Title:
Method for providing fresh spring water to occupants of a facility directly from a sealable collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container centrally located in the facility
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A method for providing fresh spring water to occupants of a facility directly from a sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container centrally located in the facility. The method includes the steps of: fabricating the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container; installing the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container to be centrally located in the facility; delivering the fresh spring water from a source of supply in a sealed container in a truck to the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container through a sanitary pipe; entering the fresh spring water from the truck into the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container; and accessing the fresh spring water by the occupants of the facility directly from the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container.



Inventors:
Schwimmer, Chaim (Brooklyn, NY, US)
Application Number:
12/313105
Publication Date:
03/26/2009
Filing Date:
11/17/2008
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E03B1/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
KIM, CHRISTOPHER S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Chaim Schwimmer (5411 14th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY, 11219, US)
Claims:
The invention claimed is:

1. A method for providing fresh spring water to occupants of a facility directly from a sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container centrally located in the facility, comprising the steps of: a) fabricating the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container; b) installing the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container to be centrally located in the facility; c) delivering the fresh spring water from a source of supply in a sealed container in a truck to the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container through a sanitary pipe; d) entering the fresh spring water from the truck into the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container; and e) accessing the fresh spring water by the occupants of the facility directly from the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein said fabricating step includes fabricating the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container to be collapsible so as to allow the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container to be brought through any normal doorway into any normal facility.

3. The method of claim 1, wherein said fabricating step includes fabricating the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container to contain a sanitary and liquid-impervious liner for containing the fresh spring water.

4. The method of claim 3, wherein said fabricating step includes fabricating the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container to be internally insulated to keep the fresh spring water in the sanitary and liquid-impervious liner cool to thereby protect the fresh spring water from temperature-related contamination.

5. The method of claim 4, wherein said fabricating step includes fabricating the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container to be internally insulated with polystyrene thermal insulation.

6. The method of claim 4, wherein said fabricating step includes fabricating the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container to be internally insulated externally adjacent to the sanitary and liquid-impervious liner.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The instant application is a Continuation-In-Part of application Ser. No. 11/418,912, filed on May 5, 2006, entitled POLYGON-SHAPED, KNOCKDOWN, AND STACKABLE CONTAINER, and incorporated herein by reference thereto.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

A. Field of the Invention

The embodiments of the present invention relate to a method for providing water to occupants of a facility, and more particularly, the embodiments of the present invention relate to a method for providing fresh spring water to occupants of a facility directly from a sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container centrally located in the facility.

B. Description of the Prior Art

Consumers are becoming more aware of the deterioration of the quality of the water supplies from their city or rural water system, or private well system. Many retailers currently sell bottled water and other beverage products in off-the-shelf containers. Some people have bottled water delivered to their homes or business, often in 5 gallon containers—designed to fit on a water cooler. The market for these forms of bottled water has become emerging to the point where purified water is a basic commodity.

Where bottled water is sold off the shelf, there are high costs involved in bottling the water due to strict sanitary conditions and in transporting the water from the bottled water plant, through the wholesale and retail distribution system, storing the water at warehouses and in the back room at retailers, and stocking shelves—not to mention the shelf space taken up by the product. Also, the time between when the water is produced and bottled and when the consumer purchases it may be a period of weeks or even months. Of course, leaking bottles also cause a problem, as when a pallet of cases of bottled water are stacked in a warehouse or the back room of a store.

Typically, the containers in which the water is purchased are not reused and end up in landfills where their final disposal requires the expenditure of energy. Even if recycled by plastic recycling or the like, fuel is consumed in transporting the containers to the recycling plant.

The conventional method of distributing and dispensing potable liquids generally involves the use of containers for packaging the liquid. On a commercial scale, this method requires that a large number of package containers be manufactured, purchased, sterilized, filled, sealed, labeled, transported, stored, and otherwise handled before the liquid is ultimately dispensed. As a result, this method has proven to be inefficient, cumbersome, labor intensive, and expensive.

In the retail trade of spring water, the consumer is required to travel to the supermarket, fetch the container of water, and cart it home. At home, the container must be handled each time water is to be personally dispensed. Moreover, because the water is available only in relatively small containers, consumers must seek replenishing supplies on a frequent basis. The alternative is to purchase several containers of water at a time. This, however, is a burdensome task for the ordinary consumer. In the retail trade, the consumer is very much involved in the distribution process before the spring water is actually dispensed. The inconvenience and expense of this method have unfortunately resulted in consumer decisions to limit their consumption of healthy spring water.

Package containers require either recycling or disposal, thus presenting added burdens and costs to consumers and their communities.

Numerous innovations for water dispensing systems and related devices have been provided in the prior art, which will be described below in chronological order to show advancement in the art, and which are incorporated herein by reference thereto. Even though these innovations may be suitable for the specific individual purposes to which they address, however, they differ from the embodiments of the present invention in that they do not teach a method for providing fresh spring water to occupants of a facility directly from a sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container centrally located in the facility.

