Title:
Vibration Reduction Grip for Golf Clubs
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A vibration reduction golf club grip is disclosed. The golf club grip includes a body having a substantially circular cross-sectional configuration throughout a length thereof. The body includes a first end having a first diameter and a second end having a second diameter. In addition, the body includes a longitudinal cavity, which is opened to the first end, adapted to receive a shaft of a golf club. The body also includes a circular cavity, which is opened to the second end, distributed around the longitudinal cavity, and the circular cavity is filled with a compressible material.



Inventors:
Schroder, Kurt A. (Coupland, TX, US)
Application Number:
12/267196
Publication Date:
05/14/2009
Filing Date:
11/07/2008
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B53/14
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
BLAU, STEPHEN LUTHER
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Russell Ng PLLC (8729 Shoal Creek Blvd., Suite 100, Austin, TX, 78757, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A golf club grip comprising: a body having a substantially circular cross-sectional configuration throughout a length of said body, wherein said body includes a first end having a first diameter and a second end having a second diameter; a longitudinal cavity located within said first end adapted to receive a shaft of a golf club; and a circular cavity located within said second end and distributed around said longitudinal cavity, wherein said circular cavity is filled with a compressible material, wherein a length of said circular cavity is less than a length of said longitudinal cavity.

2. A golf club grip comprising: a body having a substantially circular cross-sectional configuration throughout a length of said body, wherein said body includes a first end having a first diameter and a second end having a second diameter; and a longitudinal cavity located within said body, wherein said longitudinal cavity includes a first section adapted to receive a shaft of a golf club, and a second section filled with a compressible material.

Description:

PRIORITY CLAIM

The present application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §119(e)(1) to provisional application No. 60/987,790 filed on Nov. 14, 2007, the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Technical Field

The present invention relates to golf club grips in general, and in particular to a vibration reduction golf club grip.

2. Description of Related Art

When hitting a golf ball with a golf club, a golfer usually feels some vibrations generated from a golf club. Much of the vibrations are high-frequency vibrations arise from the face of the golf club head impacting a golf ball improperly or striking the ground. In addition, when a golf ball is struck at any location away from the preferred striking area (commonly known as “sweet spot”) of the golf club or when a golf ball is struck at a wrong angle of attack relative to the face of the golf club head, a considerable amount of torsional vibration can also be induced.

Golf club vibration, at a minimum, is an annoyance that interferes with a golfer's enjoyment of a golf game. But often, a chronic soreness can be induced in a golfer's hand, wrist or elbow from long exposure to golf club vibration. One such condition is known as medial epicondylitis in medical term, and it is often exacerbated by a golfer's age and the frequency of play.

Over the years, various schemes have been conceived by the golf club industry to reduce the golf club vibration felt by golfers at large. Those schemes include placing counter vibration weights and rods inside golf club shafts, filling shafts with vibration damping structures, placing coupling joints along the length of a shaft, altering the shape of a club head, etc. The problem with those schemes in that, in many cases, the alterations can add masses to a golf club and/or sacrifice structural integrity of the golf club. Furthermore, many of those schemes are ineffective against high-frequency vibration and/or making a golf club feel “mushy” or “sluggish.” Although high-frequency vibration of a golf club can lead to discomfort and joint damage, low-frequency vibration of a golf club is associated with a feeling of quality shot. Because sometimes the alterations may reduce all frequencies of golf club vibration, a golfer may lose the feel of a good shot.

Consequently, it would be desirable to provide a golf club grip for reducing the high-frequency vibration that can lead to tissue damage while retaining low-frequency vibration that is associated with quality shots.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention, a golf club grip includes a body having a substantially circular cross-sectional configuration throughout a length thereof. The body includes a first end having a first diameter and a second end having a second diameter. In addition, the body includes a longitudinal cavity, which is opened to the first end, adapted to receive a shaft of a golf club. The body also includes a circular cavity, which is opened to the second end, distributed around the longitudinal cavity, and the circular cavity is filled with a compressible material.

