 54, the circumference of bat 80A is measured where the grip will be placed. If the circumferences vary over the length of grip 10A, then several measurements are made and faired. To get a smooth seam upon application, the thickness of material 50 should be considered and the edges along side lines 54 may be beveled. The pattern is cut out of material 50 and wrapped around handle 90 as shown in FIG. 1. Alternately, grip 10A could be applied in two parts with leading portion 20 cut from a piece of leading material 20A and following portion 30 cut from a piece of following material 30A and each applied to bat 80A at the desired locations.

FIG. 4 is a partial top plan view of a second exemplary embodiment 10B of grip 10 in the form of a tape 40 of grip material 50 being applied to handle 90 of bat.80A. FIG. 5 is a top plan view of a portion of grip tape 40 of FIG. 4. FIG. 6 is sectional view of grip tape 40 taken on line 6-6 of FIG. 5.

As seen in FIG. 5, grip tape 40 includes a length of leading material 20A at one end joined to a length of following material 30A at the other end at diagonal transverse dividing line 51. One method of applying grip tape 40 to handle 90 includes placing dividing line 51 at the desired location for the outer end of leading portion 20, spiral-wrapping or helical-wrapping leading material 20A around handle 90 top form leading portion 20, and spiral-wrapping or helically-wrapping following material 30A around handle 90 to form following portion 30 of grip 10B. The ends of tape 40 may be trimmed and held to bat 80A in a suitable manner, many of which are well known in the art. Alternately, grip 10B could be applied in two parts with leading portion 20 made from tape of leading material 20A and following portion 30 made from tape of following material 30A and each applied to bat 80A at the desired locations.

As seen in FIG. 6, tape 40 may be constructed similar to material 50 and include leading material 20A at one end and following material 30A at the other end, both bonded to underlisting 59. Alternately, underlisting 59 could be used under just one material 20A or 30A or no underlisting 59 need be used. Leading material 20A is held adjacent following material 30A along dividing line 51 such as attachment by any suitable means well known in the field or by both being bonded to underlisting 59.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a third exemplary embodiment 10C of grip 10 of the invention on handle 90 of a striking instrument 80, such as golf club 80C, shown partially cut away. FIG. 8 is an enlarged cross sectional view of grip 10C of FIG. 7.

Golf club 80C includes a shaft 82 having an inner end 81 including a shaft having handle 90 on inner end 81. Grip 10C is adapted for attachment to handle 90 of club 80C and includes an inner contoured sleeve 56 having an inner side 57 shaped and dimensioned to fit around handle 90 of shaft and an outer surface 58 tapered from distal end to proximal end and shaped and dimensioned to receive leading grip material 20A to define leading portion 20 and following grip material 30A to define following portion 30. Grip materials 20A, 30A may be attached in any suitable manner, such as by glue. Sleeve 56 may be constructed from a variety of substances, such as soft elastomers, such as rubber or synthetic rubber-like materials. In this manner, sleeve grip 10C may be made for a specific user and applied to the user's golf club 80C.

Having described the invention, it can be seen that it provides an improved grip of a swinging instrument.

Although particular embodiments of the invention have been illustrated and described, various changes may be made in the form, composition, construction, and arrangement of the parts herein without sacrificing any of its advantages. For example, the grip can be used on other instruments, such as tennis racket. Therefore, it is to be understood that all matter herein is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in any limiting sense, and it is intended to cover in the appended claims such modifications as come within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

In the claims, the word “hand” includes hand coverings, such as gloves.