(1) U.S. Pat. No. 5,046,529 to Corella.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,046,529 issued to Corella on Sep. 10, 1991 in U.S. class 137 and subclass 590.5 teaches a potable water storage system including a water container having a top and a bottom, an inlet flow line passing through the container and having one end thereof terminating near the bottom and an opposite end thereof being connectable to a main supply of water, an outlet flow line passing through the container and having one end thereof terminating near the top and an opposite end thereof connectable to an exchanger hose line, and a tap disposed in the container near the bottom for releasing water from the container.

(2) U.S. Pat. No. 5,349,992 to Gallo et al.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,349,992 issued to Gallo et al. on Sep. 27, 1994 in U.S. class 141 and subclass 18 teaches apparatus and methods for distributing and dispensing a potable liquid. The apparatus includes a faucet and a storage tank. A conveying channel is provided for sanitarily conveying potable liquid from an outside source to the tank. The conveying channel includes a sanitary fitting containing an inlet channel. The fitting provides a detachable and sanitary connection between the conveying channel and the source. A mechanism drains free-standing liquid from the inlet channel. The inlet channel of the fitting terminates at a first coupling thereof containing an acme sanitary thread. A flow-producing mechanism cooperates with the tank and the faucet for causing a flow of liquid from the tank upon the opening of the faucet. A discharge channel is connected to the faucet at one end thereof and connected to receive the flow of liquid at the other end thereof. The discharge channel conveys the flow of potable liquid to the faucet. The source includes a vehicle with a supply tank mounted thereon. A mechanism, such as a pump, cooperates with the supply tank to cause a flow of liquid from the tank. A supply coupling contains an acme sanitary thread that is configured to closely mate with the acme thread of the first coupling. A hose is connected to the supply coupling at one end thereof and connected to receive the flow of liquid from the supply tank at the other end thereof. The hose conveys the flow of liquid to the supply coupling.

(3) U.S. Pat. No. 5,587,089 to Vogel et al.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,587,089 issued to Vogel et al. on Dec. 24, 1996 in U.S. class 210 and subclass 164 teaches a system for purifying water and washing and filling a container with the purified water. The system includes an apparatus including a water inlet system, a water purification system, a container washing system, a container filling system, an auxiliary function system, a mineralization system, and an ozonating system. The apparatus includes compartments where a container is washed and filled within a single compartment. The apparatus also includes a cap-washing system.

(4) U.S. Pat. No. 5,997,750 to Rozelle et al.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,997,750 issued to Rozelle et al. on Dec. 7, 1999 in U.S. class 210 and subclass 744 teaches a process and apparatus for producing purified drinking water from surface or ground fresh water sources using no chemical pre-treatment or coagulants, by usage of a positively charged filtration media to attract the typically negatively charged suspended solids present in the water source. The process—that can be portable—includes a filtration system having a filtration/recirculation/backwash component and a disinfection step. The process further includes a system controller that receives electrical signals from float controls to control the filtration, recirculation, and backwash steps.

(5) U.S. Pat. No. 6,089,420 to Rodriguez.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,089,420 issued to Rodriguez on Jul. 18, 2000 in U.S. class 222 and subclass 608 teaches a mobile vending apparatus for potable water. A flat bed truck has both one or more tanks for a large supply of potable water and one or more delivery cabinets for dispensing the water into bottles or other containers provided by consumers.

(6) U.S. Pat. No. 6,248,242 to Martin.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,248,242 issued to Martin on Jun. 19, 2001 in U.S. class 210 and subclass 739 teaches a spring water delivery system, and in particular, a system for bulk delivery of potable spring water to a customer's home. The system includes a bulk water supply truck equipped with a pumping system and an onboard ozone generator for delivery of potable tank water to a customer's supply tank. The supply tank is not pressurized, but uses an electric pump to deliver potable water to the individual faucets in the customer's home.

(7) U.S. Pat. No. 6,270,658 to Plüss

U.S. Pat. No. 6,270,658 issued to Plüss on Aug. 7, 2001 in U.S. class 210 and subclass 98 teaches a method for filling a drinking water installation in which, after filling a tank with fresh water, the water is circulated at least over a filter. An apparatus for drinking water supply from a drinking water tank having a supply pipe connectable to a fresh water source and which has a three-way valve with an inlet connected to the fresh water intake, as well as a second inlet and a supply pipe leading to the tank. A return pipe leads from the water tank to the second inlet of the three-way valve, and a circulating pump is in the water circuit formed by the return pipe and supply pipe.

(8) U.S. Pat. No. 6,349,733 to Smith.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,349,733 issued to Smith on Feb. 26, 2002 in U.S. class 137 and subclass 1 teaches a water storage and dispensing system including a water storage tank, a dispenser, and a conduit system extending between and fluidly connecting the storage tank and the dispenser. The conduit system includes an outer shell conduit defining a conduit passage therein, and an inner tubing extending through the conduit passage. The inner tubing is in fluid communication with each of the storage tank and the dispenser and is arranged and configured to convey water from the storage tank to the dispenser. The inner tubing is formed of instrument grade tubing and the shell conduit is formed of PEX.