All features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent in the following detailed written description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention itself, as well as a preferred mode of use, further objects, and advantages thereof, will best be understood by reference to the following detailed description of an illustrative embodiment when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIGS. 1A and 1B are diagrams of a golf club grip, according to the prior art;

FIGS. 2A and 2B are diagrams of a golf club grip, in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention; and

FIGS. 3A and 3B are diagrams of a golf club grip, in accordance with an alternative embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Referring now to the drawings and in particular to FIGS. 1A-1B, there are depicted diagrams of a golf club grip, according to the prior art. FIG. 1A is a side view of a golf club grip 10, and FIG. 1B is a cross-sectional view of golf club grip 10 along A-A. Any vibration generated in a shaft 11 is transferred to the hands of a golfer via golf club grip 10. As such, the golfer can experience both the damaging high-frequency vibration and the torsional vibration caused by off-“sweet spot” hits. Prolong golf play with golf club grip 10 may lead to problems from soreness to chronic pain in elbows and joints.

With reference now to FIGS. 2A-2B, there are depicted diagrams of a golf club grip, in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 2A is a side view of a golf club grip 20, and FIG. 2B is a cross-sectional view of golf club grip 20 along B-B. As shown, golf club grip 20 includes a longitudinal cavity 25 adapted to receive a shaft 21. Within golf club grip 20 and distributed about cavity 25 is a circular cavity 22. Cavity 22 is a circular elongated cavity extending longitudinally parallel to cavity 25. Cavity 22 can be tapered as it extends longitudinally along cavity 25. Preferably, cavity 22 is filled with a compressible material 29. When subjected to torsional vibrations, compressional material 29 deforms and compresses into and around cavity 22.

Material 29 may take various forms including Santoprene™, thermoplastics, elastomers, composites, and rubbers, etc. Cavity 22 and material 29 act as a dampener or filter to high-frequency vibration and low-frequency vibration. However, high-frequency components of the vibration are preferentially damped more than the low-frequency components. As mentioned above, high-frequency vibration is associated with discomfort and joint pain while low-frequency vibration is associated with the feeling of the good impact and help a golf ascertain the quality of the golfer's shot. Golf club grip 20, therefore, eliminates the painful sting associated with an off-“sweet spot” shot while retaining the feel of the impact. The dampening may be tuned by varying the shape and/or size of cavity 22 as well as the durometer of material 29.

In addition, cavity 22 compress slightly when golf club grip 20 is grasped by a golfer. As a result, golf club grip 20 conforms to the golf's hand, enabling a more secure, stronger grip without excess exertion by the golfer. Cavity 22 also reduces the weight of golf club grip 20, which enables a higher club head speed and longer drives.

Cavity 22 may take various forms and cross-sectional shapes. They may extend longitudinally parallel to shaft 21. Alternately, they may spiral longitudinally or form other patterns. In addition, cavity 22 may be opened to or sealed from the environment.

Referring now to FIGS. 3A-3B, there are depicted diagrams of a golf club grip, in accordance with an alternative embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 3A is a side view of a golf club grip 30, and FIG. 3B is a cross-sectional view of golf club grip 30 along C-C. As shown, golf club grip 30 includes a longitudinal cavity 35 having a first section 36 and a second section 37. First section 36 has an even diameter adapted to receive a shaft 31. Second section 37 has a tapered shape preferably filled with a compressible material 39. When subjected to torsional vibrations, compressional material 39 deforms and compresses into second section 37 of cavity 35. One opening of second section 37 of cavity 35 can be closed by using an end cap (not shown).

As has been described, the present invention provides a golf club grip for reducing the high-frequency vibration that can lead to discomfort and tissue damage while retaining low-frequency vibration that is associated with quality shots.

While the invention has been particularly shown and described with reference to a preferred embodiment, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes in form and detail may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.