It is apparent that numerous innovations for water dispensing systems and related devices have been provided in the prior art that are adapted to be used. Furthermore, even though these innovations may be suitable for the specific individual purposes to which they address, however, they would not be suitable for the purposes of the embodiments of the present invention as heretofore described, namely, a method for providing fresh spring water to occupants of a facility directly from a sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container centrally located in the facility.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Thus, it is an object of the embodiments of the present invention to provide a method for providing fresh spring water to occupants of a facility directly from a sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container centrally located in the facility, which avoids the disadvantages of the prior art.

Briefly stated, another object of the embodiments of the present invention is to provide a method for providing fresh spring water to occupants of a facility directly from a sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container centrally located in the facility. The method includes the steps of: fabricating the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container; installing the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container to be centrally located in the facility; delivering the fresh spring water from a source of supply in a sealed container in a truck to the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container through a sanitary pipe; entering the fresh spring water from the truck into the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container; and accessing the fresh spring water by the occupants of the facility directly from the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container.

The novel features considered characteristic of the embodiments of the present invention are set forth in the appended claims. The embodiments of the present invention themselves, however, both as to their construction and to their method of operation together with additional objects and advantages thereof will be best understood from the following description of the specific embodiments when read and understood in connection with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The figures of the drawings are briefly described as follows:

FIGS. 1A to 1B are a flow chart of the method for providing fresh spring water to occupants of a facility directly from a sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container centrally located in the facility.

LIST OF REFERENCE NUMERALS UTILIZED IN THE DRAWING

A. General.

10 method of embodiments of present invention for providing fresh spring water 12 to occupants 14 of facility 16 directly from sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container 18 centrally located in facility 16

12 fresh spring water

14 occupants of facility 16

16 facility

18 sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container

B. Method.

20 truck

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

A. General.

Referring now to the figures, in which like numerals indicate like parts, and particularly to FIGS. 1-A to 1-B, which are a flow chart of the method for providing fresh spring water to occupants of a facility directly from a sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container centrally located in the facility, the method of the embodiments of the present invention is shown generally at 10 for providing fresh spring water 12 to occupants 14 of a facility 16 directly from a sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container 18 centrally located in the facility 16.

The sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container 18 is collapsible so as to allow the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container 18 to be brought through any normal doorway into any normal facility.

The sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container 18 contains a sanitary and liquid-impervious liner for containing the fresh spring water 12.

The sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container 18 is internally insulated with polystyrene thermal insulation, sold under the trademark Styrofoam™ by the Dow Chemical Company.1 The polystyrene thermal insulation is externally adjacent to the sanitary and liquid-impervious liner to keep the fresh spring water 12 in the sanitary and liquid-impervious liner cool to thereby protect the fresh spring water 12 from temperature-related contamination. 1 Polystyrene is an aromatic polymer made from the aromatic monomer styrene—a liquid hydrocarbon that is commercially manufactured from petroleum by the chemical industry. Polystyrene is a thermoplastic substance, normally existing in solid state at room temperature, but melting if heated for molding or extrusion, and becoming solid again when cooling off. Polystyrene is commonly recycled and is one of the most widely used kinds of plastic. Pure solid polystyrene is a colorless and hard plastic with limited flexibility. It can be cast into molds with fine detail. Polystyrene can be transparent or can be made to take on various colors. Solid polystyrene is used, for example, in disposable cutlery, plastic models, CD and DVD cases, and smoke detector housings. Products made from foamed polystyrene are nearly ubiquitous, for example, packing materials, insulation, and foam beverage cups. Discarded polystyrene, which does not biodegrade, is often abundant in the outdoor environment, particularly along shores and waterways.

B. The method.

The method 10 of the embodiments of the present invention for providing fresh spring water 12 to occupants 14 of a facility 16 directly from a sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container 18 centrally located in the facility 16, comprises the steps of:

  • STEP 1: Fabricating the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container 18.
  • STEP 2: Installing the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container 18 to be centrally located in the facility 16.
  • STEP 3: Delivering the fresh spring water 12 from a source of supply in a sealed container in a truck 20 to the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container 18 through a sanitary pipe;
  • STEP 4: Entering the fresh spring water 12 from the truck 20 into the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container 18.
  • STEP 5: Accessing the fresh spring water 12 by the occupants 14 of the facility 16 directly from the sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container 18.

C. The Impressions.

It will be understood that each of the elements described above or two or more together may also find a useful application in other types of constructions differing from the types described above.

While the embodiments of the present invention have been illustrated and described as embodied in a method for providing fresh spring water to occupants of a facility directly from a sealable, collapsible, insulated, and sanitary container centrally located in the facility, however, they are not limited to the details shown, since it will be understood that various omissions, modifications, substitutions, and changes in the forms and details of the embodiments of the present invention illustrated and their operation can be made by those skilled in the art without departing in any way from the spirit of the embodiments of the present invention.

Without further analysis, the foregoing will so fully reveal the gist of the embodiments of the present invention that others can by applying current knowledge readily adapt them for various applications without omitting features that from the standpoint of prior art fairly constitute characteristics of the generic or specific aspects of the embodiments of the present invention.